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Old 22-09-2016, 00:20
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Default Canadian Lifeboat Institution

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution (CLI)

I have long felt that a thread for this organisation ought to be on this forum (Other Maritime Topics) as a companion to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) thread... so here it is.

By way of an introduction there is perhaps no better way than to let the words in their own website do the talking.

In operation since 1981 our volunteer members have participated in over 4,000 incidents.

Our Mission

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution has been in operation since 1981.
The mission of the Canadian Lifeboat Institution is Saving Lives at Sea.

Our Objectives

The objectives of the Canadian Lifeboat Institution are to:

Supplement local, community, provincial, and national efforts directed to the preservation of life and property and, in particular, providing equipment, and volunteers for marine safety, search and rescue services.
Assist with the promotion of safe boating practices through accident prevention and safety education programs

What is the Canadian Lifeboat Institution?

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution has been in operation since 1981. During that time members have participated in over 4000 incidents, working in close cooperation with other search and rescue organizations.

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution is a volunteer, not-for-profit, nationally registered charitable marine Search and Rescue organization dedicated to saving lives and property at sea. Its members and lifeboat crews, from all walks of life, are volunteers concerned about marine safety and rescue. The CLI is not directly funded by government, but relies entirely on personal and corporate donations, as well as community and other grants.

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution does not attempt to replace the Canadian Coast Guard or its Auxiliary, Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue (RCM-SAR). We provide vessels and trained crews to assist these, and other organisations, to save those in peril on the waters of Canada.

We’re following a very successful model, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI), which was founded in 1824 by Sir William Hillary. When called upon, the RNLI, on a volunteer basis, provides day and night lifeboat services required for search and rescue. Their service area extends up to 50 miles from the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland.

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution is a member of the International Maritime Rescue Federation (IMRF), which brings the world’s maritime search and rescue organisations together in one global – and growing – family, accredited at the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"

A link to the CLI website here


That done - and having read the following excerpt I am left with a question:-

Power Squadron NAVEX

On Saturday, 30 November, the Steveston Lifeboat gave practical navigation and Seamanship training to 8 Canadian Power Squadron students (also members of the CLI). The day was wet and cold with a fog that restricted visibility to 1.5 miles and made for interesting visual fixes. Although this was a basic NAVEX, radar fixes were also demonstrated. Students were given an opportunity gain some experience on the wheel as well as learn the professional way to be an effective lookout. Anchoring was also demonstrated. This sort of training supports the CLI education mandate and gives students a good opportunity to apply their theory from the classroom.

Source is the CLI website.

-----------------------------

So, the above, when taken in conjunction with the following article:-


The "Steveston Lifeboat" needs your help!

May 11, 2016
Safety Updates

The "Steveston Lifeboat” was in an accident while training volunteers for the Canadian Lifeboat Institution (CLI) in December 2014. She was badly damaged and has been in refit/repair ever since.
Amount spent to date on repairs:
$320,000
Amount needed to finish the repairs:
$40,000

There are two ways you can help get the "Steveston Lifeboat" back on the water:
1. Head over to their Go Fund Me page (https://www.gofundme.com/lifeboat)
2. Attend a fundraiser at 5pm on June 15th, 2016 at the Vancouver Maritime Museum.

Source; the fishSAFE Fishermen helping Fishermen website
----------------------------

and my question-
May one assume that the 'Steveston Lifeboat' included in each of the articles above refers to; one-in-the-same vessel? .... because the following excerpt would suggest that is the case. If so then getting the vessel back in service was a fine effort by all concerned.


Update: Crashed Richmond lifeboat hoisted to dry dock
Full extent of damage becomes apparent after volunteer vessel smashed into wall on the Fraser River during windstorm

Alan Campbell / Richmond News December 17, 2014 08:19 AM Updated: December 17, 2014 08:19 AM


John Horton, captain of the Steveston Lifeboat, was candid when explaining to the News why his vessel — with 14 passengers and crew on board — crashed straight into a seawall at the beginning of Thursday evening’s windstorm.

Horton said moments before the collision on the south side of the south arm of the Fraser River around 7:30 p.m., he was showing “trainees” how to de-tune the radar when they hit the wall, which has been in place for decades and directs the flow of the river.

Admitting it was an inopportune moment to reset the radar, Horton said, “mistakes will be made and we made one.”

Within minutes, the vessel — which belongs to the charitable, B.C. based Canadian Lifeboat Association and is not part of official rescue details along with the Coastguard and RCMSAR — was taking in water through a gaping hole and was badly listing.

