World Naval Ships Forums  
VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Other Shipping & Maritime Topics > Other Maritime Topics
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Other Maritime Topics Other topics related to non-naval seafaring

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-10-2014, 14:35
Destroyermen Dave's Avatar
Destroyermen Dave Destroyermen Dave is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Foot of Lake Winnebago
Posts: 147
Default The Age of Sail

Is it just me or is there something inherently majestic about Ships of the Line?

I remember getting a book on ships from the library when I was young. I got it because I had a fixation on the Titanic and other early 1900s ships, and I remember finding (as I skipped through the first half of the book) a beautiful painting of a 1700s/1800s RN convoy. I remember just staring at that picture for a while before returning to madly flipping to a page on HMS Dreadnought. I've never forgotten that picture.

I don't know, is it just me or was something lost in the rapid change from wooden sail ships to self propelled all metal ships? (I'm not saying newer ships don't look good, I've just never been able to get lost in a painting of an Iowa Class)
__________________
Remember faintly if you can,
The men who sail below.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-10-2014, 15:20
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Currently living in Sunbury on Thames.
Posts: 2,176
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Hi All

Couldn't agree more. There is something undefinable about the image of ship of the line under full sail. heeling to the wind, bound who knows where for what unknown purpose.

Mitch Hinde
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-10-2014, 17:01
Destroyermen Dave's Avatar
Destroyermen Dave Destroyermen Dave is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Foot of Lake Winnebago
Posts: 147
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Hinde View Post
Hi All

Couldn't agree more. There is something undefinable about the image of ship of the line under full sail. heeling to the wind, bound who knows where for what unknown purpose.

Mitch Hinde
I was at the tall ship festival last year in Green Bay, Wisconsin. I got a ride on one of the schooners. They go silently, the only sounds you hear on them are the creak of the rigging, the snapping of canvas, and the whisper of the water as it slides by. I could have been in the 1800s if I hadn't seen an ore boat headed to Chicago. But, don't worry. Sailing ships will never truely die. They will always be around. As long as man sails the seas, there will be sailing vessels. The US Coast Guard keeps a steel-hulled barque as a training ship. The Sea Scouts teach younger generations the ways of sailing a large vessel.
__________________
Remember faintly if you can,
The men who sail below.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-10-2014, 17:58
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,128
Default Re: The Age of Sail

I could not agree more. As a singer of maritime songs I often feel as though I am back in those days and onboard as the ship rolls along to the creaking of the canvas and the hiss of the sea along the sides.
I also love to read about life in the Georgian navy and I have a particular interest in the frigates and their skippers. What amazing seamen these men were. They understood wind, tides and seamanship so well. Once one begins to learn the sail plans of these vessels it is much easier to understand what was happening during a chase and the ensuing combat that one reads of. By knowing what sails were loosed, reefed up or shot away a much clearer picture develops and one can visualise the whole event in the mind's eye.
As a boy sailor I trained as a boat's coxswain and most free afternoons, whilst in training, saw me on the river taking charge of a cutter or a whaler as my forbears did in the centuries before my own.
My own ancestors were fisherman or naval men (sometimes both) and we originally came here with the Danish Vikings so I guess that you could say that it is all in the blood!
__________________
Best Wishes
Jan Steer
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-10-2014, 09:44
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,128
Default Re: The Age of Sail

I was right. It certainly is in the blood. I have just learned that I am related to Henry Avery the pirate. So I guess that there is a clue to my character if one were needed!!
__________________
Best Wishes
Jan Steer
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 14-11-2014, 14:03
Bonzo's Avatar
Bonzo Bonzo is offline
Captain
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Beccles - Suffolk - UK
Posts: 534
Default Re: The Age of Sail

I have a very good book on HMS Victory giving detailed drawings of her construction. Thought I might share one with you. It show the details of her mainmast, and there's me thinking it was one big tree trunk???
Attached Images
File Type: jpg one.jpg (293.4 KB, 36 views)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 14-11-2014, 14:22
harris harris is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Shrewsbury
Posts: 165
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Like you Bonzo, I also thought that the masts were basically tree trunks shaped and joined together to achieve the correct size/length. Looking at those details though I was immediately struck by the thought "how on earth did the shipwrights manage to repair such complex structures when they became damaged for various reasons." What skilled men they must have been having only basic type tools to work with and in such cramped conditions.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 23-01-2017, 12:16
Marius_B's Avatar
Marius_B Marius_B is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: East Midlands
Posts: 103
Default Re: The Age of Sail

The STAVROS S NIARCHOS, seen in Southampton from the deck of one of the three Queens. Away into the gathering greyness we sailed, propelled by twin ABB pods ... no sails.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Stavros S NiarchosCopy WNS.JPG (1.82 MB, 17 views)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 23-01-2017, 16:11
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroyermen Dave View Post
Is it just me or is there something inherently majestic about Ships of the Line?

