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No.49 Sqn RAF - Squadron Details - Aviation Directory

No.49 Sqn RAF


Name : No.49 Sqn RAF
Founded : 15th April 1916
Disbanded : 1st May 1965
Country : UK
Fate : Disbanded 1st May 1965
More Details :

Cave canem - Beware of the dog
Known Code Letters : , EA, XU,

49 Squadron was formed on 15th April 1916, during the First World War. In the course of the war, it flew DH4 and DH9 aircraft before disbanding in July 1919. Reformed in 1936, they flew Hind and Hampdens before war broke out in 1939. It was in a Hampden of 49 Sqn that Roderick Learoyd won the first Victoria Cross awarded to Bomber Command, when on the night of 12th August 1940, he and four other aircraft attempted to breach the heavily defended Dortmund-Ems canal. The squadron transferred to Manchesters and Lancasters, and after the war to Lincolns, before being disbanded once again on 1st August 1955. Less than a year later, on 1st May 1956, the squadron were reformed, equipped with Valiant V-Bombers of Britain's nuclear deterrent programme, but exactly nine years later, with the aircraft grounded, the squadron disbanded for the last time.

Known Service Details :

Pilot or Aircrew

Rank

Start of Service

End of Service

Known Dates

Aircraft

Airframes

Notes

W. J. Baird

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

04th February 1941

Hampden

P4299

Ball

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

03rd April 1941

Hampden

P4403

Batchelor

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

03rd April 1941

Hampden

P4403

G. M. Bates

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

AD719

J. H. Bentley

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

03rd April 1941

Hampden

P4403

Blower

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

AD719

R. Brames

Sergeant

unknown

22nd March 1941

Hampden

X3054

Killed in Action

A. L. Bryceson

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

X3001

J. Butterworth

Sergeant

unknown

11th February 1941

Hampden

AD719

Killed in Action

D. A. Caldwell

Sergeant

unknown

11th February 1941

Hampden

AD719

Killed in Action

Calvert

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

03rd April 1941

Hampden

P4403

Lou Crabbe

unknown

unknown

D. A. Cruickshank

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

X3001

Killed in Action

R. I. Eastwood

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

04th February 1941

Hampden

P4299

R. Ellis

Sergeant

unknown

22nd March 1941

Hampden

X3054

Killed in Action

H. E. Fisher

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

X3001

J. H. Green

Pilot Officer

unknown

unknown

10th February 1941

Hampden

X3001

T. R. H. Hawkes

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

04th February 1941

Hampden

P4299

L. W. Homard

Sergeant

unknown

unknown

04th February 1941

Hampden

P4299

H. Irving

Sergeant

unknown

12th January 1941

Hampden

L4045

Killed in Action

L. Jackson

Sergeant

unknown

12th January 1941

Hampden

L4045

Killed in Action

C. J. Lyon

Sergeant

unknown

22nd March 1941

Hampden

X3054

Killed in Action

H. Newhouse

Pilot Officer

unknown

12th January 1941

Hampden

L4045

Killed in Action

P. C. Prosser

Sergeant

unknown

12th January 1941

Hampden

L4045

Killed in Action

William Clifford Townsend

unknown

unknown

R. D. Wilson

Pilot Officer

unknown

22nd March 1941

Hampden

X3054

Killed in Action

Pilots and Aircrew for : No.49 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircrew from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo
Baird, W. J.
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Baird, W. J.

Sergeant W.J.Baird of No.49 Squadron was taken prisoner on February 4th 1941.
Ball,
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Ball,


Batchelor,
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Batchelor,


Bates, G. M.
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Bates, G. M.


Bennett, Tom
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Bennett, Tom

Born in 1919, Tom Bennett was a specialist navigator with 30 ops with 49 Sqn Lancasters followed by selection for Leonard Cheshire’s elite Mosquito ‘Marker Force’ within the legendary 617 Sqn. Following the D-Day landings on 5/6th June, there was a very great danger that the Germans would reinforce their troops with their reserves Panzer tank corp. These had been stationed at Calais due to the Germans belief that the invasion would come at that point. The only way to get the Panzer through to the Beachhead at Normandy was via the French Saumur tunnel. 617 squadron were assigned to destroy this and were led by the famous Leonard Cheshire VC OM DSO DFC. He used 3 Mosquitoes as a marker force for the main 617 Bomber Force and the dropping of flares was so accurate that one of the Lancaster’s put a 12000 tall boy straight through the roof of the tunnel and the tunnel was not reopened until 1946. Three Mosquitoes were used on this operation and only one of the crew is surviving today. This is Tom Bennett DFM
Bentley, J. H.
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Bentley, J. H.


