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  #26  
Old 08-04-2014, 04:02
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BlackBat242 BlackBat242 is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

What I found interesting is that, while the railgun has been hyped for years as providing ultra-long-range fire support for the USMC on land, the recent articles and interviews are emphasizing it for ABM use (both theatre ballistic and anti-ship cruise).

Here is the text of that article:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/navys-ne...peed-of-sound/

Quote:
WASHINGTON -- The phrase "faster than a speeding bullet" just took on a whole new meaning.

"An electromagnetic rail gun is a gun that uses just electricity -- no gun powder -- and, oh, by the way, can shoot a projectile like this, well over 100 miles at Mach 7," said Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the Chief of Naval Research, which developed the rail gun. "Seven times the speed of sound."

http://cbsnews1.cbsistatic.com/hub/i...projectile.jpg
Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder shows the projectile.
CBS News

An electromagnetic pulse propels a projectile down the barrel, creating a fireball of molten steel. The projectile sheds its steel cladding, and, in video released for the first time Monday, it smashes into a dummy warhead that represents an incoming missile. An explosion is caused by the sheer force of the impact.

"This is a lab gun, and it shoots a slug about this big," Klunder said, holding up a slug. "So think about that. A slug that big -- a slug that big going Mach 7 puts a hole through six half-inch steel plates this big. Just this little slug."

"There's not a thing in the sky that's going to survive against that," Klunder added.

The hyper velocity projectile, can also be seen going through three reinforced concrete walls. The Navy already has missiles that perform the same feats, but they cost millions of dollars each.

http://cbsnews2.cbsistatic.com/hub/i...lgun-steel.jpg
The projectile put a hole through six half-inch steel plates.
CBS News

"This costs right here about $25,000," Klunder said.

Both the cost and size -- it weighs 23 pounds -- mean they can be bought and stored aboard ships by the hundreds.

"Someone may be sending a multimillion-dollar missile at us, and I'm going to take it out with a $25,000 projectile round," Klunder said. "I'll take that trade every single day."

But not so fast. The first rail gun won't go to sea until 2016, and then only aboard a cargo vessel for testing. It will be the end of the decade before the rail gun appears on warships.
© 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


http://www.nbcnews.com/science/scien...ea-2016-n74166

Quote:
'Not Science Fiction': Navy to Test Futuristic Gun at Sea in 2016

The U.S. Navy is planning sea trials for a weapon that can fire a low-cost, 23-pound (10-kg) projectile at seven times the speed of sound using electromagnetic energy, a "Star Wars" technology that will make enemies think twice, the Navy's research chief said.

Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the chief of Naval Research, told a round table group recently that the futuristic electromagnetic rail gun had already undergone extensive testing on land and would be mounted on the USNS Millinocket, a high-speed vessel, for sea trials beginning in 2016.

"It's now reality and it's not science fiction. It's actually real. You can look at it. It's firing," said Klunder, who planned to discuss progress on the system later on Monday with military and industry leaders at a major maritime event — the Sea-Air-Space Exposition — near Washington.

Image: USNS MillinocketCourtesy Austal / U.S. Navy
http://media3.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscm...ux-520-280.jpg

The Navy plans to mount a futuristic electromagnetic rail gun on the USNS Millinocket for testing at sea.

"It will help us in air defense, it will help us in cruise missile defense, it will help us in ballistic missile defense," he said. "We're also talking about a gun that's going to shoot a projectile that's about one one-hundredth of the cost of an existing missile system today."

The Navy research chief said that cost differential — $25,000 for a rail gun projectile versus $500,000 to $1.5 million for a missile — will make potential enemies think twice about the economic viability of engaging U.S. forces.

"That ... will give our adversaries a huge moment of pause to go: 'Do I even want to go engage a naval ship?'" Klunder told reporters. "You could throw anything at us, frankly, and the fact that we now can shoot a number of these rounds at a very affordable cost, it's my opinion that they don't win."

U.S. officials have voiced concerns that tight defense budgets could cause the Pentagon to lose its technological edge over China, Russia and other rivals, who have been developing antiship ballistic missile systems and integrated air defenses capable of challenging U.S. air and naval dominance.

Weapons like the electromagnetic rail gun could help U.S. forces retain their edge and give them an asymmetric advantage over rivals, making it too expensive to use missiles to attack U.S. warships because of the cheap way to defeat them.

