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  #1  
Old 07-02-2012, 20:29
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KizmeRD KizmeRD is offline
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Default Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

The Italian Marconi Class submarine RM Leonardo da Vinci was launched at Monfalcone on 16th September 16th, 1939. She was 76.5m long, had a displacement of 1465 tons and had a top speed of 17.8 knots surfaced, and 8.2 submerged. The da Vinci was armed with 1 x 100 mm deck gun, 4 x 13.2 mm anti-aircraft guns, and 8 x 21″ torpedo tubes.

The sub left Naples on September 22nd 1940 bound for the newly established BETASOM submarine base at Bordeaux. After avoiding detection during the dangerous passage through the Straits of Gibraltar, the sub headed out into the Atlantic, where she immediately began operational patrol. Harassed by two British destroyers on 30th September, she had to crash-dive, but fortunately managed to make good her escape. The da Vinci was one of the twelve Italian submarines operating from Bordeaux at the time. After several unsuccessful patrols, the da Vinci set sail for the waters west of Gibraltar on the 18th of June and 10 days later claimed her first kill, the Shell oil tanker Auris (the only Allied ship sunk under the command of Capitano di Corvetta Ferdinando Calda).

In November 1942 after an extensive refit period intended to improve her overall performance and range, the da Vinci headed back out into the Atlantic, now with a new CO (C.C. Luigi Longanesi-Cattani). The subs next success came on 25th February 1943 whilst patrolling between Brazil and the Antilles, the da Vinci sank the Brazilian freighter ss Cebelo, followed on the 27th by the Latvian ss Everasma.

On 2nd June, the da Vinci was on patrolling off the Liberian coast when it came across and sank the Panamanian schooner Reine Marie Stewart. Then on the 7th, it sank the Danish ship mv CHILE, followed on the 10th by the Dutch vessel mv Alioth. Then yet another torpedo attack on the 13th resulting in the sinking of the collier ss Clan MacQuarrie.

During the summer period, the da Vinci was at the shipyard for structural change to allow for the piggy-backing of a CA midget submarine (part of a planned secret mission by La Decima MAS).

On 7th October 1943 the da Vinci set out from Bordeaux with a new man in command (the renowned Tenente di Vascello Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia). Whilst operating off Cape San Rocco on 2nd November, the da Vinci sank the ss Empire Zeal, followed on the 5th by the Greek freighter ss Andreas and US Liberty ship ss Marcus Whitman. After having exhausted her torpedoes the da Vinci’s next action was the sinking of the Dutch ss Veerhaven by gunfire on the 11th.

In February 1943, the sub began a long mission to the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. This patrol was conducted in collaboration with another Italian submarine, RM Finzi. On March 14th, the da Vinci sunk her most notable target, the troopship Empress of Canada which along with 3000 British soldiers, was also transporting 500 Italian prisoners of war. Following this on the 18th, the ss Lulworth Hill was da Vinci’s next victim.

Now in the Indian Ocean, off Durban, South Africa, on 17th April, the da Vinci sank the Dutch ss Sembilan, followed on the 18th by the ss Manaar, and on the 21st the Liberty ship John Drayton. Next came the sinking of the Shell tanker Doryessa, on the 25th. As a result of these sinkings, T.V. Gazzana-Priaroggia was promoted Capitano di Corvetta with effect from 6th May 1943.

A few days later, on May 22nd, the da Vinci sent an ill-feted radio signal informing the base that it was returning to Bordeaux. This signal was intercepted and her position DF’d by the British, who directed the destroyer HMS Active and the frigate HMS Ness to intercept and sink the submarine. After being subjected to an intensive depth charge attack off Cape Finisterre on 23rd May 1943, the da Vinci finally met its end - there were no survivors from the crew. RM Leonardo da Vinci was Italy’s most successful submarine of World War II, and her captain, Gazzana-Priaroggia, Italy’s leading submarine ace.

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  #2  
Old 07-02-2012, 20:41
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Exclamation Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

Thank you for the L da V post-a note on it's captain

During the war, Gazzana-Priaroggia commanded the following submarines: Malachite, Durbo, Tazzoli, Archimede, and Leonardo da Vinci. Submarines under his command were responsible for sinking a tonnage of 90.601 Gross Registered Tonnage (Bruttoregistertonnen, or BRT). With a higher score than Britain’s Wanklyn, in HMS Upholder, or America’s O’Kane in USS Tang (both later sunk), Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia and Leonardo da Vinci were the most successful non-German submariner and submarine in the conflict.
On 23 May 1943, Gazzana-Priaroggia was killed when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by the Destroyer HMS Active and the Frigate HMS Ness west of Cape Finisterre. He was posthumously awarded the Medaglia d'oro al valor militare and Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross.

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  #3  
Old 08-02-2012, 04:23
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

The dates in that narrative are very confused... they list November 1942, followed by several dates including 25 February 1943 and 7 October 1943, followed by mentions of November... then regresses back to February 1943.

I suspect that they are a full year off, starting with that Nov. 42 and ending with Nov. 1943.. they should be Nov. 1941-Nov. 1942.
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  #4  
Old 08-02-2012, 09:57
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

Hello BlackBat, thanks for pointing out the error over some of the year dates - my apologies for any confusion caused. The narrative was intended as a cronological account of the vessel's operational history, therefore all dates follow on from one another (not dot around!). I made the mistake of inserting the years late at night during my final editing of the narrative, and obviously I was a bit tired and careless.
In order to have a correct copy on record, all I can do is to repeat the original with cthe orrections now inserted.
Thanks again for pointing out the errors of my ways.
Michael

The Italian Marconi Class submarine RM Leonardo da Vinci was launched at Monfalcone on 16th September 16th, 1939. She was 76.5m long, had a displacement of 1465 tons and had a top speed of 17.8 knots surfaced, and 8.2 submerged. The da Vinci was armed with 1 x 100 mm deck gun, 4 x 13.2 mm anti-aircraft guns, and 8 x 21″ torpedo tubes.

