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  #51  
Old 22-10-2012, 10:56
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

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I hate to be the one to detract from Speakmans achievement but everyone who was in Korea at that time knew that he was blind drunk during this incident. In later reports he admitted this himself but so what, he got the job done.
johnny, I can confirm that. In between the RFA and the RNZN I was a policeman at Folkestone where the QOSB were in barracks. A lively bunch of lads we got to know quite well ! I heard the true story told more than once. Nevertheless he was honoured as a VC, even the officers were required to salute him.

Brian
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  #52  
Old 22-10-2012, 15:29
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light infantry

On August 15, 1950, the 2nd Battalion was created within the regiment to be a component of the Canadian Army Special Force in response to the Chinese invasion of South Korea; the unit adopted the designation of 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. The new battalion trained in Calgary and at CFB Wainwright, before boarding the USS Private Joe P. Martinez on November 25, 1950, to Pusan in South Korea.
The battalion landed in Korea in December and trained in the mountains for eight weeks before finally taking part in the war on February 6, becoming a component of the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade of the IX Corps in the 8th US Army. The 2nd Battalion of the PPCLI was the first Canadian infantry unit to take part in the Korean War.

Kapyong in 1952
On April 22, 1951, Chinese forces undertook a major offensive against the United Nations forces and pierced through the first line of defence held by the 6th South Korean Division. During the Battle of Kapyong, the 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, the 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment and A Company, 72nd Armored Regiment (US), were tasked with the defence of the Kapyong Valley. The formation delayed the Chinese forces for three days while United Nations forces withdrew to a new defensive line, thus saving Seoul. For their action, these three units received the United States Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation.

On May 25, 1951, the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was transferred to the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade within the 1st Commonwealth Division
In the fall, the 2nd Battalion was replaced by 1PPCLI and returned to Calgary. Meanwhile, in Canada, a new battalion was created on November 30, 1950. This 3rd Battalion trained in Wainwright, at CFB Borden and at Camp Ipperwash, before sending troops with the 1st and 2nd Battalions during their tour in Korea.
The 3rd Battalion replaced the 1st Battalion in the fall of 1952, and occupied Hill 355 until the Korean War ended on July 27, 1953 After three months of active service, the battalion was disbanded on February 8, 1954.
The PPCLI was again reduced to two battalions, and the commander, regimental sergeant major, and members of the disbanded 3rd Battalion were chosen to form the new 2nd Battalion

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  #53  
Old 22-10-2012, 16:12
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

For anyone who is interested, the "Pats" are the second senior regular force infantry regiment in the Canadian Army ... junior only to the Royal Canadian Regiment.
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  #54  
Old 22-10-2012, 16:14
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Jim: As a footnote, 3PPCLI was reformed a number of years ago and it has served in Afghanistan on several rotations.

Brian
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  #55  
Old 22-10-2012, 16:50
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Thanks Tim and Brian for your interest and observations.Brian is there still three Btns of PPCLI or was the 3rd reformed as the 1st???

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  #56  
Old 23-10-2012, 12:27
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Jim: The regular Canadian Army Order of Battle consists of nine infantry battalions evenly divided amongst the three regiments: Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, the Royal Canadian Regiment, and the Royal 22nd Regiment. In addition, there are the more recent Canadian Special Operations Regiment and Joint Task Force 2, the latter being equivalent to the SBS and the former being a supporting battalion sized unit for such operations.

3 PPCLI is a battalion that specializes in lighter infantry operations although its sister battalions are trained in mechanized and armoured warfare. In a small army, in practice, soldiers, companies, and battalions can be cross trained, provided time and resources are available.

