World Naval Ships Forums  
CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON OUR HUGE SELECTION OF ART PRINTS!

Go Back   World Naval Ships Forums > Other Shipping & Maritime Topics > Other Maritime Topics
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Other Maritime Topics Other topics related to non-naval seafaring

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #651  
Old 06-03-2012, 01:21
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan Steer View Post
Thanks so much SeaJane. I've started reading already and hopefully I will be able to save it in "Favourites" for future reference. We are so lucky to have you with us. X (Big Kiss).

best wishes
Jan
Why, thank you

Pleased to be of service.
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #652  
Old 08-03-2012, 19:39
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is online now
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,040
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Hi All
Things have clarified and I can now tell you that I shall be hosting a "Songs of the Sea" evening on Friday 1st June in the Yacht club, which is on the quay in Lower Town, Fishguard from 1930. It should be a really good event with great company and a chance to listen to some forebitters and shanties, or join in and make the evening even more memorable.If you are taking a break that holiday weekend in this part of the world it would be great to see you. Also on Sunday 3rd June I shall be leading a singing session in "The Ship" ,also in Lower Town Fishguard, between 1600 and1700. Good fun too.

best wishes
Jan
Reply With Quote
  #653  
Old 09-03-2012, 10:47
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: On the outskirts of Sandown, Isle of Wight
Posts: 1,664
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan Steer View Post
Hi All
Things have clarified and I can now tell you that I shall be hosting a "Songs of the Sea" evening on Friday 1st June in the Yacht club, which is on the quay in Lower Town, Fishguard from 1930. It should be a really good event with great company and a chance to listen to some forebitters and shanties, or join in and make the evening even more memorable.If you are taking a break that holiday weekend in this part of the world it would be great to see you. Also on Sunday 3rd June I shall be leading a singing session in "The Ship" ,also in Lower Town Fishguard, between 1600 and1700. Good fun too.

best wishes
Jan
How I wish - but the Isle of Wight ferries don't go as far as Fishguard!

Edna
Reply With Quote
  #654  
Old 09-03-2012, 10:49
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is online now
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,040
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It will be good knowing that you are there in spirit anyway Edna!

best wishes
Jan
Reply With Quote
  #655  
Old 09-03-2012, 14:45
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Ooooooooooooooooooh. That's very tempting!
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #656  
Old 23-03-2012, 12:44
derek s.langsdon derek s.langsdon is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: norfolk uk
Posts: 763
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Espied in 1915 "Boy's Own" annual,Maybe already posted but don't find.

"A Song of the Sea by Harry Wardale.

The Britons sailed the Severn Sea
Unto the ocean main,
From Michael's Mount to Brittany
Through storms that brought their gain.
And sons of the sea each one we be,
With the salt waves mounting high;
Sons of the sea each one we be.
And shall be till we die.

When Romans homeward turned their way
To check the Gothic host,
The Saxon seamen hunted their prey
Upon the British coast.
The salt,salt wind was in their veins
It called to the life of the free;
So they settled them down to enjoy their gains
On the shores of the Northern sea.

Right up the creek the Viking sailed
In the face of the stormy sea,
The tempest wild his friend he hailed
For a strong brave man was he.
And our Island true,with it's streams so blue
Running down to the salt,salt sea,
Claimed the Saxon true and the Norseman too,
For as long as the world should be.

Now sons of the sea each one we be,
Of Saxon or Viking birth,
And our Island free is washed by the sea
From heathland unto firth.
And we thank the Lord of the mighty main,
Who gave us our Island home.
That our English fleet never fought in vain
When it's sharp prows cut the foam
Reply With Quote
  #657  
Old 23-03-2012, 16:25
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is online now
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,040
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

That one certainly seems to be 'of it's time'. Would you happen to know is it a song or simply a poem?

best wishes
Jan steer
Reply With Quote
  #658  
Old 24-03-2012, 16:49
derek s.langsdon derek s.langsdon is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: norfolk uk
Posts: 763
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Dunno, I posted it in it's entirety including the heading.

D
Reply With Quote
  #659  
Old 26-03-2012, 15:59
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It would fit to the Dives and Lazarus / Star of County Down tune...
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #660  
Old 26-03-2012, 19:55
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by seaJane View Post
It would fit to the Dives and Lazarus / Star of County Down tune...
Or Gilderoy, which is in the same family of tunes.

I love Swan Arcade's version of Dives and Lazarus.
Reply With Quote
  #661  
Old 26-03-2012, 22:03
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinysheff View Post
I love Swan Arcade's version of Dives and Lazarus.
Never heard that one - and I like Swan Arcade. Which album was it recorded on? (if it was recorded).
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #662  
Old 27-03-2012, 08:53
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Quote:
Originally Posted by seaJane View Post
Never heard that one - and I like Swan Arcade. Which album was it recorded on? (if it was recorded).
Hi, it was on 'Together forever' recorded in 1984. It's not my favourite album of there's but there are a couple of gems on it. I prefer 'Diving for pearls'.

