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Old 25-04-2017, 17:06
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davidrn davidrn is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Pembroke
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Default A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Joseph Edwards was born in Brighton, Sussex on the 26th April 1850
He entered the Navy on HMS Boscawen on the 7th April 1865 as a Boy 2nd Class. He signed, Volunteering to serve for 10 years contracted service, from the age of 18. His height was noted at the time as being 4ft 10in’s.
A letter consenting to his entry was signed by his mother Elizabeth Edwards and witnessed by a Thomas Hales at Brighton on the 4th April 1865.
On the 8th February 1879, on the Duke of Wellington, he signed to complete his pensionable service of 20 years. – His Height is now recorded as being 5ft 9in’s.
His record of pre 1873 service is found under the ADM 139 /729 series
His record of service post 1873 is found listed on ADM 188 /22 /50331.

His Service Progression was:-

Boy 2nd Class – 7th April 1865.
Boy 1st Class – 6th May 1866.
Ordinary Seaman –31st August 1868.
Able Seaman – 1st August 1872.
Leading Seaman – 6th January 1870.
Able Seaman – 22nd March 1871.
Leading Seaman – 1st May 1877.
Able Seaman – 29th May 1879.
Leading Seaman – 12th April 1879.
Petty Officer 2nd Class – 26th June 1881.
Petty Officer 1st Class – 12th October 1881.
Admirals Coxswain – 12th March 1886.
Boatswains Mate – 17th September 1886.
Petty Officer 1st Class (Quarter Master) – 14th January 1887
Able Seaman Pensioner – 15th July 1889.
DD Discharged Dead – 22nd July 1892.

His Service Afloat was:-

HMS Bellerophon – 7th April 1865 to 18th January 1867.
HMS Serpent – 19th January 1867 to 17th May 1868.
HMS Rattler – 18th May 1868 to 26th August 1868.
HMS Rodney – 27th August 1868 to 27th April 1870.
HMS Lord Warden – 28th April 1870 to 20th March 1873.
HMS Frolic – 21st March 1873 to 19th April 1876.
HMS Thalia – 20th April 1876 to 25th July 1876.
HMS Duke of Wellington – 26th July 1876 to 5th September 1876.
HMS Asia – 6th September 1876 to 7th May 1877.
HMS Duke of Wellington – 8th May 1876 to 14th May 1877.
HMS Orontes – 15th May 1877 to 16th June 1878. – To shore, Contracted Service expired.
HMS Duke of Wellington – 8th February 1879 to 3rd March 1879.
Naval Barracks – 4th March 1879 to 24th September 1879.
HMS Northampton – 25th September 1879 to 22nd November 1880.
HMS Forester – 23rd November 1880 to 31st January 1882.
HMS Impregnable – 1st February 1882 to 6th June 1884.
HMS Royal Alidade – 7th June 1884 to 3rd July 1884.
HMS Malabar – 4th July 1884 to 25th April 1885.
HMS Bacchante - 26th April 1885 to 6th November 1888.
HMS Duke of Wellington – 7th November 1888 to 11th January 1889.
HMS Asia – 12th January 1889 to 3rd April 1889. – To shore pensioned.
HMS Asia – July 1889 to September 1891 – Prnsioner
HMS Excellent – 5th September 1891 to 14th July 1892 – Discharged to Sick Quarters.
Discharged Dead, 22nd July 1892 Haslar Hospital, cause “Jaundice”.


HMS Bellerophon – 7th April 1865 to 18th January 1867.

7th April – Joined HMS Bellerophon, a 14-gun Central Battery Ironclad (the Press keep referring to the ship, as an “Iron Ram”) under construction at Chatham. The Bellerophon was in No. 2 dock at Chatham being constructed, her lower steel masts arrived from the Mersey Ironworks on the 11th, to be fitted when the ship is floated out of the dock.
26th April – The ship was launched from the dock, it is expected to be several months before the ship is completed. The ship was not finally commissioned until 22nd March 1866 and completed on 11th
April 1866.
27th May – The press reported the appointment of Captain Edward Tatham, to the Formidable (the Chatham Flagship) for service in the Bellerophon.

1866
10th March - The Ship arrived at Spithead from Sheerness, she is expected to make a trial of her speed at the measured mile at Stokes Bay, when the wind and tide are favourable.
14th March – The Bellerophon, made a trial of her machinery off the Isle of Wight. She made a second trial on the 16th and completed her speed trial on the 19th.
20th March – The ship steamed into the harbour to be docked.
24th March – The press reported the official appointment of Captain Tatham to the Bellerophon and the ships officers start to be appointed.
12th April – The ship left Portsmouth for a few day’s cruise in the Channel to test her sea-going qualities. She arrived back at Portsmouth on the 20th.
7th May – The ship again left Portsmouth for a cruise in the Channel to try her guns. She was back at Spithead by the 12th. She remained at Portsmouth, taking part in various Gun-Carriage trials and armour plate penetration tests over the next month.
18th July – Reports that the Bellerophon is to be part of the Channel Squadron under Rear-Admiral Yelverton, which is to assemble at Portland. The ship is currently in dock, still taking on her full armament.
17th August – The ship underwent a speed trial at Stokes Bay, with a mean speed at full power of over 14 knots.
27th August – The Bellerophon left Spithead on a cruise.
20th September – The Bellerophon with the Channel fleet left Portland for the coast of Ireland, On the way, they met some heavy seas and the Bellerophon seems to have proved to be a reasonable sailor but her speed appears not as good as expected.
3rd November – The ships returned to Portland, with the Bellerophon, Wyvern and Research, going on the Spithead. The Bellerophon came into Portsmouth harbour on the 7th. (She is still not fitted with her full armament). The ship was not expected to be ready for sea until 1st March 1867.

The Urgent (troopship) left Portsmouth for Hong Kong on January 24th. She was carrying 80 marines and about 500 supernumeraries for reliefs of the officers and men serving on the ships of the China station.


HMS Serpent – 19th January 1867 to 17th May 1868.

19th January – Joined the books of HMS Serpent, a wood screw gun-vessel launched in 1860 and Commanded by Commander Charles James Bullock on the China Station.
March – The Serpent spent the month at Nagasaki.
April and May – The Serpent spent at Osaka (she was first reported to there on April 28th). A map of the foreign concession, showing the coastline, docks, boatsheds, wells, a guard house, arable land and waste land. Scale: 1 inch to 50 feet, reads, Surveyed by Commander Charles Bullock, Royal Navy, and Lieutenant Charles Johnson, HMS Serpent, May 1867.
Note, This would seem to be Kobe. - National Archives Reference MR 1/451 /2 – Description Japan: Kobe. 'The Koobe Concession (Treaty Port of Hiogo)': map of Hyogo showing the area assigned to foreigners; also showing a landing place, a graveyard, a wet-season watercourse, a lighthouse and earthworks. Reference table to abbreviations. Scale: 1 inch to 100 feet. Compass indicator. Surveyed by Commander Charles Bullock, Royal Navy, with Lieutenant Charles Johnson and William Joseph Duckhanz, HMS Serpent, May 1867”.
May – Nagasaki reported that the Serpent had left to survey the new port on the West Coast and suggested that Noti would probably be the place chosen. The ship moved to Hiogo on the 9th, Osaka on the 19th and was back at Nagasaki by the 2nd June. She left on the 11th.

