World Naval Ships Forums  
CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF NAVAL ART PRINTS!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Naval History > Naval Obituaries
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Naval Obituaries A collection of notes on those who have crossed the bar.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 27-08-2009, 20:02
qprdave's Avatar
qprdave qprdave is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Snyder Texas USA
Posts: 4,663
Default Frederick Thornton Peters, VC

Frederick Thornton Peters V.C.

Frederick Thornton Peters, VC , DSO , DSC & Bar (September 17, 1889 - November 13, 1942) was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Frederick Thornton "Fritz" Peters was 53 years old, and a captain in the Royal Navy during the Second World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC:

Operation Reservist (part of Operation Torch, the Allied landings in French North Africa) was an attempt to capture Oran Harbour, Algeria and prevent it from being sabotaged by its French garrison. The two sloops HMS Walney and HMS Hartland were packed with British Commandos and soldiers of the 6th US Armored Infantry Division.

On 8 November 1942 Captain Peters, commanding in Walney, led his force through the boom towards the jetty in the face of point-blank fire from shore batteries, the sloop La Surprise, and the destroyer Epervier. Blinded in one eye, he alone of 11 officers and men on the bridge survived. Walney reached the jetty disabled and ablaze and went down with her colours flying. Captain Peters and a handful of men managed to reach the shore, where they were taken prisoner. Hartland came under fire from the French destroyer Typhon and blew up with the loss of half her crew. The survivors, like those of Walney, were taken prisoner as they reached shore.

Captain Peters was also awarded the U.S. Army Distinguished Service Cross for the same actions. The citation, issued in Allied Force Headquarters General Orders No. 19 of November 23, 1942, stated that "Captain Peters distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy during the attack on that post. He remained on the bridge in command of his ship in spite of the fact that the protective armor thereon had been blown away by enemy shell fire and was thereby exposed personally to the withering cross fire from shore defenses. He accomplished the berthing of his ship, then went to the forward deck and assisted by one officer secured the forward mooring lines. He then with utter disregard of his own personal safety went to the quarter-deck and assisted in securing the aft mooring lines so that the troops on board could disembark. At that time the engine room was in flames and very shortly thereafter exploded and the ship turned on its side and sank."

The survivors were released on November 10, 1942 when the French garrison surrendered. In the meantime, the French systematically destroyed the harbour facilities at Oran: Operation Reservist was thus a complete failure.

Captain Peters was killed in an air crash three days later. Mount Peters near Nelson, British Columbia, where his mother lived in her last years with the family of her daughter Helen Dewdney and her husband E.E.L. Dewdney, was named in his honour in 1946.

Fritz Peters' parents were Frederick Peters (Premier of Prince Edward Island 1891-1897) and Roberta Hamilton Susan Gray (daughter of John Hamilton Gray who was Premier of P.E.I. at the time of the Charlottetown Conference of 1864). Two of Fritz's brothers died in action on the Western Front in World War One -- John Francklyn Peters in April 1915 and Gerald Hamilton Peters in June 1916. In addition to his service with the Royal Navy (which he joined in Esquimalt, B.C. in 1905 at age 16), Fritz worked with British Naval Intelligence and advised Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Russian spy Kim Philby noted his admiration for Naval Intelligence instructor "Commander Peters" in his book My Secret Life.

Further information

Killed on 13 November 1942 in a Sunderland seaplane which crash landed in Plymouth Sound, at the entrance to the Royal Navy's Devonport Dockyard, Nr. Plymouth Devon. No bodies were recovered after the crash. Grave/memorial at Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Hampshire, England. Panel 61. Column 3.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Frederick_Thornton_Peters_VC.jpg (33.1 KB, 6 views)
__________________
Non illigitamus carborundum!

Last edited by qprdave : 27-08-2009 at 21:33.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 27-08-2009, 21:30
Dave Hutson Dave Hutson is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Plymouth, Devon
Posts: 2,875
Default Re: Frederick Thornton Peters, VC

Thanks Dave I will now go on here in Plymouth to find the exact location of the crash and if I can initiate an annual memorial will start the family trace for permission.

Regards

Dave H
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 27-08-2009, 21:32
harry.gibbon's Avatar
harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Merseyside
Posts: 6,773
Default Re: Frederick Thornton Peters, VC

BZ the two Dave's!! wish you every success Dave H

Little h
__________________

GFXU - HMS Falmouth in Falmouth Bay
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 27-08-2009, 21:44
qprdave's Avatar
qprdave qprdave is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Snyder Texas USA
Posts: 4,663
Default Re: Frederick Thornton Peters, VC

Additional information

Joined the Royal Navy as a Cadet in January 1905.

