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  #26  
Old 04-11-2015, 00:16
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

I was just looking of the photo of the hanger, it appears to equipped with an impressive air conditioning system.. That should come in handy for the proposed areas that these ships will operate in.
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  #27  
Old 16-01-2016, 12:31
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

Posted: January 13, 2016 4:23 PM

First Expeditionary Mobile Base Ship Conducts Testing off East Coast

By RICHARD R. BURGESS, Managing Editor

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy’s first expeditionary mobile base ship (T-ESB), USNS Lewis B. Puller (T-ESB 3), has been conducting testing off the U.S East Coast, including its first underway replenishment.

Speaking to an audience Jan. 13 at the Surface Navy Association National Symposium, Capt. Henry Stevens III, the Navy’s program manager for strategic and theater sealift, said the ESB was delivered three months early and made a transit around Cape Horn to Norfolk, Va.

The ESB, built be NASSCO in San Diego, is a modification of the Montford Point-class expeditionary transfer dock ship (T-ESD). The ESB retains some of the ability of the ESD to ballast low in the water, but is not a requirement for its missions, Stevens said. Instead, it features a helicopter landing pad with four deck spots and berthing for 250 expeditionary personnel such as Marines, as well as command-and-control facilities for such capabilities as special operations and mine countermeasures.

NASSCO is building a second ESB (T-ESB 4) for delivery in March 2018, and the Navy plans to procure a third (T-ESB 5) this year. Stevens said a capabilities upgrade package will be back-fitted on T-ESB 3 and T-ESB 4 and forward-fitted on T-ESB 5. The capabilities will include increased bandwidth and improved aviation and command-and-control capabilities.

Posted: January 15, 2016 11:45 AM

Navy Secretary Names Second Expeditionary Sea Base Ship

WASHINGTON — Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced that the name of the Navy’s newest Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) ship, T-ESB 4, will be USNS Hershel "Woody” Williams during a Jan. 14 ceremony in Charleston, W.Va.

Williams, the ship’s namesake, was born in West Virginia and joined the Marine Corps following the attack on Pearl Harbor. In 1944, after serving in Guadalcanal and Guam, he joined the campaign in Iwo Jima. Two days after arriving on the island, Williams picked up a 70-pound flamethrower and walked ahead of his infantry’s tanks for four hours clearing their path of enemy machine gun fire. President Harry S. Truman awarded him the Medal of Honor two years later for his actions.

Williams served during the Battle of Iwo Jima until he was wounded in March 1945. He returned to the United States, was awarded a Purple Heart and released from active duty. Later, he served in the Marine Corps Reserves for 17 years.

Williams is the last surviving Medal of Honor recipient from the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The new 784-foot-long vessel will feature a 52,000 square foot flight deck, fuel and equipment storage, repair spaces, magazines, and mission-planning spaces.

Able to accommodate up to 250 personnel, the new ESB ship will support multiple missions, such as air mine countermeasures, counterpiracy operations, maritime security operations, humanitarian aid and disaster-relief and crisis response operations.

In addition, the vessel will be capable of supporting MH-53 and MH-60 helicopters, with an option for future upgrades to support MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft.

USNS Hershel “Woody” Williams will be constructed by General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. in San Diego. The ship is expected to be delivered to the Navy in 2018.
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  #28  
Old 02-03-2016, 02:08
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

According to this article it would appear that no defense weapons are to be fitted (this appears shortsighted as some defensive weapons should be fitted for transit of an area such as the Straits of Hormuz, even while being escorted).

Jan 14, 2016 | by Hope Hodge Seck
Global demand is high for new sea-basing platforms that can take some of the operational pressure off of amphibious ships, the Marine general in charge of the Navy's Expeditionary Warfare Division said Tuesday.

Speaking to an audience at the Surface Navy Association symposium near Washington, D.C., Maj. Gen. Christopher Owens said the expeditionary sea base and expeditionary transfer dock, both variants on a modified civilian oil tanker design, were expected to take on humanitarian-assistance and disaster-relief missions, as well as embassy security reinforcement and noncombatant evacuation missions in an uncontested environment.