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  #57  
Old 23-10-2012, 12:46
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

I believe that one of these Canadian soldiers while serving in Afghanistan had the longest ever sniper kill.
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  #58  
Old 23-10-2012, 13:08
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Yes Johnny07-the soldier you mentioned -his details are as shown below

Master Corporal Graham Ragsdale of the Canadian Forces was the commander of the Third Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry sniper team attached to the 101st Airborne of the U.S. Army during Operation Anaconda in the Shah-i-kot Valley, Paktia Province, Afghanistan in March, 2002.
The sniper team recorded more than 20 priority target confirmed kills including the long distance record combat kill of 2430 metres set by Corporal Rob Furlong.
Master Corporal Ragsdale with selfless disregard for his own personal safety operated his sniper team through extreme weather conditions at high altitude while under direct and indirect enemy fire aiding the success of the mission by identifying and neutralizing enemy targets and saving allied lives.
He was awarded the U.S. Army Bronze Star with "V" for valour for his actions in combat and the Mention in Dispatches Oak Leaf by the Canadian Forces for valiant conduct and meritorious service.


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  #59  
Old 23-10-2012, 13:14
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Brian I just had not realised just how much culling of the Infantry Regiments of Canada had been carried out-to leave just three.Was this cost cutting and/or recruitment problems; and where pray is the Newfoundland Regiment in all this-does it still exist-possibly as an Artillery Unit???

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  #60  
Old 23-10-2012, 15:59
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Re #57 I believe the Canadian chaps shot has been eclipsed by one Craig Harrison who dispatched two Taliban at 2.47 kilometers.
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  #61  
Old 23-10-2012, 17:07
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

The longest range recorded for a sniper kill currently stands at 2,475 m (2,707 yd) and was achieved by CoH Craig Harrison, a sniper from the Household Cavalry of the British Army.
It was accomplished in an engagement in November 2009 in which two stationary Taliban machine gunners were killed south of Musa Qala in Helmand Province in Afghanistan with three consecutive shots by CoH Harrison using an Accuracy International L115A3 Long Range Rifle chambered in .338 Lapua Magnum.[

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  #62  
Old 24-10-2012, 00:25
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Jim: There are lots of Reserve Force Infantry Regiments, including the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, The Cape Breton Highlanders, The Nova Scotia Highlanders, The Princess Louise Fuseliers, the West Nova Scotia Regiment, The Royal New Brunswick Regiment, The Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch), to name a few. We preserve many famous hat badges through reserve units. Near the end of combat operations in Afghanistan about 20% of the army folks were reservists. Sadly one of the 158 killed in action was a young Corporal from 2nd Battalion, Royal Newfoundland Regiment-my old and still infantry unit.

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  #63  
Old 24-10-2012, 00:50
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

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Originally Posted by jainso31 View Post
Brian I just had not realised just how much culling of the Infantry Regiments of Canada had been carried out-to leave just three.Was this cost cutting and/or recruitment problems; and where pray is the Newfoundland Regiment in all this-does it still exist-possibly as an Artillery Unit???

jainso31
Jim:

Most of the regiments disappeared as a result of the downsizing of the Canadian Forces in the 1960s and 1970s, primarily for fiscal reasons, but also due to the eternal Canadian government attitude that "we aren't at war, so why do we need a military?"

My cynicism may be showing here but our governments, like yours, have always subscribed to Kipling's:

"It's Tommy this and Tommy that
and chuck him out the brute
But it's saviour of his country
When the guns begin to shoot!"

I'm not usually a fan of Wickipedia, but their listing of the current Canadian Army ORBAT, isn't too far off:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadia...#Regular_force
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  #64  
Old 24-10-2012, 08:09
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Tim my thanks for explaining the the reduction of Canada's standing army.
It would appear that the ARMY RESERVE (which is where one finds the old Regiments of Canada-I thought like the words of the song "Gone to Graveyards Every One") is greater in numbers than the REGULAR ARMY.

jainso31

Last edited by jainso31 : 24-10-2012 at 11:33.
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  #65  
Old 24-10-2012, 11:24
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Tim and Jim: I too rarely refer to Wikipedia but the listing linked by Tim looks correct to me. I counted 52 infantry units in the reserve. This has been relatively constant since the last major reductions in the mid 1970s. A couple of regiments were re-roled, one to Combat Engineers and the other as an Air Defence Artillery unit. The latter will likely re-role again as Air Defence has been effectively deleted by the removal of the ADATS missile system from service.
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  #66  
Old 24-10-2012, 11:38
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Brian
I noted that 1st and 2nd Btns of the Newfoundland Regiment are brigaded to
37CBG in the Army Reserve.