You can buy Together forever here...

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SWAN-ARCADE-Together-Forever-RARE-1984-LP-Dave-Heather-Brady-NM-VG-FELLSIDE-/170798267500?clk_rvr_id=327488498690&toolid=10 013&customid=&mpre=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.c o.uk%2Fitm%2FSWAN-ARCADE-Together-Forever-RARE-1984-LP-Dave-Heather-Brady-NM-VG-FELLSIDE-%2F170798267500
Reply With Quote
  #663  
Old 28-03-2012, 02:28
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Thanks - tis done. Just hope I've got something to play it on!!
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #664  
Old 30-03-2012, 17:31
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Hope you enjoy it.

You can't beat a bit of accapella harmony. Always have a copy of Four pence and Spicy ale by the Watersons in the car. There's a great song about Hull fisherman on it (to keep in topic).

Thanks

Rich
Reply With Quote
  #665  
Old 31-03-2012, 01:20
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

I've got that one too!

My favourite a cappella group is Coope Boyes and Simpson - one of whom I think was in Swan Arcade. They have a fair number of folk songs of the sea across their albums but have yet to do a totally nautical one so far as I know (tangent, Lester told me he has been out with the Jubilee Sailing Trust a few times).
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #666  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:40
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

I like CBS, Jim Boyes was in Swan Arcade.

The Wilson's are always good for loud nautical songs, they do a great version of Bellamy/Kipling 'Big Steamers'.

In my own band we're working up a version of 'Death of Nelson', looking forward to doing it out when festival season arrives.
Reply With Quote
  #667  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:52
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

While I'm on if anyone is in the Sheffield area over Easter and fancies tunes and songs there is a weekend of folk in Sheffield's 'valley of beer'.
Shanty session Sunday 3-6 followed by a big sing in the evening.

http://www.hallamtrads.co.uk/Sheffie..._Festival.html
Reply With Quote
  #668  
Old 05-04-2012, 10:02
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is online now
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,040
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Have you ever wondered, as I have, just what songs and music were popular amongst the crews that defeated Napolean?
Their most popular song it would seem was one that was also very popular ashore. It was "Drops of Brandy" which was sung to a very old dance tune. It can be found in Campbell's dances, Book 11, of 1800 and the words that they sang were:
And Johnny shall have a new bonnet
And Johnny shall go to the fair
And Johnny shall have a blue ribbon
To tie up his bonny brown hair.
And why should I not love Johnny
And why should not Johnny love me
And why should I not love Johnny
As well as another bodie.
When the Marines and Waisters manned the capstan to weigh anchor, the pipers would have struck up this tune to put heart into the men. And it would have been sung over their grog in the dark messes between the guns.
"Nancy Dawson" would have been the tune the fifers played to call the men to their grog. This tune is better known as "Sally in our Alley". The double, double, double beat of "Hearts of Oak" would have called the men to quarters. The best known tune after these would have been "Spanish Ladies" which remained popular with sailors right into the last century. I have put the words to this one in an earlier post on this thread.
Charles Dibden's songs were very popular in the fleet and the naval hospitals. His most popular song seems to have been "Tom Bowling". Again this one remained popular into the twentieth century. According to Masefield his songs sent so many young men to the tender as recruits that the government gave him a pension!

best wishes and happy Easter
Jan
Reply With Quote
  #669  
Old 06-04-2012, 10:31
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: On the outskirts of Sandown, Isle of Wight
Posts: 1,664
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Wow, Jan, I never knew the words, but I danced the dance Drops of Brandy in school at the age of 11 - bring back the spring in the step!

Edna
Reply With Quote
  #670  
Old 06-04-2012, 17:10
John Brown John Brown is offline
Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: North Hampshire
Posts: 2,119
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Some years ago my wife told me of a song called 'Sink the Bismarck' that her father used to have on a country and western album recorded by 'Johnny Horton'. Whilst looking through her fathers record collection yesterday we came across the album. We then googled the song and found the lyrics which I have added below. We also found a recording of the song on youtube and I have included the link after the lyrics.

I'm not sure if this song really belongs among 'folk songs of the sea' but it is so interesting, if only because it is in country and western style, that I felt I should share it.

Regards...John

P.S Johnnys' recollection of when the war started does seem a little fuzzy!