Rail guns use electromagnetic energy known as the Lorenz Force to launch a projectile between two conductive rails. The high-power electric pulse generates a magnetic field to fire the projectile with very little recoil, officials said.

The U.S. Navy has funded two single-shot rail gun prototypes, one by privately held General Atomics and the other by BAE Systems. Klunder said he had selected BAE for the second phase of the project, which will look at developing a system capable of firing multiple shots in succession.
— Reuters
First published April 7th 2014, 4:50 pm
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  #27  
Old 08-04-2014, 12:52
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

One step at a time, but until it can do this.....not a viable weapon: " Klunder said he had selected BAE for the second phase of the project, which will look at developing a system capable of firing multiple shots in succession."

Certainly hope they figure out how to do it, quickly! DFO
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  #28  
Old 16-04-2014, 01:46
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Here is a video from part of the deployment of Spearhead.

http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=19355
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  #29  
Old 06-05-2014, 23:04
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. — A Navy ship that resembles a commercial ferry returned to Virginia on Tuesday following its maiden deployment to Europe and Africa, where military officials tested out some of its other capabilities aside from transporting people and equipment.

The USNS Spearhead is the first joint high-speed vessel to be deployed by the Navy. It is a catamaran designed to quickly transport just about anything that various branches of the military might need, aside from fixed-wing aircraft. Its missions could include evacuating civilians, moving Army soldiers and vehicles from one country to another or delivering humanitarian aid, among other things.

After leaving Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story in January, Navy officials said they were looking forward to testing out the ship in a real world environment. The Spearhead successfully delivered more than 22.5 tons of humanitarian supplies under the U.S. Navy’s Project Handclasp program to countries in Africa.

While deployed, the ship also participated in a variety of exercises with partner nations in west Africa. That included embarking a Coast Guard team to conduct law enforcement operations as the U.S. worked to prevent illegal fishing and other illicit trafficking. That included launching and recovering a small, hand-launched drone from the ship. The ship also served as a suspected pirate vessel for training by partner nations who were working on their boarding skills.

“When you actually go out and do something in the real world that’s when you’re going to find out where your strengths and weaknesses are,” said Capt. Douglas Casavant, a civilian who serves as the ship’s master.

Casavant said he learned plenty of lessons about what can be improved for the ship’s next deployment, but declined to provide specific details. For the most part, he said everything performed just as well as it was expected to. He said some of the lessons learned involved finding the best way to work and communicate with different military detachment teams. During the deployment, the Spearhead also embarked a U.S. Marine Corps squad for a crisis response exercise off the coast of Liberia.

Unlike most Navy ships, the Spearhead is crewed by civilian mariners and has a military liaison and security team onboard to help conduct its missions.

The ship is fast, traveling at an average speed of about 40 mph, but is primarily made out of aluminum. Most Navy ships are built of steel. That means it is only designed to go into what the Navy calls permissive environments, where there are not threats of airborne or shore-based attacks.

Capt. Marc Lederer, the Spearhead’s military detachment commander, said that the ship wasn’t likely to be threatened by pirates and noted that its speed would be a good defense against an attack even if it didn’t have a security team aboard. He said there were no occasions during the deployment where the ship was threatened.

The Spearhead will be in port in Virginia for about two weeks for routine maintenance before heading to Mayport, Fla. It will pick up some new crew members there before heading to the Caribbean Sea, Central America and South America, where it is expected to participate in some counter narcotics operations
http://www.navytimes.com/article/201...den-deployment
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  #30  
Old 31-05-2014, 17:03
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Spearhead Heads for Southern Partnership Station

By RICHARD R. BURGESS, Managing Editor

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy’s first Joint High-Speed Vessel, less than a month home from its maiden deployment, which took it to Africa, departed May 29 for its fist deployment to the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) area of responsibility.

The deployment to the Southern Partnership Station (SPS) in the Caribbean and South America will last for five months and is scheduled to take the catamaran ship to Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Colombia, and Dominican Republic, said LT Jessica Crownover, spokeswoman man for the SPS 2014.

“The mission is to deploy USNS Spearhead to the SOUTHCOM area of Responsibility in order to build partner capacity in support of the Theater Campaign Plan, conduct counter-illicit trafficking operations if necessary, and support the NWDC [Navy Warfare Development Command] Fleet Experimentation Initiative,” Crownover said. “There will be subject matter expert exchanges in each country to support building partner capacity.”