June – Was spent surveying west coast of Japan
7th July – The Serpent arrived at Hakodate surveying west coast and then moved on to Yokohama.
22nd July – The ship was off Yokohama with the Salamis, which was carrying Admiral Sir Harry Keppel the new station Commander-in-Chief, into Sendai Bay.
24th July – The ships moved to Nanbu Harbour, where the Serpent was involved in taking soundings and the Admiral in the Salamis moved on for Hakodadi, where the Serpent joined them again on the 27th.
29th July - The Serpent was at Yokohama, then moved to Nigata (She was there on the 4th August), with the Basilisk.
7th August – The Serpent and Basilisk arrived at Manao. The Serpent is to Survey the harbour.
August – The ship was reported to be at Nagasaki.
1st November – The Serpent arrived at Hong Kong.
17th December – The ship sailed to return to Japan.
22nd December – The Serpent arrived at Nagasaki.

1868
January – The Ship was reported to be at Hyogo.
17th February – The ship arrived back at Hong Kong.
March – The Serpent was reported to be at Osaka.
April – Was spent at Yokohama. On the 21st May the Ship arrived at Osaka.
17th May – Edward’s papers have him leaving the Serpent to join the Rattler (both ships being at Yokohama)..


HMS Rattler – 18th May 1868 to 26th August 1868.

18th May 1868 – Joined HMS Rattler (at Yokohama), a 17-gun wooden screw Sloop/Corvette of 1862, Commanded by Commander Henry Frederick Stephenson, China,

20th July – The Rattler joined the Admiral at Pilyawo in the Rodney. The ships sailed on the 21st and on the 22nd, left the flag ship at Tonquiera Bay, the Rattler going to Du’e to fill take on coal. The Rattler rejoined the Admiral, who then transferred his flag to the Salamis and left the Rattler to cruise with the Rodney.
4th August – The Admiral rejoined and the Rattler was despatched again to re-coal and then to stop the Basilisk at Possiette Bay with the squadrons mail.
While no mention is made of Rattler being at Vladivostock, Kepple in the Rodney were there by August 14th. Transferring his flag once again to the Salamis, he left on the 29th, by which time Edwards papers already place him on the Rodney.





HMS Rodney – 27th August 1868 to 27th April 1870.

27th August - joined HMS Rodney, a 92-gun wooden sail of 1833, (converted to screw in 1860), Commanded by Captain Algernon Charles Fieschi Heneage, flagship of Vice-Admiral Henry Keppel, China.

September – Rodney at Woosung, then moved to Shanghai.
3rd October – Mr Harris, the Rodney’s Paymaster was drowned when he and two other officers, were returning to the ship at night, their boat getting foul of some fishing stakes, capsized and they were all thrown into the water. His body was later recovered.

Outrages against the China Inland Mission.
The Yangzhou riot of August 22–23, 1868 was a brief crisis in Anglo-Chinese relations during the late Qing Dynasty. The crisis was fomented by the gentry of Yangzhou who opposed the presence of foreign Christian missionaries in the city, who claimed that they were legally residing under the provisions of the Convention of Peking. Threats against the missionaries were circulated by large character posters placed around the city. Rumours followed that the foreigners were stealing babies and killing them to make medicine. The riot that resulted was a angry crowd of Chinese, estimated at eight to ten thousand who assaulted the premises of the British China Inland Mission in Yangzhou by looting, burning and attacking the missionaries led by Hudson Taylor. No one was killed, however several of the missionaries were injured as they were forced to flee for their lives.

The result of this outrage was one of the Douglas-Morris’s no Medal Actions.
Sir R. Alcock to Lord Stanley, Peking, October 12, 1868. – “I must now place the matter in the hands of the naval Commander-in-Chief, Sir Henry Keppel, and call upon him to repair the mischief by sending such a force to the mouth of the Grand Canal as shall enable him, if necessary, to apply effective pressure, both on the local authorities and populace at Yang-chow and on the Viceroy at Nanking”,
Admiral Keppel’s response was to send Captain Algernon Heneage, to accompany Her Majesty's Consul to Nanking with the "Rodney” (Flag-ship), "Rinaldo," and "Slaney." With the Instructions, “You will make yourself acquainted with the force you are likely to encounter, and should it appear that a larger landing-party is required than can be afforded by Her Majesty's ships under your orders, reinforced by, the " Zebra " and " Icarus," you will apply to Captain Stanhope for such proportion of the Marines and small-arm men serving in the division under his orders as can be spared, informing him that it is my direction he immediately dispatches such force to banking in Her Majesty's ship "Adventurer;"
12th November - Captain Heneage of the Flag-ship HMS Rodney’s report to Admiral Keppel included, “HMS Zebra arrived at Shanghai on the 7th and I directed Commander Trollope to join me at Nanking with his ship.

Admiral Keppel in his “A sailor’s Life” Vol. 3 relates:-
“The Rinaldo, Commander Robinson, proceeded to Chinkiang and Nankin on September 3, conveying Mr. Consul Medhurst from Shanghai, whose representations resulted in a proclamation acknowledging the right of foreigners to reside in the country, and enjoining the people to respect them. A promise was also made of reparation to those who were injured. At this stage, Commander Bush of the Rinaldo, having an attack of illness, started off to Shanghai, leaving Mr. Medhurst in a house-boat to settle the affair. No sooner was the protection or prestige of the man-of-war removed than the Chinese authorities became insolent, refusing to grant the Consul the interview he had a right to demand, and withdrew all their previous concessions. I had left the Rodney at Shanghai, with instructions to Captain Heneage to carry out the views of the Consul, Mr. (afterwards Sir Walter) Medhurst, and render him every support. Directions were also given to prepare such a force as would overawe the troublesome Tontais in Formosa. Captain Heneage proceeded in Rodney, Rinaldo, and Slaney in company, to Nankin, where he was reinforced by Lord Charles Scott in the Icarus and the Zebra, Commander Trollope. Mr. Medhurst was on board the Rodney. It became apparent that the Viceroy, Tseng Kuofau, rested his faith on diplomatic fencing. The first step of our diplomacy was to seize the Chinese screw gunboat Tien Chi as a material guarantee for fulfilment of the claims of our Consul. One of these was that proclamations engraved on stone should be 1868, erected in the principal places, acknowledging the full right of Europeans to reside and exercise their calling. Compensation was demanded for the injuries inflicted on the persons and property of the missionaries; these and some minor demands were at once conceded, and the gun-boat was released. Subsequently the Consul, accompanied by a strong landing party from the ships, under the immediate command of Captain Heneage, proceeded to Yeng Cheow, where they remained until the Viceroy's concessions were enforced”.

1869
21st January – The Rodney arrived at Hong Kong to make good her defects and rejoin the Admiral.

January - The boats of the Cockchafer, when away exercising up the River Han, were assailed by stones by the inhabitants of the semi-piratical village of Ou-teng-foi.
By the Kwang Tung we have news of a serious disturbance at Swatow. It appears that the boats of H. M. gun-boat Cockchafer were exercising in a creek about four miles beyond Swatow, when their crew were stoned by some natives, the missiles striking several of the men. The latter landed and caught one of the assailants, whom they detained with the intention of handing him over to the native authorities, and retreated to their boats. A large mob of Chinese, however—some 400 or 500—suddenly made their appearance from the village in the neighbour-hood, and being well armed with gingalls opened a galling fire on the boats' crews. The latter returned the fire with their Snider rifles, but were obliged to retreat, twelve of their number being wounded, and two (the boatswain and gunner) not being expected to live. The loss on the Chinese side is said to be fourteen killed and several wounded.

