World Naval Ships Forums  
CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF ART PRINTS!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Military History > Victorian Wars > Boer War
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Boer War Discussion of the Boer War

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 18-04-2011, 17:51
jainso31's Avatar
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: DONCASTER S.YORKS UK
Posts: 8,385
Angry COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller


Colenso was the third and final battle of Black Week
and saw the denouement of General Buller as C in C South Africa.The Battle of Colenso was an abject failure because the British Force was commanded by an officer; promoted way above his capabilities.For a man decorated with the VC
he showed remarkable timidity.He lost 1240 officers and men in killed ,wounded and missing along with 10 guns;all for something less than nothing!!

jainso31



http://www.historyofwar.org/articles...s_colenso.html
__________________

HMS ANEMONE (K48)

Always on the Lookout!

Jim
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 19-04-2011, 05:27
Brett Hendey's Avatar
Brett Hendey Brett Hendey is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 109
Default Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

Colenso was indeed a disaster for the British and Buller went on to repeat his poor generalship at Spioenkop and Vaalkrans a month later. Even his ultimate success at the Battle(s) of Tugela Heights was blood-soaked and his forces prevailed only because of the weight of numbers of very brave men.

One of the best assessments of Buller and his other generals was written at that time by Captain C E Radclyffe of the 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade:

"Charging hills is an absolutely irresistable temptation to Generals out here."

I have a particular interest in the operations to relieve the Siege of Ladysmith, probably because I lived in Estcourt for many of my younger years and Buller's headquarters at Frere were only a few miles away. I have collected medals of men who fought in the Relief and two of the men represented in my collection were wounded during the Battle of Colenso. One was a Sergeant in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, a regiment that was part of the Irish Brigade, which was the one that suffered the heaviest casualties that day. A visit to the area where he was wounded reveals the absolute stupidity of the close-order approach of the Irish to entrenched Boers on high ground on the far side of the Tugela River. The Irish would not even have seen the enemy, never mind being in a position to evict them from their trenches.

Regards
Brett
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 19-04-2011, 08:05
jainso31's Avatar
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: DONCASTER S.YORKS UK
Posts: 8,385
Unhappy Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

Thanks Brett for your usual knowledgable comments.General Hart marched his men forward in quarter column in clear daylight across a coverless veld,exposed to every Boer gun and rifle in range.He eventually got himself lost ,like Wauchope, by advancing too far and further exposed his men to the accurate fire of the Boers.Buler sent an order to Hart to pull back with the aid of Lyttleton's Brigade.What an absolute shambles.Then came the loss of Colonel Long's guns.
PS I too collected QSA's to Hart's and Barton's Brigade.
jainso31
__________________

HMS ANEMONE (K48)

Always on the Lookout!

Jim
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 23-04-2011, 12:30
jainso31's Avatar
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: DONCASTER S.YORKS UK
Posts: 8,385
Angry Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

Gol. Long had been given the position, where to site his Battery of 10X12pdr guns by Gen.Buller, who pointed with his finger at a very rough sketch map. Thistook him into a loop of the R Tugela, 1000 yds from the river, near Colenso Station, far too near Boer sharpshooters ;which made a trap from which he could not extricate himself.
He lost his nerve and retreated; leaving his precious guns to the Boers to take away.All concerned should have been courtsmartialled; but for the usual cover up-,with Long shouldering the blame until 1906; when evidence from Botha exonerated him.

jainso31
__________________

HMS ANEMONE (K48)

Always on the Lookout!

Jim

Last edited by jainso31 : 23-04-2011 at 13:01.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 24-04-2011, 06:26
Brett Hendey's Avatar
Brett Hendey Brett Hendey is offline
Sub-Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 109
Default Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

The small town of Colenso is now a messy and run down shadow of its former self. Most of its former inhabitants were once proud of its place in the military history of the British Empire, but I doubt that a visitor to the town today would find a single person with any interest in the town's past. In time even its name is likely to be changed and Colenso will exist only on the pages of history books.

Regards
Brett
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 24-04-2011, 08:07
jainso31's Avatar
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: DONCASTER S.YORKS UK
Posts: 8,385
Cool Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

Thank you Brett for your obsevation and description of the presentday Colenso.As Colenso is a place of shame in the Annals of the Brtish Army-maybe to rename it, would perhaps breathe some new life into it and I do not think the British Army would be all that saddened.
__________________

HMS ANEMONE (K48)

Always on the Lookout!

