World Naval Ships Forums  
CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF ART PRINTS!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Naval History > Canadian Ships and Crews
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Canadian Ships and Crews Topics relating to a specific Canadian ship or ships.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 30-03-2012, 01:27
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default V & Cr class destroyers

I find I am in need of information about these destroyers.

Specifically, their histories post-WW2, and the reason for converting one of each class into a Type-15 ASW frigate.

It would seem that it would have been better to have converted both of one class instead.


I have found some info, but it is sparse... especially for 1946-50 for both Crescent and Crusader.


Here is what I have now, any information beyond this would be greatly appreciated.

{photos would be nice as well }

Quote:
Algonquin was recalled on VJ-Day and left Alexandria, Egypt for Esquimalt Naval Base (Victoria, BC) on November 3. Once there she paid off into reserve on February 6, 1946. She remained in reserve until she was converted to a Type 15 ASW frigate in Esquimalt dockyard, before recommissioning 25 February 1953.
HMCS Algonquin

Sioux was paid off into reserve at Esquimalt on 27 Feb. 1947. After some modernization she was recommissioned in early 1950, and did three tours of duty in Korean waters, from 1950 to 1955. Afterward she resumed her training role until paid off at Halifax on October 30, 1963.
HMCS Sioux

Crescent was kept in commission after WW2, and based in Esquimalt. In March 1949, on a cruise to China, while in port in Nanjing, the lower decks staged what her Captain was careful to NOT call a "mutiny". Two other ships of the RCN (Magnificent & Athabaskan) experienced similar events at the same time.
It appears that she began her conversion to a Type 15 in Esquimalt dockyard not long after her return from China. She remained assigned to Esquimalt until 1957, when she was transferred to Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Data from Wiki and scattered sources.

Crusader was also based in Esquimalt, and apparently kept in commission. She served in Korea as well. Afterwards Crusader was attached to the Naval Research Establishment (Dartmouth) c.1957/58 for VDS trials.
Data from scattered sources
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 30-03-2012, 02:32
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Blackbat:

There is a lot of information available on these four ships. Algonquin and Crescent were converted, not identically, to a then modern ASW frigate design inspired by the UK Type 15 ships. Sioux was modernized by removal of her X and Y 4.7" mounts which were replaced by two Squid ASW mortars, somewhat similar to UK Type 16 frigates, themselves being destroyer conversions. Crusader after being crowned the top "Train Buster" in the Korean War served as a trials ship for the then highly secret towed variable depth sonar system. She received no modernization and was decommissioned in 1960 and scrapped in 1963. The VDS was transferred to Crescent for operational trials.

The basic technical summaries for the ships can be found in Jane's Fighting Ships 1963-64 and earlier. There are several other references which I will dig out.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 30-03-2012, 03:04
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Blackbat: By sheer luck, I saw a post in the Photo Galleries tonight under the Frigate Conversions Type 15 thread. There is a good picture of Algonquin there along with bow shots of Algonquin and Crescent alongside. I have put a post on the thread pointing out some of the differences in the "sisters".
Brian
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 30-03-2012, 03:13
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Yes, I saw those.

The earliest post-WW2 Jane's I have access to is the 1964-65 edition, unfortunately.

Anything you can get me would really help.

Thanks for the info so far.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 31-03-2012, 20:20
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Jon: Many of the references I have are out of print; however, there the following will give you a good sense of the history of the "V" and "Cr" classes in the RCN:

"Canada's Navy The First Century" by Marc Milner, Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1999, ISBN 0-8020-4281-3. There is a second edition of this book with an additional chapter and it is likely the second edition that is currently available.

"The Naval Service of Canada 1910-1920 The Centennial Story" edtited by Richard H. Gimblett, Toronto, Dundurn Press, 2009, ISBN 978-1-55488-470-4. This volume and the Milner book should be readily available through Amazon or Chapters-Indigo.

"Canadian Naval Operations in Korean Waters 1950-1955" by Thor Thorgrimsson and E.C. Russell, Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1965. This book details the exploits of HMC Ships Sioux and Crusader, and the Tribal Class, during that conflict. You might find a copy in a used book store in Vancover or Victoria, BC.

As I noted in my second post to the Photo Gallery: Frigate Conversions Type 15, the two full conversions and Sioux represented transitional ships in the transformation of the RCN from a general purpose navy to a specialised ASW fleet designed to counter the submarine threat of the Soviet Navy in the North Atlantic.

