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  #26  
Old 20-01-2018, 14:22
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

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Originally Posted by ivorthediver View Post
Thanks Phill , yes i noticed that and thought I would rather be in another boat observing that than in it as the likely hood of capsizing looked all to real for my liking
It is truly amazing what sticks in the old memory bank, I would not have been more than 10 when I saw the manuals which makes it 60 years ago.
These days it can be difficult to remember which day of the week it is, but really, who cares.
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  #27  
Old 20-01-2018, 17:12
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

Tell me about it Phill ......that makes us almost the same age, my Dad always said that when the German High Command heard I was on the way Hitler new all was lost .....
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  #28  
Old 20-01-2018, 23:17
TCC TCC is offline
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

I can only concur. I have Vol 1 & 2 from 1909 and 1911 (1909 reprint with errata). They answer 90% of the "what's that?" and "how's that work?" questions that you have.

Looking at them recently, i scanned the section on weather and learnt why air-pressure affects wind. It seems that air from high-pressure zones will locate to low-pressure zones and that movment is wind. I'd never known that!

The bit on masts & yards was also informative. I'd always known the navy was systematic in the way equipment and fittings are arranged on board ships, take capital ship fo'c'sles. They all have the same fittings arranged in the same order, thus a seaman from one ship will be instantly familiar with any similar size ships he joins.

That principle also followed with the masts & yards.

"In the later battleships and large cruises there are two yards on the foremast for signalling purposes, and one small yard on each mast just below the truck to carry the wireless gear. In the latest ships, which have only one mast, there are four yards, three for signalling by flags and one for wireless gear. Older battleships and large cruisers carry two yards on each mast, with a gaff on the main-top-gallant-mast for the wireless telegraphy gear. Second and third class cruisers carry a yard on each mast in addition to the small wireless telegraphy yard."


This is bourne out in photos of late Victorian ships and early dreadnoughts, i, e. DREADNOUGHT onwards. It also gives the diameters of the masts and yards and lengths.

For anyone interested in the subject or making models, they will repay the time given up to read them.

P. S. There's a name on one of mine with "mar 1916". I looked him up in a 1918 navy list. He was a RNVR Sub. from feb 1916 to feb 1917 when he was demobbed. On Googleing him, the National Archives have his RNVR records from 1915 so he must have been an 'other ranks" before his commission. I then found a death notice in a 1962 gazette with his executors & solicitors details. He was a retired lace dealer. I found this part intesting and quite poignant.

Last edited by jbryce1437 : Yesterday at 15:45. Reason: duplicate post deleted
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  #29  
Old Yesterday, 12:28
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

Good Morning TCC , and thanks for your post

I'm glad I'm not the only one that thinks this way , and yes I couldn't agree more [ especially as your a fellow modeller] and if others took the trouble to spend a little while on a regular basis they will be blessed with a plethora of information not only on the topic they looked at but "yards" of information they had possibly looked at.... but not absorbed..... as there minds were busy elsewhere

I totally agree ref detail that..... may I be kind and say" they knew" but hadn't understood fully until they read again .....something I'm also guilty of I must admit

On the other side of the coin there are those who have an insatiable appetite for information and a photographic mind like our " secret squirrel" which I think god was in the mess room when it was my turn to be issued with those attributes

However we all have our strength and weaknesses [still waiting to find out mine]

From a modelling point of view I was amazed to read about the lightning holes cut in large cross section frames and then having the apertures lined to deter fractures occurring at that point when a point load was applied ...........Obvious when you stop and think about it but as someone more intelligent than me once remarked ......but the brain see's what it wants to see not what its shown at the time
We have all seen that detail hundreds of times but not thought what it was there for just assumed it was there for a purpose and accepted it ......

I'm on the lookout now for Admiralty Engineering Manuals and Admiralty Ordnance Manuals- but second hand.. which I have looked for but only found one that was outside of my pocket range , but time may be kind to me you never know but in the meantime I'll keep meandering through these that I have been lucky enough to un earth .

The last two I managed to get both for less than 8.00 .so hopefully they will be legible when they arrive .

I had to chuckle to myself recently as I noticed some Admiralty comms manuals
which I toyed about getting but thought better of as although interesting would be above my level of interest and understanding but worthy of collection
Thanks for looking in ...regards Ivor
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  #30  
Old Yesterday, 13:15
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

Glancing back through the threads answers I note that references to the SHIPS BOOK remains unanswered so far .....was there such a beast please? .

Thank you all for your response so far , glad to see you all reading this thread as I'm sure all you EX Navy members had them at some point , but perhaps the good lady uses them for pressing flowers now

Look forward to hearing from you .....

Regards Ivor
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  #31  
Old Yesterday, 22:08
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Default Re: Manuals of Seamanship 1-3 1951

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Glancing back through the threads answers I note that references to the SHIPS BOOK remains unanswered so far .....was there such a beast please? .


Look forward to hearing from you .....

Regards Ivor
My memory grows dim (last sea posting ended in 1996 and I was just a poor beknighted Pusser) but the "Ship's Book" is an official record of the ship which includes, inter alia, ship's particulars, fit and changes to armament, manoeuvring and engineering information and a plethora of other data. It is meant as a reference for all departments I believe. It is held on board for the life of the ship, although I suspect a duplicate is held ashore as well. I am not certain who on board was responsible for its upkeep. Many of these books are to be found in the Canadian Archives and make for interesting reading.

I'm surprised Tim (Scatari) has not come back on this particular subject as he was likely more involved with populating the "book". Over to you Tim.
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