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  #101  
Old 02-03-2011, 18:48
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Polycell Polycell is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Oh how easy it is to say 'it wasn't like that in our day'
Come on you lot lighten up!
Each generation is compared with scorn by the previous generation.
Come on time like progression moves on, accept it.
OK so todays sailor seems lacking in discipline but they are still out there doing a bloody good job. I know that if ever they are put into a war situation they'll do their best to uphold the tradition of the Navy.
Having gone Ganges or Vincent didn't necessarily make you a better person belive me Edna!!!!
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  #102  
Old 02-03-2011, 19:21
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

[quote=INVINCIBLE;154302]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scurs View Post
Agreed Nobby...............as FC2 my Action Station was in the TS too, at the height of the Indonesian Confrontation, we used to enter and leave Singapore Naval Base at Defence Stations (or maybe full Action Stations, can't recall)....anyway, always used to reckon that had we hit a mine (the given reason), my chances of escaping lay between nil and very little.
On the plus side, it was a nice air-conditioned compartment, and sitting there twiddling the occasional knob and looking at radar instead of humping 4.5" shells around, highly compensated.

Scurs,

Your experiences most interesting. There seems to be so little in print about the full story of what happened during the Indonesian Confrontation, apart from the Limbang action and the passage of the Lombok Strait.
I was there in Centaur in 1964, but we were never told much about what was going on.What ship were you in? what dates? what patrols did you conduct? did you see any action against Indonesian insurgents? Do hope you can give us a bit more on that distant confrontation.
Regarding action stations in Borneo, in Albion in 1966 the only people we had to protect ourselves against were the Scots Guards. When we brought them out of the jungle they went berserk, they smashed the place up even the chapel. In complete contrast when we brought the Gordon Highlanders out they were filthy and shattered but after about twenty minutes they were dressed in their white highland dress wearing their kilts and performing highland dancing on the flight deck. The ghurkers(spell check) were great as well they had their own sort of rum and we used to swop ( in the POs mess ).
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  #103  
Old 02-03-2011, 23:36
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harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polycell View Post
Having gone Ganges or Vincent didn't necessarily make you a better person belive me Edna!!!!
Fred; my understanding of this sentence, in the form in which it is put, means that anyone having done the Ganges or St. Vincent course ... ended up no better than when they joined! Is that what you meant please?

Little h
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  #104  
Old 02-03-2011, 23:43
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Default Re: Modern Navy

[quote=johnny07;154652]
Quote:
Originally Posted by INVINCIBLE View Post

Regarding action stations in Borneo, in Albion in 1966 the only people we had to protect ourselves against were the Scots Guards. When we brought them out of the jungle they went berserk, they smashed the place up even the chapel. In complete contrast when we brought the Gordon Highlanders out they were filthy and shattered but after about twenty minutes they were dressed in their white highland dress wearing their kilts and performing highland dancing on the flight deck. The ghurkers(spell check) were great as well they had their own sort of rum and we used to swop ( in the POs mess ).
I would have expected nothing less from my former regiment (whilst a cadet in ACF) and that of my uncles who served in Gordons in WWII.

Re; Indonesian Confrontation:-
I think this conflict is deserving of a thread of it's own, reflecting/recounting the activities of members of the RN/RM. If it is originated then we can ask the Mod's to move relevant posts from this thread to that!

Little h
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  #105  
Old 03-03-2011, 08:42
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
Fred; my understanding of this sentence, in the form in which it is put, means that anyone having done the Ganges or St. Vincent course ... ended up no better than when they joined! Is that what you meant please?

Little h
If yer like!!
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  #106  
Old 03-03-2011, 10:59
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chris westwood chris westwood is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polycell View Post
Oh how easy it is to say 'it wasn't like that in our day'
Come on you lot lighten up!
Each generation is compared with scorn by the previous generation.
Come on time like progression moves on, accept it.
OK so todays sailor seems lacking in discipline but they are still out there doing a bloody good job. I know that if ever they are put into a war situation they'll do their best to uphold the tradition of the Navy.
Having gone Ganges or Vincent didn't necessarily make you a better person belive me Edna!!!!

here here
these people are seeing combat, earning gallantry medals and coming home in body bags or with limbs and organs missing. I doubt whether the people who were rescued at benghazi last week will have many complaints

I think these people need praise for what they do and the way they do it. Frankly I couldn't care less whether they are good or not at marching up and down, polishing brass, or painting the side of a ship. has it occured to some people on here that modern ship's crews might have better things to do?
People who have been in the navy are ordinary people. being in the navy at whatever time does not make you better than other people.
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  #107  
Old 03-03-2011, 14:27
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

[quote=harry.gibbon;154688]
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny07 View Post

I would have expected nothing less from my former regiment (whilst a cadet in ACF) and that of my uncles who served in Gordons in WWII.