Good luck with your project and please let me know how it develops.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-04-2012, 05:47
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Thank you.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-04-2012, 22:02
Lee Day Lee Day is offline
Petty Officer
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Toronto, On. Canada
Posts: 40
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

I served on CRUSADER Aug'57 to Oct'59. Captain was an ex fly-boy by the name of F. W. Bradley. Good Captain and a great ship.
Searched for a German sailing ship called PAMIR that sank off of the Canary Islands I believe. PAMIR was a Barque that was used to train midshipman in the German Navy. Regrettably no survivors. Crew was around 85 members. Search was conducted in conjunction with a USCGS ANTIETAM.
We went to Portsmouth for a 3 month refit to rig our VDS gear for exercises in Gibraltar with HM SUBMARINE TALLY HO. On the way was re-directed by Admiralty to proceed to the Irish Sea where a KLM Airliner "Hubert de Groot" had crashed. Over 95 people perished. Picked up remnants of the aircraft and a couple of bodies that we landed in Galloway Bay.
I have picture of CRUSADER but I'm not sure of how to get it to you. I know if you go to the RCN website that there is a listing of all Canadian navy ships and CRUSADER is posted.

Up spirits, stand fast.
Lee Day,
LSAW
RCN
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-04-2012, 23:06
Matelot Matelot is offline
Chief Petty Officer
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 50
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

You might be able to find something useful on this site.

http://jproc.ca/r17/index.html

I got to sail on both Crescent and Algonquin, though briefly. Was drafted to Crescent to take her to the West Coast in 67. Spent about a month on board getting her ready, day trips out of harbour etc. For some reason just before sailing, can't remember why, I was drafted "next door" to Algonquin. So set sail on her along with Crescent and Columbia for Esquimalt. Great Trip.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-04-2012, 01:43
Blackfly's Avatar
Blackfly Blackfly is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eastern Canada
Posts: 231
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

I'm sure posting the pic of CRUSADER here would be appreciated. I know that I know very little about our Navy from WW2 to the time the Restigouche and St Laurants came along.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-04-2012, 08:50
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Day View Post
I have picture of CRUSADER but I'm not sure of how to get it to you.
If you can scan it into your computer you can upload it here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Day View Post
I know if you go to the RCN website that there is a listing of all Canadian navy ships and CRUSADER is posted.

Up spirits, stand fast.
Lee Day,
LSAW
RCN

Which website is that? I can't seem to find any such list on the official RCN site, and I have no idea what other website you might be referring to.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-04-2012, 21:15
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Jon: There are several things you can look at on the web. All of the RCN's Crowsnest magazines from 1948-1968 are on the RCN historical site. There are several stories and pictures of all four ships in these magazines.

In addition to the very good Jerry Proc site that another post made known to you there was a list of all RCN ships put together as part of the RCN centennial celebrations. You can get to that site through the Department of National Defence website http://www.forces.gc.ca -click on Navy on the menu bar on the left side of the page. You can drill down from there for history.

I have googled HMCS Crusader and a number of pictures turn up showing the VDS installation. There is little written about Crusader after the Korean War.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-04-2012, 00:59
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Jon: Another site is Ready Aye Ready.com but that is the basic facts about Crusader and the standard starboard side picture of her as the VDS trials ship. There is similar info there for the other three ships as well.
Brian
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-04-2012, 05:15
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Wentzell View Post
there was a list of all RCN ships put together as part of the RCN centennial celebrations. You can get to that site through the Department of National Defence website http://www.forces.gc.ca -click on Navy on the menu bar on the left side of the page. You can drill down from there for history.

I have googled HMCS Crusader and a number of pictures turn up showing the VDS installation. There is little written about Crusader after the Korean War.

Brian
Doing that just takes me to the official RCN site I mentioned earlier... and I still can't find any such list or photo gallery... despite following each section down several levels.

Either the list is really buried deep many layers down or the website is different for non-Canadian access.

Using the search function with a ship's name gets lots of links (many unrelated)... but all of them just give me a "405 error" when I try to access them.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-04-2012, 10:16
Andy Waugh Andy Waugh is offline
Commander
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 469
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

An article which might be of interest.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg a_Page_1.jpg (517.3 KB, 45 views)
File Type: jpg a_Page_2.jpg (975.1 KB, 31 views)
File Type: jpg a_Page_3.jpg (703.9 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg a_Page_4.jpg (1.04 MB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg a_Page_5.jpg (916.5 KB, 34 views)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-04-2012, 11:30
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Jon: At the http://www.forces.gc.ca website, click on "Navy" and when that page opens click on "Links". Under "Links" click on "Canadian Navy Centennial". You then have access to a number of items, the most useful of which is probably the "Education" button which provides an extensive bibliography; however, the books with reference to Korea are likely the more useful.

When I use google search for "HMCS Crusader" the images for the ship are of interest. The pictures by D.R. Gorham will be of interest but he does not provide much context. He was obviously a crew member in the late 1950s.