Keppel writes, “The inhabitants of the villages of Tang-Tau and Po-leng had on one occasion roasted alive the mandarin who had been sent to govern them. They placed another mandarin between two planks and sawed him in halves”.
“The Commodore was ordered to take command of the Rinaldo, Perseus, Leven, Bouncer, and Cockchafer, together with a party of seamen and marines from the Rodney”
“At 8 A.M. (28th January) an advance was made on the village of Tang-Tau, which, together with that of Po-leng, had assisted the villages of Ou-tengfoi in their attack. These three villages offered more or less resistance : at each, the inhabitants were first to open fire, and showed a bold front, but the Sneiders soon doubled up those who did not take the earliest opportunity of dispersing as our men advanced. Tang-Tau was burned. Po-leng was spared, as the inhabitants made little resistance. Outeng-foi, which was barricaded, had their defences destroyed, and principal houses burned. It was difficult to ascertain* the amount of loss of the villagers, as they were smart in carrying off their killed and wounded, but the Commodore, thinking they were sufficiently punished, re-embarked and returned to his ships”.

22nd March – Reported that the Rodney is ordered to return to England.

17th May – The Ocean and Zebra were at Hiogo with the Rodney (Admiral Keppel) on her way up the Kii channel to join them. They were assembled off Ozaka (Osaka) to give a show of strength to the presentation of letters of credence to the Mikado from the British envoy Sir Harry Parkes, which took place on the 22nd, the British party being accompanied by 200 marines (100 each from HMS Rodney (flagship) and HMS Ocean).
6th June – The Rodney was reported to being the Bay of Yedo (Tokyo) at Yokohama, with the Ocean, Adventure and Cormorant, where marines and small arms men from the squadron, landed and were put through a series of field movements under the command of Captain Stanhope of the Ocean.
7th June – Admiral Keppel re-hoisted his flag in Rodney.
8th July – Keppel again, “The Rodney being ordered home, she had all sorts of live animals. Among them were two bears, who had the run of the ship. In the summer months hammocks were little used; the bears lay where they liked, the men using them as pillows. Each bear would accommodate ten or a dozen at a time. By day they were all over the place, generally aloft, in the tops or along the yards, from which they could see every arrival on board”.

25th July – The ship left Yokohama to return to England.
23rd September – Sailed from Hong Kong.
7th to 16th November – The Rodney was at Singapore.

1870
27th to 30th January - Was spent at the Cape of Good Hope. She passed St Helena on the 4th February and Ascension on the 25th.
11th April – The ship arrived at Spithead.
27th April – The Rodney Paid-off (Keppel writes, some £12,000 was paid to the blue-jackets and marines).



HMS Lord Warden – 28th April 1870 to 20th March 1873.

28th April – Joined HMS Lord Warden Commanded by Captain Thomas Brandreth, flagship of Vice-Admiral Alexander Milne and then (25 October 1870) Vice-Admiral Hastings Reginald Yelverton, serving on the, Mediterranean station.

22nd March to 23rd April – The ship was at Malta.
9th May – Called at Catania
13th and 14th May – In Suda Bay
20th to 22nd May – Visited Smyrna
23rd May to June – At Tenedos
19th June to 7th July – Back at Malta
7th July – The squadron left Malta on their summer cruise to visit Sicily and Italy.
14th to 20th July – Visited Palermo
(22nd) July – Visited Messina
26th July to 3rd August – The ship was back at Malta
12th to 19th August – At Gibraltar to rendezvous with Channel Squadron
19th August to 10th September – Was spent in combined exercises with the Channel Squadron off coast of Portugal; it was during these exercises that HMS Captain was lost with heavy loss of life on
7th September, off Cape Finisterre.
Admiral Milne reported the loss to the Admiralty headed – “Lord Warden, at sea off Cape Finisterre, Sept. 7th 1870 – Sir, It has been my painful duty to forward by H.M. vessel Psyche to Vigo the following telegram to be transmitted to the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty, reporting the sad loss of H.M.S. Captain, with all hands:-
“Very much regret sending painful news. Captain must have floundered in the night. She was very close to this ship at two this morning. Sudden S. W. gale. Very heavy squalls. Daybreak: Captain missing; this afternoon her boats and spars found; all have unfortunately perished. Inconstant sails to-morrow morning with report.
It later transpired that in fact there were 18/19 survivors of her 500 plus man crew.

6th September - Admiral Sir Alexander Milne had spent the day on board HMS Captain, inspecting the ship. He was concerned that the starboard gunwale was level with the water and the sea washed along the edge of the deck for its whole length, striking the aft turret to a depth of about 18” to 2 feet.
”Do you think this is right to have the lee gunwale in the water with these sails set?” he is said to have asked Coles (the Captain’s designer who was on the ship). Coles’ insistence that it was allowed for in the design did not convince Admiral Milne, who departed back to his flagship.
16th September – Arrived at Spithead
17th September – In Portsmouth harbour
24th September – The ship was paid off.
26th September – The Lord Warden, was re-commissioned at Portsmouth by Captain Brandreth, as the flagship of Vice-Admiral Hastings Reginald Yelverton, serving on the, Mediterranean station.
5th November – The Lord Warden left Spithead for Lisbon.
12th/13th November – The ship arrived at Gibraltar and arrived to Malta on the 17th?.
2nd December – The Squadron returned to Malta from Port Said and Alexandra.
10th December – Court-Martials at Malta, Mr Charles Neville White, navigating Midshipman of the Lord Waden, Guilty of drunkenness, Dismissed the service and Mr Henry Greaves also a navigating Midshipman of the ship for firing off a pistol on the lower deck, leaving the ship without leave and on the next day, breaking out of the ship while under arrest (Court still out).
18th December – The Lord Warden left Malta for Catania, where the Psyche had gone on to the rocks. She returned to Malta on the 24th.

1871
The squadron over wintered at Malta.
7th March – The Lord Warden, Caledonia, Prince Consort and Wizard, left Malta for a cruise to Sicily and Naples.
9th March – The ships arrived at Palermo.
3rd April – The Lord Warden, Pandora, Rapid and Caledonia left Naples for Malta, calling in at Messina, Catania and Syracuse. They arrived at Malta on the 16th.
26th May - The ship was docked to have her copper cleaned and valves examined.
3rd June – The Lord Warden carrying Major-General Sir Alexander Horsford and the Weser left Malta for Catania. She is expected back at Malta about the 14th? and will then proceed on a cruise with the Ironclad squadron to Corfu and the Eastern Mediterranean.
27th June – A letter from Malta reported that the Admiral and his squadron were on the coast of Greece. They had left Malta on the 21st.
1st July – The ships left Navarino.
4th & 6th July – The squadron was at Rhodes. The Lord Warden and the Defence, were to leave Rhodes on the 6th and sail for Santorini.
15th July – The Admiral and his ships arrived back at Malta, the Lord Warden went into the dock on the 18th for some minor repairs.
The Pall Mall Gazette reported. “We have received letters stating the HM ship the Lord Warden had run aground. The facts of the case we understand, that the Caledonia grounded on a sloal at Santorio and the Lord Warden, in towing her off, had necessarily to approach the place very closely and her rudder did touch the ground while she was doing this, without, however sustaining much damage. It is true, however, that she was docked”.
22nd July – The Lord Warden with the Defence and Caledonia, left Malta for Gibraltar for a combined cruise with the Channel Fleet. The ships arrived at Gibraltar on the 31st.
21st August – The ships of the combined squadrons arrived at Queenstown, where they found orders awaiting them to sail for Lisbon on the 26th.
10th September – Admiral Yelverton, with the Lord Warden, Caledonia, Defence, Hercules, Prince Consort, Monarch and Northumberland, were reported to be in the Tagus.
16th September - Admiral Yelverton, with his section of the combined squadrons left the Tagus on an evolutionary cruise, they are expected to arrive at Vigo, in about fourteen days.
26th September? - The cruise ended and the combined squadrons went their separate ways, with Admiral Yelverton returning to Malta with his ships. The Admiral, left Malta for Gibraltar arriving on the 5th October.
11th October – The Lord Warden left Gibraltar for Port Mahon. The left Port Mahon on the 21st, sailing for Spezia. She was still reported to be at Spezia on the 31st.
1st November – The ship left Spezia for Malta, where she arrived on the evening of the 6th.

