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  #1  
Old 04-06-2010, 22:19
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Default Dockside Cranes

Sad day for Tyneside

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/england/10239578.stm
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  #2  
Old 04-06-2010, 23:08
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Default Re: Swan Hunters

Very sad to see the last two remaining cranes being dismantled, many great ships were built here including warships,end of an era, making way for progress.
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  #3  
Old 05-06-2010, 00:46
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Default Re: Swan Hunters

I wonder what sort of progress they have made way for??
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  #4  
Old 05-06-2010, 00:47
JarrowDave JarrowDave is offline
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Default Re: Swan Hunters

My Grandad was chief slinger there, in 1905/6, when they built the Mauritania.

He went on to be "Chucker Out" at the Picture House in Jarrow.

Onwards and upwards, eh?


JD
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  #5  
Old 05-06-2010, 13:23
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Default Re: Swan Hunters

A few pictures i took yesterday of the demolition of the cranes at the Ex Swan Hunter's shipyard on the Tyne.
I spent the day as guest of the Port of Tyne who kindly supplied me with a launch from which to photograph the whole event.
From start to finish the cranes were down in less than 30 seconds.

Regards
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File Type: jpg June 4 2010 061.jpg (176.9 KB, 25 views)
File Type: jpg 4 June 2010 075.jpg (164.7 KB, 26 views)
File Type: jpg 4 June 2010 09522.jpg (136.8 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg June 4 2010 042.jpg (153.6 KB, 24 views)
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  #6  
Old 06-06-2010, 09:48
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
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Default Re: Swan Hunters

Quote:
Originally Posted by JarrowDave View Post
My Grandad was chief slinger there, in 1905/6, when they built the Mauritania.

He went on to be "Chucker Out" at the Picture House in Jarrow.

Onwards and upwards, eh?


JD
JD - your's is the first reference I have ever seen to a slinger in a dockyard; after leaving the navy, my father was a slinger in Portsmouth Dockyard for many years, no-one ever believed his occupation!

Edna
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  #7  
Old 03-11-2010, 09:25
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Default Dockside Cranes

Not technically a thread about ships, but I am looking for photos of the 125t crane at HMNB Clyde, does anyone out there have a photo of it lifting something.
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  #8  
Old 06-11-2010, 13:49
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Default Re: Cranes

Came across this photo of HMS Camperdown at Malta. Looks like replacement gun barrel being hoisted aboard by shoreside crane. Not sure exactly when the photo was taken, but don't recall seeing this crane in any other views of Malta.

Jim
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File Type: jpg camperdown and crane at malta.jpg (194.1 KB, 78 views)
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  #9  
Old 06-11-2010, 17:56
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Default Re: Cranes

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbryce1437 View Post
Came across this photo of HMS Camperdown at Malta. Looks like replacement gun barrel being hoisted aboard by shoreside crane. Not sure exactly when the photo was taken, but don't recall seeing this crane in any other views of Malta.

Jim
That is one really interesting crane, Jim!

It seems to have a fixed jib angle, but there is a very clever solid pendulum extension hanging down from the top of it.

This seems to be able to be pulled nearer to the body of the crane by another tackle, giving it a limited, but varing reach within the maximum radius of the fixed jib.

Really unusual, I would say.
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  #10  
Old 09-11-2010, 23:41
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Default Re: Cranes

taken from the mystery ship quiz thread, this link showing what I think is another interesting crane:-

http://www.worldnavalships.com/forum...ostcount=13578

I am left pondering:-
How did the two(?) operators communicate? or did they need to?
Was there a third 'operator' in overall charge of the lifts?
Would they have worked in all weathers?

Little h
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  #11  
Old 09-11-2010, 23:54
ekd
 
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Default Re: Cranes

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
taken from the mystery ship quiz thread, this link showing what I think is another interesting crane:-

http://www.worldnavalships.com/forum...ostcount=13578

I am left pondering:-
How did the two(?) operators communicate? or did they need to?
Was there a third 'operator' in overall charge of the lifts?
Would they have worked in all weathers?

Little h
Great observation, Little h:

Somebody must know the detailed answer...intriguing though it is;

But my money is on one guy treading the planks from one control room to the other!

One end a 75 ton lift.