Unlike the expeditionary transfer dock, the so-called ESB is equipped with a flight deck with room for two CH-53 helicopters. With limited berthing space for Marine units, the platform may be an attractive stopgap to support the overworked amphibs.

"I emphasized they're not warships," Owens said. "They don't have the guns. They don't have the defense capabilities. They don't have the trained Navy crews ready to fight in the ship and keep it alive but they can provide great capability for lower-end crisis response and to allow [geographic combatant commanders] to employ those scarce [amphibious] assets."

These mission sets represent a significant portion of the tasks that might be assigned to a traditional amphibious ship, and would come in addition to the sea-basing vessels' primary mission of supporting prepositioning forces at sea.

The first ESB, formerly known as an afloat forward staging base, is the USNS Lewis B. Puller. That ship was delivered to the Navy in June and is completing testing and evaluation in Norfolk, Virginia, ahead of a deployment as soon as this year to replace the amphibious transport dock Ponce in the Persian Gulf. The platform may receive upgrades to accommodate special operations forces ahead of its deployment, according to reports from USNI News.

Owens said a destination had yet to be chosen for the next two ESBs, which have yet to be named. General Dynamics Corp.'s NASSCO unit began construction on ESB-4 in October, and a contract for ESB-5 may be awarded within fiscal 2017.

"There's already a lot of demand for ESB 4 and 5," Owens said. "It will remain for the [geographic combatant commanders] to state their case but we do expect demand to continue as the ships prove their utility."
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  #29  
Old 21-06-2016, 18:05
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

Flight deck certification.

http://www.navy.mil/management/photo...-OH262-445.JPG
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  #30  
Old 22-06-2016, 20:24
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

By Bill Mesta, Military Sealift Command Public Affairs
ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS) -- The Navy's first expeditionary mobile base, USNS Lewis B. Puller (T-ESB 3) got underway from Naval Station Norfolk to perform airborne countermine deployment training, June 13-16.

Puller's hybrid crew of U.S. Navy Sailors and civil service mariners (CIVMARs) worked in concert with Sailors attached to the "Blackhawks" of Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 15 to hone mine elimination capabilities.

"This underway was the first opportunity to merge the Puller's full mission deck which included small boat operations, countermine sled launches and flight operations," said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Muehlbauer, Puller's military crew officer-in-charge. "The underway was our first opportunity to simultaneously launch aircraft, small boats and anti-mine sleds."

"We got underway to train in preparation for a future Initial Operational Test and Evaluation," said Bryan Stoots, Puller's chief mate. "We performed a mock Airborne Mine Countermeasures (AMCM) mission, which included deployment of countermine assets from the ship's AMCM inventory."

The training battery during the four-day underway consisted of deploying and recovering two types of mine countermeasures from the deck of Puller.

One mine countermeasure deployed was a Mark 105 magnetic sled, which creates a magnetic field to destroy mines as it is towed behind a helicopter.

The second type of countermeasure system used during the training battery was the Magnetic Orange Pipe (MOP). This system is a shallow-water mine countermeasure which also uses magnetism to negate mine threats.

The deployment of each countermeasure was broken down into multiple phases. Puller's deck department Sailors and CIVMARs first launched three rigid-hull inflatable boats (RHIBs), manned by HM-15 Sailors. These boats were used to guide and maneuver the magnetic sled and MOP. The countermeasure devices were moved into position for towing. The sled was attached to one of HM-15's MH-53 Sea Dragon helicopters and towed through simulated mine target area.

"Prior to this underway, we developed these capabilities independently," said Muehlbauer. "We tested and qualified the crew to handle small boats and crafts. On the flight deck, we qualified the crew to launch and recover different types of aircraft."

After the designated target area was cleared, the mine countermeasures and the RHIBs were brought back aboard Puller.

"The Puller is designed to support anti-mine countermeasure mission sets," said Muehlbauer. "We are able to embark up to four MH-53 helicopters capable of towing different types of countermine equipment, such as different types of minehunting sleds or mine-finding sonars through the water."

"To support these anti-mine operations we are able to launch and recover small boats and different mine neutralization assets," added Muehlbauer. "This platform can be adapted very quickly to deploy the mine countermeasure assets required based on a particular situation."

