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  #651  
Old 06-03-2012, 01:21
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seaJane seaJane is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

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Originally Posted by Jan Steer View Post
Thanks so much SeaJane. I've started reading already and hopefully I will be able to save it in "Favourites" for future reference. We are so lucky to have you with us. X (Big Kiss).

best wishes
Jan
Why, thank you

Pleased to be of service.
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  #652  
Old 08-03-2012, 19:39
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Hi All
Things have clarified and I can now tell you that I shall be hosting a "Songs of the Sea" evening on Friday 1st June in the Yacht club, which is on the quay in Lower Town, Fishguard from 1930. It should be a really good event with great company and a chance to listen to some forebitters and shanties, or join in and make the evening even more memorable.If you are taking a break that holiday weekend in this part of the world it would be great to see you. Also on Sunday 3rd June I shall be leading a singing session in "The Ship" ,also in Lower Town Fishguard, between 1600 and1700. Good fun too.

best wishes
Jan
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  #653  
Old 09-03-2012, 10:47
Ednamay Ednamay is online now
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

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Originally Posted by Jan Steer View Post
Hi All
Things have clarified and I can now tell you that I shall be hosting a "Songs of the Sea" evening on Friday 1st June in the Yacht club, which is on the quay in Lower Town, Fishguard from 1930. It should be a really good event with great company and a chance to listen to some forebitters and shanties, or join in and make the evening even more memorable.If you are taking a break that holiday weekend in this part of the world it would be great to see you. Also on Sunday 3rd June I shall be leading a singing session in "The Ship" ,also in Lower Town Fishguard, between 1600 and1700. Good fun too.

best wishes
Jan
How I wish - but the Isle of Wight ferries don't go as far as Fishguard!

Edna
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  #654  
Old 09-03-2012, 10:49
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It will be good knowing that you are there in spirit anyway Edna!

best wishes
Jan
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  #655  
Old 09-03-2012, 14:45
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Ooooooooooooooooooh. That's very tempting!
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  #656  
Old 23-03-2012, 12:44
derek s.langsdon derek s.langsdon is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Espied in 1915 "Boy's Own" annual,Maybe already posted but don't find.

"A Song of the Sea by Harry Wardale.

The Britons sailed the Severn Sea
Unto the ocean main,
From Michael's Mount to Brittany
Through storms that brought their gain.
And sons of the sea each one we be,
With the salt waves mounting high;
Sons of the sea each one we be.
And shall be till we die.

When Romans homeward turned their way
To check the Gothic host,
The Saxon seamen hunted their prey
Upon the British coast.
The salt,salt wind was in their veins
It called to the life of the free;
So they settled them down to enjoy their gains
On the shores of the Northern sea.

Right up the creek the Viking sailed
In the face of the stormy sea,
The tempest wild his friend he hailed
For a strong brave man was he.
And our Island true,with it's streams so blue
Running down to the salt,salt sea,
Claimed the Saxon true and the Norseman too,
For as long as the world should be.

Now sons of the sea each one we be,
Of Saxon or Viking birth,
And our Island free is washed by the sea
From heathland unto firth.
And we thank the Lord of the mighty main,
Who gave us our Island home.
That our English fleet never fought in vain
When it's sharp prows cut the foam
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  #657  
Old 23-03-2012, 16:25
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

That one certainly seems to be 'of it's time'. Would you happen to know is it a song or simply a poem?

best wishes
Jan steer
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  #658  
Old 24-03-2012, 16:49
derek s.langsdon derek s.langsdon is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Dunno, I posted it in it's entirety including the heading.

D
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  #659  
Old 26-03-2012, 15:59
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It would fit to the Dives and Lazarus / Star of County Down tune...
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  #660  
Old 26-03-2012, 19:55
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

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It would fit to the Dives and Lazarus / Star of County Down tune...
Or Gilderoy, which is in the same family of tunes.

I love Swan Arcade's version of Dives and Lazarus.
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  #661  
Old 26-03-2012, 22:03
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

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I love Swan Arcade's version of Dives and Lazarus.
Never heard that one - and I like Swan Arcade. Which album was it recorded on? (if it was recorded).
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  #662  
Old 27-03-2012, 08:53
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Never heard that one - and I like Swan Arcade. Which album was it recorded on? (if it was recorded).
Hi, it was on 'Together forever' recorded in 1984. It's not my favourite album of there's but there are a couple of gems on it. I prefer 'Diving for pearls'.