One of my "incomplete", read "not started", projects has been to do a ship's history on HMCS Crusader. This would require a long visit to Ottawa and the Department of Heritage and History at the Department of National Defence.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-04-2012, 11:48
Brian Wentzell's Avatar
Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 2,059
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Gentlemen: The Michael Whitby article provides a good background to the participation of the RCN in Korea and, after the end of the Cold War, it remains a model for the conduct of operations in waters distant from Canada by general purpose combat ships.

One note on the images in the article. The first image cannot have been from 1948. The light grey paint on the hulls did not come until the mid 1950's. The image shows the two Tribals in the final configuration with the SPS 6 radar and large lattice mast.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-04-2012, 13:23
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Brian... thanks for the article, and for the attempts at help, but I simply cannot extract any information on any individual ship from the RCN site, no matter how deep I go, or how many links I chase down.


Doing Google image search for "HMCS Crusader" turns up lots of images... by many different people, websites, and so on.

Googling his name and the ship name brings me to his Flikr site... all 2,087 images, which you have to scroll through one at a time to find what you are looking for.

I just don't have the time, so I saved the url for some time when I have nothing else to do.

Thanks again for the help, I appreciate it.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-09-2012, 20:44
Scatari Scatari is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 2,256
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Jon:

Have just sent you a PM on this topic.

Cheers!
__________________
Tim
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-10-2012, 05:20
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

I want to publicly thank Scatari for the copy of "Canadian Naval Operations in Korean Waters 1950-1955".

It arrived today, and I look forward to reading it.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-10-2012, 05:27
Scatari Scatari is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 2,256
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackBat242 View Post
I want to publicly thank Scatari for the copy of "Canadian Naval Operations in Korean Waters 1950-1955".

It arrived today, and I look forward to reading it.
You're more than welcome Jon - glad to see that it made it there.

Hope you enjoy it.
__________________
Tim
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 31-03-2013, 16:38
Scatari Scatari is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 2,256
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackBat242 View Post
I want to publicly thank Scatari for the copy of "Canadian Naval Operations in Korean Waters 1950-1955".

It arrived today, and I look forward to reading it.
Jon:

Have just sent you a PM on the Canadian "V" and "CR" classes.
__________________
Tim
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 31-03-2013, 20:15
BlackBat242's Avatar
BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,355
Default Re: V & Cr class destroyers

And I have received & answered it.
__________________
Only a fool fights in a burning house. __ Jon A., Sgt USMC '81-'89; CV-61 USS Ranger '85-'87
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 22nd January 1932 : HMS Emerald : Sailed Akyab

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see our naval art portal - Eight random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian. (AP)
Half Price! - £75.00
 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The submarine depot ship HMS Maidstone is pictured off Hong Kong with a quintet of British submarines alongside for replenishment, namely (left to right) an S-class, a U-class, a T-class and two more U-class.

HMS Maidstone by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 CVN 65 USS Enterprise on her first deployment in the Gulf of Tonkin. On this day she flew 165 sorties, a carrier record! Two A4 Skyhawks head towards a bombing mission while an F4 phantom rides escort.

Yankie Station by Randall Wilson. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 HMS Prince of Wales is shown firing on the Bismarck and in the background a huge black cloud is all that is left of HMS Hood.

HMS Prince of Wales by Brian Wood (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead accompanied by the Uruguayan gunboat Rio Negro for light repairs. (Damage can be seen on the hull and behind the Conning tower ) . This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee enters Montevideo by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
HMS Illustrious slips quietly away from the docks at Devonport, Plymouth with the Fiji class cruiser in the middle distance, 1941.

HMS Illustrious and HMS Kenya at Devonport by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see our sport art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - £20.00
DB006. Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Half Price! - £75.00
 In 1992 Matthew graduated in Geography from St. Catherine's College, Oxford, where he was President of the Oxford Rowing Club.  He took part in the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race in 1990 and 1991, when Oxford beat Cambridge by substantial distances.  Also in 1992, at the age of only 21, Matthew had his first taste of Olympic success, when in a coxless pair with partner Sir Steve Redgrave, he won the gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics.  Prior to that Olympic win he and Redgrave had enjoyed an unbeaten international season, and it was already obvious that Matthew was developing to become one of the world's greatest oarsmen.  At the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 the Pinsent / Redgrave duo won another gold medal and throughout the nineties their outstanding combination also brought them seven world championship golds.  Their unbroken run of success continued through to the millennium Olympic games in Sydney when Pinsent, again with Redgrave (now in a coxless four with James Cracknell and Tim Foster) again triumphed earning Pinsent his third Olympic gold medal.  The race in which he did it was voted Britain's greatest sporting moment and the crew secured themselves a very special place in the heart of the nation.  After Sydney, Matthew formed a seemingly invincible coxless pair partnership with James Cracknell MBE.  Undefeated throughout 2001, they went on to complete a unique feat in the history of rowing, by winning the coxless pair at the world championships in Lucerne, a mere two hours after winning the coxed pairs.  In the 2002 world championships in Seville they defended their coxless pairs title, beating an experienced Australian crew who had beaten them in Lucerne earlier in the year and breaking the world record by 4 seconds in the process.  On Saturday 21st August 2004 at the Athens Olympic games, Matthew Pinsent CBE entered Olympic history.  In one of the classic sporting moments of all time, he led the Great Britain coxless four to victory over the Canadian world champions by only eight hundredths of a second.  Matthew was awarded the MBE in the 1993 New Year's Honours List and the CBE in the New Year's Honours List 2003.  In the 2005 New Year's Honours List he was awarded a knighthood.

