World Naval Ships Forums  
CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF ART PRINTS!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Naval History > Other Naval Topics
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Other Naval Topics Other general naval or navy-related topics.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 30-03-2012, 06:54
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default RN Schools

Sandy / All, here I introduce a Thread on Royal Naval Schools.
This can take in GANGES / Greenwich / Dartmouth / Pangbourne / Swanley / Waterlooville & all. Although GANGES has a Thread of its own.
Sandy is kindly helping me with queries on Waterlooville in which I was 1941-1944. Here are two pics of the Home / Orphanage known as `Hopfield', Stakes Hill Road, Waterlooville, Portsmouth.

Sadsac
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HLB1.jpg (312.5 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg HLB2.jpg (181.3 KB, 35 views)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 30-03-2012, 08:08
Teuchter's Avatar
Teuchter Teuchter is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Now live Hampshire
Posts: 667
Default Re: RN Schools

An old mate of mine was a schoolboy on the TS Arethusa (from the age of 12 I think) and joined the navy at HMS St Vincent as soon as he was 15 - we were at Lossiemouth (HMS Fulmar) together 1960/61
__________________


Best regards

T
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 30-03-2012, 11:11
Derek Dicker's Avatar
Derek Dicker Derek Dicker is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Exeter Devon
Posts: 673
Default Re: RN Schools

Good afternoon Sadsac, being an ex Ganges Boy 57-58 remember many young lads in my recruitment who came from TS Aretusa, if remember correctly there was a hospital school in the area also, do not remember the name, was it Holbrook???.
Over the years I have been returning to MALTA on a yearly basis, in my spare time I have been doing research on the island.
One of the websites I have found is about a school for service children, named ROYAL NAVAL SCHOOL TAL-HANDAQ Malta, definately worth a looksee.


Derek (Bunts)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg newbadge.jpg (8.9 KB, 8 views)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 30-03-2012, 12:06
alanandbren's Avatar
alanandbren alanandbren is offline
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northampton
Posts: 522
Default Re: RN Schools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Dicker View Post
Good afternoon Sadsac, being an ex Ganges Boy 57-58 remember many young lads in my recruitment who came from TS Aretusa, if remember correctly there was a hospital school in the area also, do not remember the name, was it Holbrook???.
Over the years I have been returning to MALTA on a yearly basis, in my spare time I have been doing research on the island.
One of the websites I have found is about a school for service children, named ROYAL NAVAL SCHOOL TAL-HANDAQ Malta, definately worth a looksee.


Derek (Bunts)
Hi Derek,do you remember Reeves in our recruitment? he was I believe ex Arethusa,the web site you mention is a must for anyone who served in Malta,

Alan
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 30-03-2012, 14:50
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

T / Bunts / Alan. I do remember Arethusa being in the news circa 1950ish for the `inmates' having a strike / protest !! Pics of them waving banners on gang-plank protesting on the food (as I recall). They should have thought they were better off than Swanley - there it was `bread & scrape' / B & marge / B & jam (no scrape) / just bread - but the bread & dripping (one round in morning) was marvellous. Should have gone to Holbrook (thats near Arethusa area.)

Sadsac
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 30-03-2012, 15:44
Fairlead Fairlead is offline
Lieutenant-Commander
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Horndean, Hampshire UK
Posts: 379
Default Re: RN Schools

TS MERCURY, now HMS GANNET in Chatham Historic Dockyard, was another naval school, which I believe was at Hamble-le-Rice in Hampshire.

Gordon
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 30-03-2012, 15:51
Bonzo's Avatar
Bonzo Bonzo is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Beccles - Suffolk - UK
Posts: 510
Default Re: RN Schools

A few miles up the road from Ganges in Holbrook is The Royal Hospital School
once nicknamed The Cradle of the Navy.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 31-03-2012, 14:48
Destroyerman Destroyerman is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,735
Default Re: RN Schools

Quote:
Originally Posted by dennis a feary View Post
Sandy / All, here I introduce a Thread on Royal Naval Schools.
This can take in GANGES / Greenwich / Dartmouth / Pangbourne / Swanley / Waterlooville & all. Although GANGES has a Thread of its own.
Sandy is kindly helping me with queries on Waterlooville in which I was 1941-1944. Here are two pics of the Home / Orphanage known as `Hopfield', Stakes Hill Road, Waterlooville, Portsmouth.

