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Castle Class Corvettes 

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Castle Class Corvettes of the Royal Navy including HMS Allington Castle, Alnwick Castle, Amberley Castle, Bamborough Castle, Berkeley Castle, Caistor Castle, Carisbrooke Castle, Knaresborough Castle.

These Castle Class Corvettes were a much improved vessel to the Flower class Corvettes The improved length designed by William Reed of Smith's Dock made these more suitable for Atlantic Weather conditions.  With the Addition of Squid which improved its anti Submarine capabilities.  from the Class Two were sunk by German U-Boats, HMS Hurst Castle on 1st September 1944 and HMS Denbigh Castle lost on the 13th February 1944 . HMS Tunsberg (ex HMS Shrewsbury Castle) was sunk by hitting a mine on the 12th December 1944.

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Castle Class Corvettes

Displacement: 1,010 tons    Speed: 16.5 knots    Complement: 120    

Armament: One 4 inch gun, Ten 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, One ATW.

Name Builder Launch Date Fate
HMS Allington Castle (ex Amaryllis) (K689) Fleming & Ferguson 29th February 1944 Sold on 20th December 1958 for scrapping at Sunderland. broken up 1959
HMS Alnwick Castle (K405) Brown, Kincaid 23rd May 1944 Scrapped in December 1958 at Gateshead.
HMS Amberley Castle (K386) Austin, Clark 27th November 1943 Became weather advisor in 1960.
HMS Bamborough Castle (K412) Lewis 11th January 1944 Scrapped on 22nd May 1959 at Llanelly.
HMS Barnard Castle (K694) Brown, Kincaid 5th October 1944 She was converted to the merchant ship Empire Shelter before completion in 1945. Eventually scrapped on 29th July 1955.
HMS Berkeley Castle (K387) Barclay Curle 19th August 1943 She capsized in dry dock at Sheerness during flooding in February 1953 and finally was scrapped on 26th September 1955 at Grays.
HMS Caistor Castle (K690) Lewis 22nd May 1944 Scrapped in March 1956
HMS Carisbrooke Castle (K379) Caledon, Clark 31st July 1943 She was scrapped on 14th June 1958 at Faslane.

Castle Class  Corvette HMS Carisbrooke Castle

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code PHX193

HMS Carisbrooke Castle. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code PHX192

HMS Denibigh Castle (K696) Lewis 5th August 1944 Lost on 13th February 1945.
HMS Dumbarton Castle (K388) Caledon, Hargreaves 28th September 1943 Scrapped in March 1961 at Gateshead.
HMS Farnham Castle (K413) Crown, Clark 25th April 1944 Scrapped on 31st October 1960 at Gateshead.
HMS Flint Castle (K383) Robb, Plenty 1st September 1943 Scrapped on 10th July 1958 at Faslane.
HMS Gorey Castle (K529) (became Hedingham Castle (F355) in 1944 Crown, Clark 30th October 1944 Renamed Hedingham Castle in August 1944 she was eventually scrapped in April 1958 at Granton.
HMS Guildford Castle (K378) Robb, Walker 13th November 1943 Served with the Canadian Navy as Hespeler (K489) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Chilcotin in 1947, renamed Stella Maris in 1958.
HMS Hadleigh Castle (K355) Smiths Dock 21st June 1943 Scrapped in January 1959 at Sunderland.

HMS Hadleigh Castle, at the breakers in Sunderland, February 1959.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2819 

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2819

HMS Hedingham Castle (K396) Robb, Plenty 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Orangeville (K491) in 1943. She then became the merchant ship Ta Tung in 1947, renamed Hsi Ling and then Shih Lin in 1947. Became Chinese ship called Te An in 1951.

HMS Hedingham Castle, June 1953.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2820

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2820

HMS Hever Castle (K521) Blyth, White 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Coppercliff (K495) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Lung in 1947, renamed Wan Lee in 1947.
HMS Hurst Castle (K416) Caledon, Thornycroft 23rd February 1944 Lost on 1st September 1944.
HMS Kenilworth Castle (K420) Smiths Dock 17th August 1943 Scrapped on 20th June 1959 at Llanelly.

HMS Kenilworth Castle.

Sent in by Bill Allon, whose father commanded this ship during the war.

HMS Knaresborough Castle (K389) Blyth, White 28th September 1943 Scrapped on 16th March 1956 at Prot Glasgow.
HMS Lancaster Castle (K691) Fleming & Ferguson 14th April 1944 Scrapped on 6th September 1960 at Gateshead.

