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CYLLA
10-08-2008, 14:55
I was doing some research in to which ship my home town COULD have adopted if any ,and in doing so found this list of other ships,and many from surrounding towns,it may just intrest other members.


http://www.godfreydykes.info/WARSHIP%20ADOPTIONS%20IN%20WW2.htm

cylla

CYLLA
10-08-2008, 17:39
This is the "OSIRIS" for my town of Ilkley.

HMS DARLASTON
18-08-2008, 22:57
Darlaston UDC adopted the destroyer HMS Charlestown, I 21 during Warship week February 1942.
She was the USS Abbot DD148. Transfered to the RN as HMS Abbot on 23rd Sept 1940 and renamed HMS Charlestown on 2nd October.
She had quite a busy war but was badly damaged in a collision with HMS Florizal on 10th December 1944 and was found to be beyond economic repair. She arrived at the breakers on 3rd December 1948.

wiggy
19-08-2008, 16:29
Darlaston UDC adopted the destroyer HMS Charlestown, I 21 during Warship week February 1942.
She was the USS Abbot DD148. Transfered to the RN as HMS Abbot on 23rd Sept 1940 and renamed HMS Charlestown on 2nd October.
She had quite a busy war but was badly damaged in a collision with HMS Florizal on 10th December 1944 and was found to be beyond economic repair. She arrived at the breakers on 3rd December 1948.

ARK ROYAL for us loiners

CYLLA
19-08-2008, 16:50
WIGGY.
Did they still have that huge piccy of ARK ROYAL on the recruiting office wall ? ......as i joined up at LEEDS......THAT WAS IN 1965.

cylla

TACKLINE
19-08-2008, 20:29
There were also 'War weapons Weeks'. When I was in training at HMS 'Royal Arthur' in June '41, my class provided the RN contingent at a march through Mansfield with fixed bayonets. It was a scorching hot day,and as we were lined up listening to a speech by the First Lord of the Admiralty,our rifle butts were sinking into the tarmac! However,it turned out a memorable day out,and made a welcome change from our normal days of training. The girls of Mansfield helped too! These occasions raised quite a lot of money for armaments,as they took part all over the country.
Tackline.

wiggy
22-08-2008, 20:11
WIGGY.
Did they still have that huge piccy of ARK ROYAL on the recruiting office wall ? ......as i joined up at LEEDS......THAT WAS IN 1965.

cylla

Unsure about photo in recruiting office Cylla ,but know for sure there's one in the Lord Mayors office at Civic Hall,alongside H.M. The Queen as it happens!!

Wiggy

CYLLA
22-08-2008, 21:20
Hi Wiggy .
i bet it,s the same one ,if it about 3 ft long [old money ] thats the one .


cylla

ChalkyWhite
03-03-2009, 09:11
This web site will open up to show some assistance I gave to Janet Penn the Canvey Island historian concerning Warship Week of 1942.I have previously shared this with Terry ( Astral Trader) but thought that our other members might be interested in the story.

http://www.canveyisland.org/page_id__39_path__0p26p.aspx

It was actually a spin off from the main area of my research at that time concerning the Americans in the RNVR during the last war.

Janet put together a very interesting compilation and I hope all will enjoy it.

Chalky White

herakles
03-03-2009, 09:22
Good to see you posting again!

SCRG1970
03-03-2009, 09:33
Welcome back. Just had a look at the link and enjoyed the amount of detail on it. Thanks for that.

Regards

gerry

John Brown
03-03-2009, 16:00
Welcolme back Chalky.


Regards...John

ivorthediver
03-03-2009, 18:20
Wecome back you seadog....new you would be back soon

I'll get the lads to get a brew on

Kind Regards Ivor

gunnersmate
03-03-2009, 19:24
Hello Chalky,
Good on you mate. Your talents are never ending.

Baz.

NickJClark
05-04-2010, 19:55
Does anyone know of a list showing all the RN vessels adopted by towns during the 'Warship Weeks' in WW2?
Or perhaps we can begin a list here?

HMS Sphene armed A/S trawler - Urban District of Oadby 21st-28th March 1942
HMS Duncton armed A/S trawler - The Civil Parish of Curdridge - March 1942

Thanks

Nick Clark

jbryce1437
05-04-2010, 20:31
HMS Kittiwake adopted by Bridlington during Warship Week in October 1941
HMS Delhi adopted by Sunderland following a Warship Week in February 1942
HMS Abercrombie adopted by County of Angus in 1942

qprdave
05-04-2010, 20:39
Here's some more

HMS Dido Bolton
HMS Ribble Settle, Yorks
HMS Firedrake Tynemouth
HMS Pearl Padiham,Lancs
HMS Brocklesby Belper
HMS Antelope Brentford
HMS Arethusa Swansea
HMS Rennet Dearne, Lancs
HMS Ark Royal Leeds
HMS Barfoss (Boom Defence Vessel) Hindley, Lancs.
HMS Forth (Depot Ship) Stirlingshire
HMS Lupin (Sloop) Whitefield, Lancs
HMS Maidstone (Depot ship) Maidstone
HMS Oberon (Submarine) Basingstoke
HMS Olympus (Submarine) Peterborough
HMS Scott (Minesweeping sloop) Peebleshire
HMS Sealion (Submarine) Guildford
HMS Tigris (Submarine) Newbury
HMS Traveller (Submarine) Leyton, London
HMS Tudor (Submarine) Bridgend
HMS Ursa (Destroyer) Hendon, London
HMS Usurper (Submarine) Stroud, Gloucs
HMS Vesper (Destroyer) Skipton, Yorks
HMS Wizard (Destroyer) Wood Green, London
HMS Laforey Northampton
HMS Tiger Leicester
HMS Hecate Corby
HMS Scylla Averdeen

steve roberts
05-04-2010, 20:46
Hi Dave.Thanks for that list.I did not realise it had been so popular.I take it the adopting Towns had collections for comforts for the crews of these ships.
Regards Steve.

qprdave
05-04-2010, 21:02
Here's how it was started as published in The Times on August 21, 1941

qprdave
05-04-2010, 21:10
Amazing Effort from Liverpool

The Times November 22, 1941

David Verghese
05-04-2010, 21:48
I am certain that many members will contribute to this thread and I maintain myself quite a large listing of ships adopted by civil communities once this campaign got going in " The warships weeks" of late 1941 to 1942. I sometimes wonder how many town halls, metropolitan, borough and district councils today are even aware of these past and important 'adoptions' by their forebears just under 70 years ago.

It wasn't just civil communities that 'adopted' the Royal Navy ships.
Here is a small collection of ships 'adopted' by financial institutions ie their staff thereof, namely:

HMS Warspite - The London Stock Exchange

HMS Rodney - Glyn Mills Bank

HMS Queen Elizabeth - The Baltic Exchange

HMS Illustrious - a group of insurance companies

Some ships didn't need to be adopted because they kept a close relationship with the particular geographical entity after which they were named . Such a relationship continued when a newly built ship of the same name was commissioned.

Some examples are:

HMS Exeter

HMS Birmingham

HMS Cumberland

Some ships were never 'adopted'. Thus HMS Encounter who went down gallantly in the Java Sea in March 1942 was to remain an 'orphan'.

However, thanks to sterling work of MV Empress and the fine efforts of her wreck exploratory and diving team which included Kevin Denlay of this Forum, HMS Encounter keeps to this day an ever faithful watch, from just a short distance away, on her consort HMS Exeter.

To me a fine adoption that will always be remembered.

David

jbryce1437
05-04-2010, 22:08
Work in progress to compile full list, hope to add more in time. (see list later in thread)

Jim

dennis a feary
06-04-2010, 04:56
Hello Nick, to your (our) list you can add Submarine DZIK, funded by MARCH, Cambridgeshire in 1942. DZIK - Ex-P.52 completed October 1942 was handed over to the Polish Navy - later tranferred to the Danish Navy as SPRINGEREN Ex-U.1 and scrapped Faslane 1958 - more of which later.

Sadsac

culverin
06-04-2010, 18:50
# 7
I think your HMS Encounter points extremely thoughtful & considerate
HMS Porpoise was adopted by Workington.
she remains to this day the last RN submarine lost in action
19-1-1945 Lt. Cdr. Hugh Turner & her entire crew.
whilst serving on the next HMS Porpoise we made the boats first visit
to the town in 1973 & were extremely well received

David Verghese
06-04-2010, 22:34
Culverin,

Thank you for your kind sentiment in post #10. I do appreciate it.

I have just spent about one hour patiently writing in this reply box what I hoped would be a well-crafted detail outlining why I myself 'adopted' HMS Encounter, and a reasoned argument why this ship, and her complement, should not be forgotten -as she virtually has been.
It is about the only post I have attempted to write when not doing it as a word document first, and then transposing it. As I hit "preview post" the site informed me that I was not signed in (Moderator ?why). I did so (again), a page came up showing the user profile of a well known poster (? why)...... and my reply is nowhere to be seen, perhaps floating in the ether of cyberspace!

Shakespeare once wrote "when beggars die there are no comets seen, the heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes".

That does it, I shall write a book on HMS Encounter - and focus on the human element. There is a story to tell.

David

alanbenn
07-04-2010, 08:40
David, the reason you weren't signed in is because it took so long for you to reply, as you say it took you about an hour to complete your post, because there was no actual activity from you the system automatically logs you out, so when you pressed submit reply it then asks for you to log back in.

The likelyhood is that when this happened you then clicked elsewhere inadvertently and ended up looking at someones user profile.

Happens to me on several occasions if I am uploading a few photo's and text, or if I leave the computer for a while when in the middle of something.

Regards
Alan

chris westwood
07-04-2010, 09:51
HMS Ark Royal was adopted by the city of Leeds, a relationship which has continues via the two subsequent ark royals

rumrat
07-04-2010, 13:58
The Dido Class CruIser PHOEBE was Adpoted By Bournemouth as was the Leander Class Frigate.

Regards
Dave

BIG LES
07-04-2010, 15:04
HMS Ark Royal was adopted by the city of Leeds, a relationship which has continues via the two subsequent ark royals
HMS ARK ROYAL was not only adop[ed by leeds it was built by money collected by the people of leeds full story here


http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/leeds/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8530000/8530169.stm
and very very proud the people were and in fact most of the older end still are

culverin
07-04-2010, 18:36
hello alanbenn # 12
---no not me---david verghese # 11
encounter is obviously extremely significant to you
good luck as it could be an emotional few years
there should be a number of ex crew still living

jbryce1437
07-04-2010, 18:49
This is an update to the list, still work in progress. Off for the weekend but hope to update it further when I return. I will be grateful for any post-war affiliations, I have added one or two from the top of my head, but there will be dozens of others - List updated, see later post.

Jim

SCRG1970
08-04-2010, 21:35
Jim

One more to add to your list. HMS SEAGULL adopted Warship Week Feb.14th 1942 by Christchurch Borough, Hampshire (now Dorset).

Regards

gerry

alanbenn
09-04-2010, 09:23
There are several ships listed as affiliated to towns, cities etc.

As mentioned Ark Royal was adopted by the City of Leeds, she also recieved the freedom of the city so is affiliated.

Here's all I have on the ships with letter A.....

Abercrombie...adopted by Angus
Aberdeen.......adopted by Ramsbottom, Lancs
Active...........adopted by Beeston & Stapleford
Airedale.........adopted by Spenborough, Yorks
Ajax..............adopted by Halifax,Yorks
Alacrity..........affiliated to Winchester
Alarm............adopted by Heanor
Albacore........adopted by Ashford, Kent
Albrighton.......adopted by Wednesbury
Albury...........adopted by Cardiff
Aldenham.......affiliated to Aldebham
Alderney........affiliated to Alderney
Alecto..........adopted by Coseley,Staffs
Algerine........adopted by Sittingbourne
Allington Castle....adopted by Alsagar, Cheshire
Alresford.......adopted by Ebbw Vale
Amazon........adopted by 1. Hinkley 2. Southampton & N.Tyneside
Amberley Castle.........adopted by ?? (she was adopted by someone)
Ambuscade...............adopted by Crewe & Nantwich
Amethyst..............adopted by Renfrewshire
Andromeda........Affiliated to Doncaster, Yorks
Anglesey...........Affiliated to Anglesey
Anson...............adopted by London
Antelope.......adopted by Brentwood, Essex
Anthony.........adopted by Matlock
Aphis............adopted by Warminster
Arcturus.......adopted by Leominster
Arethusa.......Affiliated to Swansea
Argonaut.......adopted by 1. Coventry 2.S.Pembroke
Ariadne........Affiliated to Scunthorpe
Ark Royal.....Affiliated to Leeds, Yorks
Arrow.........adopted by 1, Blackwell, Derbyshire 2. Sunderland
Ashanti.......adopted by Southend, Essex
Atherstone.....adopted by 1. Long Eaton 2.Atherstone
Aurora...........adopted by Bradford, Yorks
Avenger........Affiliated to St. Austell
Avondale.......adopted by Troubridge


I will compile the rest and send them directly to Jim for his PDF file so he can update it.