A mayday call was sent and the volunteer RCMSAR crew arrived to save nine of the passengers and crew still on board, despite the darkness, pounding rain, and 60 km/hr winds.

Five other passengers and crew had already been evacuated into a dinghy and were recovered by the Coast Guard’s hovercraft, who had arrived minutes later.

Everyone involved was taken safely back to shore with no serious injuries

Source; Richmond News where the full article can be read.



Little h
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Last edited by harry.gibbon : 22-09-2016 at 00:43.
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Old 22-09-2016, 00:56
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

CLI Fraser Lifeboat - Ex RNLI Tyne Class

Absolutely great to read the article in the CLI website about the arrival of a former Tyne Class Lifeboat ..... and most noticeable that she was in action within 2 hours of acceptance.

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Old 22-09-2016, 19:30
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
CLI Fraser Lifeboat - Ex RNLI Tyne Class

Absolutely great to read the article in the CLI website about the arrival of a former Tyne Class Lifeboat ..... and most noticeable that she was in action within 2 hours of acceptance.

Little h
Further to the above..... (and the RN even contributed in a small way).

Tyne Class lifeboat formerly the RNLI “The Famous Grouse (47-021)” now the CLI “Fraser Lifeboat (1A-04)”

For those who have not yet fully browsed the CLI website (linked above) and found the story of the journey from Poole, England to Vancouver, Canada; here it is:-

More Information About the New “Fraser Lifeboat (1A-04)”

In May the CLI took delivery of a Tyne class lifeboat from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution in Britain. Bruce Docherty and John Horton (engineer and captain of the Steveston Lifeboat) traveled from Vancouver to the RNLI headquarters in Poole so they could conduct the sea trials and accept the vessel in a formal handover.

The Lifeboat was originally built by the RNLI as “The Famous Grouse (47-021)” and has now been renamed the “Fraser Lifeboat (1A-04)”. The Grieg Star shipping company provided transport for the Fraser Lifeboat to Vancouver, but that service could only start from Vlissingen (Flushing) in Holland. After considerable research, it was decided that the best way to move the lifeboat to the Netherlands was on it’s own hull – so John and Bruce drove it across the English Channel. They spent the first night of that trip in Gosport at HMS Dolphin. The second leg of their journey ended with an overnight stay at the RNLI station in Dover. The next morning they made an early start and crossed the English Channel itself. As they approached the coast of Holland, the KNRM Lifeboat from Breskens came out and provided a courtesy escort into harbor. The KNRM also provided moorage for the Fraser Lifeboat until it could be loaded onto the Grieg Star transport
bound for Vancouver. With the Fraser Lifeboat on board, the cargo ship “Star Lima” departed Holland at the end of May and the most recent ETA for its arrival in BC is 31 July.

Both the RNLI and the KNRM provided outstanding assistance, courtesy and hospitality. It is very much appreciated. Many other organisations and dedicated individuals helped to make this acquisition possible.

Source; Canadian Lifeboat Institution website the story titled (as above) and where there are several related photographs to view.

Little h
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Last edited by harry.gibbon : 22-09-2016 at 19:49.
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Old 23-09-2016, 14:34
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Harry:

Must admit that having spent most of my life on or near Canada's three oceans, I have never heard of this organization. In terms of size and operations, it is certainly hardly comparable to the RNLI.

Of interest, in your post #1, you mention the "Steveston Lifeboat" - her owner/skipper is the world-renowned Canadian (ex-Brit!) marine artist John Horton, whose paintings are superb!

http://johnhorton.ca/biography-about-john-m-horton/

The boat itself was originally the Pearl Harbor barge for the USN admiral Nimitz. Good picture of her here:

http://abcmi.ca/iconic-vessel-needs-industrys-help/
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Old 23-09-2016, 14:40
Scatari Scatari is online now
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post

The Canadian Lifeboat Institution (CLI)

That done - and having read the following excerpt I am left with a question:-

and my question-

May one assume that the 'Steveston Lifeboat' included in each of the articles above refers to; one-in-the-same vessel? .... because the following excerpt would suggest that is the case. If so then getting the vessel back in service was a fine effort by all concerned.

Little h
Yes Harry - they are the same vessel.
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  #6  
Old 23-09-2016, 15:23
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Tim,

Thanks for your responses and the links. Very interesting reading.

It's all down to the theme running through a number of my current posts you know - 'lifeboats' - in their various guises. So only a small detour to drop in a few posts about the CLI, their website and vessels.

