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  #176  
Old 04-07-2012, 15:49
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Right on Johnny, the system failed when we had a loss of luboil to a set of main gearing in Ark Royal. I tried to phone the engine room to tell them to hold the shaft stopped, I got some office in the island. Resorted to sending the watchkeeper to the ER, later I understand a door was fitted in the bulkhead between ER & gear room.
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  #177  
Old 09-07-2012, 19:21
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Rookie submariners earn civvy street qualifications for the first time09/07/2012

Trainee submariners passing through their dedicated school at HMS Raleigh now earn a qualification recognised by industry should they leave the Silent Service.

The RN Submarine School has become the first Armed Forces training school to be recognised as an ‘approved centre’ for the instruction it delivers.

The complex which prepares submariners for their front-line duties with the Navy’s fleet of nuclear-powered boats is the first Armed Forces training school to be recognised as an ‘approved centre’ for the instruction it delivers.

Training provided to new ‘deeps’ at the RN Submarine School at HMS Raleigh in Torpoint is now accredited, giving the recruits a qualification recognised by employers in the UK Submarine Enterprise – the alliance of industry and the military which helps to sustain critical skills necessary to support the UK’s nuclear submarine programme.

That accreditation comes courtesy of the ‘approved centre’ title given to the Submarine School by the Defence Awarding Organisation, an awarding body authorised and regulated by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation Ofqual.

During 14 weeks training, fledgling submariners learn how to operate radar, electronic listening and advanced combat systems which uses information obtained from onboard sensors, including sonar and periscopes, to calculate a tactical picture that enables a boat’s command to keep the submarine safe, undetected and – allow them to make tactical decisions.

Successfully completing their stint at Raleigh, the students can progress to their submarine qualification course, which will teach them how to operate beneath the waves.

"Becoming the first Armed Forces school to become an approved centre by the Defence Awarding Organisation and have the ability to issue certificates autonomously is a positive step for the school and for our students,” explained the submarine school’s Lt Cdr Paul Hardacre.

"It provides them with documentary evidence of the competences they have gained during training and acknowledges their personal development.

"The qualification will be recognisable to civilian employers and help our submariners pursue a second career when their time comes to leave the Service.

"We have plans to expand and accredit the other Warfare based courses provided at the school to leading hands and petty officers. We are also investigating opportunities to accredit officer training.”
-----------------(continues)
_______________________________________

source; royalnavy.mod.uk


But what is the actual qualification?

Little h
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  #178  
Old 09-07-2012, 21:41
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hi Harry

Correct me if I'm wrong, which I probably am, but I was under the impression that qualification as RS and above in the comms branch qualified one for membership of the telecommunications union leading to recognition by the industry.

Mitch Hinde
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  #179  
Old 09-07-2012, 22:13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hinde View Post
Hi Harry

Correct me if I'm wrong, which I probably am, but I was under the impression that qualification as RS and above in the comms branch qualified one for membership of the telecommunications union leading to recognition by the industry.

Mitch Hinde
Yes Mitch,

An RS to whom I reported left the Navy (time served) and took employment immediately with Marconi in their laboratories in Chelmsford IIRC. He did keep in touch for a while and advised that it was a sharp learning curve for him to obtain the civilian accreditation which was missing in his Naval Service. On the plus side was the depth of his knowledge gained in becoming an RS, which enabled him to sit for the 'papers/qualifications' required by his new employer within an agreed period after gaining his new job.

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  #180  
Old 09-07-2012, 22:36
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hi Harry

Thanks for that. I think somewhere in my comic cuts I have a reference to that. Sadly I had to leave the RN before I could go any further that LRO.

Mitch Hinde
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  #181  
Old 09-07-2012, 23:12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hinde View Post
Hi Harry

Thanks for that. I think somewhere in my comic cuts I have a reference to that. Sadly I had to leave the RN before I could go any further that LRO.

Mitch Hinde
Mitch,

Your reference to it being a Trade Union that had identified and accepted the capabilities and qualifications of the RS (Radio Supervisor) and above, shows just how aware and far-sighted the members/leaders of the Organisation were.