Sadsac
I'm on the case Dennis.

Your second image (black and white) looks remarkably like the edifice at the bottom of my mate's garden.

(Not suggesting it's his shed; rather a building over the road from his rear fence).

I'll keep you posted via PM.

Cheers,

Sandy.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 31-03-2012, 15:28
brourke brourke is offline
Petty Officer
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Peterborough
Posts: 41
Default Re: RN Schools

This is a photo of RNAS Bramcote in 1953 , a training establishment for Naval Air Mechanics (and others).
As you can see It had a rather unfortunate name and I guess most used Bramcote rather than Gamecock when explaining where they were stationed.
Incidently, it was situated near Nuneaton, about as far from the sea as you can get!

Baz
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Scanned Document.jpg (1.08 MB, 37 views)
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 31-03-2012, 15:33
Mitch Hinde Mitch Hinde is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Currently living in Sunbury on Thames.
Posts: 1,634
Default Re: RN Schools

Hi All

Did a fortninght under canvas at Gamecock with the sea cadests in the 50's, my first introduction to blue liners ponced off the ships company.

Mitch Hinde
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-04-2012, 07:10
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

Re Waterlooville - here is the `Advert' as it appeared in the Navy List of 1945.
Trust it comes out !
OK Re PM Sandy.

Sadsac
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HLB7 001.jpg (813.9 KB, 33 views)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:12
Destroyerman Destroyerman is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,735
Default Re: RN Schools

Thanks for that Dennis.

Another piece in the jigsaw.

Sandy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-04-2012, 10:46
harry.gibbon's Avatar
harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Merseyside
Posts: 6,563
Default Re: RN Schools

Not exclusively an RN school but with naval connections,see:-
--------
Queen Victoria School, Dunblane

Queen Victoria School in Dunblane is a Military School funded by the Ministry of Defence to provide stability and continuity of education, within the Scottish system, for the children of UK Armed Forces personnel who are Scottish, have served in Scotland or are part of a Scottish Regiment. The school is fully boarding, co-educational and tri-service accommodating 270 pupils from age 10/11 to 18. qvs.org.uk/home Royal Grammar School, Worcester CCF (Naval Unit) Royal Grammar School, Worcester describes itself as a dynamic school with a proud heritage. The school has a strong Combined Cadet Force Unit with a thriving Naval contingent. www.rgsw.org.uk/rgsw/activities
--------

from; affiliations with HMS Montrose F236:-
http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/The-Flee...e/Affiliations

see also:-
--------
Queen Victoria School in Dunblane is funded by the Ministry of Defence to provide stability and continuity of education, within the Scottish system, for the children of UK Armed Forces personnel who are Scottish, have served in Scotland or are part of a Scottish Regiment.

Fully boarding, co-educational and tri-service (for Army, Navy and RAF children), the School takes around 270 pupils from the ages of 10/11 up to 18. All necessary costs are met by the Ministry of Defence.
--------
from:-
http://qvs.org.uk/home

Little h
__________________

GFXU - HMS Falmouth in Falmouth Bay
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-04-2012, 20:02
Destroyerman Destroyerman is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,735
Default Re: RN Schools

Hopfield House, Waterlooville, as taken yesterday morning Dennis.

I am led to believe that it is indeed the building at the bottom of my mate's garden.

"RESIDENTS TROUBLED BY GHOSTLY LANDLORD"

In his book, David Scanlan details the tale of Hopfield House, Waterlooville ? once a countryside retreat and now converted into flats.

The house was built by an Edward Fawkes, whose aim it was that the mansion should always be occupied by his descendants alone.