HMS Lancaster Castle with HMS Hadleigh Castle, laid up, July 1950.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2821

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2821

HMS Launceston Castle (K397) Blyth, White 27th November 1943 Scrapped on 3rd August 1959 at Davidson Forth.

HMS Launceston Castle and HMS Kenilworth Castle, November 1945.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2822

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2822

HMS Leeds Castle (K384) Pickersgill, Clark 12th October 1943 Scrapped on 5th June 1958 at Grays.
HMS Maiden Castle (K443) Fleming & Ferguson 8th June 1944 She was converted to the merchant ship Empire Lifeguard before completion in 1944. She was scrapped on 22nd July 1955.
HMS Morpeth Castle (K693) Pickersgill, Clark 26th November 1943 Scrapped on 9th August 1960 at Llanelly.
HMS Norham Castle (ex Totnes Castle) Harland & Wolff, Fawcett, Preston 12th April 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Humberstone (K497) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Wei in 1947, renamed Chang Cheng in 1947, renamed King Kang in 1949 and again to Tai Shan in 1950. Renamed Flying Dragon then San Blas in 1951 and again in 1954 to South Ocean. Scrapped in September 1959 in Hong Kong.
HMS Nunnery Castle (K446) Pickersgill, Clark 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Bowmanville (K493) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Shun in 1947 and was renamed to Yuan Pei in same year. Transferred to Chinese as Kuano Chou in 1951.
HMS Oakham Castle (K530) Inglis, Harland & Wolff and Robey 20th July 1944 Became Weather Reporter in 1958.
HMS Oxford Castle (K692) Harland & Wolff 11th December 1943 Scrapped on 6th September 1960 at Briton Ferry.
HMS Pembroke Castle (K450) Ferguson 12th Ferguson 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Tillsonburg (K496) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Ta Ting in 1947 and renamed Chiu Chin in 1947. Transferred to Chinese and named Kao An in 1952. 
HMS Pevensey Castle (K449) Harland & Wolff 11th January 1944 Became weather monitor in 1960.
HMS Porchester Castle (K362) Swan Hunter 21st June 1943 Scrapped on 14th May 1958 at Troon.

HMS Porchester Castle in 1952.  Sent in by Brenda Duthie.

HMS Rayleigh Castle (K695) Ferguson 19th June 1944 Converted to the merchant ship Empire Rest before completion in 1944 and was scrapped in June 1952.
HMS Rising Castle (K398) Harland & Wolff 8th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Arnprior (K494) in 1944. Transferred to Uruguay as Montevideo in 1948.
HMS Rushen Castle (K372) Swan Hunter 16th July 1943 Became weather surveyor in 1960.
HMS Sandgate Castle (K373) Smiths Dock 28th December 1943 Served with the Canadian Navy as St Thomas (K488) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Camosun in 1946, renamed as Chilcotin and again to Yukon Starin 1958.
HMS Scarborough Castle (K536) Fleming & Ferguson 8th September 1944 Converted to merchant ship Empire Peacemaker before completion in 1945. Scrapped in June 1955.
HMS Sherbourne Castle (K453) Harland & Wolff 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Petrolia (K498) in 1944. Marked for disposal on 23rd May 1946.
HMS Shrewsbury Castle (K374) Swan Hunter 16th August 1943 Served with the Norwegian Navy as Tunsberg Castle in 1944, she was lost on 12th December 1944.
HMS Tamworth Castle (K393) Smiths Dock 26th January 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Kincardine (K490) in 1944, becoming the merchant ship Saada in 1947.
HMS Tintagel Castle (K399) Ailsa 13th December 1943 Scrapped in June 1958 at Troon.

HMS Tintagel Castle, June 1950.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2823

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2823

HMS Walmer Castle (K460) Smiths Dock 10th March 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Leaside (K492) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Coquitlam in 1947, renamed Glacier Queen in 1958.
HMS Wolvesey Castle (K461) Ailsa 24th February 1944 Served with the Canadian Navy as Huntsville (K499) in 1944. Became the merchant ship Wellington Kent in 1947, renamed Belle Isle II in 1951 and lost on 19th August 1960.
HMS York Castle (K537) Ferguson 20th September 1944 Converted to merchant ship Empire Comfort before completion in 1945. Scrapped in June 1955.
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 A trio of Bell Huey UH-1s deliver ARVN Rangers to a drop zone in the central Highlands of Vietnam during 1970. The ubiquitous Huey saw action in an enormous variety of roles, Vietnam being the first true helicopter war, and it will perhaps be remembered by many a grateful GI for its (and its crews) part in many hundreds of daring rescues amid the unyielding and unfamiliar terrain of south east Asia.