You can buy Together forever here...

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SWAN-ARCADE-Together-Forever-RARE-1984-LP-Dave-Heather-Brady-NM-VG-FELLSIDE-/170798267500?clk_rvr_id=327488498690&toolid=10 013&customid=&mpre=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.c o.uk%2Fitm%2FSWAN-ARCADE-Together-Forever-RARE-1984-LP-Dave-Heather-Brady-NM-VG-FELLSIDE-%2F170798267500
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  #663  
Old 28-03-2012, 02:28
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Thanks - tis done. Just hope I've got something to play it on!!
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  #664  
Old 30-03-2012, 17:31
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Hope you enjoy it.

You can't beat a bit of accapella harmony. Always have a copy of Four pence and Spicy ale by the Watersons in the car. There's a great song about Hull fisherman on it (to keep in topic).

Thanks

Rich
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  #665  
Old 31-03-2012, 01:20
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

I've got that one too!

My favourite a cappella group is Coope Boyes and Simpson - one of whom I think was in Swan Arcade. They have a fair number of folk songs of the sea across their albums but have yet to do a totally nautical one so far as I know (tangent, Lester told me he has been out with the Jubilee Sailing Trust a few times).
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  #666  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:40
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

I like CBS, Jim Boyes was in Swan Arcade.

The Wilson's are always good for loud nautical songs, they do a great version of Bellamy/Kipling 'Big Steamers'.

In my own band we're working up a version of 'Death of Nelson', looking forward to doing it out when festival season arrives.
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  #667  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:52
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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While I'm on if anyone is in the Sheffield area over Easter and fancies tunes and songs there is a weekend of folk in Sheffield's 'valley of beer'.
Shanty session Sunday 3-6 followed by a big sing in the evening.

http://www.hallamtrads.co.uk/Sheffie..._Festival.html
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  #668  
Old 05-04-2012, 10:02
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Have you ever wondered, as I have, just what songs and music were popular amongst the crews that defeated Napolean?
Their most popular song it would seem was one that was also very popular ashore. It was "Drops of Brandy" which was sung to a very old dance tune. It can be found in Campbell's dances, Book 11, of 1800 and the words that they sang were:
And Johnny shall have a new bonnet
And Johnny shall go to the fair
And Johnny shall have a blue ribbon
To tie up his bonny brown hair.
And why should I not love Johnny
And why should not Johnny love me
And why should I not love Johnny
As well as another bodie.
When the Marines and Waisters manned the capstan to weigh anchor, the pipers would have struck up this tune to put heart into the men. And it would have been sung over their grog in the dark messes between the guns.
"Nancy Dawson" would have been the tune the fifers played to call the men to their grog. This tune is better known as "Sally in our Alley". The double, double, double beat of "Hearts of Oak" would have called the men to quarters. The best known tune after these would have been "Spanish Ladies" which remained popular with sailors right into the last century. I have put the words to this one in an earlier post on this thread.
Charles Dibden's songs were very popular in the fleet and the naval hospitals. His most popular song seems to have been "Tom Bowling". Again this one remained popular into the twentieth century. According to Masefield his songs sent so many young men to the tender as recruits that the government gave him a pension!

best wishes and happy Easter
Jan
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  #669  
Old 06-04-2012, 10:31
Ednamay Ednamay is online now
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Wow, Jan, I never knew the words, but I danced the dance Drops of Brandy in school at the age of 11 - bring back the spring in the step!

Edna
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  #670  
Old 06-04-2012, 17:10
John Brown John Brown is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Some years ago my wife told me of a song called 'Sink the Bismarck' that her father used to have on a country and western album recorded by 'Johnny Horton'. Whilst looking through her fathers record collection yesterday we came across the album. We then googled the song and found the lyrics which I have added below. We also found a recording of the song on youtube and I have included the link after the lyrics.

I'm not sure if this song really belongs among 'folk songs of the sea' but it is so interesting, if only because it is in country and western style, that I felt I should share it.

Regards...John

P.S Johnnys' recollection of when the war started does seem a little fuzzy!