1872
9th January – The Lord Warden is still reported to be at Malta.
24th February – Admiral Yelverton shifted his flag to the Helicon to visit stations at the eastern Mediterranean. The Lord Warden remains at Malta as the temporarily flag of Rear-Admiral Cooper Key.
15th March – Lieutenant Dundas of the Lord Clyde, arrived at Malta on a passing steamer to report the Lord Clyde while going to assist the Raby Castle, which had gone ashore on Pantelleria, was now also ashore. Rear-Admiral Cooper Key left at once in the Enchantress to give assistance, quickly followed by the Lord Warden and the Research. They managed to get the Lord Clyde afloat (reported loss of rudder and rudder-post and machinery disabled) and she was to be towed back to Malta by the Lord Warden, they arrived on the 19th.
14th May – It appears that Admiral Yelverton has returned to Malta and has his flag in the Lord Warden, as he left Malta with a squadron on a fortnights cruise.
28th May – A letter from Malta reported that Admiral Yelverton and his squadron had returned to Malta from Naples.
18th June – The Admiral and the squadron left Malta for Gibraltar. The arrived there on the 27th. They left on the 4th July, for Vigo, where they arrived on the 23rd, from a cruise to the westward, under sail alone.
17th August – The Squadron were at Ferrol for the arrival of the King of Spain.
21st September – The squadron left Vigo for Gibraltar and were off Lisbon on the 24th. On the 2nd October, they were reported to be off Cape Trafalgar steering for Gibraltar.
12th October – Admiral Yelverton with the Lord Warden, Invincible, Swiftsure and Pallas, left Gibraltar, for Carthagena and Barcelona, from where the Lord Warden, and Pallas, were to visit Genoa and Naples, before returning to Malta.
24th November – The Lord Warden arrived back at Malta’s Grand Harbour from Sicily.
31st December – Admiral Yelverton has given orders for the Lord Warden (Flag), Swiftsure, Research and Pallas, to be ready to put to sea on the 9th January to join him on a cruise to Greece.

1873
9th January – The squadron left Malta for the coast of Greece, the Piraeus of Athens and Corfu.
17th January – Malta reported the ships to be at the Piraeus of Athens and at Corfu on the 31st. The squadron was back at Malta by the 13th February and are still repoted to be in port on the 28th March.
20th March – Edward’s papers have him leaving the Lord Warden to join the Frolic.

Admiral Ballard in "The Black Battle-fleet" wrote of the Lord Warden - "year after year the Lord Warden led the routine life of a mid-Victorian squadron battleship, with its endless round of cruises, drills, steam tactics and periodic trials; its occasions of full dress ceremony and its intervals of refit and overhaul"
She was also the heaviest wooden ship ever built by any nationality, largely of course due to the weight of her armour and her engines and was considered one of the worst rollers in the battle-fleet.
When she finally paid off in 1885 her upper works were in an appallingly rotten condition. While being constructed the Lord’s Clyde and Warden were built using all the spare wood that the dockyard had in store (these were the last two wooden warships built), most of which was incompletely seasoned.




HMS Frolic – 21st March 1873 to 19th April 1876.

21st March – Joined HMS Frolic, a 6-gun, Gun-vessel of 1872 commanded by Commander Claude Edward Buckle (at Malta), for service on the China station. The ship had been commissioned at Portsmouth on the 8th January and sailed for China via the Suez Canal on the 10th February.

15th March – The Frolic arrived at Malta, on the 2nd April she sailed for Port Said and China,
15th April – The Frolic passed through the Suez Canal into the Red Sea.
7th to 10th June – Was spent at Galle (Sri Lanka).
8th July – The Frolic arrived at Hong Kong.
August – The ship was at Nagasaki and Hiogo before sailing for Yokohama.
5th September – The Frolic arrived at Yokohama from Honduras? (Hiogo?).
27th September – The Frolic, Iron Duke, Thistle and Dwarf, left Hakodate for the harbour of Nambu, on the Main Island of (Nippon) Japan.-, where they arrived on the 29th.
2nd October – The squadron left for Yokohama.
28th October – The Iron Duke, Cadmus, Frolic, Dwarf and Salamis, left Yokohama for Kobe (in the Inland sea), arriving there on the 1st November. On the 5th, the squadron (minus the Dwarf), left for Nagasaki.
19th November – The ship arrived at Shanghai and left in December for Hong Kong.
December – The Frolic was at Hong Kong, she left on the 30th with the Iron Duke and the Salamis, sailing (it was reported) on a Southern cruise to Singapore, Siam and Manilla.

1874
January – The ships visited Bangkok for Admiral (Sir Charles Shadwell), to call on the King of Siam. As the river was too shallow for the Iron Duke, the Frolic and Salamis conveyed the party for the three day visit.
1st/11th January – Off Selangor, pirates attacked a lighthouse, the British Governor called on the navy for assistance and they were soon blockading the Selangor coast. The Thalia, Rinaldo and Avon on the Jugra River and the Iron Duke, Salamis, Midge and Frolic, off the Klang River.
February - Penang / Malacca / Singapore
26th March to 16th April – Joseph Edwards spent in the Naval Prison at Hong Kong, 21 days with Hard Labour.

April – The ship left Hong Kong for Foochow.
May/June/July - The Frolic was at Shanghai, as senior officers ship.
14th August – The Frolic, arrived at Vladivostok, joining the Midge and Ringdove, with the Iron Duke. The ships left for Hakodate on the 20th.
24th August – The ships arrived at Hakodate. The Iron Duke and the Frolic left Hakodate for Nagasaki, on the 13th September.
20th September – The Frolic arrived at Nagasaki, two days behind the flagship. The two ships then sailed for Woosung.
6th October – The ship arrived at Shanghai from Woosung carrying the Admiral to the Modeste.
October – The ship returned to Shanghai and visited Ningpo.
November – Back at Hong Kong, the frolic sailed for the Sula (Sulu?) Archipelago, to relieve the Ringdove.
December – The ship was at Labuan, from where she sailed on the 31st for Sulu.

1875
January – The Frolic was at Manilla.
19th February – The ship arrived back at Hong Kong and was placed in the Aberdeen dock for maintenance.
16th March – The Frolic left Hong Kong for Shanghai and Yokohama.
6th April – The ship arrived at Shanghai after a rough passage.
April and May – The Frolic was at Shanghai, she may have been relieved by the Modeste, who arrived at Shanghai on the 19th May.
June - The ship seems to have been sent to Kobe from Yokohama where she returned, to convey the secretary of the Yeddo Legation to various parts of the Inland Sea.
July – The ship was reported to have joined the Admiral (A P Ryder in the Vigilant) towards the end of the month at Port Hamilton.
August and September – The ship was at Nagasaki, arriving around the 18th August.

November – The Frolic was reported to be at Hong Kong.
5th December – The ship left Hong Kong for Amoy.
29th December – Vice-Admiral Ryder advised, that the Frolic and Mosquito will be prepared at Hong Kong to receive their fresh crews.