The Spearhead is transporting Marines who will be participating in Exercise Trade Winds, a SOUTHCOM-sponsored “training exercise conducted in the Caribbean Basin which focused on improving cooperation and security in the region,” she said.

During the deployment, other mission personnel that are or will be embarked include Marine Corps civil affairs, information operations, engineers, and combat camera detachments and Navy Seabees, riverine, explosive ordnance disposal, Mobile diving and salvage, public affairs, intelligence and Navy Criminal Investigative Service detachments.

“Joint branches make up the medical Adaptive Force package going in-country,” Crownover said.
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  #31  
Old 10-07-2014, 13:38
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Default Joint High Speed Vessel as a CC ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by designeraccd View Post
One step at a time, but until it can do this.....not a viable weapon: " Klunder said he had selected BAE for the second phase of the project, which will look at developing a system capable of firing multiple shots in succession."

Certainly hope they figure out how to do it, quickly! DFO
Latest on the USN electromagnetic Rail Gun from Fox News and guess what? The JHSV is to be the test ship! So in effect, if the Rail Gun proves successful, we might have to change the JHSV's designation to a CC 7 (BATTLE CRUISERS 7)! Now that ought to make all our LCS haters happy; they finally get the "Modern" CC (AKA BATTLE CRUISERS) they always wanted


Wednesday, July 9 2014, A $250 million Navy project could change the way the US fights wars. The new electromagnetic "railgun" is said to be smaller, cheaper and more destructive. Officials say the damage the weapon is capable of is comparable to a freight train traveling 100 MPH into a building. The projectile is able to shoot down ballistic missiles, advanced cruise missiles -- even fast moving aircraft. The projectile travels at more than 5,000 miles an hour. The Navy showed off the weapon on Tuesday at Naval Base San Diego. The long-range weapon fires projectiles using electricity generated by the ship instead of gunpowder. The electromagnetic force then accelerates the missile to Mach 7.5 and can go an estimated 50 to 100 nautical miles. It isn't expected to replace traditional missiles but its cost is about a fraction of the money, at just $25,000 a pop. "We want the American public to know now that we have a gun system that is so effective and so affordable that now our adversaries will know that before they even try to do something to our nation that they will never win," Matthew L. Klunder Chief of Naval Research said. The railgun is scheduled to go aboard a new joint high speed cargo ship for further testing in 2016 before it becomes operational in 2018.
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  #32  
Old 08-11-2014, 15:35
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

ABOARD JHSV CHOCTAW COUNTY, ATLANTIC OCEAN – The joint high-speed vessel is a sight to behold, but that's not why this newest member of the blue-green team has heads turning. The civilian crewed catamaran has served as a launch pad for special operators, riverine and diving teams, and has delivered a host of fuel trucks — all within a week.

It is a key player in Bold Alligator 2014, a massive amphibious exercise that is throwing multiple crisis-response scenarios at forces from 19 nations, to include 19 U.S. Navy and coalition ships and 8,000 U.S. and international Marines. The scenario saw tensions escalate in the fictional country of Amberland as a humanitarian assistance/disaster relief mission unfolded. No one aboard JHSV had the big picture, and that was by design.

It wasn't long before the Marines and sailors aboard Choctaw County were called into action.

Roughly 56 operators and officers from 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion, based out of Camp Pendleton, California, launched from JHSV in the exercise's opening hours. Heavy seas threatened the MARSOC missions, but the ship's shallow draft allowed it to push further into calmer littoral waters. The snake eaters conducted a successful boarding operation aboard the fleet replenishment oiler John Lenthall, with the help of a crew from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 774, a Marine reserve unit out of Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia. A separate MARSOC mission saw the launch of two 11-meter rigid inflatable boats. This marked the first time the unit has operated off a JHSV, said Capt. Barry Morris, MARSOC spokesman.

And things were just getting started for JHSV.

Proving the concept

Empty of its special operators, the JHSV raced through the darkness up the Carolina coast. New orders brought her into Morehead City shortly after daybreak on Nov. 4. Navy Expeditionary Combat Command detachments and Marines from Combat Logistics Battalion 2 were waiting at the civilian port with vehicles and gear.

