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  #126  
Old 30-12-2011, 15:55
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Default Re: Modern Navy

I fully endorse the above remarks.
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  #127  
Old 30-12-2011, 21:31
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hear hear I too applaud those remarks...from a daughter of a Matelot...

Regards karen
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  #128  
Old 30-12-2011, 21:53
SheppeyMiss SheppeyMiss is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

diverdags pretty much says all in his post #125, amen and amen to that.
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  #129  
Old 31-12-2011, 09:43
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Morning all,

From another anchor faced old matlot, totally agree with sentiments expressed by Diver Dags, the spare room from which I work with my computer is a record of times gone by. Photographs of vessels on which I served and some not. If only I could move a camcorder around.


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  #130  
Old 31-12-2011, 17:47
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Gud on yer mate - Diver Dags, I totally agree with your comments and sentiments. My Dad/Uncles thought Ganges was a bit whimpy when I joined in 64, one of my Uncles was special forces (Royal Marines) embedded in Denmark during WWII, he thought I was pretty OK for joining up when all my mates were going a bit Hippy, that meant a lot to me! Everything is changing and we need to embrace it. Kids are much better educated and informed these days, I've got several and I wouldn't want to see them doing unnecessary crappy jobs like we had to do in the pusser in the 60s. The RN taught me many things, discipline and respect of traditions and our heritage, as well as a useful trade. I did very well in civvy street because of what I learned in the RN. I think that the kids of today who live in a very strange world should be given all the respect and support they deserve if they decide to volunteer against all the trends. All you old salts can't turn back the clock, stop whinging and accept it for the progressive situation it is. I think the new Darings rock!! I just wish I was 17 again!!
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  #131  
Old 31-12-2011, 18:46
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Simply concur with the above.
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  #132  
Old 17-05-2012, 16:34
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FLEET INFORMATION MANAGEMENT UNIT (FIMU)


Purpose of the Case Study
The Case Study has been written in response to requests for examples of PRINCE2 implementation from organisations considering using the method.

The Fleet Information Management Unit (FIMU)
FIMU is a Royal Naval organisation which supplies encyclopaedic data to the Fleet to support Maritime operations worldwide. They are a production unit and have selected elements of PRINCE2 to meet their needs. As such, they are a good example of how PRINCE2 can link into existing production and general management processes.

Acknowledgements
Thanks are due to the Officer in Charge of FIMU, Lieutenant Commander Anthony Knight and Mr Ian Warnecke, Quality Manager and their colleagues in the Unit, for their time and the information they provided.
Q:\

At the time this Case Study was compiled, HMS Fearless, an amphibious assault ship, which had been in service for 30 years made her final journey back into Portsmouth Harbour. When she started active service her Operations Room would have looked very much like those seen in classic films, dominated by boards and charts. Since then computerisation has advanced to the point where her replacement, designated a Landing Platform Dock (LPD), has a paperless Operations Room where all information is supplied and displayed electronically to support the operational deployment and tactical tasking of Royal Marine commandos moving from afloat to ashore.
The Operations Room is the centre for Command Mission Planning and Situation Awareness and is supported by Command Support Information Systems (CSIS), which hold mission essential information. CSIS are computers, which have specialised planning tools and software applications to enable a Commander to undertake operational planning for the deployment of forces. Their high-tech communications allow them to share plans with other Units. It has been tagged ‘windows for warriors’. CSIS equipment is installed in all major warships and submarines and some shore establishments. FIMU supplies information for these systems, for both real time operations and pre-planned exercises. Both have a high demand for encyclopaedic data and referential information.

The range of information required to support Fleet operations, is vast and the source and format of the data is very varied. Sources are both military and non-military and include authoritative bodies such as the Defence Intelligence Service, Air Warfare Centre, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office and Military Survey. Source data may include books, maps, charts, electronic imagery, photographs and electronic documents and databases. FIMU maintains a corporate MOD database, known as the Defence, Command and Army Data Model (DCADM) and responds to requests for information for specific naval operations by bringing together all the data which is considered to be necessary and converting it into a common format for use by the CSIS planning tools and software applications. FIMU therefore sees its aim as: to deliver the Right Information, to the Right person, for the Right system, in the Right format, at the Right time. This is summarised as an abbreviated nickname R5I, which also forms the FIMU Corporate Logo.

FIMU was established in 1997 with 15 members of staff who were a mixture of Royal Navy and Civil Service personnel. Two production teams had been formed and there were plans for a third. The extremely heavy work demands and differences in working practices led to a breakdown in communications between the production teams and a general lack of unity throughout the department. The Unit exhibited little teamwork, was disjointed and suffered from a range of cultural and structural issues resulting from the interface between Service and Civilian staff, which was having an adverse affect upon the working environment.
FIMU is unique in that it has no counterparts amongst other military organisations and therefore has no blue print on which to base its development. In December 1998, a change of management highlighted the need for greater cohesion and a means of bringing the Unit together. What was needed was a method. PRINCE2 fitted the bill because it was well documented, well structured and thus saved the need to reinvent the wheel. All staff could relate to it and it provided a common way of working for staff from diverse backgrounds.
FIMU activities are directed by a military Chain of Command that emanates from the Fleet Headquarters and the use of PRINCE2 was seen as a way to satisfy, without duplication, the business criteria for accountability and management control.
Q:\