That it was written into the rule book of the Trade Union to which I still belong gives me much pride.

Little h
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  #182  
Old 24-08-2012, 12:44
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In the Times newspaper, today, Friday 24th. there was an article by a Professor of War Studies. He was discussing the possibility of war in the middle east, if Israel, USA & us were to be drawn in. He made the obvious point of lack of ships & shortage of manpower. He quoted a statement made in 1914 by the Foreign Secretary, Lord Grey which he thought relevant today,I agree with the statement " The British Army is a projectile fired by the Royal Navy". A wise remark then & NOW.
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  #183  
Old 30-10-2012, 00:21
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Having posted the following link on the Warfare Branch thread I now realise that it could also serve a useful purpose on this thread.


June 2012 Edition
BR 3

NAVAL PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

FLEET PUBLICATIONS AND GRAPHICS ORGANISATION


CONTENTS
PRELIMINARY PAGES

PART 1 - PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION & STRATEGY
PART 2 - ESTABLISHMENT ADMINISTRATION
PART 3 - PERSONNEL PLANNING AND COSTING

PART 4 - RECRUITING
PART 5 - LIFE MANAGEMENT
PART 6 - UNIFORM REGULATIONS
PART 7 - CAREER STRUCTURES
PART 8 - PROMOTION
PART 9 - INDIVIDUAL TRAINING, EDUCATION & RESETTLEMENT POLICY
PART 10 - RESERVES



Spread throughout the Contents list above which comprises 10 Parts, are a total of 110 chapters.
... That should provide sufficient up to date reference material/information to resolve disputes or create discussion about the modern Royal Navy.



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  #184  
Old 11-11-2012, 15:21
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Although 72 pages in total the report is IMO a worthwhile read, so I have only included a couple of excerpts below:-

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


The Independent Commission to Review
the United Kingdom’s Reserve Forces


Future Reserves 2020


...........................(report continues)........................

The Whole Force Concept:
The Whole Force Concept seeks to ensure that Defence is supported by the most
sustainable, effective, integrated and affordable balance of regular military personnel,
reservists, Ministry of Defence civilians and contractors. (Derived from Recommendation
11, the Defence Reform Review, June 2011).

.........................(report continues).........................

