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  #1  
Old 04-06-2011, 22:55
serena serena is offline
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Default Battle of Trafalgar: Dire Straits?

Hi, Everyone
I wonder if anyone can tell me how tall an order it would have been to have your ship in the mole at Gibralter virtually dismantled and then 48 hours later be sailing in a westward gale through the straits towing your foreyard.
On the 20/10/1805.
many thanks
serena
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  #2  
Old 04-06-2011, 23:38
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qprdave qprdave is offline
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Default Re: Dire straites?

Without knowing any more about this than you have posted.

Ships who have lost their masts and rigging through stormy weather could be "Jewry Rigged" which will enable them to get to a port and be repaired.

for a decent explanation try here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_rig

Other than that I am at a loss. I would have thought that Gibraltar would have had the masts and spars to effect a repair.

Dave
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Old 05-06-2011, 00:40
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patroclus patroclus is offline
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Default Re: Dire straites?

Quote:
Originally Posted by serena View Post
Hi, Everyone
I wonder if anyone can tell me how tall an order it would have been to have your ship in the mole at Gibralter virtually dismantled and then 48 hours later be sailing in a westward gale through the straits towing your foreyard.
On the 20/10/1805.
many thanks
serena
Getting out of Gibraltar in a westerly gale would be difficult enough. Making any distance to windward in such weather whilst towing a large spar (85’ long) would be even more challenging in a large 74 such as the DONEGAL. The weather from the 22nd to 24th October is described in the logs of Collingwood’s ships as having some south in it so perhaps this enabled the DONEGAL to get to the west against a heavy swell.

As far as getting the ship ready for sea from a partially dismantled state is concerned, the CAESAR 80 managed something similar at Gibraltar in 1801. In such a case, other ships in port would send skilled men on board to assist.
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