Regards
Alan

kc
09-04-2010, 10:29
I have just spent about one hour patiently writing in this reply box........ ...........As I hit "preview post" the site informed me that I was not signed in (Moderator ?why). I did so (again), a page came up showing the user profile of a well known poster (? why)...... and my reply is nowhere to be seen, perhaps floating in the ether of cyberspace!

Sorry to hear that David. Here's a tip for you and everyone else really. It's one I have learned over the years of writing on a variety of forums:

always, always, always, when you have finished typing up your post, hit ctrl-a, then ctrl-c. If your connection gets cut off for any reason, either being logged out or just the server not working for that particular moment, you can get your post back later by pressing ctrl-v. It is very simple and has saved me lots of time in the past. Test it out next time you post - you can paste your post into word or any other similar text editor. No more lost posts!

David Verghese
09-04-2010, 12:22
Thanks Boss,

Just tried it out ie Crl.a,c & v; and I found it in your advice section.

A1

Cheers

Dave

twist
11-04-2010, 15:50
H M S ZENITH WAS ADOPTED BY SEVENOAK KENT .
Crew went to a civic reception & dance
Twist.

jbryce1437
12-04-2010, 20:28
Many thanks for that list Alan, I will incorporate it into the list. I think I have the commissioning booklet for HMS Arrow, when she held the commissioning ceremony at Sunderland. Not sure if she continued her association with Blackwell, following the wartime adoption of her predecessor
Thanks also to twist.
Just returned home from Oggieland tonight, so I see that I will have to oil my typing fingers:D

Jim

edwin astill
13-04-2010, 20:29
HMS Armeria (covette) adopted by Faversham (see "The War Years in Faversham and District" by Herbert Dane.

Edwin

jbryce1437
14-04-2010, 21:47
Thanks Edwin, I have added that to the list.
I have now compiled two lists, one in ship name alphabetical order and the second is by Town name alphabetical order, which may help to trace a particular Ship or Town more quickly.
Just spent a couple of days on the MOD(Navy) site, trying to find out current affiliations of ships, with only a little success.

Jim

Oops; Just noticed that I can't spell Duncton, have it as Ducton, will correct it on next revision.

rumrat
18-04-2010, 16:09
VESPER
Adopted by the Townsfolk of Skipton North Yorkshire.

Dave

peter schofield
19-12-2010, 14:51
Darwen Lancashire - Warship Week 14-21 March 1942

The Naval Historical Society and others quote HMS Wakeful (i) as Darwen's adopted ship but Lt Cdr Masons site says the ship was lost on 29 May 1940 at Dunkirk. Recently I found a picture on the web of the Darwen WW and the target of £210,000 for the hull of a destroyer also can be seen between the heads of the crowd what looks like the word Gurkha. HMS Gurkha (i) was lost on the 9 April 1940, while HMS Gurkha (ii) was lost on 9 March 1942 just prior to their WW. No other town appears to have adopted HMS Gurkha. HMS Wakeful (ii) was not laid down until 3 June 1942 and survived the war. So the question is which ship did Darwen eventually adopt. Also what ship did Blackburn adopt as there is no listing for their adopted ship???

Answers on the back of a postcard please.

peter schofield
19-12-2010, 16:01
Ramsbottom - Warship Week 21-28 March 1942

The Ramsbottom Observer said during its WW that it was adopting a large minesweeper to replace Rosemunde lost to enemy action. This is probably a typo as HMS Rosemonde an A/S Trawler was lost in January 1942. The target for a large minesweeper was £140,000 and eventually £158,067 was raised which worked out at £10 17s 2p per head of which £5 7s 4d per head was small savings. The vessel adopted was HMS Aberdeen (Aberdeen Class Sloop) although this is not mentioned in the paper. Most of the money would come from business and industries investments. As an incentive to raise money the Admiralty decreed that areas holding WWs would be provided with the name for the type of ship allocated to them if they achieved the sum to the cost (objective/target) of the hull. This would then be communicated in advance of the week, thus areas would be able to use the name of the ship in their publicity otherwise it remained the objective. This is to say, the type and amount to be raised were known but a name would not be provided until the cost of the hull was raised, the incentive therefore was to raise the hull sum target for the vessel before the week commenced.

peter schofield
20-12-2010, 19:45
Warship Week dates
These were held from 18 October 1941 and completed on 28 March 1942 in England Wales, they were held from Saturday to Saturday. Scotland’s Warship Weeks were intended to be held throughout the same 5 ½ month period as England and Wales, yet as early as 27 October it was reported that in view of Stirlingshire having already raised £1,500,000 for War Weapons Week (8-15 Feb. 1941) and as large sums of money had left the county to Glasgow Warship Week, the local War Savings Committee would delay fixing a week until it was ascertained whether a week in April or May was acceptable to headquarters. In January 1942 the Chairman of the Scottish Savings Committee, Lord Alness, informed the Lord Lieutenant of Stirlingshire that the Chancellor of the Exchequer was willing to authorize an extension in Scotland until the end of May for the time allotted in Scotland awarded for the holding of Warship Weeks. Nonetheless, where an extension was sanctioned it had to be through exceptional local conditions that justified the relaxation. Meanwhile, the Chancellor stressed the urgency of pressing forward Warship Weeks in Scotland as in England, concluding them wherever possible by the end of March. A high percentage of Scotland’s Warship Weeks were held throughout April and May 1942, amongst them Dunbartonshire who having been among the last in Scotland to hold a War Weapons Week held its Warship Week from 9 to 16 May 1942. Northern Irelands Warship Weeks were also late.

I hold an almost complete database of WWs but require to complete a large number of the dates (from-to). Unfortunately most postings about WWs never provide the dates, this is important as it allows the spread to be analysed. Basically the Committee allowed local authorities to choose their own dates and what is found is that a large number were held in Feb and March 1942. Any help would be appreciated.

peter schofield
21-12-2010, 19:33
HMS Loosestrife - Flower Class Corvette
HMS Loosestrife was adopted by Millom in Cumberland who held their Warship Week between 14-21 February; although the Whitehaven News quotes 7-14 February 1942. Nonetheless it was reported that a total of £90,000 with several items still to be received from the country districts had been reached. Thus the total amount raised for an area populated with less than 12,000 people gives a per capita rate for the year (£95,000 for War Weapons Week) of more than £15 per head.

These sound fantastic amounts for the time, but in reality the majority of the money came from business, industry and finance houses, the remainder being made up by the small saver as stated in the earlier posting.

Millom was presented with an Adoption plaque from the Lords Commisioners of the Admiralty in the form of a fouled anchor. This was a standard type of plaque presented to towns for which vessels did not have official crests, or that is the theory. The plaque is held at the Millom Folk Museum.

peter schofield
21-12-2010, 20:05
Eston UD Warship Week 7-14 March 1942

HMS Ivy was to be Estons adopted warship but due to damage sustained during an air raid at Harland and Wolf the ship was cancelled on 23 January 1941.

HMS Ivy (adoption) was replaced by HMS Swale a River Class Frigate this made sense as the hull and fully fitted taget costs were the same: £55,000 for the hull and £120,000 fully fitted. Swale probably has a local link to Eston as it is a North Yorkshire River.

Dartford Municipal Borough had originally adopted HMS Auricula a Flower Class Frigate but on its loss also adopted a River Class Frigate HMS Jed.

TheFormerChief
22-12-2010, 10:16
HMS Severn is the current ship adopted by Newport.

I'm assuming that HMS Newport was the ship adopted by Newport during the War. Does anyone have any details of this ship, please?

Thank you.

:)

alanbenn
22-12-2010, 11:09
Chief, Hms Newport was one of the destroyers sent to the Royal Navy as part of the lend-lease agreement with the USA.

She was then loaned by the RN to the Norwegian Navy.

Here's a photo of her in wartime camo while on loan to Norway.


Regards
Alan

TheFormerChief
23-12-2010, 09:25
Thank you; do you know what happened to her afterwards, please?

:)

alanbenn
23-12-2010, 09:31
Chief, yes she became an Aircraft target ship after being returned by the Royal Norwegian Navy, she was scrapped in 1947.

Here's a 2nd photo of her whilst in service with the Norwegian Navy.

Regards
Alan

peter schofield
24-12-2010, 08:48
Warship Week Targets
To give some idea of the build cost of vessels a battleship price tag was £10,000,000 an aircraft carrier £5,250,000 and a cruiser typically £2,750,000. For a large destroyer the major items would be broken down to £210,000 for the hull, £250,000 for the main and auxiliary machinery and approximately £240,000 to provide guns and ammunition giving a total of £700,000. The hull target would therefore be set at £210,000 and the fully fitted vessel £700,000. At the other end of the scale the amount to be raised to pay for a fully fitted Trawler/Minesweeper was £62,000 divided into £40,000 for the hull, £19,000 for the main and auxiliary machinery, £1,700 for armament and ammunition and £1,300 for other equipment. Apart from creating a feeling of gratitude to the Royal Navy throughout the country, a special feature of Warship Weeks lay in the tangibility of the object. Ten million pounds was to most minds merely a distraction difficult to comprehend, but a battleship costing ten million pounds to build conveyed its own meaning and could be visualized as a concrete reality, the result of work and effort.

culverin
24-12-2010, 15:58
I know this pre dates the warship week efforts,
but in 1929 when the new sloop HMS Bridgewater joined the fleet an approach was made to the town in Somerset after which she was named to further an association between ship and town.
This was promptly rebuffed by the town stating the ship was not named after it and neither could it be.
Bridgwater the town does not have an E between the g and w.
Maybe too much scrumpy had been consumed in the town the previous day.

peter schofield
31-12-2010, 18:26
Warship Weeks were an offspring of Business Men’s Week held in March 1918
Business Men’s Week was run simultaneously throughout the country during the week ended 4 March 1918. It was named as such because every businessman in the country would be asked to buy National Savings Bonds or War Savings certificates. The Aldwych Club was asked to take over its organization by the National Savings Committee and a great public meeting on 26 February at which the Chancellor made an appeal for subscriptions started off the week.
Every town was assessed to raise a certain amount of money, the amount being assessed in terms of warships: dreadnoughts, cruisers, submarines etc., which they would buy. One or more could be selected dependent on the population. Aeroplanes were the targets for smaller towns such as Dartmouth.
To give an idea of costs an aeroplane required £2,500, submarine £100,000, Destroyer £150,000, Monitor £250,000, Light Cruiser £400,000, Super-dreadnought £2,500,000.
City Vessel B]Cost [/B] Raised
Cardiff One Cruiser £400,000 £2,794,140
Bristol Two Cruisers £800,000 £2,813,580
Liverpool One Super-Dreadnought £2,500,000 £12,723,805
Manchester One Super-Dreadnought £2,500,000 £3,644,255
Newcastle-on-Tyne Two Cruisers £800,000 £1,182,705
Bradford Two Cruisers £800,000 £2,048,847
Leeds Three Cruisers £1,200,000 £2,131,130
Sheffield Three Cruisers £1,200,000 £1,646,580
Birmingham One Super-Dreadnought £2,5000,000 £1,018,395

It is interesting to note that Liverpool raised enough for five super-dreadnoughts.

During the week itself £114,105,630 was subscribed and in the following week £56,651,455 was raised making a total of £170,757,085. London alone raised £75,578,647.

Clive 58
31-12-2010, 19:01
This programme for Luton Warship Week was recently sold on eBay for 13 quid.