Stoots explained his role as chief mate and the CIVMARs' responsibilities during Puller's underway.

"The chief mate is similar to an executive officer on a Navy combatant ship," said Stoots. "The position includes being the deck department head, [ensuring] safe navigation of the ship and leadership in the deck department. As the chief mate, I was responsible for the safety on deck and supervised the entire operation on deck in regards to launching rigid-hull inflatable boats, the mine countermeasure sled and Magnetic Orange Pole.

While Puller's crew was busy with mine countermeasure training evolutions, there were many critical tasks being performed behind the scenes by Puller's CIVMARs.

"The main function of the deck department is navigation of the ship," said Stoots. "At all times while we are underway, there is a licensed mate on the bridge. We have a helmsman, lookout, and rover on duty. The helmsman steers the ship and takes direction from the mate. The rover keeps the ship safe and ensures there are no fires, flooding, or injured personnel."

"The lookout is maintaining a proper lookout," continued Stoots. "Other aspects of the deck department include having the boatswain on scene and they manage the deck responsibilities such as operating the cranes, winches, and supervise the movement of cargo and equipment.

There were approximately 40 CIVMARs aboard during the underway.

"I felt like the mine countermeasure training evolution was very successful," said Stoots. "We were uncertain about certain elements of the evolution. This was the first time these types of mine countermeasures were deployed from a ship's deck while using a ship's crane to deploy the equipment instead of a ship's well deck, which is the norm. There was a lot of anticipation to see how the deployment of this equipment would work from Puller and I felt like it went very well."

"The Puller has 100 Sailors in its crew," said Muehlbauer. "The military crew is in charge of the aviation department, mission deck operations, launch and recovery of small boats and any other deployed mission assets, [and] ship's force protection. The Sailors also manage C4I (command, control, communications, computers and intelligence), and are capable of providing galley services for approximately 250 military personnel."

"The Puller's military crew supports the CIVMARs in the deck department with tasks such as line handling, logistic tasks include crane operations, and moving material on and off the ship," added Muehlbauer. "The military crew is made up of four officers and nine chief petty officers. The majority of our junior enlisted Sailors are aviation boatswain's mates [equipment, fuel, handling], information [systems] technicians, damage controlmen and aviation [structural] mechanics. To round it out, we have about 30 Sailors who work in the supply department."

"This underway was our first big integrated training event and it went very well," said Muehlbauer. "The training from this underway will lead us into our final testing and evaluation period later this year when we will certify the full capabilities of the Puller and crew."

Puller's crew is categorized as a hybrid as its members are both active-duty Sailors and CIVMARs. The success of the ship is dependent on a strong working relationship between the two distinctive cultures.

"A successful hybrid crew is definitely a team effort; I like to refer to the crew as 'Team Puller,'" said Stoots. "We are one ship and one crew, and work together on every aspect of every evolution. The military crew supports the CIVMARs on deck operation, and likewise we support the military crew on operations such as mine countermeasures."

"Early on there were times when we struggled with the crew interactions between the Sailors and CIVMARs," said Muehlbauer. "When the military crew arrived on the Puller, the mariners had already been on board for over a year. So when the military detachment arrived, we were very much the 'new kids on the block.' It took a little while to build trust, credibility, and rapport with the mariners."

"The ship's master and I worked together to lay down initial ground rules for the crew, but most of the real 'gelling' for the crew took place on the deck plates," continued Muehlbauer. "The more we placed Sailors and CIVMARs in situations where they had to work together, the better they understand each other's skillsets and how each does business. This was how we really started to build our team spirit. We put the right people in the right place and it worked very well for us. The formation of a successful hybrid crew for Puller was not dictated from the top, but was more of a grassroots effort which has proven to be very effective."

"Over the course of the last six months, the crew has gotten to the point where the Sailors and CIVMARs are able to predict how each is going to react or think during a variety of situations," said Muehlbauer. "The positive development of our hybrid crew has allowed Puller to maintain its very strict timeline and will ensure we are ready to deploy next year. I believe the Puller brings great capabilities to the Navy. This platform allows the Navy to sustain an expeditionary presence longer and will free up combatant ships to undertake missions which they are better suited for."