The sub left Naples on September 22nd 1940 bound for the newly established BETASOM submarine base at Bordeaux. After avoiding detection during the dangerous passage through the Straits of Gibraltar, the sub headed out into the Atlantic, where she immediately began operational patrol. Harassed by two British destroyers on 30th September, she had to crash-dive, but fortunately managed to make good her escape. The da Vinci was one of the twelve Italian submarines operating from Bordeaux at the time. After several unsuccessful patrols, the da Vinci set sail for the waters west of Gibraltar on the 18th of June, 1941 and 10 days later claimed her first kill, the Shell oil tanker Auris (the only Allied ship sunk under the command of Capitano di Corvetta Ferdinando Calda).

In November 1941 after an extensive refit period intended to improve her overall performance and range, the da Vinci headed back out into the Atlantic, now with a new CO (C.C. Luigi Longanesi-Cattani). The subs next success came on 25th February 1942 whilst patrolling between Brazil and the Antilles, the da Vinci sank the Brazilian freighter ss Cebelo, followed on the 27th by the Latvian ss Everasma.

On 2nd June, the da Vinci was on patrolling off the Liberian coast when it came across and sank the Panamanian schooner Reine Marie Stewart. Then on the 7th, it sank the Danish ship mv CHILE, followed on the 10th by the Dutch vessel mv Alioth. Then yet another torpedo attack on the 13th resulting in the sinking of the collier ss Clan MacQuarrie.

During the summer period, the da Vinci was at the shipyard for structural change to allow for the piggy-backing of a CA midget submarine (part of a planned secret mission by La Decima MAS).

On 7th October 1942 the da Vinci set out from Bordeaux with a new man in command (the renowned Tenente di Vascello Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia). Whilst operating off Cape San Rocco on 2nd November, the da Vinci sank the ss Empire Zeal, followed on the 5th by the Greek freighter ss Andreas and US Liberty ship ss Marcus Whitman. After having exhausted her torpedoes the da Vinci’s next action was the sinking of the Dutch ss Veerhaven by gunfire on the 11th.

In February 1943, the sub began a long mission to the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. This patrol was conducted in collaboration with another Italian submarine, RM Finzi. On March 14th, the da Vinci sunk her most notable target, the troopship Empress of Canada which along with 3000 British soldiers, was also transporting 500 Italian prisoners of war. Following this on the 18th, the ss Lulworth Hill was da Vinci’s next victim.

Now in the Indian Ocean, off Durban, South Africa, on 17th April, the da Vinci sank the Dutch ss Sembilan, followed on the 18th by the ss Manaar, and on the 21st the Liberty ship John Drayton. Next came the sinking of the Shell tanker Doryessa, on the 25th. As a result of these sinkings, T.V. Gazzana-Priaroggia was promoted Capitano di Corvetta with effect from 6th May 1943.

A few days later, on May 22nd, the da Vinci sent an ill-feted radio signal informing the base that it was returning to Bordeaux. This signal was intercepted and her position DF’d by the British, who directed the destroyer HMS Active and the frigate HMS Ness to intercept and sink the submarine. After being subjected to an intensive depth charge attack off Cape Finisterre on 23rd May 1943, the da Vinci finally met its end - there were no survivors from the crew. RM Leonardo da Vinci was Italy’s most successful submarine of World War II, and her captain, Gazzana-Priaroggia, Italy’s leading submarine ace.
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  #5  
Old 09-02-2012, 01:54
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

That's better.

I had thought that to be a rather long refit (mid-1941 - November 1942)!
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  #6  
Old 20-03-2012, 14:13
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

Our newly commissioned painting, by Ivan Berryman, depicting this submarine :



Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman.

Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two. On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells. The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.
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Old 25-11-2013, 09:12
Maurizio Brescia Maurizio Brescia is offline
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

Quote:
Originally Posted by jainso31 View Post
Thank you for the L da V post-a note on it's captain

During the war, Gazzana-Priaroggia commanded the following submarines: Malachite, Durbo, Tazzoli, Archimede, and Leonardo da Vinci.
Besides the other corrections already posted in this topic, it must be pointed out that Gianfranco Gazzana Priaroggia commanded Archimede and Da Vinci only.
He was navigator aboard the Millelire during the Spanish Civil War and, later - with other assignments but without commanding them - aboard the Scirè, Balilla and Malachite.
On 22nd Jan. 1940 he was appointed XO of the Durbo and later, always as XO, aboard the Malachite again and the Tazzoli. Aboard this last boat, he was XO of the famous LtCdr. Carlo Fecia di Cossato.
Gazzana-Priaroggia took over command of Archimede in spring 1942, and left Bordeaux for his first Atlantic mission as CO on 26th Apr. 1942.
on 10th Aug. 1942 he shifted to the Leonardo Da Vinci as CO, and he remained CO of this boat until her loss on 23rd May 1943, when he died whit all the crew in the submarine's sinking, caused by a/s action by HMS Active and HMS Ness, about 300 n.m. west of Vigo.
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:38
Fredvdw Fredvdw is offline
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Default Re: Submarine Leonardo da Vinci WW2

Hello,

Best wishes!

Who knows where to look for copies or originals of the captains logs or diaries from the Leonardo da Vinci and Capellini. I have contacted the Regia Marina and am waiting for a response.
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