Here the description;

A 12 page programme for the week 7th to 14th March, 1942. Luton's effort to raise £1,000,001 for the adoption of H.M.S Ceres, a Light Cruiser. Programme lists all the events, displays, exhibitions etc and a parade where the Salute will be taken by King Peter of Jugoslavia. Size 12 x 18.5cm. Staples rusted and it has been folded otherwise in good condition.

Cheers,

Clive.

culverin
31-12-2010, 20:52
My home Town, Eastleigh, Hampshire, England and as a final farewell to 2010.
Please go to
www.hmsasphodel.co.uk
to learn more of our ship and her history.
May i also wish you all a happy New Year and peaceful 2011.
Sean

Dreadnought
29-01-2011, 09:14
Three threads about this very interesting topic merged, and to also post this link to the Galleries where there are some pictures of badges and crests associated with Warship Week:

http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7967&highlight=week

peter schofield
16-03-2011, 11:37
Warship Weeks were the second prolonged savings campaign of World War Two and following War Weapons Weeks. They were used to stimulate war savings and contribute to the war effort. They funds invested allowed the Treasury to borrow from the investor at a lower rate of interest; which was 5% offered on Government securities in World War 1, it further prevented the risk of having to repay money at short notice. Anyone who thinks Warship Weeks were initiated to buy a vessel is misguided, the cost of the hulls and fully fitted ships were only targets to encourage people to save, particularly small savers. The National Savings Committee were basically trying to stop spending on unnecessary goods as there were more people in work with more money to spend (with less goods to be bought), to this end Saving Certificates and 3% Savings Bonds were specifically designed for small savers. In fact the large savers, industrials, finance etc raised the majority of the vessel targets. The basis of the whole National Savings Movement Campaign was to create savings groups throughout the UK, in the workplace, streets, clubs etc; as the number of groups increased and more people were encouraged to join, more money went into the coffers to finance the war.

During War Weapons Weeks (700 plus) I find only ships and aircraft as savings targets, no guns or tanks seem to have been included. These weeks provided objects to aim for but there were no vessel adoptions, these came later in Warship Weeks. Here are a few of the ones I have located for weapons weeks (September 1940 to June 1941):

Barnsley two destroyers
Bradford three cruisers
Cheltenham one destroyer
Westminster one battle-cruiser
Wearside two destroyers
Berwick-on-Tweed one destroyer
Huddersfield three destroyers
Kingston-upon-Thames one destroyer
Winchester and District one destroyer
Slough two destroyers
Dover two MTBs
Northern Ireland flotilla of destroyers
Croyden two destroyers

The cost of 2 MTBs was £110,000
A destroyer was typically £320,000
These were the target amounts.

peter schofield
17-03-2011, 16:02
When Warship Weeks began the National Savings Committee promoted savings by producing a series of adverts called True Tales of the Navy. The message was accompanied by a drawing of the event and the adverts were meant to appeal to the patriotic feelings of the people.

The price of the Admiralty By Commander A. B. Campbell of the BBC Brains Trust

Minesweeper making port – at dusk – and they’ve had no sleep to speak of for four days. A plane looms up – drops to 50ft and lets go two bombs. One hits the funnel. The other explodes in the coal in the after hold. Which seems lucky at the time, for the coal absorbs the worst of the blow – and Grimsby trawlers are made to take hard knocks.

But the third bomb blows her stern right off and she sinks. Yet even as they are in the boat, the plane returns and machine-guns them.

What words the Skipper used to curse that plane are no concern of yours or mine. But what is your business is and mine – most definitely our business - is to do everything we can to lighten the load of the Navy these days. We do it by spending less and saving more.

The hardship and bitter sacrifice of men like those is part of the price we pay in winning the Battle of the Atlantic. Your sacrifice in return is so little, simply put your money safely away where it can earn good interest till better days come round. And there’s no hardship in that.

But don’t think of it as a sacrifice. Think of it as glorious thanks-offering to all that fine band of brethren who stand guard over the Narrow Seas and continue to bring us our daily bread.

THE SIGNAL IS SAVE

I have attached a PDF file which gives an insight into the adoption of HMS Quorn, Veteran, Tetcott, Jason, MTB 207, Arethusa, Garth, Valorous, Duke of York, Seagull and Tanatside, together with details of an inscription relating to MTB 58.

jbryce1437
20-03-2011, 16:27
Peter, many thanks for including the information regarding the adoptions of Quorn, Veteran, Tetcott, Jason, MTB 207, Arethusa, Garth, Valorous, Duke of York, Seagull and Tanatside in post #57. I am sure there will be many plaques on display in various locations which commemorate the adpoption of a warship during the various Warship Weeks.

Jim

peter schofield
15-05-2011, 19:20
This is a plea for information on Warship Weeks, I am currently writing an MA History Thesis on the National Savings Movement in two world wars. This has meant a considerable amount of research including the creation of a comprehensive Warship Week database. The database allows me to understand the trend of these weeks, the amounts raised, the links between adopters and ships and also what replacements were made on the loss of an adopted vessel. What I require is the following:

Adopter and vessel
Warship Week dates Sat to Sat ....................
Objective target ........................................
Amount raised ...........................................

This infromation can be found quite easily in newspapers of the period normally held in libraries and record offices. Weeks were held between 18 Oct and 28 Mar 1942 but were extended until late May 1942 in Scotland and Ulster.

Finally if anyone knows of their towns adoption plaque whereabouts I would be interested to know, these are considered as memorials and can be registered on the UK Inventory of War Memorials supported by the IWM. Adoption plaques were pesented to Town Halls and Council Offices but many have migrated to libraries, British Legions and museums

If any members need guidance on these weeks I would be more than happy to assist

peter schofield
20-06-2011, 20:42
The local campaign weeks followed a similar pattern, the size of the event dependent upon the size of the area and population, what was common to them all was that the majority of events were run at the weekend and during evenings outside of daytime working hours. The week itself would be inaugurated at a public meeting at Saturday lunchtime, the mayor normally presiding accompanied by the guest speaker. This was followed later in the afternoon by a march past when it was usual for a senior Royal Navy member to take the salute. The effort had its spiritual side too and on Sunday special church parades and services were held, a naval chaplain on occasion attended the service to give a special sermon. Entertainments played an important part in creating the right atmosphere and inspiring the whole effort. Throughout the week the various dances, concerts and other attractions were all welcome social events for everyone to join in and an opportunity to get involved with the savings effort. At the start of functions it was quite usual to sing a signature song such as ‘Rule Britannia’ to stir up patriotic fervour. To announce news and items of importance a loudspeaker car or van toured the area while guest speakers would attend meetings and appear at concerts, cinemas etc to encourage people to save. Popular Warship Week exhibitions were held throughout the week containing items of military interest as well as models and illustrations of ships belonging to local residents, admission was normally by purchase of savings stamps. Additionally many tens of thousands of badges were manufactured for sale during the campaign. To end the week a closing parade would take place ending at a local venue where displays were often given by army detachments and firefighters etc. The success of the week was not just judged on the final amount raised but more importantly on the number of savings groups established; it being Kindersley intention that a group was set up in every street and factory throughout the country to both maximize and maintain the flow of small savings.

peter schofield
21-06-2011, 09:56
The real contribution of the small saver

The small saver alone could not possibly meet the large target figures for the sporadic savings weeks therefore the impression is that business and industry contributed the majority of capital. Such inflated contributions at the opening of savings weeks provided the impression that the majority of the target sum had already been raised. Moreover the Local Savings Committees by stating the target was practically achieved on day one believed this stimulated the small saver reasoning it should be rational that businesses (insurance companies, building societies and banks) with branches throughout the country should be in a position to make contributions in the areas where they carried out their business and earned their profits. Thus banks, insurance companies and large commercial concerns were able to subscribe large amounts of money through local savings associations in a manner that artificially swelled the reported savings from a district, indeed it was profitable to the investor to lend his money for the cause. In reality it is apparent that a large proportion of institutional investments represented indirectly the savings out of the income of individuals. The funds of insurance companies were derived from receipts by way of premiums, representing savings by individual policy owners and those of the building and friendly societies represent the savings of their depositors. Further, some of the money lent to the Government by the banks represented the accumulated savings of their customers. Although these concerns were contributing through their local branches to the local Savings Association in a manner that artificially swelled the savings of a district, the government was able to achieve its aim by way of money being transferred from private concerns into government ones. Where councils contributed to War Savings Weeks the sums invested in Government securities was ratepayer’s money. Admittedly some of the money invested indirectly from business was from small savers, however it could not be considered as genuine new savings from earnings invested in small saver government securities. The small saver however directly and indirectly contributed far more than the National Savings Movement ever quoted in its final figures.

peter schofield
12-07-2011, 09:55
HORWICH, WARSHIP WEEK, FEBRUARY 14-21, 1942

The Horwich and Westhoughton Journal announced on February 6 that on February 14 there would be a parade of Naval, Army, Air Force and Civil Defence units. The salute would be taken at the Public Hall by Commander W.A.C. Dickson at about 3pm. After the parade an exhibition of military equipment and photographs would be held in the Market Hall. The events of the Week would include dances and concert parties, a Ladies Day and also a “Schools Day” on the Monday, “when the children will pour their coppers, silver and notes into the bunkers of HMS Heather, the corvette chosen for adoption by Horwich.”

The Journal of February 13 said: “Horwich is set the task of raising £120,000 to buy the corvette.” (The town, it said, had raised £100,900 on War Weapons Week in December 1940) In the same issue, an anonymous former crew member of the HMS Heather who was a native of Horwich described it as “a little ship doing a big job”. The HMS was his first and last ship. He said: “Like her sister corvettes, she is an anti-submarine escort vessel equipped with anti-submarine listening apparatus, depth charges, a 4in. gun forward, a 20 pounder pom-pom amidships, 2 machine guns but no torpedo tubes. Fifty of the men are housed in the forward mess decks.” There are a total of 5 officers and 59 ratings.

The writer went on to describe some of his hazardous trips on the Heather.

The Journal of 27 February announced that the Warship Week raised £4797 more than the £120,000 target. It said: “In achieving its aim, Horwich has earned the right to adopt HMS Heather. A replica of the ship’s plaque, together with a history of the corvette, will be presented to the town. In return, a plaque in the form of the town’s coat of arms, commemorating Horwich’s achievement, will be presented to the ship’s officers and crew to be placed on the quarterdeck of the ship.” The Journal explained that the total sum raised, £124,797, was made up of £61,821 in “large investments” and £62,976 in “small investments”. The small investments showed an average of £4.4s per head of population. The total realised by the school groups for the week was £2,450.

The Journal of 6 March featured a letter from the crew of HMS Heather expressing pleasure at Horwich’s success and inviting Horwichers to correspond with them.

In the Journal of 17 April, readers learned that HMS Heather “is regarded as the lucky mascot of the North Atlantic, for she docked recently for refitting after steaming 50,000 miles in 19 months, escorting 1600 ships in over 50 convoys without loss or damage to a single one of her charges. She has never sighted a U-boat or hostile craft, and only once have ships she protected been attacked from the air.” The attackers were warded off by AA guns in the convoy. The Journal added: “Heather’s mascot, which is in the wardroom, is a 5ft figure of a witch riding a broomstick. In one hand, the witch clutches a bunch of lucky white heather, which is never allowed to wither and is renewed regularly.” The official adoption of the ship had still to be completed at that date.