The future for Puller includes testing and evaluation. The vessel is also going to spend some time in the shipyard for upgrades and modifications prior to being permanently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility in 2017.

"The Puller is going to receive an upgrade which will enable special operations forces (SOF) to utilize the ship for operations," concluded Muehlbauer. "The Puller will be able to support maritime interdictions, operations potentially in-country, and different adaptive military packages to perform different types of SOF contingencies throughout the world."

In addition to countermine training evolutions, Puller's crew performed vertical replenishment training with the Afloat Training Group, practiced flight deck firefighting techniques, and trained to counter the threat of a small boat attack.
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=95317
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  #31  
Old 01-08-2016, 23:10
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

Video: of various training.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J157Au2ypLU
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  #32  
Old 08-08-2016, 23:58
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

While the ESB Lewis B. Puller has been off the coast of Virginia doing some workups, the keel for the 2nd ESB has been laid back in San Diego.

http://www.nassco.com/news-center/ne...ing-8-3-16.pdf
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  #33  
Old 17-09-2016, 00:47
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

By Bill Mesta, Military Sealift Command Public Affairs

The Navy’s first expeditionary mobile base, USNS Lewis B. Puller (T-ESB 3), got underway from Naval Station Norfolk to perform airborne counter-mine deployment training, June 13-16.

Puller’s hybrid crew of U.S. Navy Sailors and Civil Service Mariners worked in concert with Sailors attached to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 15 (HM-15) to hone mine elimination capabilities.

“This underway was the first opportunity to merge the Puller’s full mission deck which included small boat operations, counter-mine sled launches and flight operations,” said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Muehlbauer, the Puller’s Military Crew Officer in Charge. “The underway was our first opportunity to simultaneously launch aircraft, small boats and anti-mine sleds.”

“We got underway to train in preparation for a future Initial Operational Test and Evaluation,” said Bryan Stoots, the Puller’s Chief Mate. “We performed a mock Airborne Mine Countermeasures (AMCM) mission which included deployment of counter-mine assets from the ship’s AMCM inventory.”

The training battery during the four-day underway consisted of deploying and recovering two types of mine countermeasures from the deck of the Puller.

One mine countermeasure deployed was a Mark 105 magnetic sled which creates a magnetic field to destroy mines as it is towed behind a helicopter.

The second type of countermeasure system used during the training battery was the Magnetic Orange Pipe (MOP). This system is a shallowwater mine countermeasure which also uses magnetism to negate mine threats.

The deployment of each countermeasure was broken down into multiple phases. Puller’s deck department Sailors and CIVMARs first launched three Rigid-hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBS), manned by HM-15 Sailors. These boats were used to guide and maneuver the magnetic sled and MOP. The countermeasure devices were moved into position for towing. The sled was attached to one of HM-15’s MH-53 Sea Dragon helicopter and towed through simulated mine target area.

“Prior to this underway, we developed these capabilities independently,” said Muehlbauer. “We tested and qualified the crew to handle small boats and crafts. On the flight deck, we qualified the crew to launch and recover different types of aircraft.”

“HM-15 is one of the only two squadrons in the Navy that can perform AMCM,” said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Pineda, HM-15’s officer in charge. “We are part of the Mine Counter Measure triad, ready to deploy worldwide in a very short notice.”

“Due to their complexities, AMCM missions require intense training for both aircrew and maintainers,” said Pineda. “As was observed during this deployment, the launching of the MOP from the ship’s crane as well as the launching of the aircraft a deck above require detailed coordination and practice. Proficiency is in this is key to our success as the only AMCM national asset.”

After the designated target area was cleared, the mine countermeasures and the RHIBS were brought back aboard the Puller.

“The Puller is designed to support anti-mine countermeasure mission sets,” said Muehlbauer. “We are able to embark up to four MH-53 helicopters capable of towing different types of counter-mine equipment such as different types of mine hunting sleds or mine-finding sonars through the water.”