Since PRINCE2 was first introduced to FIMU in January 1999, manpower numbers have increased by 300% and there are now 52 staff in the Unit, a mixture of Naval staff, Civil Service staff, contractors and Naval Reservists in 4 data production teams. According to the Officer in Charge of FIMU, Lieutenant Commander Anthony Knight:
‘The Unit’s organisational structure based on PRINCE2 has proved to be both robust and flexible. Throughout this ongoing and dynamic increase, PRINCE2 methodology has proved itself invaluable in keeping the production and support teams together, maintaining close co-operation and adherence to the concepts of quality and teamwork.
In particular, the Unit has benefited from the order and structure given to the business processes, the well defined lines of communication, superior team and task coordination and awareness of the importance of product quality, accountability and responsibility. The formal planning process has strengthened workload assignment and monitoring. Senior management has been reassured of on-going progress from the Stage Reports and the Risk and Issue Logs allow the Project Manager to head-off potential problems which would otherwise have meant sacrificing quality, time or incurring higher costs.
If PRINCE2 did not exist, we would have had to develop something like it. It captures corporate knowledge, provides a template for best practice and facilitates continuous improvement.’
Ian Warnecke, who was given the responsibility of introducing PRINCE2 at the production level, could see from the outset the benefit of a neutral way of working and how some aspects of PRINCE2, such as risk management, could address the internal problems caused by the heavy workload and different working practices in the department. This was helped by the fact that his job at the time gave him a good appreciation of all the FIMU activities. Some colleagues who did not have the benefit of the broader view were initially less convinced of the need to change. Ian feels that a corner was turned when Checkpoint meetings were established which gave a vehicle for communication and brought issues to the surface, generating action by the appropriate people. Previously, it being a military environment, people were inclined ‘to cope’ and ‘get on with it’ in a way that might not have been best overall.

-------------------(Case Study continues)


POEW (Petty Officer Electronic Warfare) Kevin Stocker who took over the role of Production Manager after PRINCE2 had been introduced had a quick handover with no PRINCE2 training. He thinks of PRINCE2 as ‘just something I do, part and parcel of my job. In fact I did not realise I was using it, because it has become a standard operating procedure for the way we deliver our formatted data products’.

5. Tailoring PRINCE2
Initially, Lt Commander Knight and Ian Warnecke were trained to PRINCE2 Practitioner level and other personnel attended one or two-day in-house training courses. PRINCE2 was then evaluated to identify which elements would strengthen and enhance the work of FIMU and address problem areas concerning communication, coordination, accountability, responsibility, planning, risk management and feedback to senior management. Element selection was therefore tied very closely to perceived benefits.
FIMU does not conform to the normal project environment. It is a production unit. The delivery of data products to Fleet is continuous. In tailoring PRINCE2 they have therefore viewed a financial year as equivalent to a project and a financial quarter as equivalent to a stage in a project
The elements of PRINCE2 which were selected are described below. Appendix 2 contains a chart showing how PRINCE2 elements link to FIMU’s production process.
5.1 Organisation
FIMU uses the PRINCE2 customer/supplier concept to clarify working relationships and set up Working Groups with customers. Internally, the PRINCE2 Project Management team structure was adapted to fit the production unit environment as shown in the chart in Appendix 1.
One unusual adaptation was in the use of the Project Assurance role. In PRINCE2, people undertaking a Project Assurance role do so on behalf of the Project Board if the Project Board feel they do not have the time or expertise to monitor the Project Manager and the project's progress sufficiently closely themselves. As such, the Project Assurance role needs to be independent of the Project Manager. The FIMU organisation chart in Appendix 1 shows Project Assurance having line accountability to the Project Manager. This was a conscious decision taken to fit the resources available when PRINCE2 was first being implemented, and establish the Project Assurance principle. The approach has worked well.
5.2 Planning
Production was previously run on a day-to-day basis, reacting as work arrived. The Production Manager acted as the co-ordinator but passed on the work to the production teams without a holistic perspective. It became clear that the introduction of formal production plans would enhance effort and improve efficiency. A Yearly Work Plan and a quarterly review based on the concept of a PRINCE2 End Stage Assessment were introduced.
The Yearly Work Plan is prepared and approved by the Project Board. It is linked with FIMU business and financial plans. It is kept as a strategic document and used as a baseline for control. As such, it performs a similar function to a PRINCE2 Project Initiation Document though it is presented in a different format consistent with other general management information.
A Stage Plan is produced on a quarterly cycle. In line with PRINCE2 guidance, it defines work to be done and identifies products, tasks, resources and timescales. Once the content of the Stage Plan is agreed by the Project Board it provides the basis for the individual Product Control Forms (see below).
Q:\Users\Marie Day\Word\October 2002\Case Study MOD - The Fleet V10.doc 8

----------------------(Case Study continues with text, organisation charts, etc - although extract ends)

see this PDF for the full report.


-----------------------------

The Modern Navy had indeed arrived, unlike the Poster campaign running when I joined up which invited us to 'Join Britains Modern Navy', that being the late 1950's.



Little h
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  #133  
Old 17-05-2012, 16:54
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Projects for/with the Modern Royal Navy.

A selection of just some completed projects undertaken by one individual, in just one Company, on behalf of/for the Modern Royal Navy (amongst others)

-------------(extracts begin)

T45 Combat Management System TNA - A Training Needs Analysis (TNA) was conducted for the Royal Navy's T45 Combat Management System. This entailed producing task lists, a description of knowledge, skills and attitudes, and a DIF (Difficulty, Importance, Frequency) Analysis for the personnel in the T45 Operations Room.
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T45 Twin Screen Platform Management System - This short programme of work culminated in a proposed design solution for a two screen platform management system (PMS) for the T45, due in service in 2007. The study used ergonomic guidelines and lessons learnt from a 4 screen PMS solution that had previously been trialed with Royal Navy experts.
-----------

Anti Air Warfare (AAW) Cognitive Task Analysis - A detailed task analysis of the thought processes of a Royal Navy AAW Team was performed. Subject Matter Experts were interviewed in order to identify the key information requirements of Ops Room personnel, which were then presented in tabular & timeline formats.
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Multiple Events - This study trialed a prototype Royal Navy platform management system in order to assess the impact of automation on operator situational awareness. Subjects completed various tasks using systems with and without an automation mode. Both subjective and performance data were collected.
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Landing Platform Dock (Replacement) (LPD(R)) - Human Factors support was provided to this programme in terms of: style guide recommendations; compartment layout; interface design reviews; static acceptance (ergonomic principles) and dynamic acceptance (scenario walkthroughs).
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Warship Functions - Functional breakdowns were produced for all departments & organisations on a frigate sized platform. Departments covered included: Operations and Warfare; Marine Engineering; Weapons Engineering; Supply and Secretariate and NBCD Organisation. The final output combined all 5 functional breakdowns to produce a single wholeship functional breakdown.
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Roll and Pitch Information Display System - A video analysis was performed of helicopters launching and recovering from a frigate sized platform at sea. As a result of the analysis it was possible to identify the user's requirements of a system to provide ship's roll and pitch information.
-----------(extracts end)


see this link for details of the Company.