Information provided by Brian Smith, Horwich Local History Society

peter schofield
12-07-2011, 10:55
The MIDDLEWICH TIMES 1942
The story of HMS Jasper the ship that Middlewich built
WARSHIP WEEK OUTSTANDING EXHIBITION

The government launched the nationwide ‘Warship Week’ February 1942. On February 21st the army and navy exhibition was being assembled in the Town Hall having been arranged by the Gas Company (via the U.D.C.) and organised by Mr J H Booth and his staff. The exhibition attracted hundreds of people every day. It was open from 10am until 3pm and the admission charge was 6d. In the entrance hall and on the first floor were dozens of items that generated discussion amongst young and old alike. There were hydrostatic and acoustic mines, naval guns, a range of shells, models of destroyers, freighters and various other naval craft. Aeronautical technical equipment, machine guns, the latest bomb-releasing equipment, landing lights, a search light, parachutes (some wrapped, some open) rubber dinghies, wireless transmitting and receiving equipment, camera guns and an aircraft engine. Posters and diagrams explained the function of the items on display. It was a huge success. Resident Alan Platt recalls ‘I remember going down to the Town Hall, the old Town Hall that got knocked down when St. Michael’s Way was done. There were all items off an aircraft that had come down, or got shot down or whatever, and it was all being displayed in the Town Hall which as a lad was quite interesting’. During ‘Warship week’ Middlewich was a busy town; on the Wednesday the proceeds from the Alhambra cinema, both houses, were given to the savings week. There was a gala dance, cinema vans and on the Saturday the largest grand military and civilian parade took place with Admiral Sir Percy Noble taking the salute. Over 400 people took part, with the 30th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment at the head. Middlewich people lined the streets five or six deep, cheering and clapping. A sum of £40,000 was required for this week for the hull of the minesweeper ‘Jasper’. When the final amounts from the various events were added up, the amazing total of £72,055 was revealed, more than the cost of the complete minesweeper of £65,000.

On December 1st 1942, HMS Jasper was on patrol in the English Channel hunting German Submarines. Its job was to protect His Majesty’s fleet and the coast from German E-boats and U-boats. But on this patrol the hunter became the hunted as the anti-submarine trawler was blown out of the water by an E-boat which had sneaked unseen into the English Channel. There were 38 crew members aboard HMS Jasper when it was hit and 11 crew members died as a result of the action.


The original date of the paper was given as Saturday 18 September but this is incorrect. The date of Warship Week is also at question as on Saturday 21 Feb 1942 the exhibition was still being prepared. The choice of Warship Week was either 21-28 Feb 1942 or 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942. If anyone has the answer I would be pleased to know. Middlewich raised enough money through savings and investment to adopt the ship not build the ship as the heading suggests. There could have been all the money in the world but without material and manpower vessels would never have been built.

peter schofield
12-07-2011, 11:16
Belford RD Warship Week - Northumberland inormation kindly supplied by Jane Bowen

Berwick Advertiser
19th March 1942 page 1 - advert
THE SIGNAL IS SAVE FOR YOUR WARSHIP WEEK.
Put the same tremendous effort into you Warship Week as your sailors are putting into their job for you. The men of the navy are sacrificing much for you – now is your chance to make a sacrifice for them. The Signal is SAVE, so save and lend to the limit.

Go to a Post Office or you Bank or Stockbroker and invest your money in 3% Savings Bonds 1955-65, 2½% National War Bonds 1949-51, 3% Defence Bonds, or Savings Certificates: or deposit you savings in the Post Office Savings Bank. Buy Savings Stamps at 6d and 2/6d each from a Post Office, or your Savings Group.

INVEST ALL YOU CAN IN
3% Savings Bonds
2½ national War Bonds
3% defence Bonds
Savings Certificates
Post Office Savings Bank

March 14th – 21st
BELFORD R.D - OBJECTIVE £28,000
The Cost of Harbour Defence Craft

Berwick Advertiser
19th March 1942 page 4
BELFORD DISTRICT WARSHIP WEEK - TARGET PASSED IN THREE DAYS
In three days Belford passed its original target of £7,000 in the Belford RDC Warship Week by £4,185. The original target for the district was £28,000, and this also has been passed, the total on Tuesday being £30,000.

The Belford effort was inaugurated on Saturday when Commander G. Hilhouse, R.N., Berwick, was the speaker at a meeting in the Market Square. In his address, Commander Hilhouse, introduced by Mr H. M. Kilty, Bellshill, Belford Chairman of the Belford R.D.C., told the story of the two frogs who fell into a bowl of cream and could not get out. One of these frogs was a pessimist and kept deploring all the bad tricks fate had dealt him until, in the end he gave in and, sinking to the bottom, was drowned. The other was a Northumbrian frog, and not wanting to give in, kept on swimming around. He felt the cream getting thicker and thicker until eventually he stood on a pat of butter on top of his dead comrade. That, continued Commander Hilhouse, was the spirit of Northumberland, which, he was sure, would one day get us through. The spirit of determination to do something useful was the only spirit that would bring us through to victory. Here Commander Hilhouse mentioned the great spirit of sacrifice displayed by Lieutenant Commander Esmond, of the Fleet Air Arm, when he went into attack the three German battleships in the Channel, in the out-of-date Swordfish aircraft. This spirit of sacrifice, he went on to say also prevailed everyone in the front line.

Money in the bank or lying idle was useless, and if the war was lost would become absolutely worthless. He ended by saying that the navy was now stretched even further, protecting our merchantmen in the Indian Ocean from attacks from Japanese submarines. We could help the Navy to do their work by saving all we could by giving until it hurt. Then followed a programme of music given by the pipe band of the Royal Scots (by kind permission of the Commanding Officer). This was followed by demonstrations of weapons, field working and physical training. Children who bought Savings Stamps were given rides in Bren gun carriers. The Home Guard also gave demonstrations of weapons in Dinningside Field. A kiosk in the British Legion did a good trade in Savings Stamps and Certificates. The school children have already raised a total of £81 with their savings and are hoping to raise more by selling flowers, firewood, and by giving concerts. Over £9 was raised by a dance in the Blue Bell Hotel on Saturday, organised by the Youth Service Club. All are doing their bit by organising dances, whist drives, and other competitions, and it is hope to more than double the original figure of £7,000 by the end of the week.

Berwick Advertiser
26th March 1942 – page 4
Belford District Doubles Savings Targets
GREAT ACHIEVEMENT IN WARSHIP WEEK

Already well known in this part of the country for their many successful efforts in raising money for deserving charities, Belford Rural District has this time surely surpassed itself during their Warship Week, which was held from the 14th to the 21st March. Aiming at a total of £28,000, they have more than doubled this figure, the barometer reaching the £63,000 mark. Of this sum, Belford raised nearly £21,000, almost trebling their target of £7,000. Throughout the week everyone did their utmost, so much so that by Tuesday both target figures had been reached.

A telegram of congratulation has been received by the chairman of Belford Rural District Council from Sir Kingsley Wood. This can be read by all as it is fixed on the barometer in the Market Square. Over £65 has been handed over as gifts to the Treasury. The children added largely to this, over £14 being raised by their own efforts in school, which included nearly £5, the proceeds of a jumble sale, and a further £4 10s, the proceeds of a concert. Above all this, the children have raised £134 10s in War Savings for the week. Special mention should be made of the senior pupils of the school, who greatly helped in publicity work, and their posters which they did in connection with the different functions showed them to be artists of no mean ability.

During the week there were functions of various kinds including whist drives and dances, one held by the Youth Service Club raising over £9. The W.R.I. also helped in organising competitions of various kinds. Over £7 was raised by the Bren gun carriers, when the children gladly handed over their pennies in return for a short trip. Although the village people are missing the extra excitement of last week, they are feeling justly proud of their wonderful achievement, which, they pray, will bring victory nearer.

Berwick Advertiser
2nd April 1942 – page 6
BELFORD WARSHIP WEEK TOTAL

At a special meeting of the Belford R.D.C. Warship Week Committee in the New School, Belford, on Wednesday, March 25, it was announced that the final figure raised by the district was £65,005. Mr. Tully, Belford, acted as chairman, while among those present was Mr. Kelly, chairman of the Belford R. D. C. The committee decided to appoint a sub committee to consider the suggestion of adopting a small minesweeper instead of the harbour defence craft it was first decided to buy.

It was interesting to note that after the six o’clock B.B.C. news on Sunday, the Belford R.D.C. total was in the first half of names read out on the list of places in order of the sums of money raised. It was announced that the totals for the different places in the district are as follows: Belford, £20,137; Bamburgh, £9,043; Beadnell, £4,114; Seahouses £25,656; Eglingham £6,218.

Results of competitions were announced as follows: The guessing of the competition as to the total figure was won by Mrs. T. Fullerton, whose effort was £65,001 18s 4d. This effort was the nearest to the final figure.

RDC Minutes re Belford Warship Week
11 March 1942
Warship Week
The Chairman informed the Council that it was the Belford Rural District’s Warship Week commencing the 14th and asked that the full support of the Council be given to this.

8 April 1942
Warship Week
The Chairman informed the Council that £65,005. 10. 1d had been raised during Belford Rural District’s Warship Week, which appeared to be a very gratifying result.

13 May 1942
Warship Week
The Clerk read a letter he had received from the Secretary of the Local Savings Committee stating that as a result of Belford’s most successful Warship Week the Admiralty proposed that Belford Rural Area should adopt the Motor Launch H.M.M. L. “151”. He understood that the Admiralty would present the local authority with a plaque. He further recommended that printed certificates bearing the Admiralty badge be presented to the Parishes of Bamburgh, Beadnell, Belford, Ellingham and North Sunderland.

5 December 1942
Admiralty Plaque
The Clerk read the proposed inscription on the plaque to be presented to the Council by the Admiralty in commemoration of Warship Week March 1942. The Clerk was instructed to approve the wording.

9 June 1943
Admiralty Plaque
The Clerk stated that he had received the plaque from the Admiralty together with a letter from Rear Admiral Wellwood Maxwell asking whether the Council wished a Senior Naval Officer to come and make a formal presentation. It was agreed that the matter be referred to Mr J. P. Atkinson the Secretary of the National Savings Committee for his observations. It was agreed to recommend to him that the plaque might be exhibited in each of the villages for a period of say 10 days.

14 July 1943
Admiralty Plaque
The Clerk read a letter from Mr J. P. Atkinson, Honorary Secretary of the Savings Committee stating that he did not think it necessary to have the Plaque officially handed over unless the Council so desired. He stated that the Plaque had been displayed or was being displayed in all the villages. It was agreed that no ceremony take place.

Berwick Advertiser
10th June 1943 – page 3
BELFORD RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL - PRESENTATION OF PLAQUE
A letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Wellwood Maxwell said he would arrange for a senior officer to attend any presentation ceremony of the Warship Week plaque exhibited in the room. It was agreed to exhibit it at Bamburgh, Belford, Seahouses and Beadnell, and that Mr Atkinson, War Savings Secretary, be seen about the presentation.

Berwick Advertiser
15th July 1943 – page 4
BELFORD RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL - WARSHIP WEEK PLAQUE
There will not be any ceremony of presentation of the Warship Week plaque in the Belford area, the plaque having displayed in Bamburgh, and it will also be shown in the other villages before being given a place in the Council Chamber.

Tony Martin
12-07-2011, 15:31
Warship week was a big thing in Tavistock, Devon in 41, they raised £312,000 for the Hunt Class Destroyer HMS Lamerton which was reported for many days in the local papers and is still rcorded in the local museum with a wall plaque and ships shields on show and the ships bell is in Mayors parlour in the Town hall with a further shield in the Town Hall. Lamerton is a village North West of Tavistock where they have a wall display reminding people of the ship. Tony.

peter schofield
19-07-2011, 15:13
EXTRACTS FROM THE HORWICH/WESTHOUGHTON JOURNAL
IN MARCH/APRIL 1942 RE HMS BRIDGEWATER

In the Journal of March 6 1942, there was an appeal by the chairman of Westhoughton Urban District Council, Councillor Howarth, to the townspeople to support the local “Warship Week” from March 21-28. The target figure to enable the town to buy and adopt the HMS Bridgewater was £136,000.

The Week began with a procession through the town on the afternoon of Saturday, March 21. It started in Central Drive and moved along Bolton Road, Manchester Road, Church Street and Market Street to pass the saluting base at the Town Hall, where the Home Guard band and a bugle band played for the march-past. The salute was taken by Commander W.A.C. Dickson, RN. The Earl of Crawford performed the opening ceremony.

Then followed a week featuring a special savings campaign and numerous social events, many of them at the Carnegie Hall, even the children contributed by selling picture postcards of HMS Bridgewater.

Progress of the money raising was shown on a “thermometer” indicator at the Town Hall. It was updated at 11am each day.

However, all these efforts failed to achieve the target figure of £136,000. The Journal of 2 April said the week ended with a deficiency of about £14,000. But Councillor Howarth, determined that Westhoughton should reach its target, made personal appeals to local business firms and organisations as well as to individual people. This renewed effort brought the original contributions figure of £122,301 up to £140,924.