"Fritz" Peters was 16 years old at this time.

In 1906 he went to sea as a midshipman and was commissioned as a Sub*Lieutenant in 1909.

He was awarded the Silver Messina Earthquake medal from the Italian government in recognition of his service in leading shore rescue parties during the evacuation of the population in danger from the erupting volcano, Mount Messina in 1908.

He operated gunboats on "The China Station" prior to World War One.

He was in the Royal Navy on the outbreak of World War One and on 24th January, 1915, he was serving at First Lieutenant in HMS Meteor when his ship tried to launch torpedoes against the German ship 'Blucher'. 'Blucher' was able to hit HMS Meteor with an 8.2 inch shell, seriously damaging HMS Meteor. Lieutenant Peters was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and a Mention in Despatches.

In March 1918, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) "for services in Destroyer and Torpedo Boat Flotillas during the period ending 31 December 1917."

World War I summary

PETERS. Frederick "Fritz" Thornton, WW.I, Lt, RN

MID~[15.1.15] DSO~[3.3.15] DSC~[8.3.18] "For service in Destroyers and Torpedo Boat Flotillas during the period ending 31 Dec 1917"

At the beginning of the Second World War, he was promoted to Commander and given command of a flotilla of small boats operating against German submarines. The flotilla sank two German Submarines and in 1940, he was awarded the Bar to his Distinguished Service Cross. Supplement to the LONDON GAZETTE 11 July 1940, page 4257. "The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the following award for good services in the Royal Navy since the outbreak of War:

-* Bar to the Distinguished Service Cross: Commander Frederick Thornton PETERS, DSO, DSC, HMS "Thirlmere".

PETERS, Frederick Thornton, Captain, DSO, DSC* - VICTORIA CROSS (VC) - RN - Awarded as per London Gazette of 18 May 1943.

He was sent to Gibraltar to plan the attack on the harbour at Oran which was protected by the Vichy French. The Task Force Commander, Admiral Cunningham, had determined that the boom defences in the harbour of Oran, Morocco had to be destroyed. Peters planned the assault but the plans were known by the French defending Oran and the operation called off. After, a brief period, the operation was determined necessary. 'Fritz' Peters decided since it was a suicide charge, he would take command of the two ex*American coast guard cutters HMS 'Walney' and HMS 'Hartland' personally and lead the charge. The ships had three main tasks to perform. The first was to break the boom defences. The second was to land 17 officers and 376 enlisted men from the US Army Rangers 6th Armoured Corps and to take the seize the shore installations, immobilize the French warships (14 in total ranging from a submarine to a heavily armed cruiser). The third task was to launch motorized mines from six canoes that would be put overboard once the ships were in the harbour. To fully appreciate what happened in this naval action, you must read both the citations for the two decorations he was awarded that day:

The American Army Distinguished Service Cross and the highest gallantry award, the Victoria Cross. The American DSC was gazetted in the London Gazette 19/01/43 and the citation reads:

"While in command of the ship carrying Landing Forces of the United States Army into the harbour of Oran, Morocco, in the early morning of 8 November 1942, Captain Peters distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy during the attack on that port. He remained on the bridge in command of his ship in spite of the fact that the protective armour thereon had been blown in by enemy shellfire and was thereby exposed personally to the withering cross*fire from shore defences. He accomplished the berthing of his ship, then went to the forward deck and assisted by one officer, secured the forward mooring lines. He then, with utter disregard of his own personal safety went to the quarter*deck and assisted in securing the aft mooring lines so that the troops on board could disembark. At that time, the engine room was in flames and very shortly thereafter exploded and the ship turned on its side and sank."

The citation for the Victoria Cross published in the London Gazette 18 May 1943 was made to sound very bland so that the French would not be offended. The citation is as follows:

"Captain Peters was in the 'suicide charge' by two little cutters at Oran. 'Walney' and 'Hartland' were two ex*American coast guard cutters which were lost in a gallant attempt to force the boom defences in the harbour of Oran during the landings on the North African coast. Captain Peters led his force through the boom in the face of pointblank fire from shore batteries, a destroyer and cruiser * a feat which was described as one of the great episodes of naval history. The Walney reached the jetty disabled and ablaze, and went down with her colours flying. Blinded in one eye, Captain Peters was the only survivor of the seventeen men on the bridge of the 'Walney'. He was taken prisoner but was later released when Oran was captured. On being liberated from gaol, he was carried through the streets where the citizens hailed him with flowers." Winston Churchill described the action as the greatest naval battle since Trafalgar. The first objective of breaking the boom defences was achieved in the full frontal attack on a heavily armed port and allowed a floating dockyard to be brought into the harbour for the 'Torch' Operation landings. The second objective of landing US Rangers and a few Royal Navy Commandos was a failure as 9 officers and 180 men were killed and 5 officers and 152 enlisted men wounded. Only 3 officers and 44 men from the other units aboard the two vessels survived. The motorized mines did not work. The 'Hartland' was not able to launch the canoes as they were crushed when placed overboard. Only one of the canoes was successfully launched from the 'Walney' and it slipped into port unnoticed. Unfortunately, the motorized mines did not work and this part of the operation was a total failure.

To complete the story of this gallant attack, the following is taken from Jack McIntyre's story of the attack, code named "Operation Reservist":

"In the early morning hours of 8 November 1942, Peters small ship was being pounded by devastating shellfire at point blank range from shore batteries and from French warships anchored in Oran Harbour. As Walney proceeded down the harbour, a destroyer decided to break out. Peters promptly ordered an attempt at ramming the Frenchman. Walney missed. The destroyer responded by raking Walney with broadsides at a few yards range. The little vessel lurched but continued to limp down the harbour. The toll in death and destruction was mounting. Walney's position was hopeless and Peters knew it. Soon she came under fire from a French cruiser berthed alongside the jetty at the far end of the harbour. Walney took a direct hit in the engine room. The bridge exploded in flame from another, blowing Peters off the bridge, the only survivor of eighteen officers and men, wounded in the shoulder and blinded in one eye. The devastation above and below decks was indescribable. Many of the troops had come above decks to lob grenades and spray small arms fire at the enemy ships close by. The wounded were taken to the wardroom. It took a direct hit, the shell exploding in the cramped space, killing everyone there. By now ammunition stores were exploding, as well as depth charges stored below decks. Still Peters drove on undeterred, taking his crippled ship into the jetty and the French cruiser berthed alongside. Walney's situation was hopeless, the objective reached but the ship dying. By now it was a matter of trying to get any troops off who still survived. Some jumped from the harbour to come under machine gun fire from French gunners. Peters went forward from the bridge to help put mooring lines ashore. Then he went aft to do the same thing there. He ordered the ship to be abandoned and jumped into the water and swam ashore. Walney turned on her side and sank in shallow water, the side of her hull showing above the shallows. Her day was finally done. She went down with American and British ensigns still flying. Peters and the other survivors were taken prisoner by the French authorities and given medical treatment. They were liberated days later when allied soldiers, who landed up and down the coast, took Oran from the land. Peters, it was said, was treated as a hero by the French civilian population and borne through the streets of the town on the shoulders of a crowd of people in a strange sort of victory parade." Peters was taken to Gibraltar for further medical treatment and to be flown back to England. It was flying that was to be his undoing something the seas had not been able to achieve. On Friday the thirteenth of November, 1942, Peters with four other naval officers left Gibraltar in a Sunderland Flying Boat of the Royal Australian Air Force. The weather was very good at the start of the flight but worsened as the aircraft approached England. Due to the heavy fog, the plane flew lower and lower and finally crashed into the sea near the Plymouth breakwater. The plane flipped over but all occupants escaped. Flying Officer Whyn Thorpe, captain of the aircraft, spotted a body in the water kept afloat by a lifejacket. The two of them were in the water for 90 minutes before being picked up by a search boat. The accident and the cold water were too much for the brave Canadian and he died that night.

PETERS, Frederick Thornton, Captain, VC, DSO, DSC* - Distinguished Service Cross (USA) - Royal Navy - Awarded in 1943. See Victoria Cross Citation

WWII Summary.

Cdr RN, Bar to DSC~[11.7.40] "The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the following award for good services in the RN since the outbreak of War". Capt RN, (Canadian) DSC (USA)~[19.1.43] VC~[18.5.43] Deceased [13.11.42]

Medal of Captain Frederick Thornton PETERS, VC, DSO, DSC*, RN:

VC * DSO (George V) * DSC (George V) and bar (George VI) * 1914 Star * British War Medal * Victory Medal with MID * 1939/45 Star * Atlantic Star * Africa Star * Defence Medal * 1939*1945 War Medal * Italy's Silver Messina Earthquake Medal (1908) * USA Army Distinguished Service Cross.
__________________
Non illigitamus carborundum!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-04-2012, 13:29
Oldlongdog Oldlongdog is offline
Recruit
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1
Default Re: Frederick Thornton Peters, VC

The captain of HMS Walney was Lt. Cdr. Peter Capel Meyrick. He was undoubtedly commanding the ship from the bridge until it was destroyed. He was only 'mentioned in despatches'.