Our Senior Service clearly does not stand alone, in isolation from the skilled population which they serve, as of course was ever the case!!!


Little h
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  #134  
Old 18-05-2012, 22:03
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Some more examples of the Equipment and Systems that crew members on the ships of our Modern Naval have available. (COTS in action)

------------

Royal Navy
Project Profile: WECDIS Fleet Deployment


In 2004, Offshore Systems teamed up with Lockheed Martin UK to deliver fleet wide WECDIS (Warship Electronic Chart Display and Information System) capability to the Royal Navy (131 systems in total). The integration of ECPINS® W SUB software has expanded to 28 vessels with 26 certified as ‘Digital Navigation’ platforms. ECPINS displays Additional Military Layers (AML) and includes other features according to NATO STANAG 4564 including dived submarine navigation.

The ECPINS W SUB software is the heart of the WECDIS program and was identified as a major step forward in RN navigation capability. It is used throughout the fleet, installed in the Fleet Flagship HMS Ark Royal and onto a number of Frigate and Destroyer Platforms.

ECPINS W SUB is the RN standard for electronic navigation and is used in all aspects of military navigation including ships entering and leaving harbour and coastal and ocean passage navigation. In addition, ECPINS W SUB supports the ship’s warfare element for effective fighting.

The next phase of the RN WECDIS project includes completing installation in all remaining major warships, minor war vessels and submarines.

-----

“It is the additional military information it contains that is most impressive. We can mark on potential minefields or mid-ocean bottom profiling to enable us to better evaluate where submarines might be transiting or hiding, or even mark air routes to enable us to identify commercial air traffic from potential hostile aircraft.”

Commander Peter Sparkes
UK Royal Navy

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also; Warship - AIS

W-AIS builds on the core ECPINS product and meets IMO carriage requirements. It is designed to enhance Maritime Interdiction Operations, Situational Awareness and contribute to the Recognised Maritime Picture.

-----

“The Royal Navy (RN) constantly seeks to improve equipment and has fully embraced electronic navigation and, in doing so, has seen improvements in enhanced situational awareness. RN WECDIS and W-AIS have evolved from equipment that has been available in the commercial market and developed to provide the RN with first class capability. Both systems are being fully integrated into the Fleet and are providing ships and submarines with a clear operational edge.”

Commander Steve Holt
UK Royal Navy

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Link to the site from which the above was extracted.

COTS = Commercial Off The Shelf


R E S P E C T to all our Modern Navy servicemen and servicewomen!

Little h
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  #135  
Old 19-05-2012, 21:55
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Local Company provides ITQ, e-skills UK recognised training at HMS Dryad

HMD/Royal Navy

HMD Ltd is a leading training company in the South East of England, with over twenty years experience in its field. It provides publicly funded training, as well as some commercial training, and operates several Learndirect and ECDL test centres. HMD is well practised in delivering ICT and vocational training and was one of the first training providers to pilot the new ITQ. The company was quick to recognise the potential value of the ITQ pilot project to its clients, which include the Royal Navy. HMD is currently working closely with the Royal Navy to develop and implement highly tailored ITQ programmes

Working with the Royal Navy

The Royal Navy operates a range of high quality training schemes - that have been developed over a long period of time – to identify and develop the skills, knowledge and understanding required to build the competent performance of its staff. The organisation runs its own training for IT skills development as part of its Professional Royal Navy Training Courses, but wanted to explore using ITQ to validate its training with a national qualification.

"Based on the new National Occupational Standards (NOS) and accredited into the National Qualification Framework, ITQ could enable the many IT users serving within the Royal Navy to gain recognition of their skills within a national framework, and provide an opportunity to incorporate and validate their own training courses within the ITQ programme," explained George.

It was decided by HMD to initially concentrate on the validation of one course and a sample of 12 candidates working in the Operations room simulators of one of the Royal Navy’s Training Establishments, HMS Dryad. The Operations room within a ship contains a large amount of highly customised Information Technology applications and software used by members of the Warfare Branch. A core element of this is the Computer Assisted Command System (CACS) a very large and specialist bespoke unit that has been especially designed to meet the demands of the Type 22 Frigate’s Command and Control system, which is controlled by the Petty Officer (Above Water Warfare Tactical) - PO (AWT). Logically the IT proficiency of the PO (AWT) needs to be the greatest and was the focus area for the initial ITQ candidates.

Developing Highly Customised ITQ Profiles

To determine the ITQ project plan, a detailed study and assessment was conducted by HMD which incorporated an analysis of the Royal Navy’s organisational objectives, existing training practices and proposed candidate’s skill levels, alongside an audit of the systems and software the department used. This enabled HMD to establish the skills required to meet the Royal Navy’s organisational needs and measure the true level of staff IT competency, matched against the NOS. From this, HMD was able to develop an ITQ profile - the training options and programme for each candidate - enabling them to address the Royal Navy’s training requirements in great detail with individually customised courses for each PO (AWT), specifically designed to the Royal Navy’s IT environment.

Due to the highly specialised and unusual nature of the activities being assessed by HMD a coordinated visit from a City & Guilds External Verifier, Steve Lloyd, was set up to further validate the findings and assessment plan of HMD.

A Successful Start

Ten of the twelve candidates completed and achieved the ITQ level 3 award in March, together with the validation of the PO(AWT) training course. One candidate will receive part credit as he was appointed to sea during the pilot and the remaining candidate is expected to complete soon.