The Journal described HMS Bridgewater as a minesweeper costing £136,485. It had a displacement of 815 tons and was fitted with two 4in. anti-aircraft and five smaller guns. It had a crew of 80.

Information provided by Brian Smith

peter schofield
28-07-2011, 20:21
House builder names streets in new homes development in Bourne Two roads on Larkfleet Home's Old Laundry development in Bourne, Lincolnshire, have been named after Second World War warship HMS Beryl and its commander Harry Sellwood.

Its first commanding officer was Commissioned Bosun Harry Sellwood, who later became Lt Cdr Sellwood. He died in 1996 at the age of 86. The streets on Larkfleet's Old Laundry development have now been named Beryl Mews and Sellwood Avenue in honour of the warship and Lt Cdr Sellwood.

Warships' Week appeal was held from 7th-14th February 1942 with a target of £35,000 to buy a minesweeper but in the event, £54,168 (£1.5 million at today's values) was collected and in June, the town adopted HMS Beryl at an official ceremony on the Abbey Lawn when Rear Admiral F A Buckley of the Royal Navy handed over a plaque to mark the occasion. In return, Bourne Urban District Council also gave a plaque that was eventually fixed to the ship and stayed there for the rest of the war

rex/bourne/berylnames.htm (Warship Remembered) or more information

peter schofield
04-08-2011, 14:06
Warship week was a big thing in Tavistock, Devon in 41, they raised £312,000 for the Hunt Class Destroyer HMS Lamerton which was reported for many days in the local papers and is still rcorded in the local museum with a wall plaque and ships shields on show and the ships bell is in Mayors parlour in the Town hall with a further shield in the Town Hall. Lamerton is a village North West of Tavistock where they have a wall display reminding people of the ship. Tony.

As an update from the pages of The Tavistock Times kindly supplied by Tony I can now update this posting.

Tavistock UD and RD held their Warship Week from 14-21 March 1942 with the target of raising £120,000 the cost of a Type II Hunt Class Destroyer hull (HMS Lamerton), the final total reported was £137,836. Not sure where Tony got the £312,000 from?

peter schofield
08-08-2011, 18:15
To stimulate savings a challenge to another borough with a similar target figure was as a rule suggested by the local Warship Week publicity committee and issued by the Mayor. Challenges were rarely taken up as many areas wanted to concentrate on raising the target figure without being confused by side issues.
Nonetheless competition did occur.
To stimulate interest in the campaign from the outset a heavyweight savings contest took place between Glasgow and Birmingham each city racing to raise a minimum of £10 million to adopt a King George V Class battleship. The eventual winner was Glasgow raising £13,510,509 against Birmingham’s £10,088,199 however Glasgow had an advantage as the adopted ship HMS Duke of York was building on the Clyde and closely associated with the city. If Glasgow had the edge over Birmingham, Edinburgh would raise the stakes even higher as a total of £15,300,000 was raised to adopt the battleship HMS Howe the total being declared a British record.
Inter-town rivalry occasionally took place for example the towns of Bury and St Helens held a private challenge based on the figure per head of adult population. Each town would aim to adopt an identical destroyer with a target of £700,000. The Bury final figure was £822,451 giving £16 8s 8d for each of the 50,347 adults in the borough. St Helens with a final figure of £1,084,380 and an adult population of 75,065 had an average figure of £14 8s 11d giving Bury a clear win.

In Scotland the tendency was for a county to adopt a single vessel. The only exceptions to the rule were Scotland’s cities and some major towns and areas who opted to adopt their own vessels. A county was divided into districts and divisions each provided with a quota objective. The County of Argyll was keenly contested between Kintyre and Campbeltown and Cowal and Dunoon with the remaining seven districts making up the rest, their aim to raise £300,000 to adopt the destroyer HMS Inglefield. Provost MacFarlane, Dunoon was confident his district would win an inter-district race with Campbletown.


District Quota Objective
Kintyre and Campbeltown £70,000
Cowal and Dunoon £70,000
South Lorne and Oban £70,000
Mid Argyll £15,000
Mull £15,000
Islay £15,000
North Lorne £15,000
Ardnamurchan £15,000
Tiree and Coll £15,000
Total £300,000
Argyll Warship Week

peter schofield
08-08-2011, 18:40
The County objective for Radnorshire Warship Week 21-28 March 1942 was £210,000 for the adoption of the destroyer HMS Scorpion. The break down was as follows:

Lladrindod Wells UD £60,000
Knighton UD and RD £50,000
Rhayader RD £40,000
Presteigne UD £20,000
New Radnor RD £16,000
Painscastle RD £12,000
Total £210,000

peter schofield
19-08-2011, 12:12
Beeston and Stapleford (Nottinghamshire) Warship Week was held during the week 7-14 February 1942 with a target of £210,000 for the hull of a destroyer.

The final figure is not known but they must have met it as they adopted the A Type destroyer HMS Active.

As Arthur Mee the editior of The Children's Encyclopedia and The Children's Newspaper was a Stapleford man he was asked to send a message to the children of Stapleton to encourage them to save.

peter schofield
27-08-2011, 10:58
Whitworth Warship Week, 14-21 March 1942, HMS Moonstone – Gem Class Trawler

Whitworth’s Successful Final - £800 over objective
The final amount raised by Whitworth’s Warship Week as announced on Thursday evening to a gathering outside the Reform Club. Councillor J Crosby JP presided and said they had invited Mr James Lye of Mount Healey to indicate the final figure.
Councillor Crosby said they were highly indebted to Mr Lye who had never failed the Whitworth district and expressed his pleasure at Mr Lye’s acceptance to the invitation. Mr Lye stated that everyone in the district had a share in the result and announced the final figure as raised to be £62,822 7s. In conclusion Mr Lye exhorted everyone to save and to buy only when they needed not what they wanted.

The final total is £822 over the target set by the committee, thus enabling the district to achieve its ambition of adopting HMS Moonstone. It should be pointed out that the sum of £40,000 would have paid for the cost of the hull only, which in itself would have secured adoption but the cost of £62,000 is the cost of the ship complete. The final result can be considered a magnificent achievement for the district of Whitworth and has aroused widespread satisfaction. Councillor Crosby as chairman of the District Council has received the following telegram from the Chancellor of the Exchequer: ‘Heartiest congratulations on success of Whitworth Warship Week – Kingsley Wood’

peter schofield
06-09-2011, 11:11
Littleborough and Wardle, Warship Week 21-28 February 1942, HMS Meadowsweet, Flower Class Corvette, Target £120,000, Raised £142,337 17s 4d

Milnrow Warship Week 21-28 March 1942, HMS Morris Dance, Dance Class AS Trawler, Target £62,000, Raised £56,000 by Thursday final figure not known

Rochdale Warship Week 7-14 March 1942, HMS Frobisher, Hawkins Class Cruiser, Target £1,000,000, raised £1,060,749

As Minister of Labour, I appealed to you a few weeks ago to give me greater output and I thank you for that response. But in addition to being Minister of Labour I am also the Minister of National Service and in that capacity I want now to appeal to you to render every possible assistance by pouring your money in through saving certificates and bonds or into our savings banks to assist us to maintain the supply of raw materials our shipping for carrying it and to keep our factories going to produce the finished article. We want your money we must have your money. And we ask you to put it into the national savings immediately.

Taken from part of an appeal in June 1940 by Earnest Bevan

What he is asking for is for people to save their excess cash therefore stopping money being spent on unnecessary items which takes away effort from war production. Secondly the savings went into the War Treasury to help pay for the cost of the war which was running at £5 million a day. He was after new money rather than money being transferred from bank deposits in to government securities.

peter schofield
21-09-2011, 10:48
Richmond, Surrey - Warship Week
The Admiralty had offered the destroyer HMS Firedrake for adoption but as the borough already had links with the town class destroyer HMS Richmond the Admiralty allowed them to change to this vessel. Firedrake eventually being adopted by Tyneside, Northumberland sometime in February 1942. Richmond also offered a challenge to Wimbledon to exceed is object figure by a sum greater than by which it was hoped Richmond would succeed. Wimbledon declined as they were so anxious to raise their target figure that they did not want ot be confused with any side issues. The borough was also keen to beat the final total of Kingston-upon-Thames final figure of £609,000.

Details:
Richmond MB, 7-14 February 1942, HMS Richmond, Target £250,000, raised £458,050
Wimbledon, 17-24 January 1942, HMS Havelock, Target £300,000, raised £546,576
Kingston-upon-Thames MB, HMS Kingston, Target £250,000, raised £609,000
Tynemouth, February 1942, HMS Firedrake, Target £210,000, raised ???

CYLLA
21-09-2011, 13:26
Hi Peter S,

It is amazing how much money that joe public could offer,in those awful days , if you put all those figures in to days prices ,it would shock a lot of people.

cylla

peter schofield
21-09-2011, 14:53
Hi Peter S,

It is amazing how much money that joe public could offer,in those awful days , if you put all those figures in to days prices ,it would shock a lot of people.

cylla

Hi Cylla, only about a third on average was put in by joe public, the majority coming from institutional concerns. The money went to the Treasury via Government securities so people and institutions were guaranteed their money back with interest. The money was only lent to the Government although there were loans free of interest which people got back after the war. There were many more people in work with plenty of overtime and nothing to spend it on so the Government wanted that money invested in savings so they could borrow the money and prevent money inflation. Do not be led into beleiving that people were paying for ships it just aint true, they were only adopting them by meeting the target cost through savings. It was a great piece of psychology by the govenment co-opted by the National Savings Movement. Here is an example:

To give some idea of the influence of large investors Dundee Warship Week with a target of £2.5 million was guaranteed success as even before the week opened £2.4 million had been promised. The organisers increased the target to £3.5 million to provide another vessel and announced it would be fitting if the small investor contributed the additional £750,000. In fact on the opening day £1,643,097 of which £1,615,340 was contributed through joint stock banks the final total reaching £3.75 million

Richmond Total:
The sum of £77,850 was invested mainly through the Post Office and this amount was made up of the following National Savings Certificates £32,609; deposits in the Post Office Savings Bank £13,256; 3 per cent Defence Bonds £29,670; gift token £380; and Savings Stamps £1,935.

Free gifts amounted to £12 which added to the £380,188 in 3 per cent Savings Bonds and 2.5 per cent National War Bonds and together with the £77,850 invested through the Post Office made the grand of £458,050.

So out of the £458,050 the large investor or institutional investor raised £380,188 so joe publics contribution was worthy but small in comparison.

Peter S

peter schofield
03-10-2011, 18:19
I know this pre dates the warship week efforts,
but in 1929 when the new sloop HMS Bridgewater joined the fleet an approach was made to the town in Somerset after which she was named to further an association between ship and town.
This was promptly rebuffed by the town stating the ship was not named after it and neither could it be.
Bridgwater the town does not have an E between the g and w.
Maybe too much scrumpy had been consumed in the town the previous day.

T P Stoppard, ‘Admiralty Badges’ says: Bridgewater deserves special mention because when the sloop was to be launched in 1928 the town council of Bridgwater were quite properly invited. They accepted pointing out that there was no ‘e’ after the ‘g’. The Admiralty replied that the badges had already been cast and the name was to stay. So the Council stayed away and the ship lost her affiliation.

peter schofield
04-10-2011, 10:57
Carlisle’s Warship Week 14-21 February 1942 aimed at raising £750,000 for the cruiser HMS Carlisle. The figure for the hull of £500,000 for adoption was passed on 19 Februry Carlisle raised £754,162 at £11 10s 1d per head.

The Border Rural District of Cumberland raised a total of £213,503 in their Warship Week (21-28 Feb 1942) and adopted the destroyer HMS Catterick.

The Border Urban District of Cumberland raised £172,000 for the destroyer HMS Border during the week 7-14 February 1942 (TBC).

peter schofield
04-10-2011, 14:27
The Manchester Guardian 13 Jan 1942
Shipwrights Wanted for Savings Effort
The Manchester National Savings Committee is asking for two hundred volunteers to make model battleships for shop-window displays during the city’s Warship Week 21-28 February. Sets of blue-prints with instructions have been sent by the National Committee in London and may be obtained by persons who care to undertake this piece of service by applying to Miss N Kenyon Manchester Savings Committee, 4 Mount Street.