Maritime Reserves

20. The Maritime Reserves combine the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) and Royal Marines
Reserve (RMR) and its role is to augment the RN and RM. The RNR has 14 shore
establishments, all but one commanded by a Reservist. The RMR is based around 5
Headquarters and 24 detachments with each Headquarters commanded by a Regular
or Reservist. Together, the Maritime Reserve has a dispersed UK-wide presence which,
outside of the Naval Bases, is the only Naval presence in many parts of the country.
21. The Maritime Reserve’s strength is 2,809 which represents 86% of the target number
which the Royal Navy believes is required – known as the ‘liability’. The RNR is at 94% of
liability. The RMR is only at 77% of liability, but it is improving due to increased recruit
numbers. In addition to the Maritime Reserve, there are approximately 2,500 Sponsored
Reserves , predominantly personnel employed within the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. The Fleet
Reserve, consisting of some 16,000 ex-Regular RN/RM personnel with a Reserve liability, is
not widely used, but, with better tracking could be utilised for regeneration.
22. Since 2003, the Maritime Reserves have continuously provided personnel as both
individual augmentees and as formed detachments to operations in Iraq, Afghanistan,
the Northern Arabian Gulf and in support of wider naval operations such as the antipiracy
effort off Somalia. Reflecting the flexibility of the Reserve, many individuals have
deployed outside of their specialisations, having been trained specifically for the roles
undertaken in theatre. The Maritime Reserve uses the 1 in 3 mobilisation interval (ie a
Reservist can be mobilised for one year in every three) enabled by the Reserve Forces Act
1996 (RFA 96). Well over half of the trained strength of the RNR and the majority of the
RMR have been mobilised since Operation Telic 1, with many individuals having deployed
several times. In addition, 10% of the Maritime Reserve has been employed at any given
point on Full Time Reserve Service contracts, although this has reduced within the last
year.
23. The Commission has noted that the RNR Air Branch is unusual in that its aircrew
contribution contrasts markedly with the more limited Reservist flying capability in
the Army and RAF. The RNR Air Branch is currently providing support to operations in
Afghanistan, while simultaneously undertaking Search and Rescue missions and training
personnel for the Commando Helicopter Force. A range of supporting roles is also
delivered, including specialists embarked in the RN’s Response Force Task Group and
personnel working in UK Naval Air Stations. The Branch is commanded by a Volunteer
Reservist, with minimal supporting staff and a modest budget.
24. The Maritime Reserves cost approximately £32M per year, sub-divided into £19M for the
RNR and £13M for the RMR. £12.2M pa (38%) is spent on Reservist pay, with Regular and
civilian staff costing £10.1M pa (31%). Estates currently cost £6.2M pa (16%), although
work is being carried out to rationalise the overall footprint and reduce this element.
25. The Commission’s view is that the RNR is a taut and effective Reserve, well structured,
manned and deployed against a clearly defined and current operational requirement. Ex-
Regular and civilian skills are used appropriately, within a coherent Reservist organisation,
offering a viable Proposition, including command opportunities, witnessed by reasonably
buoyant numbers. Amongst a number of recommendations that the Commission makes,
the most significant for the Maritime Reserve is a proposal that the National Security
Council should examine the scope for them to contribute to new tasks, including UK
coastal security and domestic resilience. However we believe that in the longer term the
RN should consider greater use of Reservists to man a wider range of roles.
26. We are concerned that the structure of the RMR, with five units, each with its own
headquarters, for a total (trained and untrained) liability of some 980 people, is expensive
and the permanent staff numbers are too high. It is also short of junior officers, despite
having an exceptionally high quality of personnel in its junior ranks (more than 50%
graduates in one unit). We believe that the Navy’s proposals to make more use of formed
RMR troops and detachments will lead to a considerably better officer offer. Both the
RN and RM have already started to adopt the Whole Force approach to manning. The
Maritime Reserve is well placed within that Force.

................................(report continues)............................


Annex C to FR20 Final Report


Recommendations by Environment

1. The Commission recognises that transformation cannot take place overnight; it will take
commitment, vision, resources and energy. Against the framework of the three stages
of reform proposed, the Commission has identified below what it believes its potential
changes to be for each of the Services, Special Forces and the Defence Medical Services.

Royal Navy

2. Overview. From an assessment of the current state of the RNR/RMR, the Commission
views the Maritime Reserves as well placed to transform further, as in many ways, they are
already operating in the manner in which we envisage in the future. The Maritime Reserve
is already integrated well within the overall Naval structure and delivers consistent
operational effect against an up to date set of requirements. We envisage the Maritime
Reserves being brought up to strength in the short term, with the RNR shortly assuming
a portfolio of specialist roles currently ascribed predominantly to the Royal Navy. In the
medium to long term, more innovative Reservist utility should be possible by giving the
RNR and RMR clear cut roles in Coastal Security and UK Resilience. Overseas, greater
Maritime Reserve involvement in disaster relief, counter-narcotics and counter-piracy
is envisaged, coupled with a significant contribution to enduring operations. Increased
command opportunities through changes in unit structures and the delivery of existing
and new capabilities will improve the Reserve Proposition that is so vital, particularly at
the level of junior leaders. This should include introducing Reserve primacy to the RMR
and seeking more opportunities for formed bodies of the RMR and certain parts of the
RNR to deploy. We welcome the plans the Navy has outlined in order to achieve the latter
point. Overall the dynamic operational responsibilities of a re-vitalised Maritime Reserve
will underpin its continued effectiveness as an integrated component of the whole Naval
Service. The Commission does not anticipate larger Naval vessels being wholly crewed
by the Reserve – the low number of large vessels in the Navy and their resultant high
readiness level generally militate against it. However, the existence of a pool of trained
and accessible augmentees for larger vessels – whether from the RN Volunteer or Fleet
Reserves – would appear sensible.

