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India Discussion of the War in India

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  #26  
Old 09-02-2010, 19:10
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nigelweysom nigelweysom is offline
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Default Re: The Indian Mutiny

Manowari that's fantastic ,having read about it to now see some pictures it brings it to life
thanks
Nigel
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  #27  
Old 09-02-2010, 19:29
steve roberts steve roberts is offline
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Thumbs up Re: The Indian Mutiny

Hi Nigel.You wanted some pictures from the mutiny.Here are just a few to keep you going. Regards Steve.
1151828.jpg1153474.jpgHistoricMutinyALM_468x525.jpg1151832.jpgdaly_sepoy_mutiny_1857.jpg
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  #28  
Old 09-02-2010, 23:51
INVINCIBLE INVINCIBLE is offline
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Default Re: The Indian Mutiny

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guz rating View Post
I am not surprised the Indians revolted they were treated as if they were a lower form of life. We disrespected their religions culture and customs. If some other country had taken us over and treated us as they were treated. I would like to think that we could revolt, as a matter of fact I know we would.

Alan
In fact we were many times in our early history and of course we did revolt often but not always with success!
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  #29  
Old 10-02-2010, 12:13
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Default Re: The Indian Mutiny

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Originally Posted by INVINCIBLE View Post
In fact we were many times in our early history and of course we did revolt often but not always with success!
Yes I agree the one that stands out is the struggle beween Suetonius Paulinus and the Iceni, were superior tactics won over a superior force.
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  #30  
Old 10-02-2010, 12:46
John Odom John Odom is offline
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Default Re: The Indian Mutiny

These things look very different depending on view point. Was it the "Philippine insurection" or the "Philippine wart for independence"? All peoples want to be "free." Even when "free" is under a repressive, corrupt government of their own people, rather than an efficient honest government of foreigners.
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  #31  
Old 10-02-2010, 12:52
steve roberts steve roberts is offline
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Cool Re: The Indian Mutiny

As a interesting fact.The well known Bagpipe March "The Campbells Are Coming" originated from the relief of Lucknow! Steve.
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  #32  
Old 10-02-2010, 15:28
steve roberts steve roberts is offline
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Default Re: The Indian Mutiny

For interest I attach some available prints of the relief of Lucknow. Steve.
ant103.jpggitw1012.jpgvar0644.jpg
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  #33  
Old 15-08-2011, 17:46
jainso31 jainso31 is offline
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Unhappy Re: The Indian Mutiny

Reading through this thread,I can see many erudite comments about the Mutiny's origins.At one end of the scale the Raj unquestionably did a lot of good ;but the ordinary Indian was treated abyssmally.
The Mutiny heralded the beginning of the end; but it took a while, two world wars and ninety years.

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