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  #151  
Old 26-05-2012, 12:47
Prom Prom is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Apologies Harry

p.s. have you intention to re-type your thoughts on HMS Dragon, I would still be interested

Last edited by Prom : 26-05-2012 at 12:59.
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  #152  
Old 26-05-2012, 14:03
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
C4I (Computers 4 Intelligence)

As the thread opener of the 'RN Frigates - Duke Class Type 23' thread, I included a piece about C4I 'research'. This evening forum member Prom includes the C4I terminology in the QEC thread, spooky thinks I, because I had intended to put the following excerpts on this thread this evening, so here it is:-


Yet another insight into the Modern Navy which I hope will be of some value to those of a different era (like me) trying to come to terms with what has changed.


Little h

This PDF link of the above, is included because it has photo's of equipment installations in a variety of naval vessels from a number of different countries.

Little h
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  #153  
Old 28-05-2012, 22:28
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The very portable 'intelligence' suitcase!! (see attachment)

I wonder if there are any examples skulking around on ships in the RN
_________________________________

Intelligence Carry-On Program (ICOP)

The Intelligence Carry-On Program (ICOP) is a portable, ruggedized workstation that is available in multiple hardware configurations based on size and processing requirements. It opens to provide an integrated 3-D picture of the battlespace across three monitors. ICOP provides enterprise interoperability and data sharing with the DEN, Maritime Operations Centers and the force-level Distributed Common Ground Station-Navy (DCGS-N) Exploitation Suite. Afloat users can access the same Office of Naval Intelligence’s DCGS-N Enterprise Node (DEN) gateway used by the DCGS family of systems and greater U.S. intelligence community.

The portable ICOP system includes easy-to-use applications, local shared storage and enterprise access to support near-real-time decision making, Intelligence can be analyzed, fused and disseminated directly from national, tactical and organic sensors. There is an optional full-motion video (FMV) module, capable of being configured with multiple mature commercial and government off-the-shelf applications to support specific mission needs. Additionally, every platform deployed with ICOP becomes a sensor through its ability to rapidly deploy afloat, integrate organic shipboard FMV sensors and disseminate intelligence directly into the enterprise.

As deployed naval units face dynamic conditions and environments, they must rely on external information from the Department of Defense, intelligence agencies and coalition forces. BAE Systems is the prime contractor for the U.S. Navy’s Distributed Common Ground System-Navy (DCGS-N) program and the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence’s DCGS Enterprise Architecture. DCGS-N provides the Navy with robust processing and exploitation capabilities for intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and targeting (ISR&T). Analysts can access intelligence data from organic and external sources in disconnected, intermittent and low-bandwidth communications environments on force-level ships equipped with the DCGS-N Exploitation Suite (DES) and with connectivity to the Office of Naval Intelligence’s DCGS-N Enterprise Node (DEN).

As DCGS-N expands support to current operations, the U.S. Navy is extending similar system functionality, based on U.S. Fleet Forces
requirements, to unit-level ships. BAE Systems is partnered with the Office of Naval Research, PEO-C4I and SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific to rapidly research, integrate and deploy a DCGS-N operational prototype to address the needs of intelligence specialists on cruisers, destroyers and similar-sized ships, as well as deployable expeditionary ashore nodes.

Operationally-proven capability
The DCGS-N ICOP prototype successfully demonstrated its full-motion video and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities while installed on a U.S. Navy cruiser during Trident Warrior 11 in July 2011. As a result of its success, proven value and strong operational feedback from the operational commander, ICOP is currently deployed on the USS Vicksburg (CG 69) to further develop and refine final requirements for the follow-on, program-level funded Intelligence Carry-On Program for the U.S. Navy,
managed by the DCGS-N Program Office
.

An experienced partner
BAE Systems leverages proven command, control, computing, communication and ISR systems experience to transition the Navy from proprietary components and applications to commercial, off-the-shelf hardware and software.
Applications and services can run onboard and off-board to provide vital ISR&T processing and exploitation capabilities and
access to data from the best sources available. BAE Systems is uniquely experienced to design, develop and tailor commercial and government
off-the-shelf DCGS systems so that our forces maintain information dominance in any battlespace.
_____________________________________

taken from BAE Systems website

Little h
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File Type: jpg briefcase 492x277.jpg (76.4 KB, 15 views)
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  #154  
Old 29-05-2012, 08:22
SheppeyMiss SheppeyMiss is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Something that will be featuring on RN ships, according to the publication, The Engineer, on May 23 is this:

Navy vessels get Thales digital situational awareness system

Thales is to upgrade a large proportion of the Royal Navy’s surface vessels with a fully digitised situational awareness system.