DZ 9.00am by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
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 A Vulcan bomber returns from one of the Black Buck missions to the Falklands, preparing to touch down at RAF Ascension Island after what was the longest range bombing mission in history.

Vulcan Return by Ivan Berryman.
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In 1944 Berlin was probably the most defended city in the world.  The Luftwaffe had kept what reserves it had for planes to defend Berlin.  On March 6th, 1944, The USAAF were involved in the massive air raid on Berlin, 69 B17s were lost – but the Luftwaffe lost 160 planes.  Whereas the US 8th Air Force could recover from these aircraft losses, the German Luftwaffe could not.  By the end of the war, the 8th Air Force and the Royal Air Force had destroyed 70% of Berlin.

Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.
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Dakota G-AMPZ (formerly KN442) of Air Atlantique resplendent in the commemorative livery of RAF Transport Command heads out across the English coast, back to Berlin?  Still flying more than 50 years after serving valiantly on the Berlin Airlift, this aircraft carries out the bulk of the airlines passenger charters.  These prints are signed by the current crew.
Perpetual Motion II by Robert Tomlin.
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 Resplendent in the striking new red and yellow corporate livery, Boeing 757 SF freighter OO-DPJ, the first to bear the new colours, lifts off from Brussels National Airport, DHL's European hub.

The Power to Deliver by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
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 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.
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 Amid a hail of defensive fire, Flt Lt D J H Maltby holds Lancaster ED906/G AJ-J steady for his bomb aimer John Fort to perfectly choose his moment to release the Upkeep Bomb that would ultimately breach and destroy the Mohne Dam during the famous Dambuster raids on the Ruhr on the night of 16th / 17th May 1943.

The One That Broke The Dam by Ivan Berryman.
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NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

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 The Type 22 Broadsword Class frigate HMS Cumberland (F85) enters Grand Harbour, Malta, during the evacuation of Libyan refugees in the Spring of 2011, during which time she rescued 454 people from the uprising as well as enforcing an arms embargo before returning to her home port of Plymouth in readiness for decommissioning in June 2011.

HMS Cumberland by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £800.00
  HMS Medway was the first Royal navy submarine Depot ship that was designed for the purpose from the outset. She is shown here with a quintet of T-class submarines on her starboard side, whilst an elderly L-Class begins  to move away having completed replenishment. HMS Medway was sunk on 30th June 1940 having been torpedoed by U-372 off Alexandria.

HMS Medway by Ivan Berryman (P)
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DHM1307.  Queen Elizabeth at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.

Queen Elizabeth at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.
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On 17th June 1944, 780 miles west of Saipan in Mid Pacific, the Gato class submarine USS Cavalla dives after a lucky sighting of a Japanese Naval Task Force, which included the aircraft carriers Taiho, Shokaku and Zuikaku. The Cavalla then trailed the Japanese, attacking and sinking the Shokaku on the 19th.

A Chance Encounter by Robert Barbour.
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USS Missouri and HMS King George V head south to Tokyo for the surrender, after completing the last shore bombardment of mainland Japan, 1945.

Setting of the Sun by Randall Wilson.
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One of the finest battleships of all time, Bismarck was built by the Blohm and Voss shipyard in Hamburg and launched in February 1939.  Her first duty was for commerce raiding in the north Atlantic.  Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, the destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 and a minesweeper.  The Bismarck, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunther Lutjens, left her last anchorage at Grimstadt Fjord in Norway.  Once Bismarcks departure was confirmed all available British forces were deployed to meet the threat.  On the 24th of May 1941 the Bismarck sailed into naval history - sinking the battlescruiser and pride of the British fleet - HMS Hood.  But Bismarck would have little time to celebrate, she was sunk by a scorned British fleet three days later.  Here Bismarck is depicted on the evening of the 21st May 1941 entering the open sea on her fateful final voyage.