Re; Indonesian Confrontation:-
I think this conflict is deserving of a thread of it's own, reflecting/recounting the activities of members of the RN/RM. If it is originated then we can ask the Mod's to move relevant posts from this thread to that!

Little h
The thing about the Confrontation is that no one at home knew about it. It was'nt like the Falklands, on TV everyday. It was passed off as a misunderstanding between Indonesia and us over the future of Malasia. However there was a huge British committment there, dozens of ships, hundreds of commandos and soldiers, RAF planes and helicopters. Anyone serving in Albion or Bulwark at that time will have come into contact with most of the premier regiments of the army who did their three month jungle patrol. It was the only exciting time that punctuated my otherwise uneventful time in the navy and certainly worth a thread.
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  #108  
Old 05-03-2011, 12:43
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Sorry, have been out of action for a few days.

Nobby_N - what I expected from Ganges and St. Vincent and other training units was respect - respect for your equipment (so you took care of it), respect for your mates (so you kept an eye out in case they were in need), respect for your work tasks, respect for your service .....and so on.

It starts at school; I am concerned about the fact that in my limited experience (and from the TV story) children no longer respect their teachers or their parents, and teachers do not try to earn that respect.

By the time these children reach employment age, there is little respect for anything or anyone, and I am therefore outstandingly encouraged when I hear about young people who are working to aid chidren in the third world.

Sorry to be off target, but I am sure these things are linked.

Edna

Last edited by Ednamay : 05-03-2011 at 12:44. Reason: correcting typo
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  #109  
Old 05-03-2011, 13:10
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CYLLA CYLLA is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Cornwall sailors in Dubai

03 March 2011






F99 is taking a two-week break from keeping pirates under the knout with some much-needed TLC for the ship and some much-needed down time for the ship’s company.

Before leave could begin in earnest there were a few tasks to complete:

connect up the water and electricity supplies
sort out 150 sacks of mail
get rid of one month’s worth of gash (which must have been a fun job in the heat...)
store four lorry-loads of food waiting for the ship
pass the fitness test (for those needing to stay ‘in date’)
maintenance on that radar

I can never remember doing a fitness test in my days ,the food must be very fattening ,or they do less physical work than we did ,in our day.
And the AFT end of the ship ,must smell like a slum [a months worth of gash ]

cylla
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  #110  
Old 05-03-2011, 16:48
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Nobby_N Nobby_N is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

fitness tests

I suppose they are a good thing. No we never did anything like it in my time, after basic training that is. I think we would have thought it an insult. We did a fair bit of up and down ladders, and in my trade (REM), the mast, and again in my trade, humping PPIs (about 120lb) and other equipment up and down ladders, and that in tropical heat too and without help. We must have been pretty fit. I never needed medical treatment, apart from for accidents(!), and never once saw a dentist until I was on my discharge routines, and he said all was ok.

There were some overweight sailors, I have to say. There was a chef in Bulwark ('55-'56), and a butcher (a marine). Both were large in height and in girth. They would both stand in their doorways on either side of the passage between the galley and the meat store, and any young ODs passing through had to run the gauntlet of these two. The chef would bash you with his belly and you'd bounce off him onto the butcher, and he would bash you back like a ball in a pin-ball machine. It was their idea of fun.

A month's worth of gash.

In the (bad) old days of course it just went down the chute (tinkle tinkle little spoon...). I guess that would not be considered
environmentally responsible nowadays.

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  #111  
Old 05-03-2011, 19:26
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Polycell Polycell is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ednamay View Post
Sorry, have been out of action for a few days.

Nobby_N - what I expected from Ganges and St. Vincent and other training units was respect - respect for your equipment (so you took care of it), respect for your mates (so you kept an eye out in case they were in need), respect for your work tasks, respect for your service .....and so on.

It starts at school; I am concerned about the fact that in my limited experience (and from the TV story) children no longer respect their teachers or their parents, and teachers do not try to earn that respect.

By the time these children reach employment age, there is little respect for anything or anyone, and I am therefore outstandingly encouraged when I hear about young people who are working to aid chidren in the third world.

Sorry to be off target, but I am sure these things are linked.

Edna
Sorry, disagree, it starts at home. Children should be taught to respect by their parents. Teachers aren't allowed to discipline their charges anymore gone are the days when a thrown board rubber at a micreant in a classroom solves the problem.
I think you'll find that there are more good youngsters than bad. The trouble is good is bad press no one is interested hence the media is only interested in spreading bad news.
Back on thread deviation over.
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  #112  
Old 05-03-2011, 22:03
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chris westwood chris westwood is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by CYLLA View Post
Cornwall sailors in Dubai

03 March 2011






F99 is taking a two-week break from keeping pirates under the knout with some much-needed TLC for the ship and some much-needed down time for the ship’s company.