Using a variety of inputs, including satellite data, it effectively acts as an adjunct to analogue radar and provides better signal in congested operational maritime theatres.

The recent contract, worth more than £10m, represents the culmination of a six-year research programme in conjunction with the Ministry of Defence.

‘They identified that there was a potential issue developing with the ingress of communications signals into the radar band (such as 3G and 4G); the prevalence of complex emitters (such as multi-function radars); and the introduction of low-probability of intercept (LPI) emitters,’ Richard Streeter, head of product policy at Thales Naval, told The Engineer. ‘This effectively prevents them from seeing smaller amplitude, potential threat emitters.’

The new system will allow greater situational awareness in dense radar environments found in congested maritime theatres.

HMS Daring, the first of the Type 45 destroyers, has now entered operational service fitted with new digital antennas as part of the surveillance system.

‘The initial deployment on the Type 45s utilises the same concepts and algorithms as the solution being deployed to the whole fleet,’ said Streeter. ‘The main differences between the implementations is how the equipment integrates with the existing equipment and the platform, the level of productionisation of the solution and the operational capability the solution provides generally.’

Being largely software-driven, the digital system maximises the use of commercial off-the shelf hardware, which according to Thales makes it more reliable, easier to maintain and lowers the total cost of ownership.

‘This digital approach almost completely eliminates the need for a traditional radio frequency front-end. The system uses a very low unique part count and this means the spares package is small and lower cost,’ Streeter added.

Source: The Engineer 2rd May 2012

Missy
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  #155  
Old 30-05-2012, 22:56
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35.4

Maximum numbers of personnel to be maintained for service with the Armed Forces:



A = Numbers voted by the House of Commons
B = Maximum Numbers
C = Numbers Maintained Peak Dates

NAVAL SERVICE....................A.............B.................C
Royal Navy Officers............. 7,100........6,680..... October 2010
Men and Women................ 26,500.....24,130..... April 2010
Aggregate .........................33,600.... 30,780..... June 2010

Royal Marines Officers..1,050........890 September 2010
Men and Women..........7,900.... 7,410 February 2011
Aggregate 8,950 8,280 February 2011



ARMY SERVICE
Army Officers 15,860 14,860 October 2010
Men and Women 103,840 94,230 April 2010
Aggregate 119,700 108,870 April 2010
Commonwealth, Colonial, etc,
troops abroad and Gurkhas
Officers 160 160 May 2010
Men and Women 4,170 3,960 March 2011
Aggregate 4,330 4,100 March 2011
AIR FORCE SERVICE
Royal Air Force Officers 10,520 9,820 April 2010
Men and Women 36,880 34,230 April 2010
Aggregate 47,400 44,050 April 2010
--------------------------------------


source; MOD Annual Report and Accounts year ended 31st March 2011
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  #156  
Old 02-06-2012, 13:14
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny07 View Post
......... Hms Diamond is visiting Aberdeen so I'll go aboard and talk to the lads and hear what good work they have been doing. I might even start ordering the Navy News to get a more acurate overview........
..... and so your post #16; What happened Johnny

http://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/Article.aspx/2133690

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-12429420


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  #157  
Old 01-07-2012, 00:56
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Communications - DEFENCE MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, March 2004

Transforming communications for the Royal Navy*


Lieutenant Commander Susie Thomson, from the DCSA, looks at what the Agency is doing to improve communications on-board in-port ships.

Advances in technology have been so rapid that it is hard to remember a time when computers, the internet and enhanced communications were not transforming the way that we live and work. The Defence Information Infrastructure (DII) is the significant task being addressed by a Corsham-based Integrated Project Team, led by Bob Quick. The DII is a dual-accountable IPT hosted in the Defence Communication Services Agency (DCSA). The DCSA is the MOD agency tasked with exploiting technology for the UK's Armed Forces, both at the front line and in the business environment. For the 42,000 men and women in the Royal Navy, technology not only provides a competitive edge at the front line, it also has the ability to improve their quality of life.

In 1995 it was decided to review communications systems on the Royal Navy's warships, to determine if ship-to-shore communications could be more effective, and the standard of living for those working on the ships improved, when alongside in naval bases.

At the time of the review, each ship had its own connectivity infrastructure. As Neil Smith, Defence Information Infrastructure Project Manager, explains, this was not a long-term solution: "We were in the strange situation where communications were more effective when the ships were at sea than when they were alongside.