3. Investment and Betterment. The manning of the RNR and RMR needs attention in order
to achieve its current liability by 2015; (together they are about 500 personnel below their
trained liability). Filling this gap will need a focus on innovative and appropriate means
to more effectively recruit and retain personnel, streamlining administrative hurdles and
better enabling the transfer in of ex-Regular personnel – this will require an immediate, but
modest, uplift in funding. The RNR permanent staff structure is already exceptionally lean
and leaves no room for reduction. However, in the RMR we believe that a reduction of at
least one HQ and some permanent staff could be achieved in order to provide some cost
efficiencies whilst not diluting operational output. Like the TA, the RMR needs to build up
its officer base and the plans it has to make more use of formed troops on operations will
help with this.

4. Further adoption of the Whole Force Concept within the Maritime Reserves will improve
the training of the RMR non-commissioned officers to enable them to better integrate
within RM units and increase their utility in key unit support roles. Optimisation of the
Maritime Reserves with low operational risk against delivering Defence’s outputs, will see
the broadening of Reservists’ roles. We believe that the following changes to the delivery
of military capability should be immediately taken forward:
a. Increasing use of Reservists particularly in C4ISTAR16 and greater use of Reservists in
the Air Branch as the current RN rotary wing aircraft are updated and replaced;
b. Consideration of how in the future, Reservists (RN and RAF) might contribute to
helicopter Search and Rescue (SAR), including the use of Sponsored Reserves;
c. The training and delivery of formed sub-units in the RNR and RMR (eg force protection/
boarding parties) to enhance utility, ethos and command opportunities:
d. Greater integration of the Reserves with the Naval Regional organisation to deliver
cost and operational benefits, especially in connecting with society and supporting
recruiting;
e. Changes to the RNR Unit roles and Branch Management to deliver training efficiencies
and provide a clearer interface between the Maritime Reserve and the functional
employers in Fleet and Defence. It is important that changes to the RNR Branch
management structure should not undermine the Volunteer Reserve leadership of the
Branch and their ability to ensure the delivery of Phase 2 training;
f. Developing a Reserve counter-narcotics capability to support the UK seasonal interest
in the Caribbean;
g. Developing a low-cost initial Reserve contribution to Coastal Security and UK
Resilience. (If the NSC approves a larger contribution to coastal security, then important
decisions will need to be made regarding the replacement for the P2000 patrol boats
and the forthcoming DEFRA contract for fishery protection vessels); and,
h. Support to overseas stabilisation and disaster relief.
Unit relocation and co-location will generate minor savings in overall manpower costs
with a one-off infrastructure cost. The proposed enhanced structure would, however,
provide an effective ‘base-plate’ for further development of the Reserves in the coming
years.

5. Enabling the Future. To ensure that the Maritime Reserve presents a compelling prospect
for future recruits, the RN will continue to increase its use of Reservists in a number of
key areas. These are expected to include their greater use in C4ISTAR, UK Resilience
(as possible Second Responders), Capacity Building and Coastal Security. There a
number of other areas where Reservists could be employed cost effectively, especially
in niche capabilities such as Cyber and Media Operations. Another opportunity is to
expand the Air Branch to provide additional support to the Fleet Air Arm and through the
establishment of a Reservist Wildcat flight held at lower readiness.

6. Realising the Potential. Building on an impressive starting point, additional work will be
required to expand the Whole Force Concept further within the RN, especially regarding
the use of Reservists to provide sea-going manpower on warships. Any additional
significant change in the manpower mix will require careful consideration and will have
to be balanced against the operational requirement, risk and affordability. Nevertheless,
Reservists should be used more widely in areas that deliver less complex capabilities.