In May of nineteen forty-one the war had just begun
The Germans had the biggest ship that had the biggest guns
The Bismarck was the fastest ship that ever sailed the seas
On her deck were guns as big as steers and shells as big as trees
Out of the cold and foggy night came the British ship the Hood
And every British seaman, he knew and understood
They had to sink the Bismarck, the terror of the sea
Stop those guns as big as steers and those shells as big as trees
We'll find that German battleship thatís makin' such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin' boys and spin those guns around
When we find the Bismarck we gotta cut her down
The Hood found the Bismarck and on that fatal day
The Bismarck started firin' fifteen miles away
We gotta sink the Bismarck was the battle sound
But when the smoke had cleared away
The mighty Hood went down
For six long days and weary nights they tried to find her trail
Churchill told the people "Put ev'ry ship a-sail"
'Cause somewhere on that ocean I know she's gotta be
We gotta sink the Bismarck to the bottom of the sea
We'll find that German battleship thatís makin' such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin' boys and spin those guns around
When we find the Bismarck we gotta cut her down
The fog was gone on the seventh day and they saw the mornin' sun
Ten hours away from homeland the Bismarck made its' run
The admiral of the British fleet said "Turn those bows around"
We found that German battleship and we're gonna cut her down
The British guns were aimed and the shells were comin' fast
The first shell hit the Bismarck, they knew she couldn't last
That mighty German battleship is just a memory
"Sink the Bismarck" was the battle cry that shook the seven seas
We found that German battleship was makin' such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
We hit the decks a-runnin' and we spun those guns around
Yeah, we found the mighty Bismark and then we cut her down
We found that German battleship was makin' such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
We hit the decks a-runnin' and we spun those guns around
We found the mighty Bismarck and then we cut her down



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RTuaqL-eD4
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  #671  
Old 06-04-2012, 19:03
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Jan Steer Jan Steer is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It would seem that there has always been a place for music at sea. Crews of old were often told to sound trumpets loudly in order to cause consternation amongst the enemy!
Musicians were certainly aboard Tudor warships as tabor pipes have been found in the wreck of the Mary Rose. These were often played in concert with other instruments. In fact an illustration in Henry VIII's psalter shows the Tudor equivalent of a one-man band. The chap is playing the tabor pipe with one hand whilst banging a drum with the other. Towards the rear in the picture is a harpist and a man playing what looks like a hammered dulcimer.
Whether all these instruments would have made it on to the ships I know not but it I like to think that they possibly did. After all 'Jack' has always loved a good sing-song and I feel sure that the Tudor seamen were no different!

Edna I too remember singing and dancing to folk songs at infant's school albeit much later than you but one wonders do they still do it now?

John I wasn't aware of the song; I am not a fan of country music but thankyou for posting it. Hopefully there is something here for everyone.

best wishes
Jan

Last edited by Jan Steer : 06-04-2012 at 19:27.
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  #672  
Old 07-04-2012, 10:57
Ednamay Ednamay is online now
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Yes, the dates - but USA didn't get into the war till December 1941, so perhaps his history was a little shaky!

Jan - I grew up at school with the National Song Book, very edifying, and we did country dancing from 7 till 14 years, so yes, I learned Drops of Brandy, If all the World were Paper and many others, too numerous to remember. A few schools on the Island do country dancing for festivals, even May Day (!), but we do have the Oyster Girls to keep the dances alive.

Afraid I don't know what they do across the water, but I expect the State decided curriculum puts paid to our cultural history.

Edna
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  #673  
Old 15-04-2012, 00:25
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

SeaJane, did you hear the Titanic moment by moment programme on Radio 2? An emotional programme although the version of 'Ship Building' they played was a poor one. The Swan Arcade version is superior of the Elvis Costello classic.
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  #674  
Old 15-04-2012, 01:51
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Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Sheff, no I didn't unfortunately. - maybe "listen again" will find it for me. Been on the sick list with a stinking cold these last few days, asleep all day & awake all night.
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  #675  
Old 15-04-2012, 12:35
Shinysheff Shinysheff is offline
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Sorry to hear that. It will make a good listen for a sleepless night. Get well soon!
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Lieut. George Cairns of the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma, 13th March 1944, along with the 3rd/6th Gurkha Rifles.
Lieutenant George Cairns VC, at the Battle of Pagoda Hill, Burma 13th March 1944 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £115.00
 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
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