The other a 150 ton lift! Or similar.
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  #12  
Old 10-11-2010, 00:50
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Default Re: Cranes

got to submit this otherwise it will drive me mad:-

anything that big in the U'kraine'??

and

the designers of any of them, would they have an enlarged cranium??

Little h

OK Terry; remove at will!!!
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  #13  
Old 11-11-2010, 13:43
John Odom John Odom is offline
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Default Re: Cranes

Here is a site with some crane pictures:

http://www.gearthhacks.com/downloads...php?file=32900
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  #14  
Old 20-11-2010, 00:40
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Cowans Sheldon

One of the most famous cranemakers was Cowans Sheldon.

John Cowans and Edward Pattinson Sheldon were apprentices to Robert Stephenson in Tyneside. They had also been friendly with William Bouch from Thursby, and it was Bouch’s brother Thomas, that found some premises at Woodbank, near Upperby, on the left bank of the River Petteril, about two miles from Carlisle. This was the start of the company that went on to become one of the most important railway and marine engineering companies in the world.

In June 1846 a notice in the local paper announced that 'the works had been taken over for the erection of a works for the manufacture of locomotive engines'. In 1847 the company was founded.

The firm never made engines as such, but they were actively employed in the production of locomotive wheels and other railway forgings. This was the Railway Age and railways were booming in Carlisle and elsewhere. The firm diversified into coal-handling equipment and in five years a branch works was opened in Darlington.

In 1857 the company had to find larger and more convenient promises to cater for their extending work, and the engineering department of the works was transferred to St. Nicholas, Carlisle. George Davy Richardson had operated a crane making business at St. Nicholas Bridge on the site of the old leper hospital for ten years or more and, despite having invested heavily, he had gone bankrupt. Cowans Sheldon bought the enterprise at auction and so set out on their journey to become the greatest crane makers in the world.

Meanwhile the Woodbank Works continued to manufacture railway wheels, points and crossings, and other railway equipment. By 1858 the first railway crane had been produced and was used by the Carlisle & Maryport Railway Company.

About 1860 the company founded the first ironworks at Darlington, and in due course the whole of the Woodbank undertaking was transferred there.

In the early days of railways the method of reversing the position of locomotive engines was by means of turntables slowly worked round by gearing. Turntables on the central pivot system, by which the weight is balanced on a central steel pin working in a steel cup, were first introduced and built by Cowans, Sheldon, and Co., and were supplied all over the world. Their invention enabled the heaviest engines to be easily turned round in less than a minute by one man, who walked round the circumference of the turntable pit, pushing a lever attached to one of the turntable beams. This method superseded the original geared turntables.

By 1866 Cowans Sheldon had built a massive 532 railway turntables. Many were exported around the globe to locations including Australia, India, Egypt and Russia. The largest they ever made was a gigantic thirty metres in diameter which was sent out to China.

The works at St. Nicholas continued to expand, extended to seven acres. In 1873 the company went public. By this timeBouch brothers found themselves drawn to business elsewhere and became sleeping partners. Thomas Bouch, in fact, became an eminent civil engineer and was held responsible for the notorious Tay Bridge disaster.

Cowans Sheldon continued to expand over the ensuing years, renowned for the manufacture of cranes, lifts, creosoting plant, and specialized railway equipment for lifting derailed locomotives.

By 1891 the company had built the largest dockside crane in the country and in 1907 the first floating crane had been produced. In 1926 the firm built the largest floating crane on the planet for Mitsubishi, as covered in the previous post.

During both World Wars the company boomed due to the high demands placed upon heavy engineering for both the war effort and home front.

Cowans Sheldon's fate was tied to the fate of the railways and the British engineering industry. Britain stopped being the workshop of the world, as the postwar years saw increased competition.

In 1969 Clarke Chapman of Gateshead bought the firm. Following a merger in 1982 with John Boyd the firm was renamed Cowans Boyd. However as British manufacturing and engineering declined, Cowans Boyd followed this trend and in 1987 the St Nicholas works closed.


CowansSheldon_1: Rare photograph of a steam railway crane at the St. Nicholas yard, Carlisle, taken in 1944. Unfortunately, there is nothing left of the yard to be seen today.