Blower,
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Blower,


Brames, R.
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   Died : 22 / 3 / 1941
Brames, R.


Brunton, Geoff
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Brunton, Geoff

49 Squadron.
Bryceson, A. L.
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Bryceson, A. L.


Burnett, Wilf
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   Died : 26 / 11 / 2006
Burnett, Wilf

Canadian Wilf Burnett joined the RAF before the war and at the outbreak of hostilities was flying Hampdens. He completed his first tour of 30 operations in September 1940, flying with 49 Sqn at Scampton. His crew had bombed invasion barges in the Channel ports, mined enemy waters, operated against the Ruhr, and taken part in the first raids against Berlin. In July 1941 he was posted to 408 (Goose) Sqn RCAF, at Syerston, where one night in January 1942, returning from Hamburg, their Hampden crashed in extreme weather. Wilf was the sole survivor, and he was hospitalised. Recovering he was accepted to command 138 (Special Duties) Sqn at Tempsford who were engaged in dropping agents and supplies to the Resistance in occupied countries flying Halifaxes, later Stirlings. He died 26th November 2006.

Wilf Burnett signing the print - A Hard Lesson to Learn - by Adrian Rigby


Butterworth, J.
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   Died : 11 / 2 / 1941
Butterworth, J.

Sergeant J.Butterworth of No.49 Squadron was killed on February 11th 1941. His Hampden (AD719) was shot down by an intruder and crashed near Grange Farm in Sudbrooke, Lincoln.
Cachart, Ted
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Cachart, Ted

WOP 49 Squadron, POW and youngest (15) WOP in the RAF.
Caldwell, D. A.
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   Died : 11 / 2 / 1941
Caldwell, D. A.

Sergeant D.A.Caldwell was killed on February 11th 1941.His Hampden (AD719) was shot down by an intruder and crashed near Grange Farm in Sudbrooke, Lincoln.
Calvert,
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Calvert,


Clarke, Eric
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Clarke, Eric

Weapons Operator, 49 Squadron.
Cook, George
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Cook, George

A WOP/AG on Hampdens with 49 Sqn, where he completed 33 Ops. He completed the 2 thousand bomber raids to Cologne and Essen. He then went out to SEAC with 205 Sqn where he completed a full tour of 1000 hours on Operations in a Catalina hunting Japanese submarines.
Crabbe, Lou
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Crabbe, Lou

Served on 49 Sqn as a Flight Engineer on Lancasters from 1944. This was the same squadron with which Wg Cdr Roderick Learoyd won his VC. He flew a total of 33 Ops including raids on Dresden, Munich and the mighty Battleship Koln.
Cruickshank, D. A.
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   Died : 11 / 2 / 1941
Cruickshank, D. A.

Sergeant D.A.Cruickshank of No.49 Squadron was killed on February 11th 1941. His Hampden (X3001) was shot down by a night fighter, north of Alkmaar in Holland, where Cruickshank was then buried.
Eastwood, R. I.
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Eastwood, R. I.

Sergeant R.I.Eastwood of No.49 Squadron was taken prisoner on February 4th 1941.
Ellis, R.
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   Died : 22 / 3 / 1941
Ellis, R.


Fisher, H. E.
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Fisher, H. E.


Green, J. H.
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Green, J. H.


Hawkes, T. R. H.
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Hawkes, T. R. H.

Sergeant T.R.H.Hawkes of No.49 Squadron was taken prisoner on February 4th 1941.
Hay, Leslie
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Hay, Leslie

Joining the Royal Air Force in May 1941, Leslie Hay was trained as a pilot in Canada. On qualifying he returned to England and eventually was posted to join No.49 Squadron, then based at Fiskerton in Lincolnshire, flying Lancasters. From there he flew his first operation on 1st August 1944, following the Normandy invasion. Leslie Hay completed a total of 36 combat operations in the Lancaster, all with No.49 Squadron, at the height of Bomber Commands offensive against Germany
Hodges, Lewis
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   Died : 4 / 1 / 2007
Hodges, Lewis

Lewis Hodges flew with 49 Sqn from June 1940 until he was shot down over occupied France in Sept 1940 and taken prisoner by the Vichy French. He managed to escape and made his way back to England, rejoining 49 Sqn. He took part in the attacks against the German Channel dash operation in Feb 1942. In Nov of that year he joined 161 (Special Duties) Sqn, flying Halifaxes, Lysanders and Hudsons landing and parachuting agents into German occupied territory. Among the people he brought out of France were two future Presidents - Vincent Auriol and Francois Mitterand. He died 4th January 2007.
Homard, L. W.
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Homard, L. W.