Legend has it that Fawkes' ghost appeared to tenants in the 1800s, who promptly left, and an affluent family who bought the house years later suffered terrible misfortunes.

Of course, these could have been coincidences. But David says he still receives the occasional e-mail from residents claiming that something untoward may still be lurking in Hopfield House."

Perhaps you may recall similar tales as a young resident all those years ago?

Sandy.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Hopfield House 2-4-12.jpg (129.7 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg Hopfield House#2 2-4-12.jpg (133.6 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg Hopfield House#3 2-4-12.jpg (113.7 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg Hopfield House#4 2-4-12.jpg (185.2 KB, 13 views)
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-04-2012, 06:44
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

WOW Sandy, great stuff, great stuff indeed, and many thanks for posting the pics of Hopfield. About 2 / 3 years ago I called in to Waterlooville looking for the building & could not find it - time was short as `Pub-time' called.
Here is a picture of group of `inmates' circa 1943ish !!
Stories will follow later.

Sadsac
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DAF2.jpg (286.9 KB, 50 views)
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-04-2012, 07:50
Teuchter's Avatar
Teuchter Teuchter is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Now live Hampshire
Posts: 667
Default Re: RN Schools

Great picture Dennis - wouldn't be great to know what they are all doing now?
__________________


Best regards

T
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-04-2012, 08:41
Destroyerman Destroyerman is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,735
Default Re: RN Schools

They certainly didn't look starved during the austere times of WWII Teuchter.

Great to see that they were well cared for, and no wonder Dennis has fond memories.

So glad Waterlooville looked after you well Dennis.

And if you need any follow-up, just yell.

Sandy.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-04-2012, 15:39
Teuchter's Avatar
Teuchter Teuchter is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Now live Hampshire
Posts: 667
Default Re: RN Schools

Aye Sandy - the scran must have been pretty good there - maybe an ex Pusser killick chef I/C
__________________


Best regards

T
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-04-2012, 16:50
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

T - I know what one fellow is doing now !! The little fellow second row up standing in the middle - he now contributes to this great Forum, and has reached the dizzy heights of Rear-Admiral !!!!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-04-2012, 19:40
Teuchter's Avatar
Teuchter Teuchter is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Now live Hampshire
Posts: 667
Default Re: RN Schools

Good on yer Dennis - are you still in touch with any other of your colleagues?
__________________


Best regards

T
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 04-04-2012, 20:59
limpet44's Avatar
limpet44 limpet44 is offline
Leading Seaman
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Chichester.
Posts: 29
Default Re: RN Schools

Born and bred Purbrook,can remember the schhols in Stakeshill road Waterlooville,also South Africa Lodge,that is no longer in its old location, but has moved closer to Waterlooville and is now a convalescent home. I went to the Royal Hospital School Holbrook when aged 11. The school RHS was originally the Greenwich Hospital School,and is this year celebrating its Tercentenary,the school moved from Greenwich to Holbrook (Suffolk) in 1932. it was made up of 11 houses, each housing 60-70 pupils,all boys, each house named after a famous seafarer.One good book about the school is "Cradle of the Navy" Like many other pupils i left at the age of 15 to join the RN, which was Daddies Yacht after Holbrook.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-04-2012, 08:38
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

T - No, none from Hopfield. I was there age 4 to 7 so `children'.
I have memories of the time there, more of which later.
At 7 I went to Greenwich & then it was either Holbrook or Swanley.
For whatever reason I fetched-up in Swanley & was there until 16.
Here is a picture of Queen Victoria visiting Hopfield. Not very good I am afraid as it is a copy of a photo. At the time of its copying the copy machine at RNSM was `on-the-blink'. Dear Gus Britton (ex-Holbrook boy), was most incensed at the `modern-technology'.

Sadsac
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HLB20 001.jpg (617.5 KB, 23 views)
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 26-01-2013, 11:51
dennis a feary dennis a feary is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,700
Default Re: RN Schools

Here is an `Advert' gleaned from the Navy List of 1905.
Did not know then of the great conflicts to come.
Not too clear, butbest I can do.