PO Morris, one of the candidates taking part in the ITQ project, reflects on his experience, "By integrating the ITQ syllabus as part of my professional training, I’ve been able to gain a valuable qualification and improve my skills at no extra cost or effort. What has been of real value is the ability to officially certify my existing knowledge of IT and utilise the skills I’ve gained within the Royal Navy to achieve a civilian recognised qualification."

"From my experience, I can easily see how ITQ can have a significant impact on our organisational performance if it is extended to more staff, by helping to develop even more efficient and effective methods of using IT within our department,” added PO Morris. “Following the success of the initial pilot, I believe the Royal Navy is now investigating the possibility of integrating the ITQ award into several of its professional training courses."

HMD is committed to sharing best practice and supplied the Royal Navy’s own NVQ cell with the results of the ITQ pilot project to demonstrate how ITQ can further support the validation process of other Warfare Branch training courses.

About HMD Ltd

HMD Limited has been involved in training since 1984, originally providing management and training services in the hair and beauty industry, it has since broadened its activities to include training and development services in a range of other industries.

Based originally in Fareham, HMD has expanded its training operation throughout Hampshire and neighbouring counties offering total training solutions for businesses however large or small. Through expansion and acquisition we have developed specialist subsidiary operations with a wealth of knowledge and expertise in their sector.

In 2004 HMD was inspected by the Adult Learning Inspectorate and was considered good in all sectors of learning and its company management. HMD is now approved by many awarding bodies to offer Nationally and internationally recognised qualifications. The Investors in People Award was achieved by the Company in 1997 and has been re-accredited each year subsequently.

About the Maritime Warfare School and HMS Dryad

Within the framework of the Naval Recruiting and Training Agency (NRTA), the primary aim of the Maritime Warfare School (MWS) is to deliver world class Maritime Warfare Training, providing the required number of Warfare Personnel appropriately trained for their individual tasks – "Ready to Fight and Win". The Maritime Warfare School currently consists of HMS Collingwood, Dryad and Excellent.

Dryad provides training to over 5000 students a year, attending over 265 different types of courses. An annual budget of some 36 million pounds is required to manage assets which include an estate of some 300 acres and 65 buildings, efficiently to ensure that, within these available resources, personnel continue to be trained as effectively as possible.

Last modified: 28 Apr 2009
------------

read full article here

One just wishes that the RN had been as enlightened about recognised civilian qualifications during my time in. We were required to do the courses but denied the qualification that resulted from doing so. I think Teuchter and myself exchanged views about this in a thread somewhere.

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  #136  
Old 19-05-2012, 22:02
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What is the real date of that article Harry, do you know?

On the one hand it mentions CACS, which is pretty ancient, on the other civilian IT qualifications in the RN which I thought were much more recent
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  #137  
Old 19-05-2012, 22:20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prom View Post
What is the real date of that article Harry, do you know?

On the one hand it mentions CACS, which is pretty ancient, on the other civilian IT qualifications in the RN which I thought were much more recent
Prom,

Sorry, I have not been able to ascertain the date of the article. The menu on the left of the linked article provides links making reference to the 2003 ITQ Qualifications.

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  #138  
Old 19-05-2012, 22:27
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I can therefore only assume that the CACS reference is some strange legacy then. Odd
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  #139  
Old 19-05-2012, 22:34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prom View Post
I can therefore only assume that the CACS reference is some strange legacy then. Odd
Misplaced references to Command and Control Systems (CACS) on Type 22's, Aerials and Arrays not always in the places we expect them to be .... just some of the issues we need to bottom out Prom Odd indeed.

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  #140  
Old 19-05-2012, 23:30
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The Officer Corps of the Modern Royal Navy


Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Maritime) (ICSC(M))

The Intermediate Command and Staff Course (Maritime) is the pinnacle of formal single-Service command and staff education for Royal Naval Officers. It is designed to capture all mid-to-late seniority Lieutenants and newly promoted Lieutenant Commanders to prepare and equip them for future command, charge, and staff appointments. Since April 2011 it has been a pre-requisite for consideration for future selection for the Advanced Command & Staff Course.

The aim of the ICSC(M) is:

To contribute to Stage 1 of Maritime Through Career Development training and education for Royal Naval Lieutenants and Lieutenant Commanders, preparing them for SO2 command, charge and staff appointments by further developing their: leadership; analytical and communication skills; understanding of the international environment; knowledge of UK Defence Management and UK Military capabilities; understanding of the maritime environment; and how maritime power contributes to Joint and Combined operations. Furthermore, it is to evaluate their potential for further staff training and is to reinforce the RN ethos.

The course last 8 weeks and covers 5 main areas:
Command, Leadership, Management & Ethos
Staff & Communication Skills
Strategic Studies: The International Environment and UK Defence Management
Maritime Studies: Strategy, Environment, Capabilities, and the Royal Naval Service
Joint Studies: Capabilities, Environment, and Joint and Combined Operations

Command, Leadership, Management & Ethos (CLME)

The ICSC(M) provides an important opportunity for students to discuss a wide range of CLME topics and to take stock of their own personal development. These studies are inter-woven throughout the course with opportunities taken to expose the students to the personal experiences and insights of CLME from a wide range of speakers. A number of historical leaders are studied to draw out the lessons for contemporary maritime officers; these are supported by syndicate room discussions and military tutorials which allow the key issues to be further explored and debated.

Staff & Communication Skills (S&CS)

The Staff & Communication Skills module is also spread throughout the course with much of the work being done as part of other elements of the course. As all students are expected to have completed the online electronic Defence Writing (eDW) package before arriving, students are very rapidly taken through and tested on the fundamental Defence Writing conventions early on in the course. The basic aim is not to do “staff work” for its own sake, but to learn and develop these skills whilst studying other elements of the course syllabus by delivering formal and informal presentations, submitting various styles of written work, or leading and contributing in syndicate room discussions. The emphasis is on effective communication using the most appropriate method and media to share information and improve understanding. Supported by widely available IT equipment it is also coherent with the MoD-wide focus on reducing unnecessary paperwork. The oral skills package contains a range of formative and assessed operational type briefings and formal 1* briefs. This module also includes staff officer skills, problem solving, report writing and decision briefs and uses syndicate exercises to consolidate and reinforce all these points. This module focuses on the a, b, c of all good staff work – accuracy, brevity & clarity.