Little h
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Last edited by harry.gibbon : 23-09-2016 at 15:34.
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Old 24-09-2016, 00:58
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Tim,

Here is another snippet for you - the Royal Naval Sailing Association (RNSA) Flagship is - "The Steveston Lifeboat"


About BC Squadron
BC Squadron

The BC Squadron is privileged to be able to sail in one of the most highly regarded sailing areas of the world. The vast waterways extending between Puget Sound, Washington USA, through the wild and remote canals and channels of British Columbia, Canada, to the icy wilderness of Alaska, USA, all in inland waterways. Here the serious sailor can find challenging winds and conditions, while the novice can hole up in calm and gentle coves or quaint old fishing towns from a past era. For the off shore sailor, the rugged western coast of Vancouver Island presents a profound challenge for those of a more venturesome nature.

The Squadron though small in number, continues to keep the spirit of the RNSA alive and well in Vancouver. The BC Squadron has formed a relationship with the False Creek Yacht Club to present the Single Handed Race across the Straits of Georgia and return. This annual event has been running consecutively since its inception in 1970.

The flagship of the RNSA is the unique vessel The Steveston Lifeboat. Once the barge of Admiral Nimitz, US Navy, and now rebuilt and equipped with the latest search and rescue technology and commanded by Squadron Captain John Horton under the auspices of the Canadian Lifeboat Institution. This historic vessel is front and centre at all functions requiring an RNSA presence at sea and is the stirring location of our annual Sail Past, held aboard.

When RNSA members visit Vancouver they can be sure of a warm welcome and fine sailing.


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Old 26-09-2016, 00:23
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Last Fraser River Sockeye Salmon Fishery for 2014, Sept 13-14


The last sockeye opening of the season was held over 26 hours, from 1800 on the 13th September to 2000 on the 14th September.


At 2053 the Steveston lifeboat was requested to assist a fishing vessel that had had a 21’ pleasure craft run over its net. The pleasure craft was disabled off Crown Forrest. Arriving on scene at 2130 the pleasure boat was taken in tow for Deas Slough. The two female occupants were attended by the lifeboat nurse when it was found one had a cut hand. The vessel was secured in Ladner at 2215.

While escorting 2 Seaspan tugs with barges the lifeboat lookout reported a flare sighting at the Steveston Bend. Advising CGD Radio at 2020 of the sighting, the lifeboat came to maximum speed on the observed bearing. Arriving on scene they conducted a thorough search. Finding no vessel in distress the Lifeboat stood down at 2057 and was able to return to her escorts.

The lifeboat continued to clear nets from the ranges for commercial shipping. There was a very large concentration of fishing vessels from Steveston down River to Sandheads, and some serious conflicts occurred with the fishing vessels not clearing their nets. The lifeboat was continually asking the fishing vessels to move nets. Much of the commercial shipping is seriously hampered in its ability to maneuver and some fishermen still think a tug with barges or even a deepsea ship can weave its way around the nets. The collision regulations clearly state that “A vessel engaged in fishing must keep clear a channel or fairway for any vessel that can only navigate within it”. It has also been observed that most of the gillnet fleet do not display proper navigation lights. This, combined with large concentrations increases the danger to both fishing vessels and commercial shipping.

Following a busy day the Steveston Lifeboat responded to a request at 1825 to assist a 22’ IMG_2778 (800x533)pleasure boat disabled at Finn Slough. Arriving on scene at 1845 the lifeboat launched her RHIB which was used to tow the subject vessel out of the shallow slough. After transferring the tow to the lifeboat the pleasure craft was towed to and secured in Deas Slough at 1924.


Summary of the 2014 CLI SOCKEYE FISHERY PATROLS
The Canadian Lifeboat Institution provided:
– 265 hours of patrols

– 21 incidents attended

- 105 commercial escorts

2100 volunteer crew hours.

The CLI has received much praise for its service for which we are most grateful.

We feel our goal is to help keep our fishermen and women safe, while maintaining safe navigation for commercial shipping.

Source; The Canadian Lifeboat Institution website
"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"


-------------------------------------


2014 Chum Fishery

CLI lifeboats were on patrol for 3 chum fisheries in October. Following a very successful sockeye season that saw large concentrations of fishing vessels, a much smaller fleet deployed for the chum openings.

Thursday, 23 October

The opening in the Fraser estuary was for 8 hours. At 1000 the “Steveston Lifeboat” was tasked to assist the fishing vessel “North Star” disabled and adrift off Steveston Island. On scene at 1012 the vessel which had a seized engine was secured alongside and assisted into Steveston.IMG_2881a-sm

The rest of the opening was taken up with escort duties for scheduled Seaspan Ferry sailings and four deep sea transits. Fish boat concentrations at Crown Forrest, the Tunnel, and the Alex Fraser Bridge were given early warning of approaching traffic.