Mr C Whittaker a member of the local committee who as an expert is keeping a supervisory eye upon the publicity display for Warship Week says these blue-prints and instructions are easy to follow and will enable anyone with a bit of patience to make most interesting and attractive models. The models may be made in wood or cardboard; he has had a model of the Nelson completed in a week by a member of his staff who gave only spare time to the job and so had never attempted anything of the kind before.

In the ordinary way, he adds the blue prints would cost a model maker 7s 6d. Here is the loan of a set offered for nothing.


At a time of shortages and rationing it does not say where the wood and cardboard would come from.

peter schofield
08-10-2011, 13:01
The Manchester Guardian, 5 October 1944
Royton’s Ghost Warship – Apology Demanded

Royton Council last night decided to demand an apology from the Admiralty having allocated to Royton in recognition of its warship week effort HMS Sparrow a vessel which had not been built.

Councillor A Barker, who presided, said the Royston warship week was held in March 1942 and as a result of the success achieved they adopted HMS Sparrow which was described as a convoy escort vessel. On 7 December 1943 a naval commander came to Royton and presented to the council the badge of HMS Sparrow and the council handed to him in return a bronze plaque of the council’s coat of arms. When members of the council failed to find anyone who had succeeded in making contact with the men of the ship a letter was sent to the Admiralty. In reply the Admiralty explained that when the Sparrow was allocated to Royton it was being built and was expected to be completed. It had been found necessary however to delay the completion of the Sparrow and the Admiralty suggested that Royton should adopt in its place one of the frigates. The Admiralty also asked that the statement about the Sparrow should be kept private.

The chairman added that he was sure that the general public shared with the council the feeling of indignation at the bungling done by someone at the Admiralty. He moved that an apology should be demanded from the Admiralty.

Councillor John Smethurst who seconded the motion, said when the commander came to Royton to present the ship’s badge the Admiralty new there was no such ship. They should demand that the First Lord of the Admiralty should hold a full enquiry to ascertain how it came about that Royton had been deceived.

The resolution was passed unanimously.

peter schofield
18-10-2011, 11:44
The Manchester Guardian - 30 March 1942

The united towns of Leigh, Atherton and Tyldesley which comprise the parliamentary Boroughs of Leigh with a population of 85,000 aimed at £500,000 and had reached this figure when Warship Weeks ended on Saturday.

Warship Week: 28 Feb – 7 Mar 1942
Adopted ship: HMS Ulysses – U Class Destroyer
Amount raised: £576,396

peter schofield
21-10-2011, 10:54
Colne, Trawden and Foulridge (Lancashire) Warship Week: 7-14 March 1942

Their original aim as quoted by the Colne Times newspaper was to adopt a Corvette priced at £120,000. There was talk of raising enough for three corvettes and on Saturday 14 March it was announced that £350,751 had been raised with the final figure to be announced on the Monday.

Although a Corvette was aimed for as the target, a name was not provided and it is likely the Admiralty had run out of Corvette names as the adopted ship ended up as the Fishery Protection Trawler HMS Colne. The cost of a trawler would have been less than a Corvette.

The amount raised per head (Colne, Trawden and Foulridge) was £13 19s 6d the small savings figure being £6 9s 8d per head, a total of £162,800.

CYLLA
21-10-2011, 13:09
70th Anniversary of H.M.S AUBRETIA

Seventy years ago the people of Horsforth raised over £241,000 in one week to adopt the HMS Aubrietia. The corvette, together with HMS Bulldog and HM Broadway, was instrumental in capturing the German U Boat 110, which had an Enigma encoding machine on board. The capture of the U Boat enabled the Allies to plot the position of German naval craft. This saved thousands of lives and was one of the major turning points of the Second World War.

Cylla

peter schofield
22-10-2011, 10:34
To encourage savings in Lancashire savings leagues were established:

Manchester Guardian, 23 October 1941 - Lancashire Boroughs and War Savings

Results of the Lancashire Borough War Savings League are now available for the week 6-11 Oct. Non-county boroughs competed with each other to reach the highest figure for small savings in proportion to population. Scores indicate the number of pence saved per head. The highest score during this week was reached by Clitheroe (115) which was matched against Widnes (37). Other high scores were Morecambe (95); Fleetwood (93); Lytham-St-Annes (90) and Chorley (81). The lowest was that of Farnworth (25) in its match against Lytham. In the North West 31 areas have been placed on the Regional Roll of Honour by the NS Committee for having every street and every house covered by a street savings group.

Warship Weeks open on Saturday (25 Oct) in Wigan which hopes to raise £700,000 to adopt the destroyer HMS Janus and in Standish where the aim is £62,000 for the trawler minesweeper Arctic Explorer.

peter schofield
22-10-2011, 10:39
70th Anniversary of H.M.S AUBRETIA

Seventy years ago the people of Horsforth raised over £241,000 in one week to adopt the HMS Aubrietia. The corvette, together with HMS Bulldog and HM Broadway, was instrumental in capturing the German U Boat 110, which had an Enigma encoding machine on board. The capture of the U Boat enabled the Allies to plot the position of German naval craft. This saved thousands of lives and was one of the major turning points of the Second World War.

Cylla

Horsforth Warship Week, 15-22 November 1941

peter schofield
18-03-2012, 12:34
Manchester Warship Week 21-28 Feb 1942
Previous to Manchester Warship Week it was believed that to raise the sum of £10 million for the adoption of the battleship HMS Nelson would be a formidable task. The city had a good nucleus of investors of large sums but the previous experience of War Weapons Week had demonstrated that their numbers were not sufficient alone to produce such a large total. Although the help of small investors was indispensible it was unreasonable to expect them to raise the millions needed, the large and small investors combined were unlikely to provide the £10 million required.

Comparison with Liverpool could not be used. In Liverpool 76 cheques received from insurance, shipping and banking offices produced £9,345,000, of the £14,890,680 raised to adopt the battleship HMS Prince-of-Wales, £12 million coming in subscriptions of £10,000 and over.

For Manchester to achieve success substantially those of moderate means and resources (professional and middle class people) able to invest £1,000 to £10,000 would therefore form the backbone of the effort. The whole policy of the Manchester Savings Committee was thus directed towards influencing the modest saver to achieve a record in small savings.

The final total of £10,890,000 from the large investors was from a smaller number than expected while investments of £1,000 to £10,000 in a city the size of Manchester were expected to be four or five times more.

The final sum was made up as follows and represents £2 14s 3 per head of the population for small savers and £18 15s 1d for large investments.

Small Savers
Savings Certificates £691,625 10s 0d
Post Office deposits £157,366 0s 0d
Savings Bank deposits £106,329 0s 0d
Sale of stamps £30,784
3% Defence Bonds £630,170 0s 0d
£1,616,274 10s 0d

Free Gifts £3,697 11s 8d

Large Investors
3% Savings Bonds £5,213,347 0s 0d
2.5% War Bonds £5,470,105, 0s 0d
Miscellaneous £87,393 0s 0d
Interest-free loans £124,150 0s 0d
£10,894,995 0s 0d

Total £12,514,967 1s 8d

During Manchester War Weapons Week of 1940 the figures were only £5,915,215 for large investments and £1,262,219 for small savings.

ap1
20-03-2012, 10:45
The screen badge of H.M.S. Turbulent is on show in the Warrington museum.

The badge is on a shield with the dedication plate "To the people of Warrington, Lancashire"; that's before it went all posh, and was transposed into Cheshire!

If you have chance to visit the museum, you will find it exceedingly interesting. It has been done up recently, yet it still remains just like all Victorian museums, stuffed to the rafters with interesting exhibits. Well worth a visit, but you may need several hours to see the best bits!

It makes all the 'new' museums look bereft of exhibits, methinks.

peter schofield
20-03-2012, 14:07
Posting 87 could be in error for Warringtons Warship Week as I believe that Fleetwood in Lancashire adopted the submarine HMS Turbulent and that Warrington adopted the Onslow Class Destroyer HMS Obdurate (WW 7-14 March 1942)

The adoption plaques (two types) have a brass plaque stating the the plaque was presented to the town by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty.

Teddy
02-05-2012, 09:13
Hello There....Does anyone know where I can get a list of the ships that were adoped by schools in Warship Week? I am specifically interested in HMS Kingfisher which was adopted by Navigation Road Primary School in Altrincham, Cheshire. Any information on ship adoption or HMS Kingfisher will be gratefully received. Also if anyone knows how were ships chosen I'd be interested in that too as I am wondering what the link was between the school and that particular ship.

jbryce1437
02-05-2012, 12:13
Hello There....Does anyone know where I can get a list of the ships that were adoped by schools in Warship Week? I am specifically interested in HMS Kingfisher which was adopted by Navigation Road Primary School in Altrincham, Cheshire. Any information on ship adoption or HMS Kingfisher will be gratefully received. Also if anyone knows how were ships chosen I'd be interested in that too as I am wondering what the link was between the school and that particular ship.

Hello Teddy and welcome to the Forum.
I believe that HMS Talisman was the officially adopted ship of Altrincham during Warship Week. I believe that schools were encouraged to write letters to crew members of ships and the link with HMS Kingfisher could have been through some affiliation with a crew member, through a former pupil of the school serving aboard her. However, that is only a thought.

Jim

peter schofield
02-05-2012, 20:56
Hello There....Does anyone know where I can get a list of the ships that were adoped by schools in Warship Week? I am specifically interested in HMS Kingfisher which was adopted by Navigation Road Primary School in Altrincham, Cheshire. Any information on ship adoption or HMS Kingfisher will be gratefully received. Also if anyone knows how were ships chosen I'd be interested in that too as I am wondering what the link was between the school and that particular ship.

Teddy HMS Kingfisher a corvette was adopted by Redditch in Worcestershire during their Warship Week held between 15-22 Nov 1941, the modern shopping centre in Redditch is indeed called The Kingfisher Centre. Altrincham adopted HMS Talisman during the week 7-14 Feb 1942. The local archived nespapers will provide you with all you need to know about the Warship Week, try Altrincham Library or Record Office. The children were likely to have been in communication with the crew. National Savings Groups were organised in schools and would have helped to save towards the Warship Week. They also had competions to see who could provide the best poster related to the Week. Children were the future savers and savings groups was a way of teaching them to save, they also had influnce on their parents regarding saving. I can provide more information on school groups if you need it. Vessels were chosen by the Local Savings Committee as was their Warship Week, it was the Admiralty who allocated the vessels and the names.

Peter

peter schofield
03-05-2012, 09:19
From the outset schools had taken the National Savings Movement seriously not only teaching the importance of the movement but fostering the habit of regular saving as it was vital young people continued the habit after leaving school. Like street groups the collections helped to tap family incomes which had risen more than family commitments, however for poorer families regular saving was not always possible and occasional or no saving most likely. School savings groups it was hoped would spread beyond to clubs, youth centres and voluntary organizations. Most schools had a Savings Bank and on a certain day children could buy saving stamps, when 15s worth had been saved a savings certificate could then be purchased. Typically during Belford Warship Week the School Log Book recorded:

‘the school bank was open all week and the school raised £14 1s 7d as a gift to the Treasury to help equip their Harbour Defence Craft while the school savings movement raised over £134’.

During special campaign weeks essay, poster and model making competitions were held with savings stamps and certificates as prizes. The essay subjects were based on the services and how savings in the special week could help win the war while posters were designed to induce the public to invest in various war savings. Models could represent vessels, aircraft or tanks with judging taking place on opening day of the campaign week. Money was raised by making and selling goods like flags and emblems and anything else which could be sold for the effort; children in Colne council schools collected 989 saleable jam jars bringing in over £3 3s. In May 1942 it was reported since the war began savings groups in schools in England and Wales had raised the sum of £15 million. During 1943 the schools of England Wales were set a collective target of £3 million for Wings for Victory Weeks the final figure realizing some four times greater.

peter schofield
04-05-2012, 10:12
Runcorn UD and Runcorn RD

Runcorn UD adopted the Black Swan Class Sloop HMS Flamingo during Warship Week 21-28 March 1942

Runcorn RD however remains more of a challenge as all records state Modified Black Swan Class Sloops HMS Pheasant and HMS Starling were adopted. The problem has only been partly solved as the following gleaned from local newspapers of the period shows:

1. Stockton Heath and East Runcorn, Warship Week 16-21 March 1942, objective £120,000 the cost of a corvette
2. Frodsham and West Runcorn Warship Week 16-21 March 1942, objective £120,000 the cost of a corvette

The newspaper does not provide the names of the vessels although by this late time of the campaign all the Corvette names had been taken so they would have been offered Sloops.