Bismarck - The Final Voyage by Anthony Saunders (P)
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B146.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.
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Ships of the Falklands Task Force formate following the Argentine surrender in 1982.  Nearest is Leander class frigate HMS Andromeda with RFA Brambleleaf in her wake.  The Type 22 frigate HMS Brilliant is to the left of the picture, with the carrier HMS Invincible dominating the right.  HMS Hermes and her escorts are in the extreme distance.

Victory Parade by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 El Alamein, October 28th 1943, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel discusses the critical battle situation with the Commanding Officer of the 21st Panzer Division, in front of his Kampfstaffel.  This personal mobile headquarters comprised a variety of vehicles including a radio Panzer III, SDKfz 232 radio armoured car, Rommels famous SDKfz 250/3 communications half-track GREIF and captured British Honey light tanks.

The Desert Fox by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Camerons and Stuarts attack the centre and flank of Barrells Regiment (4th Foot) at the Battle of Culloden.

Broadsword Charge on Brown Bess by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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 The charge of the Scots Greys with the Gordon Highlanders holding onto the stirrups. Although this is a point of argument as to the improbability, both regiments concur that this action did happen.

Gordons and Greys to the Front by Stanley Berkeley. (Y)
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 The Jacobite army led by Lord George Murray having fired their first devastating volley, cast down their muskets and pistols to engage Cobhams Dragoons in fierce close quarter combat.

Battle of Falkirk by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>
The Fusilier Battalion at Gros Guerschuen by Carl Rochling. (Y)
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 One of Napoleons last successes in France when he defeated the Russian General Sacken on 11th February 1814 at Montmirail near Paris.

Battle of Montmirail by Horace Vernet. (Y)
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 Gold Beach, Normandy, D-Day, 6th June 1944.  A PIAT team and riflemen of the 6th Green Howards part of  British 50th (Tyne Tees) Division, push inland in the direction of Caen.

Off the Beach by David Pentland. (P)
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A dynamic work showing Napoleon mounted on his favourite horse Marengo, under a surprise attack from Russian Cossacks.
Napoleons Peril at Brienne Le Chateau by Robert Hillingford. (B)
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SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 Carl Fogarty testing the new Foggy Petronas FP1 at Brands Hatch, 2003.
Back on Track by Dave Foord. (Y)
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 In 1992 Matthew graduated in Geography from St. Catherine's College, Oxford, where he was President of the Oxford Rowing Club.  He took part in the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race in 1990 and 1991, when Oxford beat Cambridge by substantial distances.  Also in 1992, at the age of only 21, Matthew had his first taste of Olympic success, when in a coxless pair with partner Sir Steve Redgrave, he won the gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics.  Prior to that Olympic win he and Redgrave had enjoyed an unbeaten international season, and it was already obvious that Matthew was developing to become one of the world's greatest oarsmen.  At the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 the Pinsent / Redgrave duo won another gold medal and throughout the nineties their outstanding combination also brought them seven world championship golds.  Their unbroken run of success continued through to the millennium Olympic games in Sydney when Pinsent, again with Redgrave (now in a coxless four with James Cracknell and Tim Foster) again triumphed earning Pinsent his third Olympic gold medal.  The race in which he did it was voted Britain's greatest sporting moment and the crew secured themselves a very special place in the heart of the nation.  After Sydney, Matthew formed a seemingly invincible coxless pair partnership with James Cracknell MBE.  Undefeated throughout 2001, they went on to complete a unique feat in the history of rowing, by winning the coxless pair at the world championships in Lucerne, a mere two hours after winning the coxed pairs.  In the 2002 world championships in Seville they defended their coxless pairs title, beating an experienced Australian crew who had beaten them in Lucerne earlier in the year and breaking the world record by 4 seconds in the process.  On Saturday 21st August 2004 at the Athens Olympic games, Matthew Pinsent CBE entered Olympic history.  In one of the classic sporting moments of all time, he led the Great Britain coxless four to victory over the Canadian world champions by only eight hundredths of a second.  Matthew was awarded the MBE in the 1993 New Year's Honours List and the CBE in the New Year's Honours List 2003.  In the 2005 New Year's Honours List he was awarded a knighthood.

Sir Matthew Pinsent CBE by James Owen.
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Steeplechasers competing for the Blue Riband.

Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.
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B41. Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.

Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.
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 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
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 Valentino Rossi on his way to a seventh Moto GP World Championship in the 2009 season on his Yamaha, scoring thirteen podium finishes, including six race wins, leaving him 45 points clear of his nearest rival.

Valentino Rossi by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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MC0041P. Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms.

Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms. (P)
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Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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