I remember getting a book on ships from the library when I was young. I got it because I had a fixation on the Titanic and other early 1900s ships, and I remember finding (as I skipped through the first half of the book) a beautiful painting of a 1700s/1800s RN convoy. I remember just staring at that picture for a while before returning to madly flipping to a page on HMS Dreadnought. I've never forgotten that picture.

I don't know, is it just me or was something lost in the rapid change from wooden sail ships to self propelled all metal ships? (I'm not saying newer ships don't look good, I've just never been able to get lost in a painting of an Iowa Class)
I don't know if the change from sail to steam could be called rapid as there was an interim period when warships had both sails and a steam driven propellers.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24-01-2017, 15:55
oldsalt's Avatar
oldsalt oldsalt is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Plymouth
Posts: 2,160
Default Re: The Age of Sail

I love the way a wooden wall was painted much enlarged. If you look at some of those paintings the impression is one of might enhanced by enormous ensigns. Looking at all that rigging, tall masts & billowing sails makes one feel proud, & overawed by those ships & the men who manned them.
__________________
Keith
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 24-01-2017, 16:24
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Yes and their cannon balls always went in the right direction.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 25-01-2017, 08:56
Marius_B's Avatar
Marius_B Marius_B is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: East Midlands
Posts: 103
Default Re: The Age of Sail

The STS LORD NELSON seen near Portsmouth, taken from a cross-channel ferry May 2010.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 038 - CopySubmit.JPG (444.8 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 039 - CopySubmit 1024.JPG (588.9 KB, 12 views)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 25-01-2017, 09:53
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

I think that these 3 mast ships are called barques
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 25-01-2017, 10:33
ASSAIL ASSAIL is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Darwin NT Australia
Posts: 1,005
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny07 View Post
I think that these 3 mast ships are called barques
They are barques because they meet the rigging requirement being: a ship with three or more masts with the at least the fore and main being square rigged and the aft/ mizzen being fore and aft.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 26-01-2017, 10:40
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Yes the reason I thought that is because for several years I worked as a volunteer on Capt. Scott's Discovery in Dundee. She had the same set up and she was a barque.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 26-01-2017, 20:35
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,128
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Gentlemen, you may find my post #358 in the "Folks Songs Of The Sea" thread of interest.
__________________
Best Wishes
Jan Steer
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 27-01-2017, 15:31
Seagull's Avatar
Seagull Seagull is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 159
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Here is an artist's impression of Admiral John Byng's flag ship, The Ramillies.

http://www.mackie-art.com/portfolio/...-stormy-blast/

Also, Admiral Byng's sailors sing a Sea Shanty in this vimeo:

https://vimeo.com/186005014
[password: simpleclearvision] (if needed)
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 30-01-2017, 05:18
Seagull's Avatar
Seagull Seagull is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 159
Default Re: The Age of Sail

[.............] "there something inherently majestic about Ships of the Line"
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-02-2017, 11:31
Marius_B's Avatar
Marius_B Marius_B is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: East Midlands
Posts: 103
Default Re: The Age of Sail

ROYAL CLIPPER from Star Clippers.

http://www.starclippers.com/en/our-f...l-clipper.html

Seen in Barbados November 2015, a setting sun and some light drizzle on the way. It meant me using only a small compact camera and hand-held at that, with mediocre results.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Royal Clipper Copy WNS.JPG (183.6 KB, 19 views)
__________________
My picture portfolio on *flickr*
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tallyh...57677979466786
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-02-2017, 15:18
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

There's nothing mediocre about your photo Marius, I think it's really good.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-02-2017, 07:51
Marius_B's Avatar
Marius_B Marius_B is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: East Midlands
Posts: 103
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Thank you, very kind of you.

It's just that when the opportunity for a rare photographic shot comes along, one wishes you had your better equipment with you. Some you win some you lose.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-02-2017, 21:50
Rupert Rupert is offline
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,425
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny07 View Post
I don't know if the change from sail to steam could be called rapid as there was an interim period when warships had both sails and a steam driven propellers.
Rapid by the standards of the day perhaps. Nevertheless the key ship in that transition is also my nomination for the most beautiful warship every built - HMS Warrior.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-02-2017, 22:44
johnny07 johnny07 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: With wife Ann in Banchory, Aberdeenshire.
Posts: 3,436
Default Re: The Age of Sail

Yes Rupert a lovely ship and very powerful, also a great visit if your ever in Pompey.
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 17th January 1934 : HMS L69 : Arrived Portland

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sail Away ! derek s.langsdon Other Maritime Topics 0 14-08-2012 15:33
Sail & Steam ceylon220 All Other Naval Ships 5 20-05-2012 15:06
Russia Under Sail derek s.langsdon Other Maritime Topics 2 15-07-2011 10:53
Day of Sail tim lewin Other Maritime Topics 19 05-01-2011 17:53
Sail Men o' War Photos kookaburra Photo Galleries 32 19-04-2009 09:43


All times are GMT. The time now is 16:45.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.