Any answers?

Submarine Artefacts Restored
It is reported in this Months Navy News that Rolls Royce apprentices at Derby have restored HMS Tacticians dilapidated artefacts among them the Warship Week adoption plaque. The plaque with the rest of the artefacts will be presented to Alfreton Town Council. Alfreton adopted the submarine after their Warship Week date unknown. Can anyone provide this date

peter schofield
07-05-2012, 12:43
Posting 87 could be in error for Warringtons Warship Week as I believe that Fleetwood in Lancashire adopted the submarine HMS Turbulent and that Warrington adopted the Onslow Class Destroyer HMS Obdurate (WW 7-14 March 1942)

The adoption plaques (two types) have a brass plaque stating the the plaque was presented to the town by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty.

The Guardian (Warrington) on the 7 Feb 1942 advertising their Warship Week stated that the target was £700,000 the total cost of a destroyer 'HMS Odurate' now under construction. The same paper on 21 Feb quoted that Warrington had raised £829,811. In terms of warships this was the cost of building a destroyer and two minesweepers, this was good propaganda

tigercat
08-05-2012, 11:31
Presumably it was spun slightly differently if the town was adopting an existing vessel. Rather than paying for a new vessel? I recently discovered my home town of Watford adopted HMS Capetown and also HMS Puckeridge.

peter schofield
08-05-2012, 15:36
Presumably it was spun slightly differently if the town was adopting an existing vessel. Rather than paying for a new vessel? I recently discovered my home town of Watford adopted HMS Capetown and also HMS Puckeridge.

Watford MB and RD (Sarratt Parish Council) adopted the C Class Light Cruiser HMS Capetown during their Warship Week 7-14 Mar 1942. Hertford MB and RD adopted the Type II Hunt Class destroyer HMS Puckeridge sometime in Mar 1942, would be interested to know if you have the Warship Week date, Sat to Sat.
The Objective (Target) price made no difference whether a vessel was building or in commission, it was based on a vessels hull or fully fitted build cost. The idea of themed Weeks was to increase National Savings, through which the Objectives were obtained; investments came mainly via large companies and finance etc. (large savers) and the ordinary people (small savers). The adopted vessels were never built from the savings, the idea was to stop spending on things not related to the war effort and therefore prevent spiralling inflation. The Treasury were vacuuming up peoples spending power.
Watford library should hold the archived newspaper for your Warship Weeks and there should also be an adoption plaque in the Town Hall.

tigercat
09-05-2012, 19:33
I will have to investigate further thank you for the info. I will have to see if they still have the plaque.

peter schofield
04-08-2012, 18:40
Walsall's two adoption plaques

HMS Mahratta was originally to have been named HMS Marksman. She was laid down on 21 January 1940 but the incomplete ship was blown off the slipway during an air raid in May 1941. Marksman was to have been the lead ship of the M-class destroyers and the class was sometimes known as the Marksman class. Damage sustained by Marksman was so bad she had to be dismantled and transferred to an alternative site. The new ship was laid down on 18 August 1941 but she was renamed HMS Mahratta at her launch in July 1942 as a recognition of the financial support given by India to the war effort. Firstly Marksman later renamed Mahratta was adopted by the people of Walsall during their Warship Week from 7–14 Feb. 1942, aiming to raise £700,000 the cost of a fully fitted destroyer. She was completed on 8 April 1943 and entered service on that date. Walsall had the unusual honour of being presented with two adoption plaques, one for HMS Marksman and one for HMS Mahratta both of which are now held by Walsall Museum.

peter schofield
05-08-2012, 13:54
Bishop's Stortford's Warship Week (14-21 February) - HMS Clover. After a slow start it was feared the town had set its sights too high, but a late influx of cash raised the total to £126,638. Such events provoked 'friendly' rivalry between Stortford and Saffron Walden, as to who could raise the most money. In this case Stortford came second, Walden's target of £120,000 to adopt another Corvette, HMS Marjoram, being exceeded in two days. One little known fact was that Bishop's Stortford, despite its long history had no coat of arms. Only after Warship Week, when the adoption of HMS Clover required a plaque to be sent to the ship was a design prepared. It was hoped to make it of metal and mount it on an oak panel, which would be mounted on the ship's quarterdeck. Unfortunately, despite the generosity of townspeople in aiding the war effort, the Ministry of Health (successor of the old Local Government Board) refused to pay for the plaque and so the council paid for it out of the rates.

oglesby
22-09-2012, 22:07
I am certain that many members will contribute to this thread and I maintain myself quite a large listing of ships adopted by civil communities once this campaign got going in " The warships weeks" of late 1941 to 1942. I sometimes wonder how many town halls, metropolitan, borough and district councils today are even aware of these past and important 'adoptions' by their forebears just under 70 years ago.

It wasn't just civil communities that 'adopted' the Royal Navy ships.
Here is a small collection of ships 'adopted' by financial institutions ie their staff thereof, namely:

HMS Warspite - The London Stock Exchange

HMS Rodney - Glyn Mills Bank

HMS Queen Elizabeth - The Baltic Exchange

HMS Illustrious - a group of insurance companies

Some ships didn't need to be adopted because they kept a close relationship with the particular geographical entity after which they were named . Such a relationship continued when a newly built ship of the same name was commissioned.

Some examples are:

HMS Exeter

HMS Birmingham

HMS Cumberland

Some ships were never 'adopted'. Thus HMS Encounter who went down gallantly in the Java Sea in March 1942 was to remain an 'orphan'.

However, thanks to sterling work of MV Empress and the fine efforts of her wreck exploratory and diving team which included Kevin Denlay of this Forum, HMS Encounter keeps to this day an ever faithful watch, from just a short distance away, on her consort HMS Exeter.

To me a fine adoption that will always be remembered.

David

Hi David,

Just an update for your information HMS Encounter was in fact adopted during warship week in Feb 1942. The town of Neath in South Wales adopted her, and formed a sea cadet unit which bears her name at the same time. As the current Commanding Officer of Training Ship Encounter, I am proud to be the current keeper of the HMS Encounter ships affiliation plaques.

Kind regards
Simon

ivorthediver
23-09-2012, 08:46
A warm Welcome to the Forum Oglesby know your neck of the woods as I lived in Swansea for 11 years and learnt my trade not a million miles from you whilst listening to the Male Voice Choir in the evenings in Morriston :D

peter schofield
23-09-2012, 19:38
Hi David,

Just an update for your information HMS Encounter was in fact adopted during warship week in Feb 1942. The town of Neath in South Wales adopted her, and formed a sea cadet unit which bears her name at the same time. As the current Commanding Officer of Training Ship Encounter, I am proud to be the current keeper of the HMS Encounter ships affiliation plaques.

Kind regards
Simon

Hi Simon, is it possible for you to post pictures of the adoption plaques, I assume you hold the plaque present by the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty and also the plaque presented to the ship by the people of Neath. The local papers for Feb 1942 will provide you with information of the Week itself normally held on micro-film in the local library or record office, the reports of the plaque presentations will appear some time after your Warship Week
Regards
Peter

peter schofield
26-09-2012, 11:52
This letter was recently posted on Flickr with a picture of the plaque presented by the people of Loftus, North Yorkshire (referred to in the letter) and the Admiralty adoption plaque. Loftus held their Warship Week between 29 Dec and 6 Dec 1941. No doubt the rest of the flotilla plaques were returned to their adopted towns.

Coastal Force Base
Maddalena
Sardinia
6 December 1944

Dear Sirs
I am returning herewith the plaque of HM MTB 57 which was adopted by your council during your Warship Week during December 1941.

This craft did valuable work in the Mediterranean during those days when British Naval resources on this Station were stretched to the utmost.

As can be imagined the wear and tear of such fast light craft is heavy and she and the other MTBs of her flotilla had later to be paid off.

I feel your council may accordingly be glad to preserve this token which represents a part of the Loftus war effort

Yours faithfully
K. C. K??????
Lieutenant Commander RNVR
C. F. Base

The Chairman
Loftus Urban District Council
Loftus
c/o General Post Office

peter schofield
26-09-2012, 15:56
The town of Ripley, Derbyshire adopted the Algerine Class Minesweeper HMS Rattler during their Warship Week of 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942.

HMS Rattler was commissioned on 22 April 1943 and renamed HMS Loyalty in June 1943

On 22 August 1944, U-480 torpedoed and sank HMS Loyalty (Lt.Cdr. James Edward Maltby, RNR) in the English Channel

peter schofield
01-11-2012, 12:07
Newcastle Emlyn, Carmarthen Warship Week – 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942 – Adopted the Dance Class Trawler HMS Quadrille, Objective (Target) £70,000

Carmarthen Journal, 23 Jan 1942 – Newcastle Emlyn Notes
Spur for Warship Week – The War Weapons Week held in the county last year was a great success. A Warship Week is now being organised and with a combined effort it is hoped that the magnificent results of the last appeal will be exceeded. Newcastle Emlyn contributed handsomely to the War Weapons appeal, and it is stated they are equally enthusiastic over this effort. It is hoped to organise a concert in the near future to commence the fund.
Residence grievance: Voluntary contributions were appealed for during War Weapons Week and apparently the inhabitants were generous in their response. What they are still pressing for is the publishing of a subscribers list. No one appears to know has been contributed or subscribed.

Carmarthen and RD - HMS Penylan, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer – 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Amman Valley – HMS Holderness, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer – 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942

Information kindly supplied by Raymond Jones

peter schofield
19-11-2012, 09:44
HMS Wellington a Grimsby-class sloop, launched Devonport, 1934 was adopted by the town of Wellington, Somerset after their Warship Week sometime during March 1942. During World War Two she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, Temple Pier on the River Thames London as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the Company to have a Livery Hall. Up to the outbreak of war various proposals were examined including the purchase of the sailing ship Archibald Russell. After the war, it became apparent that the possibility of building a Hall in the City of London was very remote. In 1947 HMS Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The Company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating Livery Hall, an appropriate home for a Company of seafarers.

peter schofield
08-12-2012, 13:01
THE WAR SAVINGS COMMITTEE and GILLINGHAM’S WARSHIP – HMS PINE
In the Town Hall there is a plaque on the wall presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to the people of Gillingham, Dorset to mark the achievement of raising funds to pay for a ship for the war effort. On Thursday 10 April 1941 the inaugural meeting of the Gillingham and District National Savings Local Committee under the Chairmanship of Air Vice-Marshall Sir Alfred Iredell, KBE, CB, was held at Plank House. The object was to bring together Savings Groups within the town and surrounding parishes and to bolster enthusiasm to put as much as possible into National Savings for the good of the Nation. In October a meeting was held at the Phoenix Hotel and representatives of local organisations were invited to discuss the question of holding a "Warship Week". It was agreed that this should take place from 15-22 November 1941 and a target of £62,000 adopted, the cost of a Trawler Minesweeper. The week's efforts were announced at a meeting on 18 December and the total, as sent to the Regional Savings Office on 25 November was £110,654 being equivalent to £11.10.8d per head of population of the district (9,595). Late additions were received making a final total of £112,805. It was decided to send £850 ‘as a free gift to the Chancellor of the Exchequer’ and £50 was held in reserve for the next effort. At the January meeting the committee were invited to adopt a ship, which was already in service, named HMS Pine.

CYLLA
08-12-2012, 13:20
Hi Peter Schofield,
It amazing the amount of history you have found on this thread ,the town FORUM where i live ,were asking about OSIRIS the other month , [which i started this thread by]and i believe they found us {W.N.S.F} on the internet .
So i must say , all your hard work ,is not done for nothing , it has helped heaps of people in the history of there town /village .Keep up the good work BZ


cylla

peter schofield
08-12-2012, 13:58
Hi Peter Schofield,
It amazing the amount of history you have found on this thread ,the town FORUM where i live ,were asking about OSIRIS the other month , [which i started this thread by]and i believe they found us {W.N.S.F} on the internet .
So i must say , all your hard work ,is not done for nothing , it has helped heaps of people in the history of there town /village .Keep up the good work BZ


cylla

This is odd as I wrote to Ilkley History Society regarding the plaque for Osiris their adopted submarine and told them that their adoption plaque was held by the RN Submarine Museum and the museum would be willing to loan it out long term, the museum would then check on its condition and whereabouts once a year. I can't remember getting a reply. They need to contact the Keeper of Artefacts at the museum who is only in her office three days a week. Let me know if you want more info as I have her name somewhere. I have a picture of the plaque which is a black shield with the submarines crest.

