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Castle Class Corvettes 

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Castle Class Corvettes of the Royal Navy including HMS Allington Castle, Alnwick Castle, Amberley Castle, Bamborough Castle, Berkeley Castle, Caistor Castle, Carisbrooke Castle, Knaresborough Castle.

These Castle Class Corvettes were a much improved vessel to the Flower class Corvettes The improved length designed by William Reed of Smith's Dock made these more suitable for Atlantic Weather conditions.  With the Addition of Squid which improved its anti Submarine capabilities.  from the Class Two were sunk by German U-Boats, HMS Hurst Castle on 1st September 1944 and HMS Denbigh Castle lost on the 13th February 1944 . HMS Tunsberg (ex HMS Shrewsbury Castle) was sunk by hitting a mine on the 12th December 1944.

Contact message board for crew and families available at bottom of page 

Castle Class Corvettes

Displacement: 1,010 tons    Speed: 16.5 knots    Complement: 120    

Armament: One 4 inch gun, Ten 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, One ATW.

Name Builder Launch Date Fate
HMS Allington Castle (ex Amaryllis) (K689) Fleming & Ferguson 29th February 1944 Sold on 20th December 1958 for scrapping at Sunderland. broken up 1959
HMS Alnwick Castle (K405) Brown, Kincaid 23rd May 1944 Scrapped in December 1958 at Gateshead.
HMS Amberley Castle (K386) Austin, Clark 27th November 1943 Became weather advisor in 1960.
HMS Bamborough Castle (K412) Lewis 11th January 1944 Scrapped on 22nd May 1959 at Llanelly.
HMS Barnard Castle (K694) Brown, Kincaid 5th October 1944 She was converted to the merchant ship Empire Shelter before completion in 1945. Eventually scrapped on 29th July 1955.
HMS Berkeley Castle (K387) Barclay Curle 19th August 1943 She capsized in dry dock at Sheerness during flooding in February 1953 and finally was scrapped on 26th September 1955 at Grays.
HMS Caistor Castle (K690) Lewis 22nd May 1944 Scrapped in March 1956
HMS Carisbrooke Castle (K379) Caledon, Clark 31st July 1943 She was scrapped on 14th June 1958 at Faslane.

Castle Class  Corvette HMS Carisbrooke Castle

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code PHX193

HMS Carisbrooke Castle. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code PHX192

HMS Denibigh Castle (K696) Lewis 5th August 1944 Lost on 13th February 1945.
HMS Dumbarton Castle (K388) Caledon, Hargreaves 28th September 1943 Scrapped in March 1961 at Gateshead.
HMS Farnham Castle (K413) Crown, Clark 25th April 1944 Scrapped on 31st October 1960 at Gateshead.
HMS Flint Castle (K383) Robb, Plenty 1st September 1943 Scrapped on 10th July 1958 at Faslane.
HMS Gorey Castle (K529) (became Hedingham Castle (F355) in 1944 Crown, Clark 30th October 1944 Renamed Hedingham Castle in August 1944 she was eventually scrapped in April 1958 at Granton.
HMS Guildford Castle (K378) Robb, Walker 13th November 1943 Served with the Canadian Navy as Hespeler (K489) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Chilcotin in 1947, renamed Stella Maris in 1958.
HMS Hadleigh Castle (K355) Smiths Dock 21st June 1943 Scrapped in January 1959 at Sunderland.

HMS Hadleigh Castle, at the breakers in Sunderland, February 1959.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2819 

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2819

HMS Hedingham Castle (K396) Robb, Plenty 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Orangeville (K491) in 1943. She then became the merchant ship Ta Tung in 1947, renamed Hsi Ling and then Shih Lin in 1947. Became Chinese ship called Te An in 1951.

HMS Hedingham Castle, June 1953.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2820

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2820

HMS Hever Castle (K521) Blyth, White 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Coppercliff (K495) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Lung in 1947, renamed Wan Lee in 1947.
HMS Hurst Castle (K416) Caledon, Thornycroft 23rd February 1944 Lost on 1st September 1944.
HMS Kenilworth Castle (K420) Smiths Dock 17th August 1943 Scrapped on 20th June 1959 at Llanelly.

HMS Kenilworth Castle.

Sent in by Bill Allon, whose father commanded this ship during the war.

HMS Knaresborough Castle (K389) Blyth, White 28th September 1943 Scrapped on 16th March 1956 at Prot Glasgow.
HMS Lancaster Castle (K691) Fleming & Ferguson 14th April 1944 Scrapped on 6th September 1960 at Gateshead.

HMS Lancaster Castle with HMS Hadleigh Castle, laid up, July 1950.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2821

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2821

HMS Launceston Castle (K397) Blyth, White 27th November 1943 Scrapped on 3rd August 1959 at Davidson Forth.