Sir Matthew Pinsent CBE by James Owen.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Celebrating Englands 1980 Five Nations Grand Slam. After the 70s had been dominated by the Welsh, England battled through an exceptionally tough campaign to win their first Grand Slam in 23 years.

1980 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see our aviation art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 At 3.30am on the 23rd June 1945, a Dakota of 357 (special duties) Squadron took off from Mingaladon airfield nr.  Rangoon , to travel the 600 miles, 300 of them behind enemy lines, to rescue a downed American Liberator crew deep in the jungles of   Siam  .  The Dakota was flown by pilot Fl Lt. Larry Lewis, who already held the DFM awarded to him for 33 ops as a rear gunner on   Wellingtons  in 1941. Two crews had already failed when Lewis was asked to attempt this hazardous mission. Flying between 5,000 - 6,000ft he flew over The Hump, a ridge of mountains running down the spine of   Burma  . Local villagers had cleared a rough airstrip 800yds long with Lewis finding it by the time dawn broke. With monsoon clouds gathering, the Liberator crew aboard and the Dakota sinking in the wet ground, he managed, just, to get airborne. Flying at zero feet and looking out for Japanese Zero fighters Lewis took a different course back. Although being fired on from the ground they managed to make it all the way to the airfield at Dum Dum nr.   Calcutta ,  India  . Lewis was awarded an immediate DFC. By the end of the war he had completed 63 ops, held the rank of Squadron Leader with his service from 1938-1945, and was awarded the Air Efficiency Medal.

Larry Lewis DFC by Graeme Lothian. (B)
Half Price! - £40.00
 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £70.00
 A Bristol Beaufort Mk I of No 22 Squadron attacks a railway marshalling yard during raids on the French coast in the Autumn of 1940.

Bristol Beaufort by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £50.00

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see our military art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

Stug Mk.III
Stug - Operation Barbarossa by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £340.00
 British Vickers MKV1B Light tanks of the 3rd Hussars, 7th Armoured Division celebrate their part in the momentous victory over Italian forces in North Africa, February 1941.

Victory at Beda Fomm by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 As 1944 drew to a close, Hitler made his final gamble of the war, mounting a massive strike force aimed at splitting the Allies forces advancing upon Germany. His armour, supported from the air, would rip through the Ardennes to Antwerp, capture the Allied fuel supplies, and cut off all the opposing forces to the north. Hitlers commanders were dubious of the outcome but nevertheless obeyed orders, and the operation was launched on 16th December. Allied intelligence had discounted any German counter-offensive and the initial wave, comprising 8 Panzer divisions, took the Allied forces completely by surprise. A parachute drop of English-speaking German soldiers in American uniforms behind the assault zone added to the confusion. Advancing some 30 miles, and almost in sight of the River Meuse, by 26th December the SS Panzers had ground to a halt with empty fuel tanks, and were at the mercy of Allied counter-attacks. By 16th January the German penetration was repulsed and Hitlers beloved Panzer units retreated in tatters. The Fuhrers last gamble had failed. Fw190s of JG1 provide close support to the 9th SS Panzer Division, as they spearhead Germanys final major offensive of World War II. Seen advancing on the 82nd Airborne Division, the King Tiger tanks, with the aid of Luftwaffe ground-attack fighters, drive the Americans back through the snowy fields of the Ardennes on Christmas Day, 1944. It was the last, short-lived and ultimately unsuccessful advance made by the German forces during World War II. <br><br><b>Published 2001.</b>

Ardennes Offensive by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Half Price! - £135.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RN Destroyers: K CLass Pedro Ruíz Royal Navy Ships and Crews 27 02-03-2013 13:53
RN Destroyers: W & Z Class alanbenn Photo Galleries 22 10-06-2011 23:12
RN Destroyers: L & M Class Chris Howat Royal Navy Ships and Crews 17 25-05-2011 15:42
RN Destroyers: S Class WW1 Rolf-guenter Photo Galleries 10 23-04-2010 16:34


All times are GMT. The time now is 23:59.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.