Sadsac
Attached Images
File Type: jpg WNSFNL 001.jpg (1.03 MB, 15 views)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 26-01-2013, 19:48
harry.gibbon's Avatar
harry.gibbon harry.gibbon is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Merseyside
Posts: 6,563
Default Re: RN Schools

Dennis, the following excerpts have been plucked from several sites on t'internet and relate to another Royal Naval School,

First at Camberwell, London:-

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Royal Naval School was an English school that was established in Camberwell, London, in 1833 and then formally constituted by the Royal Naval College Act 1840.[1] It was a charitable institution, established as a boarding school for the sons of officers in the Royal Navy and Royal Marines. Many of its pupils achieved prominence in military and diplomatic service.
A purpose-built school building was designed by the architect John Shaw Jr, and opened in about 1844 at New Cross in south-east London (close to Deptford and Greenwich, both areas with strong naval connections).
(See attachment below)

However, the school soon outgrew this building and relocated to Mottingham in 1889. (The building remained in educational use, being sold to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for £25,000, and being re-opened by the Prince of Wales in July 1891 as the "Goldsmiths' Technical and Recreative Institute" – more commonly known simply as the "Goldsmiths' Institute".[2] In 1904, it became the main building of Goldsmiths College.)

The Royal Naval School remained at Mottingham (in a building today occupied by Eltham College) until it closed in 1910

source Wiki

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In the Peckham Road, by which we now proceed, we pass, on our left, one of the two asylumslicensed for the reception of lunatics in Camberwell. This asylum, known as Camberwell House,with its surrounding pleasure and garden grounds,occupies a space of some twenty acres, part ofwhich is laid out in a park-like manner, theremainder being kept for the use of the patientswho take an interest in garden pursuits. The principal building, formerly known as AlfredHouse, was erected by Mr. Wanostrocht for a school, which he conducted for many years witheminent success.
The house was afterwards used by the Royal Naval School, which, as we havealready seen, was subsequently removed to NewCross. (fn. 4) The Royal Naval School was projected by Captain Dickson; was started by voluntary contributions, headed by the handsome donation of£10,000 from the late Dr. Bell; and had for itsobject the education of the sons of those naval andmarine officers whose scanty incomes did not allowthem to provide a first-rate education for their boys. Its office was represented, from 1831 to 1833, by asecond-floor room in Jermyn Street, St. James's; and here its founders and projectors regularly meton board days, and worked for the advancement of the interests of the Royal Naval School. They were famous men who went up those stairs to thehumble committee-room in Jermyn Street—menwhose names are household words amongst us now,and whom history will remember. William IV.,"the Sailor King," was interested in this school,and met there Yorke, Blackwood, Keats, Hardy,Codrington, and Cockburn—brave admirals andfamous "old salts," some of whom could recollect, mayhap, what a struggle it was to live likea gentleman once, and bring up their boys asgentlemen's sons, on officer's pay. Alfred Housewas for a time the institution which uprose fromthe committee's first deliberations, from voluntarycontributions, and unaided by that Government grant which it deserved as an impetus in the first instance, and which to this day, and for reasonsinexplicable to all connected with the service andthe school, it has been unable to obtain.

Source here at British History online

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
and then the move to Mottingham:-

The Royal Naval School in Mottingham

Most of you know by now that the School for the Sons of Missionaries moved to Mottingham in 1912 and became Eltham College. That’s why 2012 will be a year of centenary celebrations, including a new history book about the school, based on pictures, called Our Century. I should know; I’m writing it.
But the main buildings of our school are much older than 100 years.

What was here before 1912? The answer is another school: the Royal Naval School. The building, originally known as Fairy Hall, has been there since about 1700; it was a private residence and a “country retreat” for people who otherwise lived and worked in London, which was several miles away. It became a school only in 1889 when the Royal Naval School moved from New Cross, vacating a building there which is now Goldsmiths College.