7. Maritime Reserves Summary. The RN is well advanced in adopting the Whole Force
Concept and should be able to deliver the Betterment and Enabling the Future packages
relatively easily.
----------------------------------
16. Command. Control, Computers, Communications, Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance.
----------------------------------

................................(report continues).........................
source here


Little h
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  #185  
Old 12-11-2012, 02:44
SheppeyMiss SheppeyMiss is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Although 72 pages in total the report is IMO a worthwhile read, so I have only included a couple of excerpts below:-
Having not had the time or opportunity to read the whole report, my understanding is that the reservists are / will be ex service personnel or those from certain specialised professions eg hospital specialists who have volunteered to be reservists . My thoughts are; at a time when employers are expecting more from their employees and are under pressure to function in the current near recession (if not actual recession), which of these are going to be willing and able to employ reservists when it is going to cost them money to employ someone to provide 'cover' whilst the reservist employee is away on active service? Although these proposed plans would not come in to play for some time , the country's financial difficulties are likely to continue for many years, IMO.

Will the government pay the employer to release the reservist employee whilst on active service ? Will companies be reluctant to employ ex service people in case they are or might become reservists? The current maternity and paternity leave laws are already putting smaller businesses under pressure. Another sector of employee needing extended leave could be a step too far for many to accept. Is it realistic for the authors of this report to believe that the civilian sector of the country can partner / subsidize in the military the way it appears to suggest?

One is merely trying to play devil's advocate here.

Missy
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Last edited by SheppeyMiss : 12-11-2012 at 07:06. Reason: include link to little h's post
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  #186  
Old 12-11-2012, 09:42
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A good point well put Missy!
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  #187  
Old 12-11-2012, 16:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SheppeyMiss View Post
Having not had the time or opportunity to read the whole report, my understanding is that the reservists are / will be ex service personnel or those from certain specialised professions eg hospital specialists who have volunteered to be reservists . My thoughts are; at a time when employers are expecting more from their employees and are under pressure to function in the current near recession (if not actual recession), which of these are going to be willing and able to employ reservists when it is going to cost them money to employ someone to provide 'cover' whilst the reservist employee is away on active service? Although these proposed plans would not come in to play for some time , the country's financial difficulties are likely to continue for many years, IMO.

Will the government pay the employer to release the reservist employee whilst on active service ? Will companies be reluctant to employ ex service people in case they are or might become reservists? The current maternity and paternity leave laws are already putting smaller businesses under pressure. Another sector of employee needing extended leave could be a step too far for many to accept. Is it realistic for the authors of this report to believe that the civilian sector of the country can partner / subsidize in the military the way it appears to suggest?

One is merely trying to play devil's advocate here.

Missy
Missy,

Seems there was/is a consultative process for them to have their say, lend their support. Here is a link to the list of supporting enterprises:-

Employers who've publicly pledged their support


see also:-

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Employers across the UK are invited to take part in a survey on their views on the future uses of the Reserve Forces.

The survey (now closed) has been set up by SaBRE (Supporting Britain’s Reservists and Employers) for the Ministry of Defence and the results due to be published in February.

The results of the survey will feed into the MOD’s review of the recommendations outlined in the Future Reserves 2020 (FR20) report, which was a comprehensive study on how best the Reserve Forces should be used in the future.

The survey will gauge employer’s views on a number of initiatives that have been proposed in the FR20 report such as:
Reservists being used more for UK operations and homeland security
Additional legislation to prevent employer discrimination against Reservists
Increasing the use of the civilian skills of the Reservists in areas such as civil engineering or cyber expertise.

The possibility of shorter but more frequent mobilisations of Reservists for UK operations and events and/or for their civilian skills

The following organisations are supporting this consultation with employers: the Confederation of British Industry, Institute of Directors, Federation of Small Businesses, British Chambers of Commerce and Forum of Private Business.

This survey is part of a wider research programme with employers on FR20, which includes an initial online survey in early 2011 when original research was carried out as part of the initial FR20 consultation with employers, as well as current employer focus groups and interviews throughout the UK.

Employer support is vital for Reservists to balance their civilian and military roles in society successfully. The results of this survey and the other research SaBRE is conducting on employers’ views will be hugely beneficial to the government as they make their plans for the future.