1876
January – Vice-Admirals Ryder’s report to the Admiralty of the 27th, placed the Frolic at Swatow.
10th February – The Frolic arrived at Hong Kong, to be paid off and re-commissioned.
March and April – The ship was at Hong Kong, refitting.
19th April – The Frolic, Mosquito and Kestrel, were paid off and new crews that had arrived days before in the Thalia, took over and they were re-commissioned the same day. The old crew’s embarked on the Thalia for their homeward passage via the Suez Canal.
29th April - The Thalia left Hong Kong for England.
25th July – The Thalia arrived in Plymouth Sound.


HMS Duke of Wellington – 26th July 1876 to 5th September 1876.

26th July – Carried on the books of the Duke of Wellington, acting as the Portsmouth flag ship of the port Admiral and depot ship.
I assume that most, if not all of this time was covering his first period of home leave in six years.


HMS Asia – 6th September 1876 to 7th May 1877.

6th September – Joined HMS Asia, acting as the guard ship of the Portsmouth reserve.


HMS Duke of Wellington – 8th May 1876 to 14th May 1877.


HMS Orontes – 15th May 1877 to 16th June 1878

15th May – Joined HMS Orontes (at Portsmouth), a 3-gun Iron screw troopship of 1862, commanded by Captain E H Seymour.
19th May – Reported that the ship had been docked for examination.
23rd May – Reported that the ship was to convey the 88th Foot from Kingstown to the Cape of Good Hope via St Helena, to relieve the 32nd Regiment.
13th June – The Orontes left Portsmouth for Ireland, she is now also to take out Royal Artillery and Engineers.
16th June – While coming into Kingstown harbour, when part of her steam machinery broke. The ship was towed into the harbour and it is thought that repairs will take three or four days. She now has on board, detachments of the 3rd Buffs, RE, RA, 24th Foot and is taking on the full 88th.
23rd June – The Orontes left Kingstown for Queenstown, where she arrived on the 24th. She left on the same day and it was reported that her machinery was working well.
4th July – The ship arrived at St Vincent, she left in the afternoon for the Cape calling at Ascension and St Helena, where she arrive on the 16th, sailing in the evening for Table Bay.
24th July – Capetown reported the arrival of the Orontes. The ship is to embark the 1st Battalion of the 24th for East London, taking on there the Head-Quarters of the 80th for conveyance to Natal, returning to East London to embark the 32nd regiment for passage to Devonport.
20th August – The Orontes arrived back at Simons Bay from East London.-, she was expected to leave for Portsmouth about the 25th.
5th September – The ship sailed from Ascension.
23rd September – The Orontes arrived at Plymouth, she discharged the Headquarters wing of the 32nd Regiment (11 officers and 300 men). After discharging the seamen brought home for this port, the ship will proceed to Portsmouth, where she arrived on the 26th.
3rd October – The ship is to embark the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment at Portsmouth for conveyance to Fort George. There she will embark the 79th and take them to Glasgow, returning to Portsmouth with the 26th Regiment. She was expected to sail for Scotland on the 10th and is due at fort George on the17th and at Glasgow on the 22nd. They arrived back at Portsmouth on the 29th.
November, December and January – The ship was undergoing extensive alterations and defects made good. She is also to be fitted with steam steering gear.

1878
29th January – The Orontes, got up stem and left Plymouth for machinery trial.
11th February – The ship sailed to Devonport to embark the 57th Regiment for passage to Portsmouth, the Regiment are en-route for Aldershot. She returned to Portsmouth on the 14th.
4th March – The ship embarked to 78th Highlanders at Greenock to be conveyed to Kingstown.
11th March – The Orontes arrived back at Portsmouth.
10th April The ship left Portsmouth for Sheerness carrying equipment.
14th April – The ship arrived in Leith Roads, with depots of the 1st & 2nd Battalions of the 5th Foot from Sheerness en route for Berwick.
23rd April – The Orontes left Greenock for Kingstown.
29th April – The ship arrived at Portsmouth with troops from the Irish Militia.
31st April – The Orontes left Portsmouth for Queenstown and Kingstown, with 670 army reserve men to be attached to the British Regiments stationed in Ireland.
7th May – The ship arrived back at Portsmouth, with Artillery and Infantry Militia as well as Coastguardmen.
12th May – The Orontes left Portsmouth for Portland and Queenstown.
16th May – The ship embarked the first battalion of the rifle brigade at Queenstown for transport to Woolwich.
4th July – The ship having been fitted for cavalry and horses, left Portsmouth for Malta, where her arrival was announced on the 11th. She was to take Indian troops to Cyprus.
16th July – Joseph Edwards was transferred to shore, as his Contracted Service expired. He re-engaged on the 8th February 1876 for a further 10 years.


HMS Duke of Wellington – 8th February 1879 to 3rd March 1879.


Naval Barracks – 4th March 1879 to 24th September 1879.


HMS Northampton – 25th September 1879 to 22nd November 1880.

25th September – Joined the Northampton, a 21-gun Iron Screw Armoured Frigate of 1876. The ship was commissioned at Chatham by Captain John Fisher, as Flagship of the North American and West Indian Station.
31st October – The Northampton left Chatham for Bermuda via Sheerness, where she will take on her powder and shell, swing her compasses and then leave for a weeks preliminary cruise, she is then under orders to call in at Spithead on her way, to perform her speed trial in Stokes Bay.
12th November – The ship arrived at Spithead. The ship had her speed trial but had a problem with one of her rudder chains, she returned to port for some suggested alterations, the ship was taken into Dock, where her 12-ton guns were found to be defective and were removed.
19th December – The Northampton after making a speed trial at Stokes Bay. Left Spithead for the North American station (Bermuda) with Vice-Admiral Sir Leopold M’Clintock, where she is to replace the Bellerophon as Flag ship.

1880
7th January – The Northampton is reported to have arrived at Bermuda and is expected to sail for the West Indies on the 20th.
28th January – The ship arrived at Barbados. The Admiral reported a serious accident on the vessel, owing to the faulty breech action of the Nordenfeldt gun (the Northampton was carrying 4 Nordenfaldt’s).
17th February – The Northampton arrived at Trinidad from Barbados. The ship was reported to be at Antigua on the 20th and arrived at Jamaica on March 11th.
5th April – The Ship arrived back at Bermuda. She left, sailing for Halifax on the 11th May. Where she was reported on the 21st.
17th August – The Northampton left Halifax for a cruise to Quebec, where she is expected to arrive on the 1st September. She expects to return to Halifax on the 26th. She returned on the 20th and was to visit various parts of the station. The Northampton arrived back at Halifax on the 25th, with the Blanche and Forester in company.
5th October – The ship was at Halifax and mails after 11th November are to be sent to Bermuda (where she was expected to sail for on the 26th), via New York. She left in company with the. Forester, Fantome, Druid and Tenedos.
25th October – The Northampton arrived at Bermuda. She remained there until late December.



HMS Forester – 23rd November 1880 to 31st January 1882.

23 November – Joined HMS Forester, a 4-gun gunboat of 1878 at Bermuda, which was refitting. The ship was commanded by Lieutenant-Commander F A Harston.
24th December – The Forester arrived at Port Royal and was to sail for Turks Island on the 11th January.

1881
20th January – The Ship arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica and would return to Port Royal, after giving leave to her crew.
28th March – The Forester was expected to have arrive at Jamaica from Nicaragua.
1st April – The ship was to leave Jamaica for Barbados, to be employed on that division.
27th April – The Blanche (senior officers ship) arrived at Barbados to find the Forester there.
29th May - The ship was reported to be at St Vincent.
4th July – Reported that the Forester has been recalled to Devonport to be Paid Off.
21st October – The ship arrived at Halifax from Bermuda. She is to convey mails due on the 6th November to the Flag at Bermuda.

1882
8th January – The Forester arrived at Plymouth Sound from Bermuda and went into Barapool.
31st January – The ship was paid off at Devonport.