The official opening was on 17th July 1889. The Kentish Mercury described the school as follows:
A first floor gallery, which opens out to six dormitories, masters’ and servants’ apartments, and bedrooms; a central hall on the ground floor, with six large classrooms; a passage to a dining hall big enough for 200 boys; a quadrangle with two fives courts, a swimming pool and a gymnasium; through an arched passageway, the Headmaster’s house and the Bursar’s house. The premises were altered and enlarged for the purposes of
the school; the new buildings included a chemical laboratory and lecture room. The 1891 prospectus refers to a detached Sanatorium, now the White House.

There are excellent pictures in the press of the time; these can be viewed in Lewisham Library, Archives Section, along with much more material about the Naval School, on which this article is based. It’s best to make an appointment and the helpful staff will prepare for your visit.
As the Eltham College Archivist, I sometimes receive queries about boys who attended the school around 1900. The problem is, which school? The Naval School used the term Eltham College, or Eltham College (Royal Naval School) as early as 1892, for example on the prospectus, the Prize Day programme and the Form Lists of that year. But much later, e.g. in 1908, it was not always used (see below left). All very confusing.

Prize giving in 1900 was carried out by HRH the Prince of Wales, soon to be King Edward VII. This was widely reported
in the press. The Chapel foundation stone was laid on July 18th 1903 (see picture, below) and the Opening and Dedication
Service was on June 2nd 1904. We were particularly fortunate that the Naval School built the chapel before leaving the
premises. The story of the building of the Chapel requires more space than is available here.

What sort of a school was the Royal Naval School? To be honest, it was rather like our school. There were concerts and debates, much sport including rugby, cricket, swimming and fives, academic success including places at Oxford, prize day, a House competition and so on. Their Headmaster was in Holy Orders. OK, we don’t have an annual “Assault-at-Arms”, but otherwise their school, as reflected in their magazine, confusingly called the Elthamian (see previous page), was similar to ours and many others.

So why did the school close in 1910? Basically because of a lack of money. Try as they might, they couldn’t attract enough
pupils. Even extending the intake to sons of gentlemen who had nothing to do with the Navy didn’t help. Osborne College
on the Isle of Wight was more attractive. By 1910 there were just 53 pupils, of whom 13 were to withdraw at the end of the summer term. Funds were £191 with liabilities around £900. Subscribers were down from 569 in 1890 to 100 in 1910, of whom only 30 were naval officers. Two appeals in recent years had hardly met their own expenses. Headmaster Rubie, who had waived part of his salary in order to help the school’s finances, declared that no further economies could be effected without destroying the character of the school. There was also an “incident” in 1909, which did not help. Never mind what that was all about.

But let us not be too sad about the demise of the Royal Naval School. On the contrary, their loss was our gain. For just £6,800 we purchased the buildings and a small amount of land in front of the main entrance. The playing fields were not part of the deal, as these were sold separately, eventually to the YMCA. When we moved in we had to erect a fence to keep trespassers out. They moved out in July 1910 but we didn’t move in until January 1912. There was much work to be done in the meantime, costing a further £7,500. The auction of the entire contents of the Royal Naval School took place on 13th and 14th September. We have the catalogue, which appears to indicate that the SSM purchased many practical items for use in situ, such as benches, cutlery etc for the dining-hall. The auction raised £982 4s 4d.

From the Chapel, tablets with the names of Old Boys killed in action were removed to the Royal Naval College in Greenwich. Other tablets were to be removed by the families concerned, if they wished, at their own expense. One was not
removed and is still there (see left). We had someone on the premises for over a year before we moved in. Mr Sydney Moore, the wonderfully inspirational and successful French teacher (1902-15), had been living in the sanatorium since September 1910, showing visitors around and keeping an eye on the place. When we moved in, the modern facilities included electric light and central heating. But that’s another story, told in Our Century. Make sure you get a copy in 2012. (see 2nd attachment)

Source THE ELTHAMIAN ARCHIVES where other images associated with the article can be viewed



Little h
Attached Images
File Type: jpg wiki 800px-Goldsmiths_Main_Building.jpg (147.8 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg Elthamian Royal Naval School (2).jpg (245.6 KB, 3 views)
__________________