Jim
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 29-09-2011, 09:54
jainso31's Avatar
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: DONCASTER S.YORKS UK
Posts: 8,385
Default Re: COLENSO-The Sunset of General Buller

Of the many commentaries on Colenso the briefest are the best-"The general and not his gallant focewas defeated" declared the German Staff Historian."We all hammered our heads against a stone wall of which nobody knew anything" wrote Lt. Leslie Renton of Dundonald's Force."Fight? Och,it was no fight at all,at all" said a Dublin Fusilier. Of Col. Long's guns what can be said!!

jainso31
__________________

HMS ANEMONE (K48)

Always on the Lookout!

Jim
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 12th January 1939 : HMS Ajax : Took up patrol in the Plate estuary

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see our naval art portal - Eight random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

B64AP.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
HMS Glowworm, burning severely after receiving hits from the mighty Admiral Hipper, is depicted turning to begin her heroic sacrifice off the Norwegian coast on 8th April 1940. Hugely out-gunned and already crippled, Glowworms captain, Lieutenant-Commander Roope rammed his destroyer into the side of the Admiral Hipper, inflicting a 40 metre rip in its armour belt before drifting away and exploding. 38 British sailors were rescued from the sea and Roope was awarded a posthumous VC for his bravery, the first earned by the Royal Navy in WWII.

HMS Glowworms Attack on the Admiral Hipper by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.†

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £140.00
One of the most decisive battles in the history of the Royal Navy, Nelsons defeat of the French fleet took place on 21st October 1805 off Cape Trafalgar and was conducted with not a single British ship lost, although few ships escaped severe punishment and loss of life on both sides was tragically high

The Battle of Trafalgar, 21st October 1805 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £85.00

B61.  USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman.
USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £40.00
B114AP. HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914.  By Ivan Berryman.
HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914. By Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The third of the Royal Navy's Vanguard class submarines, HMS Vigilant (S30) entered service on 2nd November 1996.  She is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane and carries the UK's nuclear deterrent Trident ballistic missile.  Manned by a crew of 14 officers and 121 men, her main power is supplied by one Rolls Royce PWR2 nuclear reactor driving two GEC turbines.

HMS Vigilant by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £725.00

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see our sport art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Colin McRae and Nicky Grist.  Ford Focus WRC
High Flier by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
Monte Carlo - June 1st 2003 and Juan Pablo Montoya put in an outstanding drive, pushing his Williams BMW to victory in the Monaco Grand Prix. His triumph in what is possibly the most prestigious race of the season allowed him to celebrate his first win since Italy in 2001.

Harbour Master by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £82.50
 Depicting Englands emphatic 1995 grand slam victory.

1995 Grand Slam by Scott Bridges. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see our aviation art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.†

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00
 An ignominious end for an Albatros C.III demands an act of compassion by a British medical team who are first on the scene of a crash in the early years of World War 1.

Not All Landings Are Good Landings by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £750.00
 A pair of P51D Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, escort a damaged B17G Flying Fortress of the 381st Bomb Group back to its home base of Ridgewell, England, during the Autumn of 1944.

Last One Home by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918†by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see our military art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £75.00
DHM1079GL.  The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands.

The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
 The men of the US 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment ambushed the German 1st Battalion, 6th Fallschrimjager Regiment making their way to Carentan, the Battle of Hells Corner ensued.

Hells Corner, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 88mm AA guns of the 23rd Flak Regiment, used as anti-tank guns by orders of Rommel himself, are shown firing on British Matilda tanks of 4th/7th Royal Tank Regiment.

Action at Arras, France, 21st May 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RN Ships: General Maritime Michael Ian Photo Galleries 259 26-06-2014 11:41
Zulu Sunset jainso31 Zulu Wars 17 15-12-2010 17:45
Communicators Nightmare Sunset and Colours Jack McHammocklashing Other Naval Topics 16 15-11-2009 23:40
General info Ian Green Introductions 1 04-11-2009 18:54
HMS General Wolfe Harley Royal Navy Ships and Crews 13 13-05-2008 16:13


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:11.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.