HMS Impregnable – 1st February 1882 to 6th June 1884.

1st February – Joined HMS Impregnable the ex 98-gun wooden sail of 1810, acting as a Naval boys training ship at Devonport, Commanded by Captain R Bradshaw.


HMS Royal Alidade – 7th June 1884 to 3rd July 1884.

7th June – Joined HMS Royal Alidade, the Portsmouth Depot ship.


HMS Malabar – 4th July 1884 to 25th April 1885.

4th July – Joined HMS Malabar, a 3-gun Iron screw Indian Troopship of 1866, commanded by Captain Harris.
28th August – The Malabar, which is leave England for Bombay on the 19th September, made a
very satisfactory trial of her machinery.
10th September – The Malabar started the trooping season, leaving Portsmouth with drafts from the
1st battalion Dorset’s and Warwick’s for Bombay via Queenstown where she was to embark other
troops.
12th September – The ship arrived at Queenstown and embarked drafts from, the 1st Suffolk’s, 2nd
Somerset, 1st West Riding and the Scottish Rifles.
10th October – The Malabar arrived at Bombay.
5th November – The ship left Port Said for England. She arrived at Malta on the 10th and left on the
11th.
18th November – The Malabar arrived back at Portsmouth, she brings home 47 officers and 897 time
expired men for the discharge depot at Brockhurst, 154 from the Royal Artillery and 18 individual
soldiers and women and children.
27th November – The ship again left Portsmouth for Bombay with Various drafts. She arrived at
Bombay on December 25th. She left for England on the 5th January.

1885
17th January – The Malabar arrived at Suez. She brings home, 51 Officers, 62 Invalids, 630 time
expired men and 267 men to join ten depots, besides women and children.
12th February – The ship left Portsmouth fo Bombay. She carries 63 officers 1149 other ranks, 46
women and 52 children. She arrived at Bombay on 11th March.
21st March – The ship left Bombay for England and left Suez on April 3rd.
18th April – The Malabar arrived back at Portsmouth.
20th April – It was reported that the Malabar is to be paid off and her crew to be drafted to ships
fitting out.
5th May – The Malabar was paid-off.



HMS Bacchante - 26th April 1885 to 6th November 1888.

26th April – Joined HMS Bacchante (at Portsmouth), a 16-gun ironclad screw-propelled corvette of 1876, commanded by Captain A W Moore and acting as the flagship of Rear-Admiral Sir Frederick W Richards, the C-in-C of the East Indies station. On the 23rd the ship had been anchored in the stream at Portsmouth due to so many of her men having broken their leave. (The Bacchante served during the third Anglo-Burmese War in 1885, transferring three-quarters of her complement to serve on gunboats, on the Irrawaddy River, or in the suppression of banditry).
30th April – The ship was inspected at Spithead by Admiral Geoffrey Hornby.
1st May - The Bacchante sailed for the East India station. (I trust that Edward’s received his Malabar wages before he sailed)
13th May – The ship sailed from Malta.
16th May – The ship was at Port Said, she arrived at Aden on the 27th and was to await the arrival of Rear-Admiral Sir F Richards. She remained there until the 16th June.
“Aden On 3 June, the port was hit by a cyclone, the Bacchante “pitched and rolled to an alarming extent, causing a serious strain on her anchor gear, the sea beat upon her with terrific violence, and broke clean over her decks, a great wave carried away the dinghy and punt and smashed the whaler into matchwood, the launch and the steam barge sank alongside and finally the steam cutter sank”
The French warship La Renard with a crew of 7 officers and 120 men, was lost with all hands.

28th June – The Bacchante arrived at Trincomalee with the Reindeer.
July – The ship remained at Trincomalee.
14th August – The Admiral reported to ship to be at Colombo. On the 29th, the Admiral further advised the Bacchante would leave Colombo on the 5th September, on a cruise to visit, Diego Garcia, Mauritiys, Tamatave, Johanna, Zanzibar and the Seychelles. And expect to arrive at Bombay on the 19th November.
5th September – The ship left on her cruise.
9th/10th September – The ship called in at Diego Garcia abnd moved on to the Rodrigues Islands.
16th? September – The Bacchante arrived at Mauritius, the Admiral advised that they would proceed for Tamatave and Zanzibar on the 7th October, She arrived at Tamatave on the 12th October and left the next day for Zanzibar.
20th to 24th October – The ship was at Zanzibar, she left sailing for Rangoon due to the current Burma crisis.

On the 26th October Calcutta reported, “Unless a reply to the ultimatum which gas been sent by the Indian Government to King Theebaw be received in Rangoon by the 10th November and contain a complete acceptance of the terms laid down, hostilities will commence the next day.
Another Prince and Regency will be substituted for the present government. Either a protectorate or annexation is certain.
The troops will embark as soon as they are ready. Every exertion is being made to prepare the Transports.
The Irrawaddy leaves Rangoon on Wednesday (28th) with 50 Bluejackets for the frontier, the Woodlark is there. The Bacchante, Turquoise and Ranger are expected before the 10th November. General Norman is to command the Bengal Brigade, he will arrive on Wednesday”.

It was later stated that the Naval Brigade is to be supplied from HM ships Bacchante, Turquoise and Woodlark. The latter ship manning the Indian government steamer Irrawaddy which will be armed with 20-pounder breechloaders, Nordenfelts and Gardner guns and those of the other two ships will man ten boats and steam launches. Again being armed with Nordenfelts and Gardner guns. The first duty of the Naval Brigade will be to conduct the troops up the Irrawaddy River.

1st to 10th November – The ship was at the Seychelles.
11th to 13th November – Was spent at Trincomalee.
19th/20th November – The Admiral in the Bacchante arrived at Rangoon.

Clowes in his Naval History writes:-
“Rear-Admiral Sir Frederick William Richards, the naval Commander-in-Chief, who was then at Zanzibar in the Bacchante, had instructed Captain Woodward by telegraph to organise a Naval Brigade, and had informed him that twelve '25-pr. guns would be furnished to him by the Indian Government. As these guns arrived in succession from India, they were made ready and four of them were sent on to the front on November 11th with the Turquoise's contingent of the Brigade, under Lieutenant Frederick Fogarty Fegen. The remaining eight were held back for the Bacchante's contingent. Leaving only the Bacchante's contingent to follow him. Captain Woodward himself departed for the front, and overtook the advance on the 17th at Minhla, where he assumed command of the Brigade.
The Admiral who, after the arrival of the flagship on the 19th at Rangoon, proceeded to the front on November '20th, with the Bacchante's contingent

The first hostile movement of the campaign was made on November 14th by Commander Clutterbuck, who, with the Irrawaddy and Kathleen, undertook a reconnaissance up the river, and, about twenty-eight miles above the Thayetmyo, came upon a Burmese steamer, which he engaged with his machine-guns.
On the 27th the steamer Ptilu, with Rear-Admiral Sir Frederick William Richards, and the Bacchantes contingent, arrived and anchored, the naval Commander-in-Chief at once going to the Palow to visit General Prendergast. As soon as it appeared that the Burmese no longer purposed to resist, the troops were landed to take over the guns and other arms which were to be surrendered, a brigade being also sent to Sagain fort, on the right bank, for the same purpose. Only about '2500 stand of small-arms seem to have been given up. Probably as many more were earned off by the Burmese. That night the flotilla lay between Ava and Sagain and on the 28th it moved up to Mandalay, At 1 P.M. the Naval Brigade disembarked, and accompanied the
troops to the King's palace, where it took over the custody of the eastern entrance during Colonel Sladen's interview with Theehaw, who agreed formally to surrender on the 29th, when the army made its triumphal entry,
In the interim, a party from the Naval Brigade was employed at the palace under the orders of the sorting committee; the Irrawaddy, Tigris, and Kathleen were detached on various services, launches patrolled the river for the suppression of dacoity and the Bacchante's contingent was sent to the Chindwin river for the same purpose.”