In May of nineteen forty-one the war had just begun
The Germans had the biggest ship that had the biggest guns
The Bismarck was the fastest ship that ever sailed the seas
On her deck were guns as big as steers and shells as big as trees
Out of the cold and foggy night came the British ship the Hood
And every British seaman, he knew and understood
They had to sink the Bismarck, the terror of the sea
Stop those guns as big as steers and those shells as big as trees
We'll find that German battleship that’s makin' such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin' boys and spin those guns around
When we find the Bismarck we gotta cut her down
The Hood found the Bismarck and on that fatal day
The Bismarck started firin' fifteen miles away
We gotta sink the Bismarck was the battle sound
But when the smoke had cleared away
The mighty Hood went down
For six long days and weary nights they tried to find her trail
Churchill told the people "Put ev'ry ship a-sail"
'Cause somewhere on that ocean I know she's gotta be
We gotta sink the Bismarck to the bottom of the sea
We'll find that German battleship that’s makin' such a fuss
We gotta sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
Hit the decks a-runnin' boys and spin those guns around
When we find the Bismarck we gotta cut her down
The fog was gone on the seventh day and they saw the mornin' sun
Ten hours away from homeland the Bismarck made its' run
The admiral of the British fleet said "Turn those bows around"
We found that German battleship and we're gonna cut her down
The British guns were aimed and the shells were comin' fast
The first shell hit the Bismarck, they knew she couldn't last
That mighty German battleship is just a memory
"Sink the Bismarck" was the battle cry that shook the seven seas
We found that German battleship was makin' such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
We hit the decks a-runnin' and we spun those guns around
Yeah, we found the mighty Bismark and then we cut her down
We found that German battleship was makin' such a fuss
We had to sink the Bismarck 'cause the world depends on us
We hit the decks a-runnin' and we spun those guns around
We found the mighty Bismarck and then we cut her down



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RTuaqL-eD4
Reply With Quote
  #671  
Old 06-04-2012, 19:03
Jan Steer's Avatar
Jan Steer Jan Steer is online now
Rear-Admiral
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
Posts: 1,040
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

It would seem that there has always been a place for music at sea. Crews of old were often told to sound trumpets loudly in order to cause consternation amongst the enemy!
Musicians were certainly aboard Tudor warships as tabor pipes have been found in the wreck of the Mary Rose. These were often played in concert with other instruments. In fact an illustration in Henry VIII's psalter shows the Tudor equivalent of a one-man band. The chap is playing the tabor pipe with one hand whilst banging a drum with the other. Towards the rear in the picture is a harpist and a man playing what looks like a hammered dulcimer.
Whether all these instruments would have made it on to the ships I know not but it I like to think that they possibly did. After all 'Jack' has always loved a good sing-song and I feel sure that the Tudor seamen were no different!

Edna I too remember singing and dancing to folk songs at infant's school albeit much later than you but one wonders do they still do it now?

John I wasn't aware of the song; I am not a fan of country music but thankyou for posting it. Hopefully there is something here for everyone.

best wishes
Jan

Last edited by Jan Steer : 06-04-2012 at 19:27.
Reply With Quote
  #672  
Old 07-04-2012, 10:57
Ednamay Ednamay is offline
Vice-Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: On the outskirts of Sandown, Isle of Wight
Posts: 1,664
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Yes, the dates - but USA didn't get into the war till December 1941, so perhaps his history was a little shaky!

Jan - I grew up at school with the National Song Book, very edifying, and we did country dancing from 7 till 14 years, so yes, I learned Drops of Brandy, If all the World were Paper and many others, too numerous to remember. A few schools on the Island do country dancing for festivals, even May Day (!), but we do have the Oyster Girls to keep the dances alive.

Afraid I don't know what they do across the water, but I expect the State decided curriculum puts paid to our cultural history.

Edna
Reply With Quote
  #673  
Old 15-04-2012, 00:25
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

SeaJane, did you hear the Titanic moment by moment programme on Radio 2? An emotional programme although the version of 'Ship Building' they played was a poor one. The Swan Arcade version is superior of the Elvis Costello classic.
Reply With Quote
  #674  
Old 15-04-2012, 01:51
seaJane's Avatar
seaJane seaJane is offline
Vice Commodore
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hampshire or Somerset depending
Posts: 629
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Sheff, no I didn't unfortunately. - maybe "listen again" will find it for me. Been on the sick list with a stinking cold these last few days, asleep all day & awake all night.
__________________
Call sign Foxtrot
Reply With Quote
  #675  
Old 15-04-2012, 12:35
Shinysheff Shinysheff is online now
Captain
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 545
Default Re: Folk Songs of the Sea

Sorry to hear that. It will make a good listen for a sleepless night. Get well soon!
Reply With Quote
Reply



Ship Search by Name : Advanced Search
Random Timeline Entry : 12th January 1946 : HMS Barfleur : Sailed Darwin

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see our naval art portal - Eight random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 The elegant but ill-fated jewel in the White Star crown Titanic was a technical marvel of engineering in its day. At 882 ft long, her perfect proportions and magnificent profile were the envy of other shipping companies. her tragic loss on her maiden voyage was a crushing blow to the White Star Line that left the whole world in shock.