Before leave could begin in earnest there were a few tasks to complete:

connect up the water and electricity supplies
sort out 150 sacks of mail
get rid of one month’s worth of gash (which must have been a fun job in the heat...)
store four lorry-loads of food waiting for the ship
pass the fitness test (for those needing to stay ‘in date’)
maintenance on that radar

I can never remember doing a fitness test in my days ,the food must be very fattening ,or they do less physical work than we did ,in our day.
And the AFT end of the ship ,must smell like a slum [a months worth of gash ]

cylla
maybe they are more conscious of these things nowadays-good
the people on these ships ansd in the defence serevices in general seem to be doing pretty well. Good for them.
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  #113  
Old 05-03-2011, 22:05
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chris westwood chris westwood is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polycell View Post
Sorry, disagree, it starts at home. Children should be taught to respect by their parents. Teachers aren't allowed to discipline their charges anymore gone are the days when a thrown board rubber at a micreant in a classroom solves the problem.
.

and a good thing too.
teachers do a great job, children do have respect, and they grow into the fine young adults that this country should be proud of but far too often prefer to criticise
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  #114  
Old 05-03-2011, 22:39
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John O'Callaghan John O'Callaghan is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

GASH? GASH? GASH? These modern days Mateloets have it too easy! IN MY DAY WE DIDN'T HAVE ANYTHING TO THROW AWAY! (Sinks back into couch whilst sipping on beer can.)
Cheers John O'C.
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  #115  
Old 08-03-2011, 19:00
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by CYLLA View Post
Cornwall sailors in Dubai

03 March 2011






F99 is taking a two-week break from keeping pirates under the knout with some much-needed TLC for the ship and some much-needed down time for the ship’s company.

Before leave could begin in earnest there were a few tasks to complete:

connect up the water and electricity supplies
sort out 150 sacks of mail
get rid of one month’s worth of gash (which must have been a fun job in the heat...)
store four lorry-loads of food waiting for the ship
pass the fitness test (for those needing to stay ‘in date’)
maintenance on that radar

I can never remember doing a fitness test in my days ,the food must be very fattening ,or they do less physical work than we did ,in our day.
And the AFT end of the ship ,must smell like a slum [a months worth of gash ]

cylla
Don't they have gash chutes these days?. The most miserable part of ship in my day was gash chute sentry. Thinking about it that was probably done by men under pun. and was'nt a part of ship.
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  #116  
Old 09-03-2011, 09:51
buster185 buster185 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Hey up johnny, not sure what the RN policy is on 'gash' but Maersk have a policy (and many more ships than the RN!) which makes interesting reading. Looks like no more 'gash shute sentry' for men under punishment but you might find yourself in charge of a 'three-phase biological sewage treatment system' and just hope not too many blow-backs up the chute in a following sea!!
Regards
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http://www.maersk.com/Sustainability...eHandling.aspx
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  #117  
Old 09-03-2011, 11:49
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Nobby_N Nobby_N is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

No more Admiral Brown then!!

Nobby_N
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  #118  
Old 09-03-2011, 12:59
buster185 buster185 is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Looks like he's taken his last salute!!
Buster
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  #119  
Old 27-12-2011, 14:56
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harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

The modern navy in action, ashore!

Able Seaman Michelle Ping, Royal Naval Reservist (photo below)

Seems many of those who would not like to have served alongside women at sea, are not like the highlander who served alonside this medic reservist in Afghanistan. He owes his life to her!!!


Following Article in the Sheffield Telegraph, on line.
--------------------
Taliban fired on me as I saved a life, reveals Sheffield heroine Michelle
Published on Tuesday 20 December 2011 08:57

HERO Sheffield paramedic Michelle Ping has told how she dramatically saved the life of a wounded soldier under fire from the Taliban while on duty as a reservist in Afghanistan.

The brave 37-year-old, from Dungworth, had to go alone on to a rooftop to make the rescue as bullets tore through the air.

She refused to give up on the injured Highlander after he was shot in the head and his colleagues had left him believing he was dead - and he is now recovering from his ordeal.

Former Sheffield schoolgirl Michelle, a member of the Royal Navy reserves, was stationed with the Fourth Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland - the Highlanders - as part of her tour of duty in Helmand Province, when the incident happened.

She said: “While in Helmand, I would go on patrol with the boys and we were on an operation in an area where we hadn’t been before.

We landed on the helicopters at dawn, it was like something out of the computer game, Call of Duty.