Strategic Studies (SS): The International Environment and UK Defence Management

Strategic Studies covers a wide range of subjects and aims to set the strategic context within which UK maritime forces operate. It includes an extensive lecture programme provided by both Defence Studies Department (DSD) and external lecturers, student research time to study and reflect during each stage and a number of syndicate room discussions led by DSD tutors. It covers topics such as: understanding the international environment; globalisation; security; British politics, economics, foreign, and defence policies; European defence and security; United States domestic and foreign policy; the United Nations; and global and regional security studies. UK Defence Management includes: the MoD; acquisition policy; DE&S; the media; equipment capability; defence strategy; and strategic deterrence.

Maritime Studies (MS): Strategy, Environment, Capabilities, and the Royal Navy

Maritime Studies aims to develop understanding of the unique nature and importance of the maritime environment whilst putting the Royal Navy properly into the context of the strategic environment studied earlier. The key tenets of strategy and strategic thought are introduced focusing on: strategic thinkers; UK and US maritime strategy; maritime power; maritime doctrine; and naval diplomacy. To ensure students leave with a good understanding of their own Service, a range of subjects are covered including: UK maritime capabilities; force generation; current commitments; maritime power projection; maritime security; international engagement; and RN personnel and branch update briefs. The most pressing Naval Staff issues are also exposed during course visits to the MoD and NCHQ.

Joint Context (JC): Capabilities, Environment, and Joint and Combined Operations

This package studies the core capabilities of the UK Armed Forces and the environments in which they operate. These are particularly well supported due to the Joint make-up of Royal Naval Division Directing Staff, consisting Royal Navy, Royal Marine, Army and Royal Air Force officers; the maritime contribution to Joint and Combined Operations is also examined. The utility and constraints of military force are explored covering topics such as: military power; legal and ethical issues; the nature of contemporary and future conflict; terrorism & counter-terrorism; counter-insurgency; and stabilisation operations. Combined operations are discussed exposing the specific challenges faced during NATO and other coalition operations. To complete the course a number of historical operations are studied to draw out the key lessons for maritime officers involved in contemporary operations. The Normandy Campaign is studied in detail, both here in the JSCSC and during a 2-day staff ride to the Normandy beaches to experience this environment first-hand. On the penultimate day of the course individual reflections on the realities of conflict are heard from military officers with experience from past and current operations, ensuring the CLME aspects of the course are reinforced to the very end.

The Student Body

There are up to 50 students on each ICSC(M). The majority of students are career or full term commission Royal Naval Officers supplemented by Royal Marine and Royal Fleet Auxiliary officers. Additional MoD Civil Service employees and occasionally international students add to the already wide range of backgrounds and experience. Students are divided into syndicates of up to 10, each with its own military Directing Staff (DS) and Kings College Defence Studies Department (DSD) academic tutor. The deliberate mixture of student specialisations and experience in syndicate is key to the success of the ICSC(M) as a broadening and educational course.

The JSCSC Environment

The course is an intensive and challenging 8 weeks, designed to breakdown pre-conceived ideas and bring students right up-to-date with the latest challenges and issues facing the Royal Navy. Within the demanding study programme there are opportunities for social and sporting activities which aid syndicate and course bonding and the exchange of ideas. The wide range of courses at the JSCSC undertaken by UK Armed Forces officers, other Government Department officials and those from international military forces, enables informal engagement, thus enhancing the student learning experience as much as possible.

Accreditation

The ICSC(M) is accredited by the Open University (OU), at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and by the Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM).

Joint Services Command and Staff College

------------

taken from the this website



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Old 21-05-2012, 20:35
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Bring back KR&AIs and fighting spirit.
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Old 21-05-2012, 21:00
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Bring back KR&AIs and fighting spirit.
Johnny,

Not possible; we have neither King nor Admiralty!!


In my opinion the young servicemen and servicewomen, including reservists, are doing a fine job in today's Navy. Perhaps more emphasis by the various branches of the media should be given to show their contribution ashore in Afghanistan for instance, rather than just the medal winners.

My recent posts identify some of the aspects of training and recognition of that training by civilian 'standard setters' that are undertaken in this the latest version of the modern navy. My belief is that former Artificers would certainly appreciate the need for good training, which leads to recognised qualifications that have received accreditation by the appropriate civilian Institutes and/or Universities.

Wish that it had been so in my time.


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Old 22-05-2012, 21:40
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Johnny,

Not possible; we have neither King nor Admiralty!!


In my opinion the young servicemen and servicewomen, including reservists, are doing a fine job in today's Navy. Perhaps more emphasis by the various branches of the media should be given to show their contribution ashore in Afghanistan for instance, rather than just the medal winners.

My recent posts identify some of the aspects of training and recognition of that training by civilian 'standard setters' that are undertaken in this the latest version of the modern navy. My belief is that former Artificers would certainly appreciate the need for good training, which leads to recognised qualifications that have received accreditation by the appropriate civilian Institutes and/or Universities.

Wish that it had been so in my time.


Little h
As a former artificer I agree Harry.
I do moan at times about todays navy but my nephew is a naval officer and although he has'nt done much sea time he works really hard in his shoreside activities.
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Old 25-05-2012, 22:08
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C4I (Computers 4 Intelligence)

As the thread opener of the 'RN Frigates - Duke Class Type 23' thread, I included a piece about C4I 'research'. This evening forum member Prom includes the C4I terminology in the QEC thread, spooky thinks I, because I had intended to put the following excerpts on this thread this evening, so here it is:-

----------------------------

Naval C4I systems: naval command and control stays out of the limelight. The thousands of miles of wires and the hundreds of computer screens are rarely seen on news footage from the global war on terror, or during humanitarian intervention and stability operations. For the media, it lacks the 'sex appeal' of troops in combat, or helicopters lowering aid packages to stricken villagers

by Thomas Withington

However, naval Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Intelligence (C4I) systems are the knitting that holds a ship's security and its capabilities together. A warship's C4I system is the central point at which information from the ship's sensors and communications systems arrives. It is the point from which the vessel's weapons are controlled and from where the ship's own data, tactical situation and intelligence can be shared with other vessels, or with other assets on land or in the air. As such, today's systems place a high emphasis on 'plug and play' designs, using open architecture via which new weapons systems, sensors and communications can be slotted into the C4I system with minimal fuss. At the same time, C4I system designers and integrators are increasingly looking to integrate commercial off-the-shelf (cots) components in their designs that can be used to reduce costs; one notable example of this is the use of the Windows or Linux computer operating systems. As many people use such technology in their everyday lives, the use of cots elements can bring with it a high degree of intuitive learning.

