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HMS Lion 

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HMS Lion.  The boys of the training ship Lion undergo instruction in seamanship. The braces are ropes belonging to the yards of a ship, two to each yard - one attached to each of its extremities- rove through the lateral strain brought upon the yard by the wind acting on the sails. By easing off the braces on one side and easing off on the other, a yard may be braced "sharp up" enabling the ship to lie as close to the wind as possible. The yards of the Lion are seen here braced up on the port tack. The main yard - the lowest and largest spar across the main mast - differs from the other yards in having a double set of braces, one pair leading forward and one pair aft, the former (preventer braces), are used for "bracing up", but the lads of the Lion are seen hauling taut the weather main brace as a support to the yard.

HMS Lion c.1897

Marching out Battalion Parade on the Training Ship HMS Lion

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price 20 plus 3 post for UK 10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/65 order magazine photo  here

At Sail Drill on Board HM Training Ship Lion

The boys of the training ship Lion undergo instruction in seamanship. The braces are ropes belonging to the yards of a ship, two to each yard - one attached to each of its extremities- rove through the lateral strain brought upon the yard by the wind acting on the sails. By easing off the braces on one side and easing off on the other, a yard may be braced "sharp up" enabling the ship to lie as close to the wind as possible. The yards of the Lion are seen here braced up on the port tack. The main yard - the lowest and largest spar across the main mast - differs from the other yards in having a double set of braces, one pair leading forward and one pair aft, the former (preventer braces), are used for "bracing up", but the lads of the Lion are seen hauling taut the weather main brace as a support to the yard.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price 20 plus 3 post for UK 10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/66 order magazine photo  here

The Cubs of the Lion 1896

These were the sailor lads who formed the company of the training ship Lion at Devonport during the 1890's. The old wooden two-decker lay moored with the Implacable astern of and attached to her, off Torpoint, nearly half-way up the Hamoze. This Lion whose striking gilded figure-head representing the British lion rampant, told the ships name as you approached her. She was built at Pembroke Dockyard and launched 29th July 1847 as an 80 gun ship, carrying a company of 750 men. She began her training ship duty in 1871. The Implacable, which lay stern to stern with the Lion and formed part of her, was at this time the only existing ship in the world apart from the Victory, which was present at the Battle of Trafalgar. She was then the French Duguay Trouin which was captured after Trafalgar while flying from the battle. The British Navy renamed the prize Implacable.

The Boys of the Training Ship Lion c.1900

The establishment which was officially known as the Lion was really two old battleships of the line, the Implacable and the Lion, the combined vessels constituted the training school for boys at Devonport. The training brig Liberty was attached as tender. The picture shows the young boys under instruction. It was from these sources that the Navy drew its future seamen and at this time there was no shortage of young boys eager to begin their training and fill any vacancies in the Royal Navy.

 

 

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