Captain Peters conceived and executed a 'suicide mission' with other people's lives, gallant men who carried out his orders without question. I would hope in all the revelry about the awarding of a VC to this man that the bravery of the the rest of the crews of both HMS Walney and HMS Hartland will also be recognised.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 19th January 1940 : HMS Diana : Covered Convoys HN.20 and ON.21 and Operation DU Activities

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see our naval art portal - Eight random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 One of the most advanced submarines in the world, the nuclear-powered HMS Astute (S119) is depicted making her way into the open sea from her base at Faslane.  Commissioned into the Royal Navy on 27th August 2010, Astute is capable of carrying 38 Tomahawk Block IV cruise missiles over virtually unlimited distances.

HMS Astute by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
B69AP. HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
HMS Hood makes a turn to port, while in line and astern is HMS Collingwood.  Valetta can be seen in the distance.

HMS Hood at Malta 1896 By Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £65.00
 Launched on Trafalgar Day, 1960, HMS Dreadnought was the Royal Navy's first nuclear powered submarine, entering service in 1963.  She is depicted here in the Firth of Forth with the iconic Forth Bridge in the background in December 1963 when she was docked at Rosyth for re-coating of her hull and a general examination.

HMS Dreadnought S101 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

The English fleet pursued the Armada up the English Channel and, as darkness fell, Vice Admiral Drake broke off and captured the Spanish galleon Rosario, Admiral Pedro de Valdes and the crew.  The Rosario was known to be carrying substantial funds to pay the Spanish Army in the Low Countries.  Drakes ship had been leading the English pursuit of the Armada by means of a lantern.  By extinguishing this for the capture, Drake put the fleet into disarray overnight.  On the night of 29th July 1588, Vice Admiral Drake organised fire-ships, causing most of the Spanish captains to break formation and sail out of Calais . The next day, Drake was present at the Battle of Gravelines.  English losses were comparatively few, and none of their ships were sunk.

Grenvilles Revenge by Brian Wood.
Half Price! - £95.00
HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
VAR344B.  H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
B103.  HMS Royal Sovereign and HMS Warspite departing Malta by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Royal Sovereign and HMS Warspite departing Malta by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see our sport art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 David Coulthard. McLaren Mercedes MP4/13
A Scottish Gentleman by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
Marcus Gronholm wins the 2002 Rally New Zealand in the Peugeot 206 and gains the World Rally Championship Title, October 2002.
Finnish First by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £75.00

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see our aviation art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Boulton Paul Defiant of 151 Sqn, based at Wittering, attacking a Messerschmitt Me110. Following an exhausting summer during the Battle of Britain, 151 was designated a night fighter squadron and was equipped both with Hurricanes and Defiants. On the night of†15th January 1942, two Defiants succeeded in bringing down three German aircraft and further successes were recorded during enemy raids on Birmingham when a further nine kills were claimed.

Night of Defiance by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £450.00
The leading ace of the mighty Eighth Air Force, Gabby Gabreski. He finished the war with a total of 28 air victories and 2 1/2 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground by strafing airfields. Gabreski also scored 6 1/2 air victories in the Korean war.

Return From Bremen by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter†by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00
 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity†by Stan Stokes. (C)
Half Price! - £65.00

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see our military art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 After almost two months of continuous fighting in the front line, remnants of the 12th SS Panzer Division, Hitler Jugend, fall back under incessant air attacks by allied fighter bombers for their final battles in France. In their defense of the northern flank of what is to become the Falaise Gap the new Jagdpanzer IV in particular is to prove a formidable foe to the attacking British and Canadian tanks.

The Falaise Gap, Normandy, 12th - 20th August 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00
DHM341B. The Battle of Beda Fomm  by David Rowlands.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM1079GL.  The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands.

The 1st Battalion Duke of Wellingtons Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HMS Ambrose-my grandad frederick william haddock lynnmaidment Service Records / Naval Relatives and Friends 3 10-02-2009 11:06
Peters and Dewdney relations kootenayguy Introductions 3 01-02-2009 02:33
Frederick William Hicks --- Chief Sick Berth Steward RNLSGC Medals 3 22-05-2008 06:20


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:53.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.