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  #67  
Old 24-10-2012, 15:16
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Part of Unicorn's tasks was to ferry troops up to Japan, usually Kure. I remember a lot of them were National Servicemen.
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  #68  
Old 24-10-2012, 20:48
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Jim: True. The Brigade set up was brought into effect several years after I stepped down as Commander, Newfoundland Militia District in 1992. The Districts were not technically field formations, although we behaved similar to a brigade. Under my command I had the two infantry battalions, the engineer squadron, and the service battallion-approximately 700 regular and reserve personnel. By combining the units of the five former Atlantic Province districts into two brigades, the headquarters were reduced and covered larger geographical areas. With modern communications and the centralization of leadership resources there were some improvements in command and control.

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  #69  
Old 24-10-2012, 22:41
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

As a substantive Colonel-were you Acting Brigadier??I assume your CD was an award for just that service.

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  #70  
Old 25-10-2012, 02:09
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Jim: The District Commander, like current Brigade Commanders, were substantive Colonel positions. In the Canadian Army/Canadian Forces that means we wore and the current incumbents wear four stripes on the sleeve or epaulettes. No executive loops for army and air force officers.

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  #71  
Old 25-10-2012, 02:20
Scatari Scatari is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

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As a substantive Colonel-were you Acting Brigadier??I assume your CD was an award for just that service.
jainso31
Jim:

The Canadian Forces Decoration (post-nominals "CD") is a long service and good conduct decoration. It is awarded after twelve years of service, or as we say in the Navy, for "twelve years of undetected crime!" A clasp to the decoration is awarded for each additional ten years of such service.

Please note that my italicized comment above does NOT in any way infer anything negative about Brian's long and obviously meritorious service!!!
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  #72  
Old 25-10-2012, 07:24
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Thank you Tim-As a medallist I should have known this -the TD(Territorial Decoration) is/was awarded to officers in British Army T&VR on much the same basis-unless of course- the award is something else now.

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  #73  
Old 26-10-2012, 02:08
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

Tim: Thanks, it was 25 years in all and I have the first bar to the CD.
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  #74  
Old 31-10-2012, 18:27
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Default Re: Korean Conflict 1950-53

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Originally Posted by Scatari View Post
Jim:

The Canadian Forces Decoration (post-nominals "CD") is a long service and good conduct decoration. It is awarded after twelve years of service, or as we say in the Navy, for "twelve years of undetected crime!" A clasp to the decoration is awarded for each additional ten years of such service.

Please note that my italicized comment above does NOT in any way infer anything negative about Brian's long and obviously meritorious service!!!
Well, since when I received my USMC Good Conduct Medal, Captain Cooper (USMC, so 0-3) used exactly that phrase during the ceremony, I find nothing offensive about it (and neither should those from the "great white north")!

OK, he actually said "This is in recognition of 3 years of undetected crime", due to the differing regs between our services (USN was 4 years).
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  #75  
Old 01-11-2012, 09:33
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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BB
The time served for GCM for USN and USMC seems relatively short.The RN and RM have the "combined" Long Service and Good Conduct Medal and the qualification for it is as follows:-

Qualifying criteria
An other rank who completes 15 years reckonable service from date of attestation or age 17, whichever is later, and is a holder of all three good conduct badges, shall be eligible for consideration provided that their character has continuously not been lower than 'very good'. There are a number of offences / misconduct which would normally preclude award of the LSandGCM. Award's are only made after a comprehensive check of a sailor's record of service.

As this medal requires the recommendation of the individuals' commanding officer, it can only be awarded to serving personnel.
An other rank who, subsequent to award of the Medal, goes on to complete a further 15 years service shall be eligible for award of the Clasp to the LSandGCM provided that the conduct / discipline criteria have been met.


An Officer shall be eligible for award of the LSandGCM if 12 or more of the 15 years service has been in the ranks and provided that the other criteria have been met. An Officer shall be eligible for award of the Clasp if 22 or more of the 30 years service has been in the ranks and provided that the other criteria have been met.

A very much tougher target for keeping one's nose clean-I'm sure you will agree.

Prior to 1 December 1977, 18 years service was required for consideration for the LSandGCM.

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