The Marines brought 16 Humvees; medium tactical vehicle replacements, or "seven-tons;" and logistics vehicle system replacements. It was a standard set that takes about three hours to load. With JHSV, the Marines were able to do it in under an hour.

"This was extremely fast and the level of skill required was minimal," said 1st Lt. Jonathan Pica, executive officer of Transportation Support Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 2. "It was the first embark for some, and they were able to knock it out without issue. Very efficient. I think we've proven the concept that JHSV can be used for rapid embarkation from a commercial-esque port."

Because the scenario simulated a commercial port, Coastal Riverene Squadron 4 was called in from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek/Fort Story, Virginia, to conduct escort operations and harbor security. The mission is nothing new for the riverine team, which deploys about six out of every 18 months, but this operation was different. Instead of the fixed facilities from which they typically operate, its 97 sailors had to scout and establish their own forward operating bases.

"Well, the 'E' does stand for 'expeditionary,'" said Lt. Brendon Key, officer-in-charge of Bravo Company, referring to its parent Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. His crew set up a secured perimeter around three large tents just off a main highway and next to a yacht club — and roughly 35 miles from the headquarters element. Logistics and communications were the biggest challenge, but Key said that is par for the course.

The sailors had a tactical operations center up and running, boats in the water and the pier secured within 16 hours of receiving the fragmentary order. They were dual-ported with five of their 34-foot Sea Ark patrol boats in Morehead City, and five at Mile Hammock Bay by Camp Lejeune. They provided security for dozens of vessels bringing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. As tensions escalated, the team's role shifted. Visit, board, search-and-seizure operations were almost nonstop.

Meanwhile, brown-water sailors loaded their boats into JHSV's spacious hull, and did so with a heightened sense of expectancy. Scuttlebutt was that the aid mission had met stiff opposition. The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit out of Camp Lejeune had geared up and was preparing for some kind of action. While details were lacking, the expeditionary sailors knew they would be called in to clear sea lanes of explosives before any Marine force moved in.

Comfortable surroundings

Motor-T Marines were next in line, but debarkation would have to wait about four hours while initial amphibious operations concluded. There was no complaint from the Marines. Life aboard the catamaran is anything but typical. It could be called comfortable — even pleasant when compared to life aboard gray hulls.

"The creature comforts are not representative of what my Marines could expect if they were to be assigned to a [Marine expeditionary unit]," Pica said. "They're getting a little spoiled."

The first lieutenant was not complaining, just trying to keep things real. This is the first time at sea for many of the 37 Marines he brought aboard. He used the time to teach his leathernecks about shipboard life — how to account for weapons, communications gear and the like, and how to use the time to catch up on maintenance or knock out some correspondence courses. Such lessons are tried and true on any ship. But the vast differences between JHSV and a typical amphib are evident at every turn.

"I'm about 6-foot-1 and I'm not crouching under stuff; it's fantastic," Pica said. "Though not designed for long-term berthing, I wouldn't mind being on here for a while."

Berthing spaces top out at 15 racks. The head has private toilet stalls and top-notch hand dryers. A large common area has upwards of 300 reclining chairs (complete with adjustable back support) and 20 flat-screen TVs for movies and video games. Knee-knockers are more like toe-stubbers and hatches have been replaced by doors you don't have to dog down. There are plenty of outlets in berthings and common areas, and plenty of air conditioning pumps through all the spaces.

"This is really nice. Very spacious. A lot better than my previous ships," said Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Eddie Rodriguez-Ferrera, a member of Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 11, who has served on a frigate and amphib in his 10-year career. "My berthing has a thermostat. Blew me away. I've never seen that before on a ship."

But the JHSV is not all sugar and spice. Some elements are matters of preference: There is no gym aboard — JHSV is not designed for long-term embarkation. Others are matters of survivability. Saltier chiefs and officers looked warily at aluminum bulkheads and overheads.

"This stuff would melt if there was a serious fire in here," one chief said as he sat in the open lounge area.

While chow was far better than average, there is only seating for 40 at a time. The ship has 104 racks, but is designed to use those as hot racks to accommodate up to 312 passengers, which would make for long chow lines.

For many, the motion of the ocean was the biggest drawback. They don't call JHSV the "vomit comet" for nothing.

The joint high-speed vessel rolled 4 degrees port, quickly rolled 4 degrees starboard, and back again, and this was at a mere 10 knots in a steady sea state. The snapping action that capped each roll caused even the saltiest of sailors and Marines to prepare for the open ocean that lay beyond the bay.