“To support these anti-mine operations we are able to launch and recover small boats and different mine neutralization assets,” added Muehlbauer. “This platform can be adapted very quickly to deploy the mine countermeasure assets required based on a particular situation.

“Puller’s crew performed extremely well during this underway period,” said Captain Jonathan Olmsted, Puller’s master. “There were several long days, but everyone had a chance to catch a break and a meal without any impact to operations.”

The Hybrid Crew; Results from the Deck Plates

Stoots explained his role as Chief Mate and the CIVMARs responsibilities during the Puller’s underway.

“The Chief Mate is similar to an executive officer on a Navy combatant ship. The position includes being the deck department head, safe navigation of the ship and leadership in the deck department,” said Stoots. “As the Chief Mate, I was responsible for the safety on deck and supervised the entire operation on deck in regards to launching Rigid-hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBS), the mine countermeasure sled and Magnetic Orange Pole.”

While Puller’s crew was busy with mine countermeasure training evolutions, there were many critical tasks being performed behind the scenes by Puller’s CIVMARs.

“The CIVMARs’ responsibilities aboard Puller include navigation, engineering, galley service, maintenance, repair, and damage control,” said Olmsted. “Additionally CIVMARs operate all the ship’s cranes in support of mission requirements.”

“The main function of the deck department is navigation of the ship,” said Stoots. “At all times while we are underway, there is a licensed mate on the bridge. We have a helmsman, lookout and rover on duty. The helmsman steers the ship and takes direction from the mate. The rover keeps the ship safe and ensures there are no fires, flooding or injured personnel.”

“The lookout is maintaining a proper lookout. Other aspects of the Deck department include having the Bosun on scene and they manage the deck responsibilities such as operating the cranes, winches and supervise the movement of cargo and equipment.

There were approximately 40 CIVMARs aboard during the underway. “I felt like the mine countermeasure training evolution was very successful,” said Stoots. “We were uncertain about certain elements of the evolution. This was the first time these types of mine countermeasures were deployed from a ship’s deck while using a ship’s crane to deploy the equipment instead of a ship’s well deck, which is the norm.”

“There was a lot of anticipation to see how the deployment of this equipment would work from Puller and I felt like it went very well,” added Stoots.

“The Puller has 100 Sailors in its crew,” said Muehlbauer. “The military crew is in charge of the aviation department, mission deck operations, launch and recovery of small boats and any other deployed mission assets, ship’s force protection. The Sailors also manage C4I, and are capable of providing galley services for approximately 250 military personnel.”

“The Puller’s military crew supports the CIVMARs in the deck department with tasks such as line handling and logistic tasks to include crane operations and moving material on and off the ship,” said Muehlbauer.

“The military crew is made up of four officers and nine Chief Petty Officers,” said Muehlbauer. “The majority of our junior enlisted Sailors are Aviation Boatswain’s Mates, Aviation Fuels, Information Technicians, Damage Controlmen and aviation mechanics. To round it out, we have about 30 Sailors who work in the supply department.” “This underway was our first big integrated training event and it went very well,” said Muehlbauer. “The training from this underway will lead us into our final testing and evaluation period later this year when we will certify the full capabilities of the Puller and crew.”

The Puller’s crew is categorized as a hybrid as its members are both active duty Sailors and CIVMARs. The success of the ship is dependent on a strong working relationship between the two distinctive cultures.

“A successful hybrid crew is definitely a team effort. I like to refer to the crew as ‘Team Puller’,” said Stoots. “We are one ship and one crew and work together on every aspect of every evolution. The military crew supports the CIVMARs on deck operation and likewise we support the military crew on operations such as mine countermeasures.”

“Early on there were times when we struggled with the crew interactions between the Sailors and CIVMARs,” said Muehlbauer. “When the military crew arrived on the Puller, the mariners had already been on board for over a year. So when the military detachment arrived, we were very much the new kids on the block. It took a little while to build trust, credibility and rapport with the mariners.”