HMS Launceston Castle and HMS Kenilworth Castle, November 1945.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2822

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2822

HMS Leeds Castle (K384) Pickersgill, Clark 12th October 1943 Scrapped on 5th June 1958 at Grays.
HMS Maiden Castle (K443) Fleming & Ferguson 8th June 1944 She was converted to the merchant ship Empire Lifeguard before completion in 1944. She was scrapped on 22nd July 1955.
HMS Morpeth Castle (K693) Pickersgill, Clark 26th November 1943 Scrapped on 9th August 1960 at Llanelly.
HMS Norham Castle (ex Totnes Castle) Harland & Wolff, Fawcett, Preston 12th April 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Humberstone (K497) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Wei in 1947, renamed Chang Cheng in 1947, renamed King Kang in 1949 and again to Tai Shan in 1950. Renamed Flying Dragon then San Blas in 1951 and again in 1954 to South Ocean. Scrapped in September 1959 in Hong Kong.
HMS Nunnery Castle (K446) Pickersgill, Clark 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Bowmanville (K493) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Shun in 1947 and was renamed to Yuan Pei in same year. Transferred to Chinese as Kuano Chou in 1951.
HMS Oakham Castle (K530) Inglis, Harland & Wolff and Robey 20th July 1944 Became Weather Reporter in 1958.
HMS Oxford Castle (K692) Harland & Wolff 11th December 1943 Scrapped on 6th September 1960 at Briton Ferry.
HMS Pembroke Castle (K450) Ferguson 12th Ferguson 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Tillsonburg (K496) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Ting in 1947 and renamed Chiu Chin in 1947. Transferred to Chinese and named Kao An in 1952. 
HMS Pevensey Castle (K449) Harland & Wolff 11th January 1944 Became weather monitor in 1960.
HMS Porchester Castle (K362) Swan Hunter 21st June 1943 Scrapped on 14th May 1958 at Troon.

HMS Porchester Castle in 1952.  Sent in by Brenda Duthie.

HMS Rayleigh Castle (K695) Ferguson 19th June 1944 Converted to the merchant ship Empire Rest before completion in 1944 and was scrapped in June 1952.
HMS Rising Castle (K398) Harland & Wolff 8th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Arnprior (K494) in 1944. Transferred to Uruguay as Montevideo in 1948.
HMS Rushen Castle (K372) Swan Hunter 16th July 1943 Became weather surveyor in 1960.
HMS Sandgate Castle (K373) Smiths Dock 28th December 1943 Served with the Canadian Navy as St Thomas (K488) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Camosun in 1946, renamed as Chilcotin and again to Yukon Starin 1958.
HMS Scarborough Castle (K536) Fleming & Ferguson 8th September 1944 Converted to merchant ship Empire Peacemaker before completion in 1945. Scrapped in June 1955.
HMS Sherbourne Castle (K453) Harland & Wolff 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Petrolia (K498) in 1944. Marked for disposal on 23rd May 1946.
HMS Shrewsbury Castle (K374) Swan Hunter 16th August 1943 Served with the Norwegian Navy as Tunsberg Castle in 1944, she was lost on 12th December 1944.
HMS Tamworth Castle (K393) Smiths Dock 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Kincardine (K490) in 1944, becoming the merchant ship Saada in 1947.
HMS Tintagel Castle (K399) Ailsa 13th December 1943 Scrapped in June 1958 at Troon.

HMS Tintagel Castle, June 1950.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2823

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2823

HMS Walmer Castle (K460) Smiths Dock 10th March 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Leaside (K492) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Coquitlam in 1947, renamed Glacier Queen in 1958.
HMS Wolvesey Castle (K461) Ailsa 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Huntsville (K499) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Wellington Kent in 1947, renamed Belle Isle II in 1951 and lost on 19th August 1960.
HMS York Castle (K537) Ferguson 20th September 1944 Converted to merchant ship Empire Comfort before completion in 1945. Scrapped in June 1955.
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

During the early 1930s, Imperial Airways of London introduced to its European and Eastern routes the HP42, an enormous four-engined Handley Page biplane carrying up to 38 passengers at a sedate 100mph.  For the first time air travellers could enjoy Pullman comfort, the wicker-work chairs finally being dispensed with.  Eight of these outstanding aircraft were built and operated from 1931 to the start of the Second World War.  The European services were flown by the four known as the Heracles class with fleet names Horatius, Hengist and Helena.  The Hannibal class with Horsa, Hanno and Hadrian serviced the Empire routes.  They accumulated over 10 million miles of peacetime operations wthout harm to a single passenger or crew member.  Safety became their byword. Depicted here is Horatius, bound for Paris from Croydon.  What a sight to behold, truly a galleon of the clouds.
Croydon Departure by Gerald Coulson.
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 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman.
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Our Gal Sal, a veteran of over a hundred ops, returning to base in the summer of 1944.  The peace of the  English country side is broken by the thunder of the mighty four engined bombers and keen observers will spot the rabbit scampering along the country lane as the Forts of the Bloody 100th circle the Airbase. With one engine feathered and showing signs of the gauntlet of Flak and fighters she has had to come through, the crew know they are only moments away from the safety of home.

