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Naval Obituaries A collection of notes on those who have crossed the bar.

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Old 20-10-2009, 17:03
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Default Admiral of the Fleet Sir George E. Creasy

Sir George Creasy

Admiral of the Fleet Sir George E. Creasy, GCB, CBE, DSO, MVO, who died on Tuesday 31st October 1972 at the age of 77, had a distinguished career, alike in staff and command service, which was remarkable for its variety. Though he had never before commanded a destroyer, he was a successful flotilla captain. Not long after being Director of Anti-Submarine Warfare during critical stages of the Battle of the Atlantic, concerned with the destruction of enemy U-boats, he became Head of the British Submarine Service, responsible for the extension and development of under-water craft. Though he had never been directly associated with naval aviation, he was Flag Officer (Air) in the Far East. He was Chief Staff Officer to the Allied Naval Commander in the invasion of Europe and after the war held more than one appointment on the Board of Admiralty.

George Elvey Creasy, the son of Leonard Creasy, was born on October 13, 1895. He entered the Navy as a cadet at Osborne in. 1908, was at Dartmouth from 1910 to 1912, and passed out from the training cruiser Cornwall the following year. He served in the Grand Fleet and took part in the operations in the Heligoland Bight in 1917. After serving as Assistant Director of Plans at the Admiralty in 1936-38, he took command of the Grenville and the lst Destroyer Flotilla, Mediterranean. This was his command during the early months of the Second World War. The Grenville returned to join the Home Fleet, and after she was sunk by a U-boat in January, 1940, he transferred to the Codrington. In this ship he brought to England Princess Juliana and her family after the invasion of Holland in May, 1940, and afterwards took part in the evacuation from Dunkirk. For two years from September, 1940, he was Director of the Anti-Submarine Warfare Division of the Naval Staff, and in 1942-43 commanded the battleship Duke of York. He was promoted. to Rear-Admiral in July, 1943. His next appointment, was as chief staff officer to Admiral Sir Alexander Ramsay for the planning and execution of the naval operations for the Allied landing in Normandy in June, 1944. Three months later he was appointed Rear-Admiral (Submarines) and held the, post for a period, which saw the end of the war and the surrender of the German U- boats.

It was a tribute to his all round capacity that from submarines he turned to aircraft, taking up, in 1947, the post of Flag; Officer, Aircraft Carriers and Air Stations, British Pacific Fleet and East Indies. In 1948, he was promoted Vice-Admiral. Eight months later he succeeded Admiral Sir Philip Vian as Fifth Sea Lord and Deputy Chief of Naval Staff (Air), and in 1949, was transferred to another post on the Admiralty Board, that of Vice-Chief of the Naval Staff. He I was C-in-C Home Fleet from 1952 to 1954 and also C-in-C Eastern Atlantic under NATO. From 1954 to 1957 he was C-in-C Portsmouth and also C-in-C Home Station designate and Allied C-in-C Channel Command under NATO. In 1959 he was appointed. A Deputy Lieutenant for Essex. He married in 1924 Monica eldest daughter of Wilfred Ullathorne and had one son.

Taken from the Times Archive
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21st October 1805. As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet towards the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass the Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column. Harvey was discouraged with a customry rebuke from Nelson and duly fell into line behind the flagship. The enemy can be seen spread along the horizon whilst, to the right in the distance, the leading ships of Admiral Collingwoods fleet can be seen spearheading a separate assault to the south. In the light airs preceding the battle, much sail was needed to drive the British ships towards the enemy line. HMS Victory, nearest, has royals and stunsails set and is making good way, her furniture boats strung behind in readiness for battle. On her poop deck, officers prepare to run up a signal.

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HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Fully dressed and resplendent, HMS Hood is pictured preparing for King George Vs review of the Fleet in July 1935 as other capital ships take up their positions around her. Ramillies can be seen off Hoods port bow, Resolution astern, whilst just beyond her boat deck, the mighty Nelson gently nudges into position.

HMS Hood During the Fleet Review of 1935 by Ivan Berryman.
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22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
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 At 3.30am on the 23rd June 1945, a Dakota of 357 (special duties) Squadron took off from Mingaladon airfield nr.  Rangoon , to travel the 600 miles, 300 of them behind enemy lines, to rescue a downed American Liberator crew deep in the jungles of   Siam  .  The Dakota was flown by pilot Fl Lt. Larry Lewis, who already held the DFM awarded to him for 33 ops as a rear gunner on   Wellingtons  in 1941. Two crews had already failed when Lewis was asked to attempt this hazardous mission. Flying between 5,000 - 6,000ft he flew over The Hump, a ridge of mountains running down the spine of   Burma  . Local villagers had cleared a rough airstrip 800yds long with Lewis finding it by the time dawn broke. With monsoon clouds gathering, the Liberator crew aboard and the Dakota sinking in the wet ground, he managed, just, to get airborne. Flying at zero feet and looking out for Japanese Zero fighters Lewis took a different course back. Although being fired on from the ground they managed to make it all the way to the airfield at Dum Dum nr.   Calcutta ,  India  . Lewis was awarded an immediate DFC. By the end of the war he had completed 63 ops, held the rank of Squadron Leader with his service from 1938-1945, and was awarded the Air Efficiency Medal.

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Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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Operation Overlord by David Rowlands. (Y)
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