The government recognises that employer support will be crucial in making the changes of the Reserve Forces a success. We therefore ask all those who are responsible for their organisations’ HR policy and decision making in UK organisations to take part in the survey and make sure your views are heard."

Tim Corry, SaBRE Campaign Director

For further information on how the FR20 recommendations may affect employers or about employing a Reservist please contact SaBRE.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(source as in link in the last paragraph)



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  #188  
Old 13-11-2012, 15:32
SheppeyMiss SheppeyMiss is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Missy,

Seems there was/is a consultative process for them to have their say, lend their support. Here is a link to the list of supporting enterprises:-

Employers who've publicly pledged their support ......

The following organisations are supporting this consultation with employers: the Confederation of British Industry, Institute of Directors, Federation of Small Businesses, British Chambers of Commerce and Forum of Private Business...............

For further information on how the FR20 recommendations may affect employers or about employing a Reservist please contact SaBRE.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(source as in link in the last paragraph)
Little h
Thank you Harry for taking the time and trouble to source that link to a most informative website that addresses my concerns well.

The only downside would be that I can't see any businesses in my location that are listed as Supportive Employers. I guess that's would be why I was unaware of the work that SaBRE (Supporting Britain’s Reservists and Employers) are doing.

My only lingering disquiet is based on the willingness, or lack of, of the employers who are not listed on this site to employ a potential Reservist in their localities. Nationwide would these 1524 employers be able to supply / support the whole number of Reservists required under the 2020 Review, one wonders.

Missy
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  #189  
Old 13-11-2012, 15:53
scouse scouse is offline
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Well put Ma'am, we had to give a weeks notice to have a floater (ie days payed holiday many moons ago in a factory ) Hammond and the MOD are full of spin and it is a move backwards IMO
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  #190  
Old 15-11-2012, 11:50
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Be interesting to see how this pans out in the future , now that the emphasis has shifted in this direction
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Old 15-11-2012, 11:54
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
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One little niggle at the back of my mind is - who fills in the form, making the offer? If it is HQ, where staff work a five-day/weekday week, well yes, but are they prepared to release the workers at the shop-front/coalface, who work Saturdays and Sundays?

Edna
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  #192  
Old 28-06-2013, 18:17
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Managers on board ships and submarines!!

The following was taken from an article in the RN website:-

Having spent years conducting underwater operations across the globe on six different submarines, Kev is currently the communications manager on board HMS Vanguard, one of four ballistic submarines which make up the UK’s continuous at sea deterrent. Kev’s department on board HMS Vanguard is responsible for ensuring the submarine deciphers all communications wherever they are in the world – everything from family messages, known as “family-grams” to Downing Street directives.

Source; the Royal Navy website.
-------------------------------------------

The chap is a submariner and a Petty Officer whom I presume has followed the following route in his chosen branch which I take to be the Warfare Branch, his specialisation would be CIS (Communication Information Systems).

But where does the 'Communications Manager' come in the scheme of things??

The following was taken from the BR3 PDF relating to requirements/qualifications for promotion to a Petty Officer CIS in the Warfare Branch:-

Petty Officer – Pre-Selection Requirements
a. Completed generic OJT TB and TEM OJT TB. Achieved OPS as LS(CIS). OPS is to
be recorded under ‘Professial|OPS for LS(CIS) QQ40|Navy|’ (QP - Para 7704 Sub Para
e) (Para 7703 Sub Para a and Sub Para b).
b. Serving on FC/OE1 or EC/2OE that expires after the nominated CPD.
c. In date RNFT or waiver obtained at SED; recorded as JPA competency ‘CMS|Fitness
Test|Navy|’.
d. Recommended for promotion on Appraisal Report by Commanding Officer on SED.
(Para 7705).