The Veteran by Simon Smith.
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 As dawn breaks across South Pacific skies, a group of Mitsubishi A6M5 Zeros of the 201st Air Group head outbound from their base at Rabaul on a raiding sortie in November 1944.

Zero Hour by Ivan Berryman.
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 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.
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 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 During the years of the German occupation of Holland in World War II, more than 20,000 Dutch civilians perished through starvation and lack of basic provisions. Operation Manna was set in motion on Sunday, 29th April 1945 when Lancasters of the Royal Air Force began the first of 2,835 sorties, dropping 6,672 tons of food, to relieve the crisis in the Netherlands.  These humanitarian missions continued until 8th May, saving many thousands of civilians from certain death by starvation and malnutrition.  Here, Lancaster 4K765, LS-Z of 15 Sqn piloted by Flying Officer Jack Darlow, releases its precious cargo over a sports field north of The Hague.  Also in the crew was Alistair Lamb the Rear Gunner.

Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman.
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 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

B63AP.  HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 The mighty Bismarck returns fire to the fast-approaching HMS Hood a the start of a battle that would see both adversaries tragically sunk.

Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 Fully dressed and resplendent, HMS Hood is pictured preparing for King George Vs review of the Fleet in July 1935 as other capital ships take up their positions around her. Ramillies can be seen off Hoods port bow, Resolution astern, whilst just beyond her boat deck, the mighty Nelson gently nudges into position.

HMS Hood During the Fleet Review of 1935 by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 The Dido class cruiser HMS Naiad is pictured together with the cruiser HMS Leander during the encounter with the French Guepard in 1941 whilst they were both engaged in operations against the Vichy-French forces in Syria.

HMS Naiad by Ivan Berryman.
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 The greatest naval battle of the First World War took place on the 31st of May and the 1st of June 1916, near the Danish province of Jutland.  It was the first and only sea battle between the British and German fleets, and certainly proved to be the clash of the Titans that the First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, had long planned.  Decisive victory was claimed by both sides, but, desperately fought though it was, the outcome was indecisive.  The Royal Navy suffered higher losses in both men and ships, but the German fleet never ventured out of harbour to seek battle again.  During the daylight fighting HMS Barham, under Rear Admiral Evan-Thomas, lead the 5th Battle Squadron (Valiant, Warspite and Malaya) and is seen here at 4.50pm exchanging with Hippers battle-cruisers to the south.

HMS Barham leads the 5th Battle Squadon at Jutland by Anthony Saunders.
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 Launched in March 1984 and commissioned into the Royal Navy in October the following year, HMS Tireless (S88) was the third of seven Trafalgar Class SSN submarines and is depicted in the Arctic waters near the polar ice cap in 1991.

HMS Tireless by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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Napoleon at the height of his military career, receives the surrender of the city of Ulm after an almost bloodless victory.
Surrender of Ulm by Charles Thevenin. (B)
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On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack!  The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action.  The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines.  Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below.  Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself!  Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour.  Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.
Storming of Badajoz by the Sherwood Foresters painting by Mark Churms. (P)
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DHM605.  Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia.
Charge of the Russian Cuirassiers at Borodino by Jim Lancia.
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 William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) is shown as an Army Scout during a skirmish with Indians on the Frontier. 

Buffalo Bill by Brian Palmer.
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VAR636. 6th Inniskilling Dragoon by Chris Collingwood.
6th Inniskilling Dragoon by Chris Collingwood.
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At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, the tanks of C and F Battalions in MkIV tanks advanced alongside the men of the British 12th Division against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported in the air by 4 RFC squadron flying ground attack missions, the general offensive had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.

Battle of Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Depicting the charge of the Bucks, Berks and Dorset Yeomanry on November 13th 1917 during the Palestine campaign.

Action of the 6th Mounted Brigade at El Muhgar by J P Beadle. (Y)
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 Depicting Jeromes Infantry attacking the South gate of the Chateau during the battle of Waterloo.

Hogoumont by Mark Churms. (B)
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SPORT PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Richard Burns and Robert Reid.  Subaru Impreza WRC 99
Rain or Shine by Michael Thompson
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22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
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 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
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B41. Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.

Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.
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 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 Marcus Gronholm.  Peugeot 206 WRC.
Reflections of a Champion by Michael Thompson.
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Matt Le Tissier is quite simply a legend of Southampton Football Club. Since making his debut in 1986, Matt played 462 games for the Saints scoring 209 goals (including 49 penalties out of 50!)

Matt le Tissier by Gary Brandham. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00

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