The ship's crew are accustomed to rolls that span 20 degrees — 10 degrees port, then 10 to starboard — which is five times greater than felt on Nov. 5. In the end, sea sickness was kept to a minimum. Dramamine was passed around like candy on Halloween. But sailors and Marines also owe a debt of gratitude to whales spotted off the Carolina coast. Environmental laws forced JHSV to keep its speed at 10 knots — one quarter of its capacity.

"There's definitely a different feel to it," Rodriguez-Ferrera said. "If you've been through some rough seas on a frigate, then this is probably no problem for you. If you've never been on a frigate, you might find it challenging. I would imagine it would be tough for most of these guys if she really opened up."
http://www.navytimes.com/story/milit...ator/18708113/
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  #33  
Old 28-11-2014, 13:15
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Default Connected: ONR "Ramps" Up Support for JHSV



Anyone know if the decisison has been made to actually build and deploy the "ramp"?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=TGkucLNOXAw

By David Smalley

ARLINGTON, Va.— As an M1A1 Abrams tank roared across a giant aluminum ramp, atop a motion simulator that mimicked crashing waves, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) last week completed a successful demonstration of a new lightweight ramp intended for use on the Navy's Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV).

The advanced ramp would provide significant improvement over the JHSV's current ramp by allowing the loading or unloading of people and combat vehicles—in rougher ocean conditions than are currently possible—between a JHSV and another ship, pier, mobile landing platform or more.

"The knowledge we have gained in designing this ramp is going to be vital for successful future deployment of personnel and equipment," said Dr. John Pazik, who heads ONR's Ship Systems and Engineering division. "The Navy and Marine Corps need easy-to-use, lightweight ramps to load and unload materiel in combat or humanitarian situations."

The Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. James Amos, told an audience last month that he views a new ramp for the JHSV as an essential element of future JHSV capability.

"You are looking at the new 'John the Baptist' of ship-to-shore connectivity," he joked in a speech at an April Sea-Air-Space conference, where he stressed the importance of improved ramps for JHSVs.

While the May 1 demonstration, which included a tank and a Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck crossing in simulated high-wave conditions, was successful, officials say the future for the ramp is still being decided.

"Right now we have a lot of data analysis and reporting to consider," said Dr. Paul Hess, who manages ONR’s Interface Ramp Technologies (IRT) program. "This demonstration ramp met significant engineering challenges in connecting two ships in a simulated seaway, while also allowing a tank, truck and HUMVEE to successfully cross.

"This gets us to a place we've never been before, in terms of at-sea transfer of vehicles between ships."

Navy officials will receive the results of the analysis this summer, and begin consideration on how to best utilize the knowledge gained. Options include a review of existing ramps, to see if they could be made stronger, using lessons learned from the IRT program; or using the information to pursue an entirely new ramp for the JHSV fleet.

In either case, officials said at the demonstration, ONR's work will play a key role in whatever direction is ultimately decided for the JHSV ramp.

JHSV is a new class of all-aluminum swift ships, intended to meet requirements for shallow water deployment of personnel, combat vehicles or other supplies and equipment as needed. The vessels can transport approximately 600 tons at an average speed of 35 knots, and are designed to operate in challenging ports and waterways.

Officials will use the analysis of the ramp demonstration to help determine ramp requirements for existing JHSVs, as well as for future vessels.

The ONR ramp program was done in partnership with the Navy's Strategic Mobility and Combat Logistics office, as well as the Strategic and Theater Sealift program office.

David Smalley is a contractor for ONR Corporate Strategic Communications.
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  #34  
Old 01-08-2015, 11:01
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Posted: July 31, 2015 12:42 PM

Keel is Authenticated for Newest Joint High-Speed Vessel, USNS Carson City

MOBILE, Ala. — The keel of the future joint high-speed vessel USNS Carson City (JHSV 7) was authenticated during a July 31 ceremony at the Austal USA shipyard, Naval Sea Systems Command announced in a release.

The keel was authenticated by the mayor of Carson City, Robert Crowell. By etching his initials into the keel plate, Crowell confirmed that the “keel” of the ship had been “truly and fairly laid.” The ceremony serves to recognize the joining together of a ship’s components, representing a major milestone in the ship’s construction.