Original source of photograph unknown. No copyright restrictions evident.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_1.jpg (644.3 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_2.jpg (280.5 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_3.jpg (282.6 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_4.jpg (281.9 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_5.jpg (243.2 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg CowansSheldon_6.jpg (222.5 KB, 6 views)
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Last edited by Dreadnought : 31-08-2012 at 15:55. Reason: additional images
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  #15  
Old 24-11-2010, 13:22
leamingtonspa leamingtonspa is offline
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Default Re: Cranes

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbryce1437 View Post
Came across this photo of HMS Camperdown at Malta. Looks like replacement gun barrel being hoisted aboard by shoreside crane. Not sure exactly when the photo was taken, but don't recall seeing this crane in any other views of Malta.

Jim

Malta, Somerset Wharf 160T @ 21.1m Hydraulic
Armstrong, Mitchell and Co., Newcastle works no. 2983/1883
See – ICE Proceedings, CXIV 1892-3.
See – ‘Genie Civil’, XV 1894-5.
Diagram – Article re Venice Arsenal crane, ‘Palladio’, 12/1994
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  #16  
Old 24-11-2010, 13:33
leamingtonspa leamingtonspa is offline
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreadnought View Post
Cowans Sheldon

One of the most famous cranemakers, and already mentioned in this thread, was Cowans Sheldon ......
Book - Carlisle's Crane Makers: The Cowans Sheldon Story -...( the late Prof.) "Alan Earnshaw's informative, well illustrated book is a fitting memorial to the enterprise of Messrs Cowans and Sheldon" ( beware of a few errors - for instance in one photo SAR is South Australian Railway ; not South African Railway )

Public House with small photo gallery - Cranemakers London Road, Carlisle.

Last edited by Dreadnought : 26-11-2010 at 11:54. Reason: Reduced quotation
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  #17  
Old 24-11-2010, 14:05
leamingtonspa leamingtonspa is offline
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

For Iraq State Railways - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement with relieving bogies, at the Carlisle works of Cowans Sheldon. Woks no. 9255/1948, ordered in 10/1944.
http://www.ajg41.clara.co.uk/iraq/cranes.html

Last edited by Dreadnought : 26-11-2010 at 11:54. Reason: removed quote ... not necessary in this instance
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  #18  
Old 25-11-2010, 12:27
leamingtonspa leamingtonspa is offline
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Default Re: Cranes

Quote:
Originally Posted by leamingtonspa View Post
Malta, Somerset Wharf 160T @ 21.1m Hydraulic
Armstrong, Mitchell and Co., Newcastle works no. 2983/1883
See – ICE Proceedings, CXIV 1892-3.
See – ‘Genie Civil’, XV 1894-5.
Diagram – Article re Venice Arsenal crane, ‘Palladio’, 12/1994
Another view of Malta and hydraulic crane.
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File Type: jpg Armstrong Malta.jpg (120.8 KB, 52 views)
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  #19  
Old 26-11-2010, 11:56
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Thanks for that leamingtonspa ... nice shot of the shored based crane, and good to have the makers details.. I see there is a small floating crane in the right hand side foreground.

The ship on the slipway is HMS Melita, a Royal Navy Mariner-class composite screw gunvessel of 8 guns. She was the only Royal Navy warship ever to be built in Malta. The name is the Latin name for the island. She was launched on the 20th March 1888, which dates the photograph to that time.
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Last edited by Dreadnought : 27-11-2010 at 13:17. Reason: addition of information regarding HMS Melita
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  #20  
Old 27-11-2010, 13:25
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Following discussion in the Admiralty Floating Docks thread (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5167), posts #321 and #322, information regarding the hammerhead crane seemed worthy of inclusion in this thread.

This 80 ton hammerhead crane was ordered by J. S. White, a shipbuilder in Cowes, Isle of Wight, in 1911, and came into service in 1912. It was designed by Babcock and Wilcox, who built it at their Renfrew plant. It was the only giant cantilever Crane they ever built .

It was built of cast iron with a square tower of three stages, with its base embedded in concrete. It had a circular mechanism for manoeuvring the crane, with a balanced horizontal jib above. with a tapering front. There were two gabled structures of corrugated iron at the top the jib. The switch gear and power housing was housed in nearby building.