“All day long while we were there, British platoons were being shot at. In the afternoon, we went into a compound to resupply with ammunition and we then got smashed by Taliban fire for a few hours.

“Some of the boys were on the roof and one - Highlander Craig Paterson - got shot in the head.

“The other guys up there evacuated to safety and thought he was dead. I went up on the roof and all the Taliban who had been shooting at the boys turned their attentions on me. Someone had taken Craig’s helmet off and he was lying with his eyes open not moving. I thought ‘I’m not going to let you die’. I shook him and he came round.”

Michelle said that due to the trauma 22-year-old Craig had received he did not know what was happening and wanted to sit up.

She recalled: “I had to lie on top of him to stop him. Some of the boys came up and gave me a hand, and we pushed him off the rooftop into the arms of two other boys below, then we had to run with him for half a mile to a secure helicopter site so he could be evacuated.

Craig was flown to Kandahar and then back to the UK for treatment. He is now at the MOD’s Headley Court rehabilitation centre in Surrey, where Michelle said his recovery is going well. She said: “He is having to have a metal plate in his skull and because he was hit on the left-hand side of his head, he has some impairment on the right hand side of his body but he has all his faculties.

“He just can’t remember the incident.”

Craig was due to accompany Michelle to The Sun’s Military Awards 2011 - an event being attended by celebrities and royals including Prince William and Harry - where her bravery saving his life has led to her being on a shortlist of three for Reservist of the Year. She and other nominees were also invited to 10 Downing Street for a reception.

Michelle, an Able Seaman and former pupil at the old Earl Marshal School in Fir Vale, Sheffield, said: “I was just doing my job - I’m so excited to have been nominated for the awards.”

Proud dad Graham Ping, of Grimesthorpe, said: “When Michelle was deployed this last time, she just said she was going abroad - we only found out it was Afghanistan just before she went. I said she wanted her head examining - but I am so proud of her.”
---------------
from:-
http://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/...elle_1_4075444

.................................
now read how the:-
Royal Navy personnel train for Afghanistan

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/De...fghanistan.htm

(I think I may have posted the second link elsewhere in the forum)

Little h
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Michelle Ping 801803114.jpg (92.8 KB, 21 views)
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  #120  
Old 27-12-2011, 15:45
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Teuchter Teuchter is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Very interesting Harry - thank you and a big BZ to Michelle and all her colleagues
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T
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  #121  
Old 27-12-2011, 15:57
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harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teuchter View Post
Very interesting Harry - thank you and a big BZ to Michelle and all her colleagues
and with the man she saved - click on pic (ping2) on right:-

http://www.abilityhandlingltd.co.uk/...ves-award.html

Little h
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  #122  
Old 27-12-2011, 18:14
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Teuchter Teuchter is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Aye Harry - thanks again - great photos!!

I see she wears the badge of a naval air mechanic 1st class as well as three good conduct badges so she served a fair bit of time in the regular navy as a Fleet Air Arm "fixer of aeroplanes" - very probably started off as a wren air mechanic

More power to her!!
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T
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  #123  
Old 27-12-2011, 19:58
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harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

More details of the award winning Sailors and Marines are to be found in this Navy News article:-

http://www.navynews.co.uk/archive/news/item/3101

together with mention of the other service personnel who received awards.

Little h
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  #124  
Old 28-12-2011, 12:56
ludsie ludsie is offline
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I think our servicemen and women are doing a great job in a terrible location. They deserve all of the credit and our respect as they put their lives on the line for us ( just as we did when we served)
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  #125  
Old 30-12-2011, 10:25
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diverdags diverdags is offline
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Default Re: Modern Navy

Well, I guess I might as well stick my oar in too. lol

To the modern matelot and matlass [matlass???] can I say this in all sincerity.

You are in the greatest fighting service the World has ever produced and one with a very proud history and unsurpassed tradition. Some have screwed up along the way but overall the Andrew has a superb record, and although smaller than we oldies knew it is still the most professional navy on the planet.

We ancient naval reprobates managed to keep it going in our day, in spite of all the free rum and duty free fags we consumed along the way, and now it's your turn. You haven't got the rum, baccy and trips down the gut to distract you, so I am absolutely certain that you will perform at least as well as we did, and in some ways it would be bl@@dy hard to do worse.

As Admiral Andrew Cunningham said...it takes 3 years to build a ship, 3 hundred to build a tradition. Please maintain that tradition a bit longer if only to keep us proud old salts proud old salts. Most of us if we are honest, love [and that is not too strong a word] the RN and will take that love to the grave with us. So keep that tradition alive - Do it in spite of governmental tight-fistedness and with our blessings and best wishes. Our parent's generation thought we weren't up to it either, so ignore the old grumps among us. God bless the lot of you, both female and male.
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