GFXU - HMS Falmouth in Falmouth Bay

Last edited by harry.gibbon : 26-01-2013 at 20:13.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 28-03-2013, 16:44
D01Caprice's Avatar
D01Caprice D01Caprice is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Pattaya, Chonburi, Thailand
Posts: 252
Default Re: RN Schools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Dicker View Post
Good afternoon Sadsac, being an ex Ganges Boy 57-58 remember many young lads in my recruitment who came from TS Aretusa, if remember correctly there was a hospital school in the area also, do not remember the name, was it Holbrook???.
Over the years I have been returning to MALTA on a yearly basis, in my spare time I have been doing research on the island.
One of the websites I have found is about a school for service children, named ROYAL NAVAL SCHOOL TAL-HANDAQ Malta, definately worth a looksee.

Derek (Bunts)
My brother was Assistant Headmaster at Verdala school in Malta for a number of years. He was made an honourary member of the Wardroom of FORTH, berthed in Msida Creek just down the road from his pad. Later he was Headmaster at the school for service personnel's children at Singapore NB.
__________________
I used to be an OD, now I've been promoted to an SOB.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 10th January 1940 : HMS Grimsby : Sailed the Tyne escorting Convoy FS.68

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see our naval art portal - Eight random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

B64AP.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 In the early morning murk of 24th May 1941, the forward 15in guns of HMS Hood fire the first shots against the mighty German battleship Bismarck. Both Bismarck and her escort, the Prinz Eugen, immediately responded, the latter causing a fierce fire on Hoods upper deck, while plunging shot from Bismarck penetrated deep into the British ships hull, causing an explosion that ripped the Hood apart, sinking her in an instant. Tragically, just three survivors were rescued from the water.

HMS Hood Opens Fire Upon the Bismarck by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £230.00
 HM submarine H.28 enters Scapa Flow anchorage, passing the forlorn Battle Cruiser SMS Derfflinger and a group of sunken destroyers H.28 was one of the H class submarines. Launched in March 1918, she was finally scrapped in 1944.

Scapa Flow Graveyard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Royal Fleet Auxiliary Olna prepares to receive HMS Active (F171) during the Falklands campaign of 1982.  HMS Coventry (D118) is in the background
RFA Olna by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £625.00
 The mighty Tirpitz demonstrates the effectiveness of her splinter camouflage, surrounded by her net defences at Kaafjord in the Winter of 1943-44.

Tirpitz in Kaafjord by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Shows the action on 26th May 1941 by Swordfish from HMS Ark Royal on the German battleship Bismarck. Fresh from her triumphant encounter with HMS Hood, Bismarck was struck by Swordfishs torpedo which jammed her rudder and was finished off by the home fleet on 27th May 1941.
Sink the Bismarck by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see our sport art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

B49. Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00
FAR635. Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick

Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick
Half Price! - £20.00
FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - £20.00
B42. Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.

Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see our aviation art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Out of Alex by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXEs of 611 Squadron make their way home from a patrol during the summer of 1942. At this time 611 Squadron were based at Kenley and were the first squadron to receive the new Mk.IX putting it on equal terms, for the first time, with the formidable Focke-Wulf 190.

Spitfire Mk.IXE by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 A Vulcan bomber returns from one of the Black Buck missions to the Falklands, preparing to touch down at RAF Ascension Island after what was the longest range bombing mission in history.

Vulcan Return by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see our military art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

CC089. Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.

Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £900.00
 Churchill MkIV tank of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade (comprised of 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards, 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards and 3rd Battalion Scots Guards), pass infantry of the 2nd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders during the Battle for Caumont.

Operation Bluecoat, Normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Braving intense enemy fire, Lt. Col. RB Mayne, Commanding Officer 1st SAS Regiment devastated a German ambush and subsequently rescued wounded troops of his own unit who had been pinned down while on a reconnaissance mission for the 4th Canadian Armoured Division.

Paddys Fourth DSO, The Olderburg Raid, 9th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:44.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.