RMS Titanic by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
DHM1306.  Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.

Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 The E-class light cruiser HMS Emerald is shown off the Newfoundland coast in company with a Flower class corvette.  Between October 1939 and August 1940, HMS Emerald carried £58 million in gold from Britain to Canada.

HMS Emerald by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 17th February 1943, U-201 with U-69 were ordered to intercept the westbound convoy ONS165. With fuel low U-201 was eventually forced to surface following a depth charge attack and rammed by the Destroyer HMS Fame.

U-201 Deadly Chase by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

The Battle of Trafalgar was fought on a calm, almost windless day, on 21st October 1805.  Nelsons revolutionary battle plan was to cut apart the larger Franco-Spanish fleet of Vice-Admiral Villeneuve by sailing in two single column divisions directly at right angles into the combined fleet and thus rendering almost half of the leading ships useless until the could turn and join the fight, which in such calm conditions could take hours.  The battle raged for five hours in which time not one British ship was lost, however, Nelson would tragically lose his life at the very moment of his triumph, a triumph which rendered the British Navy unchallenged in supremacy for over a century.  Here HMS Mars passes between the French ship Belleisle on her starboard and the French ship Fougeux on her port, firing a murderous hail of gunfire at both ships.  Also shown in the painting on the left hand side is the Spanish ship Monarco and the French ship Pluton.

The Battle of Trafalgar - Mars Breaks the Line by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00
Harriers prepare to enter the landing pattern as Invincible steams in company with HMS Bristol with dusk closing in on day.

HMS Invincible by Randall Wilson. (Y)
Half Price! - £210.00
The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen.

HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
USS Maddox engaging North Vietnamese torpedo boats with 5-in gunfire, August 2nd, 1964, in the Gulf of Tonkin.

USS Maddox by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see our sport art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - £20.00
SFA18.  Going Home by Chris Howells.

Going Home by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £65.00
SPC5006. Ryan Giggs by Keith Fearon.
Ryan Giggs by Keith Fearon.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Kentucky - born Steve Cauthen was just 12 years old when his father Tex finally agreed to help the single-minded young man realise a burning ambition to become a jockey provided he didnt let success make him big-headed.  No parental proviso was ever more faithfully fulfilled.  In the year of his seventeenth birthday the kid rode 487 winners of 6 million dollars, including the U.S. Triple Crown on Affirmed.  He went on to captivate British hearts two years later.  By 1984 he was champion. But better was to come. No wonder the fairytale ingredients of 1985 have fired the imagination and talent of Peter Deighan to such compelling effect.

The Golden Boy by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £60.00

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see our aviation art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

A pair of RAF Tornado GRIs at low level during the Gulf War operation Desert Storm, in their distinctive desert pink camouflage colour scheme.
Pink Tornados by Geoff Lea.
Half Price! - £50.00
 A Douglas C-47 of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group gets away from the Devon airfield of Upottery on 5th June 1944 carrying paratroops of 101st Airborne Division.  The company departed from Upottery airbase in Devon, England, and dropped over the Cotentin Peninsula of Normandy, France in the early hours of the morning of June 6th, 1944 at the start of the Normandy invasion.

101st Airborne en route to Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109.

Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £52.50
 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £500.00

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see our military art portal - Four random half price items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Offers

 Juno Beach, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  Sdkfz 232 armoured cars of 12th SS Reconnaissance Battalion commanded by  Obersturmfuhrer Peter Hansmann observe the Canadian beachhead at Juno Beach.  His small team was tasked with finding out if an invasion was actually underway and it drove some 80km, arriving at the coast near Tracy at 7.30 in the morning to witness the landings in progress.

D-Day Recce by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Wherever the GIs went they took their Jeeps with them, and before the war was run the little quarter-ton, 4-wheel drive, utility vehicle was as well known around the world as the Model T Ford. Nicolas Trudgian has painted a compelling image, set back in time when the little Jeep was omnipresent on and around the roads and battlefields of a war-torn world. It is Christmas 1944 and, as a gaggle of 339th FG P-51 Mustangs disturb the peace of this ancient English village, a little Jeep waits patiently outside the pub while her occupants sample the local ale. A wonderfully nostalgic painting that will bring back pleasant memories to many.
Welcome Respite by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe. No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shanties and Sea Songs - alive-oh! Ednamay Other Naval Topics 4 08-05-2010 11:21


All times are GMT. The time now is 16:28.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.