"The satellite technology used at sea was potentially blocked when the ships entered the naval bases, and the existing analogue communications systems were largely ineffective. We realised we had to consolidate and rationalise the systems if they were going to successfully deliver communications for those on board, and needed to make the infrastructure future-proof."

After a year of reviewing designs the DCSA decided to emulate the example set by the American Department of Defense (DOD), which used a system called the Pierside System. The Pierside System consolidated a number of communications systems onto a single ATM backbone, thereby providing a common platform to facilitate ship-to-shore communications and allowing secure transmission of voice, data and video traffic. It also had the ability to provide broadband connectivity for the ships whilst they were alongside naval bases.

In the summer of 1999 the DCSA put the project out to tender, and awarded a pan-European network services and solutions provider, Telindus, a contract to fit five naval warships and two naval bases with a Ship Alongside System (SAS) in November 1999. Since then, Telindus has fitted Portsmouth and Plymouth naval bases with 622MB ATM backbones, and four naval warships with 155MB ATM backbones.

The SAS has not only improved the operational capabilities of the ships when they are alongside; it has vastly improved quality of life for the men and women working on them.

"Historically, we couldn't offer digital connections to the ships", says Neil Smith. He continues: "The digital technology provided by the new system has really changed the day to day lives of those on-board. When you work for the Royal Navy, the ship becomes your home. You therefore want comparable facilities to be available, such as telephones, television and internet connections. This becomes even more important when you consider that many sailors have to remain on-board the ships even when they are alongside."

The SAS has allowed the fleet to benefit from a telephone exchange replacement programme, whereby analogue telephones are replaced with digital versions. Royal Navy personnel can now get calls directed to any point on the ship – in their own cabins, for example – allowing for further privacy.

Additionally, a major advantage is that telephone lines have now been expanded from six to 30 on the ships. "From an operational point of view, the extra telephone lines have certainly alleviated the previous frustrations felt by ship staff when they were alongside UK naval bases", says Commander Andy Darwent, Fleet CIS. "It used to be extremely difficult to organise anything effectively with such a small number of telephones.

"Before implementation of the SAS, there was also very limited capability to access the internet. The new system has provided broadband connectivity for the ships, allowing access to internal intranets and email facilities so that the sailors can email home."

Another key benefit of the SAS has been the implementation of the Ship Alongside TV Service (SATS), which improves television reception on-board.

"Prior to the implementation of the SATS, the ships had to use normal antennae to access TV stations when alongside naval bases", says Neil Smith. "In the dockyard environment, with its steel and cranes and changes of tide, they would lose signal all the time and the reception was appalling."

The ships' TV system is now up-linked to the SAS network and distributed around the dockyards. They can receive 12 channels of recreational digital TV, such as SKY Sports, and the picture quality is now reliable. "They are no longer in danger of a football match cutting out at half-time!", says Neil Smith. The SATS has also helped non-ATM fitted ships, as an RF connection is taken across the SAS system in the ATM fitted vessels and broken out there for the other ships to receive better quality TV.

The SAS programme continues, not only with Telindus' support of the DCSA and the installation into the second new Landing Platform (Replacement) ship, but also with ASTUTE and the Type 45 destroyer.

"However, we would ideally like to secure funding to fit more ships with the SAS," says Neil Smith, "particularly some of the smaller vessels which are not seeing the benefits of the system."

Commander Darwent agrees: "Harbour hassle is greatly reduced for those ships fitted with the SAS. It's not just a 'hearts and minds' exercise – it actually improves operational efficiency too. We'd like to see the system fitted in all ships and naval bases, so that everyone can benefit."

To find out more log onto the DII website at http://dcsa.defence.mod.uk/dii/home.htm.
_______________________________________

source Defence Management.com


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  #158  
Old 01-07-2012, 14:39
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hi All

I never realised how bereft of home comforts we were. You never know how poor you are until some one tells you.

Mitch Hinde
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  #159  
Old 02-07-2012, 17:12
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Most of the time that I was at sea the only communication we had with home was when a Shackelton would drop a mail bag.
I never ever made a phone call in the navy.
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  #160  
Old 02-07-2012, 22:35
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hi Johnny

You could always come down to the wireless office with a SLT and your tot at the short trail.

Mitch Hinde

SLT - Ship Letter Telegram. Sent from the ship as a telegram then posted on to the addressee by the UK receiving station.
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  #161  
Old 02-07-2012, 22:49
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hi All

My wife has just reminded me that during my/our time in the mob very few people had a home telephone and mobile phones a figment of the fertile imaginations of sci fi writers so the need for a ships telephone for use by the lower deck hardly existed.