Petty Officer – Pre-Promotion Requirements
e. 12 months’ sea service (excluding Squad time ashore where applicable) since
passing LS PQC at SED. Recorded as JPA competency ‘CMS|12 Months Sea Time
LH|Navy|’. (Para 7704 Sub Para d).
f. Senior Rates Leadership Course (SRLC) completed by nominated CPD and
recorded as JPA competency 'Miscellaneous|Senior Rates Leadership Course (RNLA
103)|Navy|'. (Para 7703 Sub Para g and Sub Para h).
g. Passed PO(CIS) PQC by nominated CPD+12 months (awarded PO specialisation
badge (Crown)). (AIP - Para 7704 Sub Para e) (Para 7703 Sub Para g and Sub Para h)
h. At least 6 months since last career check (if any) on nominated CPD or date due
promotion (if later).
i. Qualified educationally for PO and recorded as JPA competency 'Educational|RN/RM
QEPO/Sgt|Navy|No'. (Para 7709).
j. In date RNFT or waiver obtained at nominated CPD (or when eligible for promotion
(if later)); recorded as JPA competency ‘CMS|Fitness Test|Navy|’.
k. In date Annual OPS Check recorded as JPA competency 'CMS|Annual OPS Check
LH|Navy|'. (Para 7704 Sub Para b).

Promoted to PETTY OFFICER COMMUNICATIONS INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIALIST

Source BR3 ANNEX 77B
----------------------------------------------


The RN careers page says nothing about 'Communications Manager' in the career progression paragraph, see:-

Promotion
You’ll start your career as an Able Rate. With some experience and further training, you could be promoted to Leading Hand. After that, you may go on to become a Petty Officer, Chief Petty Officer, then a Warrant Officer. If you show the right commitment, skills and academic ability, you may also have the chance to become a Commissioned Officer. You’ll be chosen for promotion on merit, so if you work hard, you can quickly rise through the ranks.
-------------------------------------------------------------


An explanation of this 'Manager Role' would be much appreciated,

Little h
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  #193  
Old 28-06-2013, 18:24
Dave Hutson Dave Hutson is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

iwHarry,

That looks a lot more complicated then in our day, but, fundementally it is the same - it is just that the progressions in technology which seem to be more complicated are in fact simpler with systems more reliable.

Dave H
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  #194  
Old 28-06-2013, 18:31
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harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
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Hi Dave

.... but a Communications Manager??? What or whom is he managing? He is a Petty Officer and would surely have the ability to 'manage' his watch or department with that Senior Rate qualification surely.

Little h
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  #195  
Old 28-06-2013, 18:41
Dave Hutson Dave Hutson is offline
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[quote=harry.gibbon;10080894]Hi Dave

.... but a Communications Manager??? What or whom is he managing? He is a Petty Officer and would surely have the ability to 'manage' his watch or department with that Senior Rate qualification surely.

Little h[/QUOTEl]

There has been a shift for some years to make RN Rates more PC in civilian circles. I recall a case some years ago now when a Fleet Chief RS was made dockside manager in Devonport - he was basically in charge of Dockside Accommodation. [Bathrooms, Heads and Messdecks].

Dave H
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  #196  
Old 28-06-2013, 20:21
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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We used to call them sweepers.
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Old 28-06-2013, 22:06
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Default Re: Modern Navy

[quote=Dave Hutson;10080898]
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Hi Dave

.... but a Communications Manager??? What or whom is he managing? He is a Petty Officer and would surely have the ability to 'manage' his watch or department with that Senior Rate qualification surely.

Little h[/QUOTEl]

There has been a shift for some years to make RN Rates more PC in civilian circles.

Dave H
Dave,

I posted earlier in this thread the positive efforts made in the RN to obtain acceptable like for like qualifications that were acceptable to the civilian authorities.

This situation regarding a Senior Rate who is entitled as a Manager is still a bit of a puzzle to me. I have noticed for some time now, that (former) Senior Rates include this title/function/appointment in their work profile on sites like 'Linkedin'. I presume therefore that it is a legitimate function/title within the trade/skills envelope, but just what or whom is being managed is eludes me.