The White Family moved to Cowes , from Broadstairs , Kent, in 1803 and by the 1850s White's docks, with its steam sawmills and engine shops, and the mast and block shops, provided work for around 500 craftsmen. By the 1870s they were making lifeboats in numbers. They were also building the new torpedo boats, and as a result of which, they were sought out by the Admiralty to develop torpedo boat destroyers, a design for which they earned a notable reputation.

By the 1880’s, however, White's lost a lot their repair work to the new docks at Southampton. As a result, the company filled in its docks at the West Cowes and concentrated on the engineering part of their business, building steam engines and turbines, boilers and diesel engines. Ship construction was carried at their East Cowes site, while fitting-out was undertaken at the West Cowes quays. The crane was part of the expansion and redevelopment plans for building naval warships. During the period from 1912 to the end of World War I White’s built 27 destroyers, 11 patrol vessels, 2 submarines and 200 seaplanes.

During World War II White’s built 26 destroyers, one minelayer, and 285 small craft. This included HMS Impulsive which was involved in the action against the German ship Scharnhorst, and together with other Cowes ships was involved in the evacuations from Dunkirk in 1940. Amongst other destroyers built at White's was HMS Cavalier. The largest ship built was HMS Abdiel, a minelayer 420 feet long, 72,000 SHP and capable of a speed of 40 knots.

It has been estimated that in 1914 over 75% of the commerce and trade of Cowes depended on White's shipyard. The work force numbered around 2,000, rising to 3,500 by World War II.

During the 1950s, 60s and 70s a number of frigates and destroyers for royal and foreign navies were built along with many commercial ships including the Channel Island Caesarea, Sarnia and Trinity House boats. During 1965 the last naval ship HMS Arethusa was built. At this time John Samuel White’s was the oldest private shipyard on the Admiralty list.

With the run-down of shipbuilding White’s diversified into other products including air conditioning and bow thrusters. These products were phased out gradually in favour of compressors and turbines for the oil industry.

John Samuel White was taken over in the early 1970’s by the American company Elliott Turbomachinery, who closed the Cowes site in 1981.

The Crane has been out of use since 2004, but two engineering surveys carried out in 2005 and 2009 showed that the Crane remained structurally sound. On the 2nd August 2004, the crane was listed Grade II through the good efforts of the Isle of Wight Industrial Archaeological Society (http://freespace.virgin.net/iw.history/cowes/crane.htm). This was upgraded to a Grade 11 star on the 30th October 2007, and placed on the English heritage ‘At Risk’ list in July 2008. Since then there has been growing concern that no remedial work has been forthcoming, and a grant from English Heritage is being sought in order to issue an Urgent Works Notice (April 2010) so some work can be carried out towards taking the crane out of its 'at risk' status.

CowesCrane_1: J Samuel White shipyard. Date unknown
CowesCrane_2: The crane towering over the R Class Destroyer HMS Sable. Date 1917.
CowesCrane_3: Good shot of the crane with merchant vessel.
CowesCrane_4: Another shot, with what looks like a paddle steamer
CowesCrane_5: Picture of crane taken in 2005
CowesCrane_6: Crane in year 2000
CowesCrane_7: Picture clearly showing the distinctive double cabs. Date unknown


Pictures from a number of sources. No copyright restrictions evident.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_1.jpg (418.1 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_2.jpg (262.3 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_3.jpg (311.5 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_4.jpg (327.0 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_5.jpg (313.8 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_6.jpg (404.5 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_7.jpg (380.5 KB, 23 views)
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  #21  
Old 16-12-2010, 13:53
Abbeywood. Abbeywood. is offline
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