But again some fishermen were very late clearing a passage. One fishing vessel was very nearly run over by a deep sea and his net was destroyed. Fortunately nobody was hurt.

Saturday 25th October

A Native economic fishery saw about 40 vessels fishing. A storm warning had been forecast but fortunately did not materialize. CLI had concerns for some of the very small open Native boats that might have had problems if the weather had been bad. With very few commercial movements and the low number of vessels fishing there were thankfully, no problems.

Tuesday 28 October

The final scheduled chum fishery again saw a reduced fleet on the River for a 10 hour opening.

The “Fraser Lifeboat” escorted 3 deep sea and 2 Seaspan Ferry movements while the “Steveston Lifeboat” escorted 1 deep sea, 2 Seaspan Ferries and 1 tug and barge transits. While the reduced number of fishing vessels made life easier there were several conflicts with one close call below the tunnel.

CLI Lifeboats logged a total of 301 hours of patrol duties during the 2014 salmon fishery. “BZ” to all our volunteers.

This is probably the end of fishing in the Fraser for 2014, now it’s back to catching up on training – especially for new volunteers.

Source; The Canadian Lifeboat Institution website

"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"

-----------------------------------------


An excerpt from the entry titled:-
“Lifeboat Keeps a Lookout on Fraser”
From the Richmond Review Newspaper, 17 September, 2014
Story and Photo by Liisa Atva



John Horton, captain of the Steveston Lifeboat, addresses the crew, “I want your eyeballs out for the nets.” The crew, all volunteers trained to professional marine standards, are a varied lot: men and women from their twenties to retirement age, a former fire department paramedic, an ex-navy lieutenant commander, master mariners, forestry and marine engineers, recreational and competitive sailors, a marine biologist, a nurse and some with limited marine experience but willing to learn.

Source; The Canadian Lifeboat Institution Blog, under News, in the CLI website.
"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"

---------------------------------------

Those are just a few entries from the CLI Blog ... I just loved reading the inclusion of a "BZ" in the second report. Well deserved all the volunteers!


Little h
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Last edited by harry.gibbon : 26-09-2016 at 01:21.
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Old 26-09-2016, 01:13
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

This post arises because of the reference to a 'Liverpool tow' (bolded my me in the excerpt below) included in the entry titled:-

Commercial Fisheries, August 24 and 25


At 2358 the “Steveston Lifeboat” observed flares down river from Garry Point. Alerting Coast Guard radio she was brought to full speed on the observed bearing. Navigating through countless nets is not easy at
the best of times but much more so in the dead of night. The lifeboat arrived on scene at 0018 to find the fishing vessel “Shirley Ann” on rocks at S7. Because of the 4 knot ebb and the precarious position of the vessel, it was decided to attempt to tow the vessel off using a “Liverpool Tow”. Since the crew of the fishing vessel was sure their vessel was neither holed nor taking on water, a line was quickly passed and secured with the lifeboat closing to about 20 feet off the rocks. Power was applied but owing to the falling tide she remained stuck and she would not refloat for about 2 hours.

Source; The Canadian Lifeboat Institution website
"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"


-------------------------------------------


Q. What is a 'Liverpool tow'?

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Old 18-04-2017, 23:15
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Default Re: Canadian Lifeboat Institution

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry.gibbon View Post
This post arises because of the reference to a 'Liverpool tow' (bolded my me in the excerpt below) included in the entry titled:-

Commercial Fisheries, August 24 and 25


At 2358 the “Steveston Lifeboat” observed flares down river from Garry Point. Alerting Coast Guard radio she was brought to full speed on the observed bearing. Navigating through countless nets is not easy at
the best of times but much more so in the dead of night. The lifeboat arrived on scene at 0018 to find the fishing vessel “Shirley Ann” on rocks at S7. Because of the 4 knot ebb and the precarious position of the vessel, it was decided to attempt to tow the vessel off using a “Liverpool Tow”. Since the crew of the fishing vessel was sure their vessel was neither holed nor taking on water, a line was quickly passed and secured with the lifeboat closing to about 20 feet off the rocks. Power was applied but owing to the falling tide she remained stuck and she would not refloat for about 2 hours.

Source; The Canadian Lifeboat Institution website
"We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia"


-------------------------------------------


Q. What is a 'Liverpool tow'?

Little h

Anybody uncovered what is meant by a "Liverpool tow" in the context as described above?

I have certainly not come across a definition on t'internet yet


Little h
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