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Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)- World Naval Ships .com
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Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)


Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)

With their crews, the 447th Bomb Group B-17 Fortresses arrived at Rattlesden in late 1943, the East Anglian base from which the group flew all its missions until the end of the war. Entering combat on December 24, the 447th targeted submarine pens, naval installations, ports and missile sites, airfields and marshalling yards in France, Belgium and Germany in preparation for the Normandy invasion. In the thick of the bomber offensive, the 447th took part in the Big-Week raids, supported the D-Day landings, aided the breakthrough at St. Lo, pounded enemy positions during the airborne invasion of Holland, and dropped supplies to the Free French forces fighting behind enemy lines. During the Battle of the Bulge, December 1944 - January 1945, the group attacked marshalling yards, railroad bridges and communications centers in the combat zone, later resuming their offensive against targets deep inside Germany. When the war ended the 447th had flown over 257 individual missions, with one of their aircrew, Robert Femoyer, being awarded the Medal of Honor. Theirs was typical of the action packed campaigns flown by the American Eighth Air Force bomb groups in Europe during WWII.

Published 2001.

Signed by eight combat crew veterans flying B-17 Flying Fortresses for the 447th BG out of Rattlesden, England, during World War II.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : DHM2176APReturn to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian (AP) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.


Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 37 inches x 22 inches (94cm x 56cm) Bitzer, John C
Bussel, Norman
Dingivan, Edward A
Frision, Frank
Osbahr, John H
Petrillo, Orlando
Schlag, Byron
Sherman, Don
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £310
£40 Off!Now : £200.00

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Other editions of this item : Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian.DHM2176
TYPEEDITION DETAILSSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSYOUR PRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.
Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 37 inches x 22 inches (94cm x 56cm) Bitzer, John C
Bussel, Norman
Dingivan, Edward A
Frision, Frank
Osbahr, John H
Petrillo, Orlando
Schlag, Byron
Sherman, Don
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £310
£80 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £160.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Limited edition of 25 publishers proofs.
Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 37 inches x 22 inches (94cm x 56cm) Bitzer, John C
Bussel, Norman
Dingivan, Edward A
Frision, Frank
Osbahr, John H
Petrillo, Orlando
Schlag, Byron
Sherman, Don
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £310
£20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £180.00VIEW EDITION...
FLYERPromotional Flyer A4 Size Double Sheet 11.5 inches x 8 inches (30m x 21cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...
SPECIAL
PROMOTION
Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

TWO PRINTS ONLY IN THIS SPECIAL PROMOTION.

Great value : Value of signatures exceeds price of item!
Paper size 37 inches x 22 inches (94cm x 56cm) Bitzer, John C
Bussel, Norman
Dingivan, Edward A
Frision, Frank
Osbahr, John H
Petrillo, Orlando
Schlag, Byron
Sherman, Don
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


Signature(s) value alone : £310

B.O.G.O.F.
Now : £280.00VIEW EDITION...
General descriptions of types of editions :



Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Colonel Edward A Dingivan DFC (deceased)
*Signature Value : £35

Edward Dingivan was pilot of 'Brass Wagon', flying his first combat mission to Neuminster , Germany in September 1944. He completed a tour of 30 combat missions in the B-17. after the war, Director of Traffic during the Berlin Airlift and Commander of the 35th Air Transport Squadron. Later Military Executive to the Assistant Secretary of the US Air Force, he retired in 1969. Sadly, Edward Dingivan passed away on 2nd December 2010.
First Lt Frank Frision
*Signature Value : £35

Frank Frision was Bombardier on the Fortress 'Bouncin Baby' flying his first mission on 2nd November 1944 when the Luftwaffe mounted one of their largest fighter operations of the war. He flew the last of his 35 combat missions on 22nd March 1945, supporting the Rhine Crossings.
S/Sgt Don Sherman 
*Signature Value : £40

Don Sherman was the ball-turret Gunner on the B-17 'Buddy Buddy'. The first of his 31 combat missions was in December 1944 to Mainz in Germany. His final mission was flown in April 1945 against German targets holding out a Royan in France.
S/Sgt John H Osbahr
*Signature Value : £40

John Osbahr flew his first combat mission on 2nd November 1944, flying to Merseberg, Germany. He was Ball-Turret Gunner in the B-17 'Bouncin Baby'. John completed the last of his 32 missions in March 1945 on a mission to Dresden.
S/Sgt Orlando Pete Petrillo
*Signature Value : £40

Pete Petrillo was a Waist Gunner on the B-17 'Bit o' Lace'. He flew his first combat mission to Caen, France in August 1944, and the last of his 35 missions was in December 1944 to Mainz in Germany. One of his memorable trips was a supply drop to the French Maquis.
Sgt Byron Schlag
*Signature Value : £40

Byron Schlag was the Tailgunner of B-17 'Ol Scrapiron', flying his first combat mission on 26th February 1945 to Berlin. On 23rd March his B-17 collided mid-air with another B-17, cutting the tail off. He managed to bail out at just 400ft; his ball-turret gunner fell in his turret from 23,000ft and survived. The rest of the crew died. Byron Schlag was taken PoW; he escaped and was recaptured four times.
T/Sgt John C Bitzer
*Signature Value : £35

John Bitzer joined the service in 1942 before tramsferring to England. On 30th December 1943 flying the B-17G Fortress 'Maid to Please', on his very first combat mission his aircraft was shot down and he had to bail out. John was taken prisoner by the Germans and remained in captivity until May 1945.
T/Sgt Norman Bussel
*Signature Value : £45

As Radio Operator on the B-17 'Mississippi Lady', Norman Bussel flew his first combat mission in March 1944 to Frankfurt. On 29th April 1944 his aircraft was shot down over Berlin, the worst day for losses for the 447th during the entire war. Bailing out with his clothes on fire, four of his crew died that day. Norman was taken PoW for the rest of the war.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ˝ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

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