Sergeant L.W.Homard of No.49 Squadron was taken prisoner on February 4th 1941.
Hubbard, Ken
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   Died : 21 / 1 / 2004
Hubbard, Ken

On 15 May 1957 Valiant XD818 captained by Wg Cdr Ken Hubbard, OC No 49 Sqn, dropped Britain's first H-bomb at Christmas Island in the South Pacific. Awarded the DFC during WWII whilst flying Wellington bombers in Italy with No 70 Sqn, he later flew Liberators and commanded No 104 Sqn with Lancasters. He commanded RAF Scampton during the height of the V-Force build-up with the Blue Steel equipped Vulcan B2s and has flown numerous types including the Victor and Vulcan. He died 21st January 2004.
Irving, H.
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Irving, H.


Jackson, L.
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Jackson, L.


Jones, Eric
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Jones, Eric

Eric Jones joined the RAF in April 1941 and trained as a pilot in Canada. Back in England he was posted to No.49 Squadron flying Lancasters, and flew his first operation on the night of 22nd August 1943. The target that night was Leverkusen. On the night of 14th January 1944 on a raid against Brunswick his aircraft shot down an Me110 nightfighter south of Hannover. He flew 12 trips to Berlin, the most heavily defended target in the Reich. Eric Jones completed a tour of 29 combat operations in the Lancaster. He was awarded the DFC.
Learoyd, Roderick
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   Died : 24 / 1 / 1996
Learoyd, Roderick

On the day that war was declared Rod Learoyd was on patrol flying Hampdens with 49 Sqn. Continually involved with low level bombing, on the night of 12th August 1940, he and four other aircraft attempted to breach the heavily defended Dortmund - Ems canal. Of the four other aircraft on the mission, two were destroyed and the other two were badly hit. Learoyd took his plane into the heavily defended target at only 150 feet, in full view of the searchlights, and with flak barrage all around. He managed to get his very badly damaged aircraft back to England, where he circled until daybreak when he finally landed the aircraft without inflicting more damage to it, or injuring any of his crew. For his supreme courage that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross. He later joined 44 Sqn with the first Lancasters, and then commanded 83 Sqn. He died 24th January 1996.



Citation for the Victoria Cross, gazetted 20th August 1940.

This officer, as first pilot of a Hampden aircraft, has repeatedly shown the highest conception of his duty and complete indifference to personal danger in making attacks at the lowest altitudes regardless of opposition. On the night of I2th August, 1940, he was detailed to attack a special objective on the Dortmund-Ems Canal. He had attacked this objective on a previous occasion and was well aware of the risks entailed. To achieve success it was necessary to approach from a direction well known to the enemy, through a lane of especially disposed anti-aircraft defences, and in the face of the most intense point blank fire from guns of all calibres. The reception of the preceding aircraft might well have deterred the stoutest heart, all being hit and two lost. Flight Lieutenant Learoyd nevertheless made his attack at 150 feet, his aircraft being repeatedly hit and large pieces of the main planes torn away. He was almost blinded by the glare of many searchlights at close range but pressed home this attack with the greatest resolution and skill. He subsequently brought his wrecked aircraft home and, as the landing flaps were inoperative and the undercarriage indicators out of action, waited for dawn in the vicinity of his aerodrome before landing, which he accomplished without causing injury to his crew or further damage to the aircraft. The high courage, skill and determination, which this officer has invariably displayed on many occasions in the face of the enemy, sets an example which is unsurpassed.
London Gazette, 1940.

Lowe, Drane
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Lowe, Drane

Joining the RAF in August 1935 he completed pilot training and was posted to 49 Sqn flying Hawker Hinds as a light bomber. At the outbreak of war he took part in the early bombing raids over France, flying Hampdens and then Wellingtons on missions over occupied Europe. Fully operational until mid 1941, he was then posted to OTU at Cottesmore and Finningley as an instructor. After a long and distinguished career, including a spell flying Canberras, he retired from the RAF in 1965.
Lowe, F
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Lowe, F