The design and production of naval C4I systems are chiefly centred in Europe and North America, although Israeli and South African companies are also producing naval C4I equipment. In Europe, the naval C4I systems industry is dominated by Thales, which builds a number of systems including Senit, Sewaco, Sic-21, Stacos, Tacticos and Tavitac. BAE Systems meanwhile produces a range of products including Acmis, Adaws-2000, Adimp, Nautis, SSCS and the SMCS-NG. Selex Sistemi Integrati of Italy produces the IPN-5, -10 and -20 systems, along with the Numc/Nupa Combat Management System (CMS). Saab Systems has enjoyed considerable success with its 9LV CMS series, while Atlas Elektronik has produced the Isus 90-1 system. Joint ventures between BAE Systems and Alenia Marconi have yielded the command and control systems for the Royal Navy's Type-45 class destroyers while collaborations between Thales and DCNS have resulted in the Subtics and Sycobs submarine command and control system, and the Setis-Fremm CMS. Finally, Terma has designed and produced the C-Flex system for the Kongelige Danske Marine (Royal Danish Navy) Absalon class command and support vessels.

Looking towards North America, one of the continent's biggest producer of naval C4I systems is Lockheed Martin which builds a range of systems including Aegis, AN/UYK-43, BSY-2, CCSM, Scomba and Shinpads. Raytheon meanwhile produces the ACDS, AN/BYG-1, AN/SYQ-20, SSDS and the TSCE systems. Northrop Grumman has developed the Mains system for the Landsort class mine countermeasures vessels operated by Sweden and Singapore. Looking further afield, African Defence Systems in South Africa and a joint venture between IAI/Elbit and Tadiran in Israel has resulted in the Combat Management System and Navigation Subsystem and the Unified Combat System command and control systems.

Thales has enjoyed international success with its naval C4I systems. The company produced the Senit series of CMS which is deployed on the Marine Nationale (French Navy) Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier. Senit displays information from the ship's sensors and its communication systems and has been a popular choice for a number of navies. To this end, it equips the French Navy's Cassard class destroyers and the force's Foudre and Mistral class Landing Platform Dock and Horizon class frigates. Senit also equips the Royal Norwegian Navy's Skjold class fast attack craft and the Royal Saudi Navy's Al-Riyadh class frigates. The company has enjoyed similar widespread success with the Sewaco combat data system, which, like the Senit system, acquires information from the ship's sensors and communication systems. Sewaco can be teamed with the company's Tacticos CMS (see below). Sewaco is one of the most ubiquitous naval C4I systems, equipping ships in the German, Dutch, Hellenic, Qatari, Argentine and Belgian navies.

The French Navy is in the process of gradually replacing the Senit system with the Thales Sic-21 command and control system which has a modular design enabling it to be tailored to the needs of the ship. Sic-21 is the focal point for communication and mission planning while providing a detailed picture of the theatre. In February 2004 Thales won a $141 million contract from France's DGA (Delegation generale pour l'armement) to roll the system out across the French Navy's surface fleet, its E-2C Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning Aircraft and associated ground stations. Work began in 2006 to retrofit the Sic-21 onto the Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier.

The company's Tacticos system consolidates the control of a ship's weapons, its sensors such as the air-search radar, and electro-optical systems and can be scaled according to the size of the vessel on which it will be deployed. Tacticos has been installed on a range of ships from patrol boats to destroyers. The Royal Navy of Oman has the system fitted on its al-Qahir class corvettes while the Hellenic Navy uses Tacticos on its Roussen class fast attack craft and the Republic of Korea Navy has Tacticos on its Kang-Ding class frigates. Thales also builds the Tavitac system which is able to perform automatic threat assessment by collating information from the vessel's sensors. It can also be linked to the vessel's fire control and countermeasures systems helping to coordinate self-protection.

BAE Systems has enjoyed success in the naval C4I market. The company builds a range of systems including the Adaws-2000 CMS, which is fitted to the Royal Navy's Albion class LPDs. In April 2005 the company won a contract to upgrade the systems on the Albion class vessels to make them Link-16 compatible so as to provide an enhanced level of air-defence protection. The Royal Navy's Invincible class aircraft carriers are fitted with the company's Adimp command and control system which is fully compatible with Link-11 and Link-14 naval tactical datalinks and the ships' Eads Astrium Scot Satellite Communication system.

The company's Nautis series of C2 systems has been particularly successful, equipping mine-hunting and mine-countermeasure vessels, and furnishing over 60 vessels worldwide including those operated by the Royal Navy, the Royal Saudi Navy, the Royal Australian Navy, the Turkish Navy, Spanish Navy, Japan Maritime and Self-Defence Force, the Royal Malaysian Navy, Royal Brunei Navy and the US Navy. The Nantis can be designed to support operations against air and subsurface threats while supporting mine clearance missions. For submarines, BAE Systems has developed the Submarine Command System-Next Generation (SMCS-NG) CMS which equips the Royal Navy's Trafalgar class nuclear attack submarines (SSN). For surface combatants, the company's Surface Ship Command System (SSCS) equips the Royal Navy's Type-23 frigates and the Republic of Korea Navy's Chungmugong Yi Sunshin and King Sejang the Great class destroyers. The SSCS use of cots is typified by its utilisation of Pentium processor cards. BAE Systems has teamed with Alenia Marconi to provide the CMS for the Royal Navy's Type-45 destroyers which makes significant use of both cots and open architecture, and also includes a datalink processing system to hand the information off to other allied warships.