The RN has an easy to read PDF site detailing the job opportunities and career prospects in the service, but not once does it include that a Senior Rating is a Manager. On the contrary it identifies that Commissioned Officers are the managers in the service, see:-

--------------------------------------------------------------

UNDERSTANDING THE RANKS
Although everyone goes through almost the same recruitment process when joining the Royal Navy, depending on your qualifications or the job you choose, you will do so either as a rating or an officer.

Your career as a rating Ratings are our specially trained personnel, fully prepared for vital operational jobs anywhere in the world.

ABLE RATE Whatever your job, you’ll start your career as an Able Rate

LEADING HAND With some experience and further training, you could be promoted to Leading Hand, often managing a small group of Able Rates.

PETTY OFFICER As a Petty Officer, you’ll have responsibility for certain sections within your department

CHIEF PETTY OFFICER The rank of Chief Petty Officer gives you more responsibility in the team, with the officers relying heavily on your skills and experience.

WARRANT OFFICER 2 Known as a WO2 you’ll provide a crucial leadership link between your officers and the ratings serving under you.

WARRANT OFFICER 1 WO1 is the highest rank you can achieve as a rating.

If you show the right commitment, skills and academic ability, you may also have the chance to become a Commissioned Officer at any time during your career as a rating. To qualify for commission, you have to be chosen at a promotion board. You’ll be chosen on merit, so if you work hard and show potential, you can quickly rise through the ranks.

Your career as an officer
Officers are our management team, providing leadership and taking the
decisions needed to fulfil our many and varied jobs. You’ll also be responsible for the training and development, welfare, morale and ultimately the lives of the people under your command. Your career progression is very much in your hands and depends on your choices and achievements.

----------------------

Lifelong learning
As a member of the Royal Navy, whatever your job and rank, you’ll have the chance to study for extra or new qualifications. These can be academic, practical or connected with an interest, sport or hobby. As well as helping you in your job with us, many of our courses lead to qualifications that will
be recognised by civilian employers. If you join us without any formal qualifications, we’ll help you gain GCSEs, A-levels or even a degree or Masters during your career.

As well as providing our own courses, we have two schemes that offer generous financial support if you want to carry out other training, whether it’s directly relevant to your work with us or not. The Standard Learning Credit Scheme, which is available to everyone, gives you up to £175 every
year for all kinds of training courses. The Enhanced Learning Credits Scheme, which is open to you after a minimum period of service, provides funding of up to £6000 over three years, which you can use for training for up to 10 years after you leave the Royal Navy.

----------------------

Q: How easily will I be able to start a civilian career once I leave?
A: Most people, whether ratings or officers, find the high levels of training,
responsibility and management skills they gain from their Royal Navy career
are highly desirable among civilian employers


Source; ROYAL NAVY - Your career guide

I guess all we need now is somebody who is serving or has recently served to come along and explain the 'Manager' thing.


Little h
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Old 15-07-2013, 22:57
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Management responsibility for Comms (CIS) sub-branch of RN Warfare Branch goes to the Weapon Engineering Department

Short excerpt from a PDF article in the RNCCA website reads::-

The last few years have seen a lot of change for the Communications sub-specialisation. This year we transferred management responsibility of the CIS Branch, a sub-specialisation of the Warfare Branch, across to the Weapon Engineering Department.

(See the full article in the PDF attachment below)


Little h

CIS = Communications Information Systems
RNCCA - Royal Navy Communication Chiefs Association
Attached Images
File Type: pdf Extract from RNCCA Newsletter July 2013.pdf (117.6 KB, 12 views)
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Old 25-02-2014, 14:14
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PAYING OFF PENNANTS

Appreciate that this is off thread but its difficult to do a search when 'off' cannot be used.
Does anyone know if the modern navy still uses paying off pennants?
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Old 25-02-2014, 14:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelican View Post
PAYING OFF PENNANTS

Appreciate that this is off thread but its difficult to do a search when 'off' cannot be used.
Does anyone know if the modern navy still uses paying off pennants?
Why don't you Google 'Paying-off Pennants'? You will see modern vessels paying-off (pennants and all)
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