A letter from the Bacchante’s Naval Brigade dated Leaving Bhamo December 31st appeared in the British Press. “Part of this brigade left Rangoon on the 19th November, en route for Mandalay, in the steamship Pulu, arriving at Prome on the morning of the 22nd, where we were met by Rear-Admiral Sir F Richards and the remainder of the brigade. Leaving Prome we proceeded up the Irrawaddy, expecting to encounter a heave storm of lead but nothing of much importance occurred until we overtook the column which left Rangoon some time before. We proceeded on to Ava, arriving abreast of the forts at 10.00 am on the morning of the 26th, where we saw nothing but Burmese troops for more than a mile but having a flag of truce, we did not fire”. Following a discussion between the Admiral and an Ambassador the Ave Forts were surrendered to the English. After destroying the forts guns and arms, The troops continued on the Mandalay, where they arrived on the 27th? and with the Naval Brigade as the advance guard succeeded in entering the City. The following day the King (Theelaw) was captured soon to be sent down the river for Rangoon as a prisoner of war.
The letter continues, “We then proceed to wreck the Palace of its grandeur and everything in the shape of arms and ammunition was destroyed, the jewel’s &c, being packed in boxes to be sent to Calcutta, where they will be sold and, it is believer, the proceeds distributed as prize money to the forces.
On the 13th December the General ordered the Bacchante’s brigade under Commander Barlow, to prepare for a march on the other side of the river to capture Dacoit’s, the thieves and burglars, who go and destroy villages and plunder the dwellings. We went some way down the river in the steamer Doo Woon and landed at a place that had just been burned by them. The next morning after loading some bullock carts, we marched some 16 miles and camped at Aloka Pah. The following day we continued our march, having several skirmishes with the Dacoits”.
During their continued march, they had several brushes with the Dacoits, capturing up to 28 at a time and handing them over to local head chief. One rather unpleasant incident the letter records, is that in one village that the brigade came to, the found the many of the very young village girls had been ravished, hung up be there heels and after pouring petroleum over them, had burnt them to death. After a week of chasing the Dacoits, around the Irrawaddy and Chindwin rivers, the brigade returned back down the river and boarded the steamer Tigress on the 21st, which took them up to Mandalay. Here they were ordered to join the Bhamo expedition but as they were not required, they returned to Mandalay.

28th November – General Prendergast with his head-quarters and Captain Woodward with the naval brigade arrived at Bhamo.

1886
January and February – The Bacchante remained at Rangoon. She was expected to leave about the 24th for Trincomalee, Colombo and Bombay.
10th/11th March – The Bacchante and Sphinx arrived at Trincomalee. She left on the 12th?, for Colombo.
20th March – The Bacchante left Colombo for Bombay.
25th March – The Bacchante with the Admiral arrived at Bombay.
April – The ship spent at Bombay. The Admiral was with Sphinx in the Persian Gulf.
14th May – The Bacchante was still at Bombay, she was expected to sail for Colombo about the 19th. The Bacchante was at Colombo by the 25th.
14th June – The ship left Colombo for Trincomalee on the 17th.
1st July – The ship was to leave Trincomalee on a cruise.
20th July – The Admiral in the Bacchante reported from Diego Garcia.
4th August – The ship arrived at Mauritius, with the Turquoise, Reindeer and Mariner, which ships had seemed to have joined the Flag at Diego Garcia. The Ships were still at Mauritius on the 31st August, when it was thought that they would leave on a cruise.

11th September – The British press reported, ‘A Serious Accident on board the Bacchante’ – “While engaged in oiling the engines on board the Bacchante, a Stoker named H Turner, had his left hand so severely injured as to require amputation necessary. Turner, who was one of the survivors of the Doterel disaster, is now on his way to England.
(Note;- HMS Doterel was a Doterel-class sloop launched by the Royal Navy in 1880. She sank at anchor off Punta Arenas (in the Straits of Magellan), after an explosion on 26 April 1881. Her loss caused the deaths of 143 crew members, and there were 12 survivors. She was en route to join the Pacific Station. Her loss was initially the source of much speculation. Causes considered included an attack by the Fenians, a lost torpedo, and a coal gas explosion. An enquiry in September 1881 concluded coal gas was the cause.)

21st September – The ships arrived at Reunion and would leave on the 21st.
2nd October – The ships arrived at Zanzibar, the Turquoise was to remain as the senior officers ship on the East Coast of Africa with the Reindeer, under her orders.
7th/8th November – Admiral in the Bacchante, with the Mariner and Penguin arrived at Aden.
19th November – The Bacchante left Aden for Muscat and Bombay.
6th December – The Bacchante with the Mariner arrived at Bombay.

1887
January – The ship remained at Bombay.
3rd to 8th February – The ship visited Goa, arriving back at Bombay on the 9th.
February and March – The ship remained at Bombay.
31st March – The Bacchante left Bombay for Colombo.
5th to 23rd April – The ship with the Admiral on board was at Colombo. They left on the 23rd for Trincomalee.
May – The Bacchante remained at Trincomalee, she left on June 18th on a cruise.
24th to 27th June – The ship spent at Diego Garcia.
2nd to 7th July – The Admiral visited the Rodrigues Islands.
9th to 20th August – Was spent at Mauritius.
25th/26th August – The ship was at St Augustine Bay, Madagascar,
1st to 4th September – They called in at Mozambique.
15th September – The Bacchante with the Mariner arrived at Zanzibar, they left on the 6th.
8th to 15th October - The Seychelles were visited.
20th to 24th October – The ship spent at the Maldives.
1st November – The Bacchante arrived at Colombo, sailing again on the 12th for Trincomalee.
November – The Bacchante was at Colombo and Trincomalee which she left on the 27th sailing for the Andaman & Nicobar Islands.
14th December – The ship arrived at Rangoon. The Admiral advised that they would leave, sailing on the 26th December for Calcutta.

1888
January – The Bacchante spent at Calcutta, she left on the 28th for Madras and Trincomalee.
While the Bacchante was at Calcutta, a team from the ship competed against the Calcutta Naval Artillery Volunteers in a rifle match and much to their surprise won the match by 29 points.

2nd February – The ship arrived at Madras and left on the 8th for Trincomalee, where she arrived around the 11th.
13th March – The Bacchante was at Colombo, she left on the 14th for Bombay.
22nd March - Captain Reginald F H Henderson appointed to the command as on this date.
March and April – The Ship remained at Bombay, awaiting Rear-Admiral Edward Fremantle the new station Commander-in-Chief.
8th May – The Bacchante, now with Admiral Fremantle left Bombay for Colombo which they left on the 25th for Trincomalee.
28th May – The ship arrived at Trincomalee.
15th June – The Bacchante left Trincomalee, sailing on a cruise.
21st//22nd June – The Admiral visited Diego Garcia and on the 27th / 29th the Rodrigues Islands, followed on the 1st to 5th July, by Reunion.
6th July – The ship arrived at Mauritius where on the 20th, the Bacchante rendezvoused with the Boadicea, Captain Curzon-Howe, who relieved her on station, Rear Admiral transferred his flag and the Bacchante left on the 24th.
3rd August – The Bacchante Arrived at Durban, she left later the same day.
7th to 14th August – The ship spent in Simons Bay.
29th August – The ship was at St Helena, 15th September at Cape Vincent, Cape Verde Islands, and she arrived at Plymouth Sound on the 8th October, where she received orders to continue on to Portsmouth to be Paid off.
11th October – The Bacchante arrived at Portsmouth.
7th November - The Bacchante was paid off into the Reserve.