Joined the RAFVR in 1938 and started flying training at Kidlington. He was posted to 16 OTU, Upper Heyford in July 1940 where he completed a course on Ansons and Hampdens. Later he retrained as a staff pilot until he was posted to CTS Finningsley in November 1940, before transferring to 49 Sqdn. Scampton in December 1940. He flew a tour of 30 bombing and minelaying operations on Hampdens before returning to 16 OTU, Upper Heyford in July 1941 as instructor on Ansons and Hampdens and then as staff pilot on Air Firing Training Flights, using Hampdens, Lysanders and Wellington aircraft. On 28 July 1942, he was detailed to captain a Wellington on a thousand bomber raid on Hamburg, with a pupil crew. Although recalled due to bad weather, the trainee WOP failed to receive the signal and the aircraft was shot down by an Me110. Three crew were killed and three bailed out including the second pilot who was later one of the 50 shot after the Great Escape from Stalag Luft 3. Chatting to his twin brother (a Spitfire PRU Pilot) after the end of the war they discovered that he had taken a photograph of a Prisoner of War camp near Bremen, where he was held near to the end of the war. At that time, of course, he had no idea that he was a prisoner in the very same camp! Frank returned to the UK in May 1945 and subsequently was demobbed in January 1946.
Lucas, Kenneth
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   Died : 1 / 2011
Lucas, Kenneth

Ken Lucas joined the RAF in June 1940, and trained as ground crew for bomber Command. He was sent first to 49 Squadron at RAF Scampton, before transferring to 617 Squadron upon its formation, Involved in all the major servicing of the aircraft before the raid including fitting the motors that drove the belt that spun the bomb, and attaching the critical lamps to the underside of the aircraft. Sadly, Ken Lucas passed away in January 2011.
Lyon, C. J.
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   Died : 22 / 3 / 1941
Lyon, C. J.


Newhouse, H.
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Newhouse, H.


Prosser, P. C.
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Prosser, P. C.


Ratcliff, Len
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Ratcliff, Len

Len Ratcliff joined the RAFVR in early 1939 to train as a pilot. In 1941 he completed a full tour of 30 operations in Bomber Command with 49 Squadron. After a rest period he was posted to 161 (Special Duties ) Sqn as Flight Commander flying agents and supplies in and out of France, Belgium, Holland, Norway and Denmark. He then spent a period in charge of A.I.2.C at the very centre of clandestine activities in the whole of occupied Europe. He returned to 161 Squadron in 1943 as Flight Commander and later Squadron commander.
Souter, Robert
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Souter, Robert

Robert Souter joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force in February 1941, and after training was posted in 1942 to the Middle East, joining No.108 Squadron then flying Wellingtons. He first flew operationally in June of that year, in the Western Desert campaign, and the last operation of his first tour was in Nov 1942 with the battle of El Alamein. After a period with No.26 OTUWing, Robert undertook a second tour - this time flying Lancasters with No.49 Squadron, up to the end of the war. He had completed a total of 47 operations by that time. After the war he flew Dakotas and Liberators with RAF Transport Command.
Townsend, William Clifford
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   Died : 0 / 4 / 1991
Townsend, William Clifford

Pilot and Captain of Lancaster AJ-O, he attacked the Ennepe Dam. Transferring to the RAF from the Army in 1941, Bill Townsend served a tour as a pilot with 49 Squadron, before joining 617 Squadron, at the time a Flight Sergeant. As part of 617 Squadron Bill Townsend flew Lancaster ED886 codenamed AJ–O for Orange in the famous dambuster raid of May 1944. Flight Sergeant Townsend flew his bomber and crew in the third wave of the famous raid. After the first two dams (Mohne and Eder) were breached, O for Orange was tasked to attack the Ennepe dam. With no anti-aircraft firing at them, they had time to do three trial runs before they released their bomb, but it failed to damage the dam. Forced to fly back at tree top level by enemy action, his Lancaster was the last to return. It limped home short of one engine. He was awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal for his courageous actions in the raid. Bill Townsend was later promoted to Flight Lieutenant. He had been a pupil at Monmouth and after the war studied at Lincoln College, Oxford. He became a business man and a civil servant after his studies. FLt/Lt Townsend passed away in April 1991 , there with a flypast by 617 Tornadoes at his cremation on the 15th April 1991.
Ward-Hunt, Peter
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   Died : 7 / 12 / 2005
Ward-Hunt, Peter

Born 6th December 1916. Joined the RAF in July 1937, with No 106 Sqn flying Hampdens, moving to No.49 Sqn at the end of that year. After a period as an instructor, joined No.207 Sqn flying the Manchester. He was selected to convert others to Lancasters in May 1942, and became a flight commander of No 106 Sqn in February 1943. He died 7th December 2005.
Webb, Ernest
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Webb, Ernest

After joining the Royal Air Force in June 1941, Ernie Webb was chosen for training as a pilot. After qualifying he was posted in 1943 to join No.49 Squadron, based at Fiskerton in Lincolnshire. The squadron were by that time flying Lancasters, and heavily involved in the RAF Bomber Command offensive against the major targets in Germany. He flew a total of 30 combat operations in the Lancaster during his tour with No.49 Squadron, and later went on to serve with No.242 Squadron, RAF Transport Command. Ernest Webb was awarded the DFC.
Wilson, R. D.
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   Died : 22 / 3 / 1941
Wilson, R. D.





Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
10-02-1941 - Hampden was shot down by an intruder and crashed near Grange Farm in Sudbrooke, Lincoln. Sergeants Butterworth and Caldwell were killed.
Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
12-01-1941 - Hampden crashed at Northorpe after pilot lost control.
Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
04-02-1941 - Hampden was shot down and crew were made prisoners of war.
Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
03-04-1941 - Hampden was laying mines off Lorient. It later overshot and crashed into a hedge on coming in to land at St Eval. No injuries.
Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
10-02-1941 - Hampden was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed north of Alkmaar in Holland.
Squadrons :
No.49 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
21-03-1941 - Hampden crashed into high ground on Hamel Down Tor near Devon.



Known Individual Aircraft of No.49 Sqn RAF :

Type

Serial

Codes

First Flew

Squadron History

Aircrew History

History Notes

Engine

Factory

Hampden I

AD719

-

details

details

details

Hampden I

L4045

-

details

details

details

Hampden I

P4299

-

details

details

details

Hampden I

P4403

-

details

details

details

Hampden I

X3001

-

details

details

details

Hampden I

X3054

-

details

details

details

Aircraft for : No.49 Sqn RAF
A list of all aircraft associated with No.49 Sqn RAF. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
AircraftInfo

DH4

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DH4

Full profile not yet available.

DH9

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Manufacturer : De Havilland

DH9

Full profile not yet available.

Hampden



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Manufacturer : Handley Page
Retired : 1942
Number Built : 1500

Hampden

The Handley Page HP.52 Hampden was a twin-engine medium bomber built for the Royal Air Force and was used by Bomber Command in the early years of world war two. Along with the other medium bombers the Whitley and Wellington, the Hampden bore the brunt of the early bombing war over Europe, taking part in the first night raid on Berlin and the first 1,000-plane raid on Cologne. The newest of the three medium bombers, the Hampden was known as the Flying Suitcase because of its cramped crew conditions. A total of 226 Hampdens were in service with eight Royal Air Force squadrons by the start of the Second World War. Despite its speed and agility, in operational use the Hampden was no match for the fighters of the Luftwaffe (ME109 and FW 190) and the Hampdens role as a day bomber was brief, but Hampdens continued to operate at night on bombing raids over Germany and in mine laying (code-named gardening) in the North Sea. Almost half of the Hampdens built – 714, were lost on operations, witht he loss of 1,077 crew killed and another 739 missing. German flak accounted for 108; with one Hampden being lost due to German Barrage balloons; 263 Hampdens crashed due to a variety of causes, and 214 others were classed as missing. Luftwaffe pilots claimed 128 Hampdens, shooting down 92 at night. The Hampden soon became obsolete for its roll as a medium modern bomber, after operating mainly at night, it was retired from Bomber Command service in late 1942. but continued with Coastal Command throughout 1943 as a long-range Torpedo Bomber (the Hampden TB Mk I which carried the Mk XII torpedo in an open bomb-bay and a single 500 lb (230 kg) bomb under each wing) The Hampden was also used by the Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force.

Hind

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Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1935

Hind

The Hawker Hind entered service with the Royal Air Force in November1935 and eventually 20 RAF bomber squadrons equipped with Hawker Hinds. Many Hinds were also sold to foreign customers including Afghanistan, the Irish Free State, Latvia, Persia (Iran), Portugal, South Africa, Switzerland, and Yugoslavia. The Hawker Hind was gradually phased out of frontline service from 1936 onwards and replaced by the Fairey Battle and Bristol Blenheim. At the outbreak of world war two only 613 squadorn was still equipped with Hawker Hinds in the roll of Army co-operation before re-equipping the Hawker Hector in November 1939. The Hawker Hind became a training aircraft from 1938 being the next step up from basic training on Tiger Moths. In 1941, Hinds flew combat missions in their original role as light bombers. South African Hinds were employed against Italian forces in Kenya, Yugoslav Hinds were used against the Germans and Italians.

Lancaster



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Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Lincoln

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Manufacturer : Avro

Lincoln

Full profile not yet available.

Manchester

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Manufacturer : Avro

Manchester

Full profile not yet available.

Valiant

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Manufacturer : Vickers

Valiant

Full profile not yet available.




Last edited : 20:50, November 30, 2013
Last editor : DataStream

No.49 Sqn RAF Artwork


Ops On Hold by Richard Taylor.

Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian.


Handley Page Hampden by Keith Woodcock.

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