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NAVAL ART AVIATION ART MILITARY ART SPORT ART
The Star Class Destroyers were built by palmer's S.B Co. Displacement: 360 tons  Speed: 30 Knots, Compliment: 63  Armament: One 12 pounder and two Torpedo Tubes. the Funnels were an odd arrangement with the Middle funnel not in the Centre Line.

HMS Chamois laid down 28th May 1896, launched 9th November 1896 and completed November 1897.  Sunk after her propeller blades came off while at speed in the Gulf of Patras, Greece causing a large hole torn our of the ship causing her to sink.

HMS Star.  Laid down on the 23rd March 1896 and launched 11th August 1896, Completed September 1898.  Served in the home waters and some time in the Mediterranean. During World War One along with HMS Ouse, sank a German U-Boat in 1918 Sold for scrapping in 1919

HMS Star 11th August 1896 Broken up in 1919.
HMS Whiting 26th August 1896 Broken up in 1919.
HMS Bat 7th October 1896 Broken up in 1919.
HMS Crane 17th December 1896 Broken up in 1919.
HMS Chamois 9th December 1896 Foundered in 1904.
HMS Flying Fish 4th March 1897 Broken up in 1919.

HMS Star

HMS Star c.1908

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHD014

HMS Star.  Sent in by Darren Clough.

HMS Whiting

HMS Whiting.  Sent in by Gerard Thompson.

HMS Whiting, 1911.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP1497

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP1497

HMS Bat

HMS Bat in c.1908 ©Walker Archive

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHD017

HMS Bat.  Laid down on 28th May 1896, launched 7th October 1896 and completed August 1897. served in the home waters and also some time in the Mediterranean. sold for scrapping 1919

HMS Bat.  Sent in by email.

HMS Crane

HMS Crane c.1908

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHD016

HMS Crane, laid down on 2nd August 1896, launched 17th December 1896 and completed in April 1898. Served in Home waters and also in the Mediterranean. finally scrapped in 1919

HMS Crane, 1916.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP1498

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP1498

HMS Chamois

HMS Chamois, 1897.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP1499

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP1499

HMS Flying Fish

The history of the name HMS Flying Fish.

The Second “FLYING FISH” was a 6-gun schooner, captured by the “Providence” from the French as “L’Esperanza” in 1793.  She was of 80 tons, and carried a crew of 30 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 63ft., 17ft., and 6ft.  In 1793 the “Flying Fish” was on the Jamaica station. Encouraged by the overtures of the French Royalist at San Domingo, the “Flying Fish” accompanied Commodore John Ford in a squadron of three ships, with his broad pennant in “Europa,” and some troops to attempt to take Jeremie and St. Nicholas Mole in San Domingo.  The British were welcomed with joy, and on September 19th Jeremie was taken possession of in the name of the French crown.  On September 21st the Commodore was off St. Nicholas Mole, which was expecting an assault from a body of blacks and mulattoes.  By skilful tactics and diplomacy he secured the capitulation without bloodshed, and on the following day was to be seen the extraordinary spectacle of a French port mounting 100 heavy guns in the quiet possession of the British.  Later in the year the Commodore secured the surrender of other towns in the same Island of San Domingo, notably, that of Leogane.  In June 1795 the “Flying Fish,” commanded by Lieutenant George Seaton, was captured in the West Indies by two French Privateers.

The third “FLYING FISH” was a 12-gun French schooner privateer carrying a crew of 80 men, captured on January 13th, 1797, as the “Poisson Volant” by the “Magicienne” in the West Indies near San Domingo.

The fourth “FLYING FISH” was a 6-gun French privateer schooner carrying a crew of 50 men, taken as the “Poisson Volant” on February 15th, 1797, by the “Magicienne” in the West Indies.

The fifth “FLYING FISH” was a 12-gun schooner from the Frnch.  She was of 150 tons, and carried a crew of 40 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 79ft., 22ft., and 7ft.  She was taken as the “Poisson Volant” off San Domingo on June 30th, 1803, by the boats of the squadron, commanded by Captain Henry William Bayntun.  On August 30th, 1806, the “Flying Fish,” commanded by Lieutenant James Glassford Gooding, was one of a squadron of four vessels under Commander George Le Gevt which captured a Spanish 14-gun felucca off Trinidad.  The “Flying Fish” and two other vessels then entered the Gulf of Matamano, and on September 2nd landed 64 officers and men.  They advanced the 22 miles to Batabano through bush and marshes; and though opposed by a considerable force of Spanish soldiers and militia, captured the fort, and carried off or destroyed eleven French and Spanish vessels with a loss of only one man wounded.  On December 15th 1808, the “Flying Fish,” while commanded by Lieutenant J.G. Gooding, was wrecked and lost off San Domingo.

The sixth “FLYING FISH” was a 4-gun schooner, launched at Bermuda in 1804.  She was of 70 tons, and carried a crew of 20 men.  Her length, beam, and draught was 55ft., 18ft., and 5ft.  She was eventually captured by some prisoners confined on board.

The seventh “FLYING FISH” was surrendered by the Danes as a 14-gun brig in 1807.  She had been built at Copenhagen in 1788, and was of 213 tons.  Her length, beam, and draught was 77ft., 26ft., and 10 ft.  In the Danish service she had been known as the “Flyvendefiske.”  This vessel’s name was changed to “Venture” and she was sold in 1811.

The eighth “FLYING FISH” was a Dutch armed schooner.  As the “Vliegende Visch” she was taken on January 1st, 1808, at the capture of the Dutch Island of Curacoa. 

The ninth “FLYING FISH” was a small schooner hired and armed for service in 1814.

The tenth “FLYING FISH” was a 78-ton schooner, purchased in 1817.  Her length, beam, and draught were 62ft., 17ft., and 8ft. In 1812 the “Flying Fish” was sold.

The tenth “FLYING FISH” was a 78-ton schooner purchased in 1817.  Her length, beam, and draught were 62ft., 17ft., and 8ft. In 1821 the “Flying Fish” was sold.

The eleventh “FLYING FISH” was a 12-gun brig, launched at Pembroke in 1844.  She was of 445 tons, and carried a crew of 110 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 103ft., 32ft., and 14ft.  In 1852 the “Flying fish” was broken up.

The twelfth “FLYING FISH” was a 6-gun screw despatch vessel, launched at Pembroke in 1855.  She was of 868 tons, 350 horse-power, and carried a crew of 65 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 200 ft., 30ft., and 7ft.       In 1860 the “Flying Fish,” commanded by Commander Charles Webley Hope, formed one of the escotr to H.M.S. “Hero,” which vessel carried His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales on his memorable visit to Canada and the United Sates of America.  In 1862 the “Flying Fish,” commanded by Commander Warren H. Anderson, was actively engaged in the suppression of the slave trade on the west coast of Africa.  In 1864 the “Flying Fish” was broken up.

The thirteenth “FLYING FISH” was a 4-gun screw sloop, launched at Chatham in 1873.  She was 940 tons , 840 horse-power, and 11 knot speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 160ft., 31ft., and 14ft.  In 1874-1877 the “Flying Fish,” commanded by Commander Herbert F. Crohan, was actively engaged in the suppression of the slave trade on the east coast of Africa.   In 1888 the “Flying Fish” was sold.

The fourteenth “FLYING FISH” is a twin-screw torpedo-boat destroyer, launched at Jarrow in 1897.  She is of 380 tons, 6200 horse-power, and 30knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 215ft., 21ft., 7ft.

 

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