HMS Duke of Wellington – 7th November 1888 to 11th January 1889.

Acting as Flagship of the Port Admiral and Depot ship Portsmouth.

HMS Asia – 12th January 1889 to 3rd April 1889. – To shore pensioned.

Acting as Guard Ship and flag of the Admiral Superintendent Portsmouth.

HMS Asia – 15th July 1889 to 4th September 1891 – Drill

15th July 1889 -- Joined HMS Asia as an AB pensioner to 13th April 1890. Then 28th April 1890 to 19th April 1891 and 4th May 1891 to 4th September 1891.


HMS Excellent – 5th September 1891 to 14th July 1892 – Discharged to Sick Quarters.

5th September 1891 – Joined HMS Excellent the Portsmouth Gunnery ship/Base at Portsmouth to 3rd April 1892, then 18th April 1892 to 14th July 1892 when he was discharged to sick quarters.
22nd July 1892 - Discharged Dead from Haslar Hospital, cause “Jaundice”.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg EDWARDS. John 1.JPG (91.4 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg EDWARDS. John 2.JPG (92.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg EDWARDS. John 3.JPG (33.7 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg EDWARDS. John 4.JPG (45.5 KB, 0 views)
File Type: jpg EDWARDS. John 5.JPG (38.7 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg BURMA WAR.jpg (164.0 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg HMS BACCHANTE in a HURRICANE.jpg (47.2 KB, 3 views)
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  #2  
Old 25-04-2017, 18:41
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jbryce1437 jbryce1437 is online now
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Nice work David, a great read.

Jim
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  #3  
Old 25-04-2017, 18:58
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Yes a great read, those were the days although the punishments were a bit harsh, roasting and sawing.
I read a few paragraphs and will get stuck in again tomorrow.
What is an AB Pensioner?
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  #4  
Old 26-04-2017, 20:34
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davidrn davidrn is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Hi Jonny,

AB Pensioner is "Able Seaman Pensioner"

Regards Dave
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  #5  
Old 29-04-2017, 16:13
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Yes Dave but what is an able seaman pensioner? I see he was an AB pensioner but still serving, that's what's confusing me.
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Old 29-04-2017, 16:21
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

I was trying to think of where I had heard of King Theebaw, I think it was in the wonderful poem/song The Road to Mandalay.
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Old 30-04-2017, 22:46
Scatari Scatari is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny07 View Post
I was trying to think of where I had heard of King Theebaw, I think it was in the wonderful poem/song The Road to Mandalay.
Right you are Johnny - the last king of Burma.

From the second verse of the poem "Mandalay":

'Er petticoat was yaller an' 'er little cap was green,
An' 'er name was Supi-yaw-lat - jes' the same as Theebaw's Queen,
An' I seed her first a-smokin' of a whackin' white cheroot,
An' a-wastin' Christian kisses on an 'eathen idol's foot:
Bloomin' idol made o' mud
Wot they called the Great Gawd Budd
Plucky lot she cared for idols when I kissed 'er where she stud!
On the road to Mandalay...


One of Kipling's finest poems, in my humble opinion.
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:58
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james_harvey james_harvey is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

An AB Pensioner is a sailor who having reached the rank of able bodied seaman is pensioned and then rejoins

If he was a LS or PO or CPO when pensioned he would then be that rank e.g. Po pensioner

They were loads in ww2

Under the rules a pensioner could not accrue time towards ls medal hence why until after ww2 bars for second awards did not exist but the only was a man could receive a bar was to be a serving pensioner

It was during ww2 king gvi changed the award criteria to allow pensioned med to get the bar
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in memory of my grandfather A/B C F Harvey RN Boom Defence.

39-45 Star, Burma Star, France and Germany Star, Defence Medal and War Medal

And my grandmother LACW G I Harvey WAAF
Defence and War medal
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:51
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Thanks James. That explains a lot.
My father who was a Chief G.I had a bar on his long service and good conduct medal which must have been quite unusual.
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Old 01-05-2017, 14:09
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Means he completed 30 years service

Some did slip through prior to ww2 but most we're stopped

What was his name and I'll see if I can find anything

Regards

James
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in memory of my grandfather A/B C F Harvey RN Boom Defence.

39-45 Star, Burma Star, France and Germany Star, Defence Medal and War Medal

And my grandmother LACW G I Harvey WAAF
Defence and War medal
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Old 01-05-2017, 15:02
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Well James the reason he was able to build up so much time was that he was in a system called NCS that is non continuous service. He served throughout the war and when he completed his 22 yrs instead of leaving the navy he remained in as NCS that is that he signed on every year (or maybe 2 yrs) as long as he was fit for service. He got fed up after only 47 yrs and left as the oldest ever serving sailor and the longest serving. He got loads of medals in the war but they found a small gap on his uniform so they gave him the BEM.

PS Look out for a PM.
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Old 01-05-2017, 15:07
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

[quote=Scatari;10164292]Right you are Johnny - the last king of Burma.

From the second verse of the poem "Mandalay":

'Er petticoat was yaller an' 'er little cap was green,
An' 'er name was Supi-yaw-lat - jes' the same as Theebaw's Queen,
An' I seed her first a-smokin' of a whackin' white cheroot,
An' a-wastin' Christian kisses on an 'eathen idol's foot:
Bloomin' idol made o' mud
Wot they called the Great Gawd Budd
Plucky lot she cared for idols when I kissed 'er where she stud!
On the road to Mandalay...


One of Kipling's finest poems, in my humble opinion.[/QUOTE
Yes Tim a great piece of work in spite of the geographical inaccuracies regarding China being across the bay from Mandalay which of course as we know it isn't.
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Old 02-05-2017, 11:42
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Not received any pm yet.

Regards

James
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in memory of my grandfather A/B C F Harvey RN Boom Defence.

39-45 Star, Burma Star, France and Germany Star, Defence Medal and War Medal

And my grandmother LACW G I Harvey WAAF
Defence and War medal
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Old 02-05-2017, 18:45
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Quote:
Originally Posted by james_harvey View Post
Not received any pm yet.

Regards

James
James, I can't empty my inbox which is full but have asked for help so will be in touch soon.
Regards, John.
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Old 02-05-2017, 20:02
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james_harvey james_harvey is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Pm received but cannot reply as you have exceeded your limit
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in memory of my grandfather A/B C F Harvey RN Boom Defence.

39-45 Star, Burma Star, France and Germany Star, Defence Medal and War Medal

And my grandmother LACW G I Harvey WAAF
Defence and War medal
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-05-2017, 20:40
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Quote:
Originally Posted by james_harvey View Post
Pm received but cannot reply as you have exceeded your limit
My inbox now empty James.
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Old 04-05-2017, 20:58
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Default Re: A Burma 1885 -7 to the Navy. HMS Bacchante

Re- AB Pensioner. At this time if a man was pensioned and allowed to rejoin of extra periods of service, regardless of his rank, he was signed on as an Able Body Pensioner. see this mans service rank.
Boatswains Mate – 17th September 1886.
Petty Officer 1st Class (Quarter Master) – 14th January 1887 - (1889 pensioned to Shore)
Able Seaman Pensioner – 15th July 1889.

Re- Long Service medal and bar, Douglas Morris in his "The Long Service Medals" gives a list of bars issued from 1919 to 1962, which he admits is incomplete. This list contains some 750 awards. So while scarce the award of a bar is not rare.

Dave
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