Equipping several frigate, destroyer, corvette, LPD and aircraft carrier classes in the Italian Navy is Selex's IPN series of naval C4I equipment. The system acts as the junction between a ship's fire control system, its sensors and communications. The Italian Navy is a major user of the IPN series with the system deployed on the navy's Giuseppe Garibaldi and Cavour aircraft carriers, along with its Horizon, Rinascimento/Fremm (Fregate multi-mission/Fregata Europea Multi-Missione), Artigliere and Maestrale class frigates, plus its Durand de la Penne class destroyers. Selex's Numc/Nupa CMS, which controls the vessels' internal and external communication, ship navigation and fire control systems, is used on the Italian Comandanti class of patrol vessels. The IPN system, which has been upgraded from IPN-10 to IPN-8 status, is also used on the Royal Malaysian Navy's Laksamana class corvettes.

Page 2

Another European naval command and control system which has enjoyed good international sales is the Saab Systems 9LV CMS series. Versions of the system, such as the 9LV Mk 3, are in service on the Anzac class frigates of the Royal Australian and the Royal New Zealand navies, along with the Royal Danish, Royal Swedish and Lithuanian navies. The 9LV uses open architecture to interface with the ship's sensors and weapons systems which allows new capabilities to be added to the vessel during upgrades, moreover, the 9LV series uses a Windows-NT operating system. Saab has also developed a version of the 9LV system called SESUB940A which is used on the Gotland class diesel electric submarines (SSK) used by the Royal Swedish Navy.

French shipbuilder DCNS has been involved in a number of ship command and control projects as a result of joint ventures with Thales. To this end the company is involved in the Subtics system which is produced by UDS International, a subsidiary of Aramis which is owned by DCNS and Thales. Subtics is used on the Agosta-90B class SSK and also the Scorpene class boats used by the French Navy. The system is designed to enable the crew to make an instant assessment of their vessel's tactical situation by fusing data derived from the boat's sensors, navigation equipment and fire control systems.

The other submarine product built by a Thales-DCNS joint venture is Sycobs (Systeme de Combat pour Barracuda et SSBN--Barracuda and SSBN combat system). Equipping the French Navy's Le Triomphant class nuclear missile boats and the force's Barracuda SSNs, the sys tern can control the vessel's external communication, including its satcom, and the submarine's torpedoes while also displaying information derived from the boat's active and passive sensor systems such as its Thales Dmux-5, -80 and Dsuv 6-1B sonar systems.

Atlas Elektronik of Germany has produced the Isus 90-1 command and control system which is deployed on the Dolphin class SSKs of the Israeli Sea Corps and the Manthatisi class SSKs of the South African Navy, providing a central point for sensor management of the vessel's Atlas Elektronik CSU-90 sonar, along with management of the boat's communication and navigation systems. Terma meanwhile builds the C-Flex command and control system in use on the Royal Danish Navy's Absalon class command and support vessels. C-Flex controls the vessel's communication suite which includes the vessel's satcom and also its Link-11 and -16 tactical datalinks.

Looking to North America, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon and Northrop Grumman dominate the naval command and control systems market. Lockheed Martin produces the Aegis, which provides the user with a central control point for data derived from the AN/SPY-1 multifunction radar, along with external communication data which can then be fused to provide a picture of the tactical environment. This information, which is gathered by the command decision system, is then transmitted to the weapons control system which provides fire control for the ship's missiles. In September 2005 the US Navy gave the go-ahead for the Aegis systems onboard the Arleigh Burke and Ticonderga class destroyers and cruisers to be upgraded to 'Baseline 7.1' status to improve the performance of the AN/SPY-1 radar in the littoral environment; a process which has made significant use of cots technology.

Lockheed Martin also produces the AN/UYK-43 computer system which uses OA and provides tactical ship system control. The AN/UYK-43 has sold over 1250 units around the world. The company also constructed the AN/BSY-2 submarine CMS which equipped the US Navy's Seawolf class SSNs until it was replaced by Raytheon's AN/BYG-1 system (see below). Moreover, the company is developing the Command and Control Systems Module that will furnish the Virginia class SSNs and will use open architecture to integrate the ship's weapons systems, sensors, countermeasures and navigation systems. Lockheed Martin supplied Canada's Halifax class frigates with the Shinpads (Shipboard INtegrated Processing and Display System) command and control equipment while the Scomba (Sistemas de Combate de Buques de la Armada) CMS system is being installed on the Spanish Navy's Principe de Asturias aircraft carrier and will be progressively rolled-out across the Spanish Navy fleet on all new warships.

Raytheon is building the AN/BYG-1 command and control system, which will equip the Royal Australian Navy's Collins class SSKs and also the Los Angeles and Seawolf class SSNs.

Page 3 ----------------(continues)

These two operations indicate that naval C4I systems must not only provide a seamless link between a vessel's fire control, communication and sensor systems, but they must also ensure that the vessel can be interoperable with the other ships and submarines of its own navy and also those of other countries. Moreover, given the emphasis on coordination seen during operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, naval vessels must also work smoothly with air and ground forces. Fortunately help is at hand from both cots and open architecture. The first reduces the cost of developing new technical solutions for naval C4I systems and makes it easier to slot in new weapons, sensors and capabilities as they are added to ships and submarines. Certainly, naval command and control systems are becoming more advanced, intricate and versatile, while cots and open architecture are helping to make this advancement a little more painless. George Washington once said, <>, sophisticated naval C4I systems have an important role to play in this regard.

COPYRIGHT 2008 Armada International
COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning

-------------------------------------------
The excerpts above were taken from here



Yet another insight into the Modern Navy which I hope will be of some value to those of a different era (like me) trying to come to terms with what has changed.