“The ship’s master and I worked together to lay down initial ground rules for the crew but most of the real ‘gelling’ for the crew took place on the deck plates,” said Muehlbauer. “The more we placed Sailors and CIVMARs in situations where they had to work together, the better they understand each other’s skill-sets and how each does business. This was how we really started to build our team spirit. We put the right people in the right place and it worked very well for us. The formation of a successful hybrid crew for Puller was not dictated from the top but was more of a grass-roots effort which has proven to be very effective.”

“Over the course of the last six months, the crew has gotten to the point where the Sailors and CIVMARs are able to predict how each is going to react or think during a variety of situations,” said Muehlbauer. “The positive development of our hybrid crew has allowed Puller to maintain its very strict time-line and will ensure we are ready to deploy next year.”

“I believe the Puller brings great capabilities to the Navy,” concluded Muehlbauer. “This platform allows the Navy to sustain an expeditionary presence longer and will free up combatant ships to undertake missions which they are better suited for.”

In addition to testing and evaluation for the Puller, the ship is going to spend some time in the shipyard for upgrades and modifications prior to being permanently deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility in 2017.

“The Puller is going to receive an upgrade which will enable special operations forces (SOF) to utilize the ship for operations,” added Muehlbauer. “The Puller will be able to support maritime interdictions, operations potentially in-country, and different adaptive military packages to perform different types of SOF contingencies throughout the world.”

In addition to countermine training evolutions, Puller’s crew performed vertical replenishment training with the Afloat Training Group, practiced flight deck firefighting techniques, and trained to counter the threat of a small boat attack.

“Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller is among the greatest legends in the United States Marine Corps,” said Olmsted. “Known as ‘Chesty’ for his prominent barrel chest, Puller is the most decorated Marine in history and the only Marine to earn five Navy Crosses.”

“During his 37-year career, he saw action in Haiti, Nicaragua, the WWII Pacific Theater, and Korea,” added Olmsted. “He was revered by his Marines, and he continues to inspire new USMC candidates who finish each night at boot camp declaring, ‘Good night, Chesty Puller, wherever you are’.”

“General Puller’s legacy continues with USNS Puller as a constant reminder of Chesty’s toughness, his inspirational leadership, and his ability to overcome great challenges,” concluded Olmsted.
http://www.msc.navy.mil/sealift/2016/August/puller.htm
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  #34  
Old 24-10-2016, 23:37
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

With the CH-53K program moving along with orders that may add up to 200 units in time, they are sure to make their way aboard Puller in time.

http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/20161021-ch53k.html
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  #35  
Old 26-01-2017, 19:57
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

Construction on a 3rd ESB, has begun.
https://news.usni.org/2017/01/26/nas...onary-sea-base
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  #36  
Old 12-07-2017, 18:50
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

Puller has departed for the 5th Fleet.

https://news.usni.org/2017/07/12/expeditionary-sea-base

http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/...12-Puller.html

Last edited by Surfgun : 12-07-2017 at 21:36.
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  #37  
Old 12-07-2017, 21:56
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

News report of departure: includes the statement that she will not return to Norfolk.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lgDuQ00FqE4


Video: MV-22 operation off the Viginia Capes this past June.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TVJWEKZoowE

Last edited by Surfgun : 13-07-2017 at 00:34.
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  #38  
Old 16-08-2017, 23:19
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

USNS Lewis B. Puller is to be redesignated as USS Lewis B. Puller.
https://news.usni.org/2017/08/16/nav...er-uss-warship

PS, (to cheeky Brits) no jokes about Puller and Ponce operating together.

Last edited by Surfgun : 16-08-2017 at 23:40.
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  #39  
Old 22-08-2017, 01:45
Surfgun Surfgun is offline
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Default Re: The Revised MLP, USNS Lewis B. Puller

An article about the first ever overseas commissioning of an United States Ship.
http://www.navytimes.com/news/2017/0...ewis-b-puller/
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  #40  
Old 22-08-2017, 18:44
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Default Re: USS Lewis B Puller - The Revised MLP

The second ESB Hershel Williams has been launched.
https://www.navyrecognition.com/inde...-williams.html
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  #41  
Old Today, 15:01
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Default Re: USS Lewis B Puller - The Revised MLP

USS Lewis B. Puller has been integrated within Alligator Dagger 2017.
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=102522
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