During the 1950's, the Fleet carrier, HMS 'Victorious' underwent a major refit during which she was fitted with new Foster-Wheeler type boilers.
Two of these were built under licence, by J. Samuel White and transfered to Portsmouth Dockyard by Red Funnel Ferries who were operating a former LCT at that time, as a car ferry, between Southampton and East Cowes and this craft, 'Norris Castle', was chartered to carry the two boilers across the Solent, one at a time.
When completed, the boilers weighed in at just over 90 tons each, and the Hammer-head was given special dispensation to operated at its overload limit with much creaking and groaning on its part.
One of the operators only recently passed away, but prior to his departure, enjoyed many a libation on the strength of his stories of his participation in the massive lift.
The crane is approaching its centenary and although still used, occasionally, for the 'stepping' of yacht masts, etc the lifting capacity is greatly reduced, and the structure is crying out for remedial maintenance. The hammer-head, being free to move, has now become the port of Cowes' largest weather-vane.
At one time, 'White's were one of only three shipyards contracted to build lifeboats for the RNLI and the 'Big Crane' was often used to carry out the self-righting trials both for White-built boats and for those built by Groves and Gutteridge Ltd whose boatyard lay a little further up the River Medina

Last edited by Abbeywood. : 16-12-2010 at 14:26. Reason: Editing
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  #22  
Old 22-12-2010, 15:56
Abbeywood. Abbeywood. is offline
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Ref: Thumbnails attached to posting #33 by Dreadnought.

The following info' may, or may not be of assistance in your research

No 1. Photograph of the launching of Cowes-East Cowes Chain Ferry No 3, sometime during 1936. (I have no specific date). The picture was probably taken from the Hammer-head on the West Cowes side of the River Medina
The Ferry operated across the R. Medina, with the East Cowes berth on the other side of the covered building berth, known locally as the Submarine Shed, though neither of the two White-built submarines were built in it. They were both built on the same berth as the chain ferry.

No.2. Of the three destroyer fitting out, the outer ship is HMS 'Sable', an 'R' class destroyer while the other two ships are thought to be HMS 'Tribune' and HMS 'Trinidad' both of which were 'S' class destroyers. the Admiralty had a strange method of classification in those days
(I leave it to the reader to determine which is which).
The 'R' class ships were not launched until 28th March and 5th April 1918, resp', so maybe they are not as previusly described. (I'm open to correction).

No.3. The steamer under the crane is the s.s. 'Hitherwood', launched on the 1st July 1922. So far, I have no further info' except that she was owned by a Mr C.A.Stewart.

No.4 The paddle-ferry I believe to be the Southern Railway Co ferry 'Freshwater', completed in 1927 for the Lymington-Yarmouth service

I hope this is of some use to you, Dreadnought, if so there may be more lurking at the back of my cranium.
Regards, Abbeywood
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  #23  
Old 23-12-2010, 21:52
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

Thanks ever so much for that detailed information Abbeywood, very much apprecaited. It is so much better, I always think, to have the full knowledge of "what" and "when".

Without moving too far off topic, I understand J.S. White also built Chain Ferry No.2, which was the last of the steam driven "Bridges" as they were called. It operated from 1925-1952, although I believe that in her later days, she operated at Sandown.

Bridges No.3 operated from 1936-1975. the first diesel electric powered bridge.

CowesCrane_8: Bridge No.1, built by William Whites of Cowes. Operated 1909-1936.
CowesCrane_9: Bridge No.2.
CowesCrane_10: Bridge No.3
CowesCrane_11: Bridge No4, built by J. Bolson of Poole. Operated 1952-1982. Crane busy in the background.
CowesCrane_12: Bridge No.5, built by Fairey Marine, East Cowes. Operated 1975-present. A sad lack of shipping, crane not so busy.

Original sources of pictures indeterminable. No copyright restrictions evident.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_8.jpg (255.5 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_9.jpg (231.2 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_10.jpg (236.5 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_11.jpg (238.8 KB, 38 views)
File Type: jpg CowesCrane_12.jpg (233.9 KB, 26 views)
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  #24  
Old 23-12-2010, 22:02
ekd
 
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

What is the name of the frigate in post #36; #4 picture, please?
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  #25  
Old 14-01-2011, 14:53
leamingtonspa leamingtonspa is offline
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Default Re: Dockside & Floating Cranes

The information regarding the Cowes giant cantilever crane is of interest thank you, and it is always good to raise the profile of these survivors; but I am unconvinced that the Titan crane in the background of the floating dock picture is the same machine. The engineering style is different in certain ways; and I am certainly not sure from my own recent voyage around the island ( on a particular Southampton based steam ship! ) that the crane is visible as stated. I have circulated the picture among some Soton specialists and await replies. I hope!
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