Little h
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Last edited by harry.gibbon : 25-05-2012 at 22:32.
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  #145  
Old 25-05-2012, 22:16
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Re C4I; Just look at the kit available to the guy portrayed in this PDF

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  #146  
Old 25-05-2012, 22:30
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Default Re: Modern Navy

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Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Re C4I; Just look at the kit available to the guy portrayed in this PDF

Little h
A brilliant first post, and interesting second post. Many thanks for them both Harry. One gets an idea of why this hardware costs so much, especially if, like me, you remember the first transistor to come on the public market, and worked with valve rectifiers, valve oscillators, and carbon - pile motor controllers.
The problem is, I can't help thinking that it will only take one small bullet in a critical part for the whole system to come crashing down, and then it's all back to manual control. If that happens, are the men trained to cope?
Having said that, I always expected helicopters to be pretty vulnerable as a small amount of damage to a rotor blade should unbalance the rotor disc and lead to high levels of instability. This does not appear to happen, at least it is not reported.
Maybe I'm not thinking it through enough
Steve
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Old 25-05-2012, 22:46
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Originally Posted by eskimosailor View Post
A brilliant first post, and interesting second post. Many thanks for them both Harry. One gets an idea of why this hardware costs so much, especially if, like me, you remember the first transistor to come on the public market, and worked with valve rectifiers, valve oscillators, and carbon - pile motor controllers.
The problem is, I can't help thinking that it will only take one small bullet in a critical part for the whole system to come crashing down, and then it's all back to manual control. If that happens, are the men trained to cope?
Having said that, I always expected helicopters to be pretty vulnerable as a small amount of damage to a rotor blade should unbalance the rotor disc and lead to high levels of instability. This does not appear to happen, at least it is not reported.
Maybe I'm not thinking it through enough
Steve
Steve,

Thanks for your response mate.

Previouisly on this thread, I had tried to post about the modern navy's sailors and their medal winning exploits for example. My most recent flurry of posts start at #132 and were about training and recognition. These most recent are about the Modern Naval equipment.

As I read up and try to absorb the technology going on in the modern day forces, oft times I find that I have to really 'research' what the 'stuff' I am reading about actually means ... so, when I have a got a minimal grip on a topic, I quickly try to impart it on the forum by way of excerpts and links, always trying to make available the text I have read and a link giving credit to those whom have done the work in producing it, a simple courtesy I think.

So off I go looking for some other innovations about which I know nothing about yet!!

Little h
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Old 25-05-2012, 22:52
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Eskimo,
firstly a lot of the C4I kit is of course in the citadel of a warship and so as protected as anything can be in that environment.
secondly the computer aspect of a combat management system (the core of C4I) will have built in redundancy. Those you could take a sledgehammer to one of the servers and the warfare staff should barely even notice- one of the other servers will take over the duties of the one destroyed.
Thirdly groups of servers can be located in different parts of the ship so that a missile is only likely to take out one group, allowing full operation from the others.

The extent of this redundancy and the designs for it vary across the systems described.

By the way, C4I doesn't stand for "Computers for Intelligence" as that article claims. It stands for command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence / information (usage varies on the last one)

Below is a T45 console. The centre console displays the main "birds eye" graphical view of the battlespace, with totes to the right of it displaying supplementary data (on what I cannot tell). The left hand screen is presumably supposed to be displayed an imaged from one of the electro-optical devices (though it is not from a perspective that would be possible), I can't tell what the right hand console is showing in this instance, but I would guess infra-red images also from an electro-optical device

Below the centre console is a software driven touch sensitive screen to allow fast selection of various types of data customised to the role. There is also of course a trackerball and keyboard
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File Type: jpg Picture-1-CMS_side_view.jpg (98.2 KB, 6 views)
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Old 25-05-2012, 23:11
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prom View Post
Eskimo,
firstly a lot of the C4I kit is of course in the citadel of a warship and so as protected as anything can be in that environment.
secondly the computer aspect of a combat management system (the core of C4I) will have built in redundancy. Those you could take a sledgehammer to one of the servers and the warfare staff should barely even notice- one of the other servers will take over the duties of the one destroyed.
Thirdly groups of servers can be located in different parts of the ship so that a missile is only likely to take out one group, allowing full operation from the others.

The extent of this redundancy and the designs for it vary across the systems described.

By the way, C4I doesn't stand for "Computers for Intelligence" as that article claims. It stands for command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence / information (usage varies on the last one)

Below is a T45 console. The centre console displays the main "birds eye" graphical view of the battlespace, with totes to the right of it displaying supplementary data (on what I cannot tell). The left hand screen is presumably supposed to be displayed an imaged from one of the electro-optical devices (though it is not from a perspective that would be possible), I can't tell what the right hand console is showing in this instance, but I would guess infra-red images also from an electro-optical device

Below the centre console is a software driven touch sensitive screen to allow fast selection of various types of data customised to the role. There is also of course a trackerball and keyboard
Another good post that one Prom, many thanks for bringing both Steve and myself up to speed (so far) However, you will note that in none of my posts have I said that C4I was Computers for Intelligence, rather I took a bit of licence and regarding the 4 x C's.

I must add that I think it extremely helpfull for folk of my generation, to receive informed advice on current methods used in the Modern Navy.

Little h
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Old 26-05-2012, 07:14
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Another good post that one Prom, many thanks for bringing both Steve and myself up to speed (so far) However, you will note that in none of my posts have I said that C4I was Computers for Intelligence, rather I took a bit of licence and regarding the 4 x C's.

I must add that I think it extremely helpfull for folk of my generation, to receive informed advice on current methods used in the Modern Navy.

Little h
Thanks again Harry. In my day even aircraft autopilots were electro - mechanical, and unfortunately my only experience of Operations Rooms was playing with the radar displays in Eskimo's OR, and working with the simulators at Dryad. Things have obviously moved on hugely since then, and I have not worked in any sort of technological environment since 1981. I don't think I will be able to catch up now, but it is nice to try, and I am hugely grateful to those who make the information available in a manner that I may possibly understand.
Steve
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