“We’re honored to have Mayor Crowell of Carson City give life to the ship by authenticating its keel,” said CAPT Henry Stevens, Strategic and Theater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. “This ship will fill a role critical to our maritime strategy, providing forward naval presence, and strengthening alliances and partnerships, and the keel laying is the first significant milestone in her journey.”

JHSVs are versatile, noncombatant vessels designed to operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, increasing operational flexibility for a wide range of activities including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport. They are capable of interfacing with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, as well as on/off-loading vehicles such as a fully combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank.

The vessels support a variety of missions including the overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, supporting special operations forces and supporting emerging joint sea-basing concepts.

JHSVs provide fast intra-theater transportation of troops, military vehicles and equipment. Each JHSV is capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots. Each vessel includes a flight deck to support day and night aircraft launch and recovery operations.
http://www.seapowermagazine.org/stor...rson-city.html
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  #35  
Old 18-09-2015, 22:28
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

The SECNAV, has apparently 'softened' the name of this ship.

Posted: September 18, 2015 11:07 AM

Next Joint High Speed Vessel Will be City of Bismarck

BISMARK, N.D. — Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the next joint high speed vessel will be named USNS City of Bismarck (JHSV 9) during a Sept. 17 ceremony at the North Dakota Heritage Center in Bismarck.

Mabus named the ship in honor of North Dakota's capital city; this will be the first ship in (edit: US) naval history to bear the name.

JHSVs have a 20,000-square-foot open-mission deck and an aviation flight deck to support day and night air vehicle launch and recovery operations. They can operate in a variety of roles to include supporting overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, supporting special operations forces and supporting emerging joint sea-basing concepts.

USNS Bismarck is being constructed by Austal USA in Mobile, Ala., and will join the fleet at the beginning of next year.
http://www.seapowermagazine.org/stor...arck-jhsv.html
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  #36  
Old 05-06-2016, 17:13
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

The Austal built Alakai also known as USNS Puerto Rico has been refit at Charleston, South Carolina for ferry service between Portland, Maine and Nova Scotia.
http://www.maritime-executive.com/ar...avy-fast-ferry
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  #37  
Old 05-06-2016, 20:02
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfgun View Post
The Austal built Alakai also known as USNS Puerto Rico has been refit at Charleston, South Carolina for ferry service between Portland, Maine and Nova Scotia.
http://www.maritime-executive.com/ar...avy-fast-ferry
Suspect this service is doomed to fail (like its predeccesor) as there just doesn't seem to be enough demand on that run.
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  #38  
Old 07-06-2016, 00:58
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Brian Wentzell Brian Wentzell is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Tim: Thanks to foolish politicians, this unnecessary service has been funded for at least two years. The operator has been promised tons of money with little apparent accountability to the taxpayers of Nova Scotia. It is a sad set of circumstances.
Brian
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  #39  
Old 12-07-2016, 02:27
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

For some reason USNS Spearhead is in for an "emergency dry docking" in Charleston, South Carolina. She has been back from deployment for some time at Little Creek and all of sudden she is in Charleston. A bit curious?

Last edited by Surfgun : 12-07-2016 at 02:44.
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  #40  
Old 13-08-2016, 00:24
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

Video: a quick tour of JHSV.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zv62P8XCqxI
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  #41  
Old 26-08-2016, 22:15
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

The "emergency" dry docking of Spearhead is complete and she has returned to her home port of Little Creek, Virginia this week.

Last edited by Surfgun : 26-08-2016 at 23:32.
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  #42  
Old 20-09-2016, 00:00
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Location: Maryland
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

A contract has been awarded for hulls eleven and twelve.

https://news.usni.org/2016/09/19/aus...es-latest-hull
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  #43  
Old 24-04-2017, 23:58
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Program

EPF-8 Yuma delivered.

https://news.usni.org/2017/04/24/eig...-delivers-navy

Interestingly EPF-12 is to be named Puerto Rico. So obviously, the former Hawaii super ferry will be officially losing that name.
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  #44  
Old 12-10-2017, 00:40
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) - formerly Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) Prog

Interesting, apparently the Navy has spent some money on refurbishing USNS Guam.
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=247831

http://www.navy.mil/management/photo...-OH262-747.JPG

Last edited by Surfgun : 12-10-2017 at 01:20.
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