Mitch Hinde
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  #162  
Old 03-07-2012, 07:28
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

And therein lies the rub Mitch.

A few short decades ago people did not dream of being constantly available on the phone wherever they were, or of having mobile access to a library of the world. Now, for many, it is unthinkable that they are have not.

We could not recruit or retain personnel if we did not provide better comforts than was the case in ships of that era.

TV; DVDs; internet access; they are mandatory for the youth of today.

In a similar way, the much improved standards of houses since the end of WWII have meant that we have had to offer much improved accomodation, e.g. :
  • The end of hot bunking on submarines
  • Mess spaces on surface ships for 6 instead of 50;
Fortunately the same advances in technology have meant that the number of people we have to fit on is much reduced. A Bellona light cruiser of WWII had a complement of 530, a larger (and more powerful) T45 has a complement of 190.
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  #163  
Old 03-07-2012, 11:50
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

In the old days as a punishment they would stop your rum.

These days is it stoppage of internet.?
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  #164  
Old 03-07-2012, 11:53
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Doubt it Johnny, that would probbaly be seen as a breach of human rights
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  #165  
Old 03-07-2012, 12:34
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Default Re: Modern Navy

The only phone calls I made in the RN was to : Eng. Rm.Blr. Rm., gear room. evap rm. etc. etc.
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  #166  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:19
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Small aside triggered by old salt's mention of internal telephones:
pity the poor sods doing the final connections and setting to work on QEC

50,000 equipment 100,000km of cabling to get to work. The worst being all those needed to get internal comms working. Because until that is all working, every time someone needs to check the item at the other end of the bit of wire, it could be 100m along and 9 flights up:
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  #167  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:23
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
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Hi Rupert

I'm not sure that the messing arrangements of 6 to a cabin is an improvement, although I haven't seen it at first hand. It seems to me to be splitting the ships company into splinter groups with little or no chance to get away from your messmates as you will always be with the same half dozen or so. The old large messes may have been a tad uncomfortable but they certainly built camaraderie in my experience. Ships like Striker (LST) had the entire ships company, except stokers, down aft in one big mess and we had a great atmosphere. I may be completely wrong, but thats they way I see it.
I can also live quite happily without a mobile phone.

Mitch Hinde
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  #168  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:29
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

I can sympathise with that view Mitch. But that is the pressure.

Anyone still serving know how much choice people get on which sub-mess they are in? Can they swap to be with friends for example?
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  #169  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:36
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rupert View Post
Small aside triggered by old salt's mention of internal telephones:
pity the poor sods doing the final connections and setting to work on QEC

50,000 equipment 100,000km of cabling to get to work. The worst being all those needed to get internal comms working. Because until that is all working, every time someone needs to check the item at the other end of the bit of wire, it could be 100m along and 9 flights up:
Should be OK if they get all this right from the off.

Little h
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  #170  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:44
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Link doesn't work h
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  #171  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rupert View Post
Link doesn't work h
Just checked it, double clicked this and up she came!!!!

Little h
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  #172  
Old 03-07-2012, 13:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rupert View Post
Link doesn't work h
Works ok for me.
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  #173  
Old 03-07-2012, 14:00
Rupert Rupert is offline
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Oh, I still get "Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage"

However, I deduce from the URL that it is about fibre optics (FO).

Remember that whilst there is a lot of FO used nowadays, there is still a lot of copper cabling as well, not to mention power (DC, low, medium, high), cooling (air, water) and assorted others
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  #174  
Old 03-07-2012, 21:50
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsalt View Post
The only phone calls I made in the RN was to : Eng. Rm.Blr. Rm., gear room. evap rm. etc. etc.
Was that with the old hand cranked SPT Keith?.
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  #175  
Old 04-07-2012, 09:58
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hinde View Post
Hi All

My wife has just reminded me that during my/our time in the mob very few people had a home telephone and mobile phones a figment of the fertile imaginations of sci fi writers so the need for a ships telephone for use by the lower deck hardly existed.

Mitch Hinde
The Old Days? 1930s?
I met my father when I was 3 years old, he had been with the Mediterranean Fleet. My mother wrote to him every Sunday afternoon, three times a year she would include photographs of myself and my brother, taken on our birthdays and at Christmas. He wrote when he could, life on board was apparently pretty hectic. Unfortunately my mother did not keep his letters or his postcards.
Edna
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