Recently I had a phone call from Newcastle Emelyn in South Wales which adopted HMS Quadrille. They found the plaque in the town hall and it is now on display in their museum. Last week they put on a display of their Week for their local festival and the display proved popular with many questions asked.

I have just found the wherebouts of Ulverstons plaque for HMS Violet and the town clerk is getting it out of storage in the Heritage Centre to be displayed in the Town Hall once more.

I have basically a full listing of Warship Weeks so if anyone one has a question fire away. The intention from the first was to get people interested in their Weeks and hopefully get some feed back. Seems to be working albeit slowly.

Let me know how Ilkley get on.

Thanks for the positive vibes

Peter

CYLLA
08-12-2012, 14:12
Hi Pete ,
I am not a member of there forum , i just luke over it ,i have enough on my plate with being on a few other service websites :), Having retired after having a business in Ilkley for a good number of years ,i do know a good number of people , so i will ask about .

cylla

peter schofield
08-12-2012, 14:50
Hi Pete ,
I am not a member of there forum , i just luke over it ,i have enough on my plate with being on a few other service websites :), Having retired after having a business in Ilkley for a good number of years ,i do know a good number of people , so i will ask about .

cylla

Difficult, it is a case of getting hold of someone who is interested in getting the plaque back - council, RNA, Legion, Local History Society, Sea Cadets, any submariners etc. Maybe worth talking to the local press, if you need any help writing an article am sure I can provide something. Getting the plaque back is good PR for the town and newsworthy. PM me if you want any help or advice.

Peter

peter schofield
09-12-2012, 11:07
Adapted from Bilston's tremendous response to National Savings Warship Week by Nick Harrison
Raising money to help the war effort was a common occurrence during the Second World War for many communities in the Black Country. In Feb 1941 the Mayor of Bilston called on all those who lived and worked in the town for a special effort during National Savings ‘Warship Week’, with magnificent results. Reg Aston from Wombourne sent the following story as a direct result of our recently published serial about Wilfred Turton's career in the navy: Wilfred Turton's story reminded many in Bilston of the town's association with the Halcyon Class minesweeper HMS Salamander during the war. "When Mr J. T. Perks became Mayor Elect of Bilston Borough Council he expressed the hope that he would be Bilston's 'Victory Mayor', and the bells of peace would ring loud and proud during his year in office. The peace bells may not have rung for him, but there was certainly a lot of pride felt by the people of Bilston at the time. He became a local politician in 1921 when served on the old U.D.C. but was forced to retire due to business commitments, in particular with the company he ran in partnership with his brother-in-law, Ernest Gould, called Perks and Gould Ltd., Builders. But the lure of serving his town on the political stage was too strong and he was elected a member of the first Borough Council in 1933. He became well known for his work with the Bilston Horticultural Society and the development of Hickman Park, but his most notable achievement came during his time as Mayor. Official notification was received in December 1940 that a ‘Warship Week’ was to be held from 21-28 Feb 1942. The idea was that upon raising a sum of money equivalent to the cost of one of HM ships, the Admiralty would present to the local authority a replica of the ship's badge, and the people of Bilston were ready for the challenge. Bilston's target was to raise £136,000 in loans to the government, and in return they would be allotted HMS Salamander. The Mayor led the appeal by contacting individuals, groups and local industrialists requesting that money should be invested in government securities. The Borough of Bilston's Civil Defence announced that the event, to be launched on Saturday afternoon 21 Feb, would begin with a parade in Hickman Park where the assembled crowds would be addressed by Commander Anthony Kimmins RN. There was also to be a procession round the borough under the command of Lt. Col. Pitkeathley M.C. commanding the 34th Battalion South Staffs. Home Guard, together with several fire service and military machines, John Thompson's band, the police, British Legion, W.F.S., St. John's Ambulance, and contingents from the A.T.S., sea cadets, W.V.S., Girl Guides, Boy Scouts, and both the Girls and Boys Brigades. It was a grand event to match the importance of the appeal. The response from all Bilstonians during the week was terrific, with an encouraging start made from the outset when Col. S. J. Thompson of the John Thompson Engineering Co. pledged the largest amount, £15,000. But all kinds of people and groups chipped in: £2. 6s .0d was collected by the children of Ettingshall Council School; a donation of 12s 6d came from Mrs L. V. Fellows, a florist in High Street, Bilston; the girls of the press department at Bradley's, Mount Pleasant, collected £1.10.0d; and there was keen competition between local schools who raised £10,000 in total, St. Martin's School, Bradley, leading the way with £1,553.8.6d. By the end of Warship Week the people of Bilston had met and exceeded their expectations by reaching a grand total of £137,242.10s. 7p. Within a short space of time congratulatory letters were received at the Town Hall and local schools from Lt. W.R. Muttram the Commanding Officer of Salamander, "to all the school children of Bilston, Staffs. I have received from His Worship the Mayor of Bilston an account of the magnificent contribution the schools have made towards the Town's Warship's Week total. May I, on my own behalf and on behalf of my ship's company offer my heartiest congratulations to all the schools, and especially St. Martin's, Bradley; Stonefield Senior Girls' School; and Loxdale School on the wonderful results they achieved. I hope one day to be able to come to Bilston and convey these sentiments personally. "Mayor Perks' hope for the war to end during the time of his office may not have been fulfilled, but the success of Warship Week helped sustain the morale of everyone in Bilston for a long while afterwards. Salamnder was laid down in April 1935 and launched on 24 May 1936. Pre-war commitments involved salvage duty during the search for the submarine Thetis. In April 1940 she joined the 4th Minesweeper Flotilla and took part in an operation off the coast of Holland. She was one of the ships employed in the evacuation of the BEF on the beaches at Dunkirk, and from the 26 May to 11 June rescued a total of 1,100 troops. The ship suffered damage through air attacks which severely affected the engine room, but managed to limp home to Dover with her cargo of soldiers. Following coastal patrol duty HMS Salamander spent most of 1942 escorting Russian convoys. Then following a refit sailed to Gibraltar to escort a convoy of landing craft. She also played a role during the Normandy Landings in June 1944. On 27 August 1944 Salamander was attacked in error by a British Typhoon aircraft whilst working off the coast of France near Le Havre, an attack which left eleven men injured, some seriously. She was severely damaged when the rockets destroyed her entire stern, and fire broke out in the minesweeper stores, but some efficient work by the crew saved the day and the Captain did not have to abandon ship. She was eventually towed to safety but adjudged to be beyond economical repair and finally scrapped in May 1947.

peter schofield
12-12-2012, 17:42
The following appeared on the Peterboroughtoday website:

Peterborough raised £410,000 for the adoption of HMS Olympus during Warship Week held from 29 November to 6 December 1941

Mayor H.J. Farrow wrote to the people in a programme produced for the effort, urging them to contribute to “the most memorable week in the history of the glorious city.” He said “We have set ourselves an enormous task in raising £425,000 for the Olympus, the very name inspires confidence which will require the united effort of a united people to achieve but I am convinced that if everyone does his part it can be done. We shall have to lend even to the point of sacrifice. “It is not necessary to remind ourselves of the magnificent work of the Royal Navy. We owe them an infinitely larger debt than we can ever hope to repay. “We are determined to fight to the bitter end rather than see this beloved country overrun by the enemy, and with the united help of our allies and the United States of America we shall crush this evil thing from the face of the Earth.”
The programme for the week started with a procession from the Town Hall at 2 p.m. on Thursday, November 27 (Sat 29? Warship Weeks were held Sat to Sat) led by the Home Guard band. The Marquis of Exeter, the Lord Bishop of Peterborough and Admiral Sir William E Goodenough marched alongside the City of Peterborough Home Battalion Guard and members of the Soke of Peterborough Savings Committee. At 3.15 p.m. the procession returned to the Market Place, where Councillor Farrow officially declared the week open and purchased the first National Savings Certificate.
On the second day a march by the 70th Leicester’s started and finished at St Peter’s College. A display of captured enemy weapons in Market Place no doubt boosted morale (and savings), as did displays from the Searchlight Unit, the National Fire Service Units, and the Civil Defence Services. Local businesses threw their weight behind the scheme; Hoyles of Westgate proclaimed“thanks to the Navy” it could still offer a fine selection of the latest autumn fashions, Harris Tweed proving the material of choice. “Dive deep into your pocket for the submarine,” urged Westgate men’s outfitter Harry N Nobbs, while Watkins and Stafford hoped that buying war bonds would make Hitler feel sorry for himself. A.M. Graham chemists hoped that people would follow their lead to dispense with Hitler, while the Peterborough and District Co-operative Society based at Park Road proudly proclaimed that it had lent £25,000. Those supporting the scheme could visit the selling centres at 10a Church Street, Kings School and the Peterborough Trustee Savings Bank in Long Causeway, tying in their sortie with a glimpse of the admiralty exhibition, and the mobile cinema screening naval shows several times a day.
The week concluded with another march by the Leicester on 6 December (Sat), before the mayor took the salute. The £425,000 target was not quite reached, but was enough to adopt Olympus. Tragically the vessel served for six months before it was sunk. An adoption plaque marks the achievement of the city at Peterborough Town Hall as part of Peterborough Museum’s collection. This also includes a roll of honour for the crew, 12 copies of photos given by the RN Submarine Museum, Gosport, a map of Malta showing the site where the submarine sank, press cuttings and ten related display panels from a previous display about the submarine.

Additional information
The adoption plaque was originally at the RN Submarine Museum. Lost May 1942, adopted P512 ex US R-1 Class (USS R17). It is also believed that the final total raised was £523,477. the £425,000 would be for the complete vessel and a much lower sum for the cost of the hull was easily passed so they would have adopted the submarine without any problems.

peter schofield
14-12-2012, 18:09
The inscription on Abergele’s Warship Week adoption plaque is interesting and states: Presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Abergele Urban District Council to Commemorate the Adoption of HMS Hollyhock and HMS Derg.

The date of the Warship Week was from 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942 and this was for HMS Hollyhock (launched Aug 1940). A month after Warship Week Hollyhock was lost off Ceylon (Sri Lanka), in an attack by aircraft from the Japanese aircraft carrier Soryu with the loss of 53 lives (Apr 1942). HMS Derg (launched Jan 1943) was then adopted as a replacement vessel, however it is not known if further fund raising through National Savings was carried out, but this was the norm. The adoption plaques were presented to the council some time after Warship Week and clearly the loss of Hollyhock directly after their Week and the adoption of the replacement vessel within this time frame allowed them to have both names on the adoption plaque. My interpretation is therefore that the original ship adopted was HMS Hollyhock and following her loss HMS Derg was then adopted, not that two ships were adopted in the same Warship Week.

peter schofield
15-12-2012, 14:43
HMS Kittiwake adopted by Bridlington during Warship Week in October 1941
HMS Delhi adopted by Sunderland following a Warship Week in February 1942
HMS Abercrombie adopted by County of Angus in 1942

There appears to be confusion over Bridlingtons adopted ship as the following articles show:

Mike and Dianne - Free Spirit Writers:
Bridlington residents first heard of a vessel being named after their town in an announcement in the Bridlington Chronicle of 28 July 1939. A small paragraph read: “Amongst the names which have been approved for certain ships of Britain’s 1939 naval construction programme figures that of HMS Bridlington.” She was to be a Bangor Class Minesweeper.

Bridlington Free Press, 2 November 1940: “at the Town Council meeting on Wednesday night it was announced by Alderman H. Harker that intimation had been received that one of His Majesty’s ships had been named HMS Bridlington.” The piece added that “when happier days came along it was hoped that the ship would visit Bridlington Bay.” In February 1941 the paper said that HMS Bridlington had thanked the local WRVS for a parcel of woollens sent for the sixty men on board.

October 1941 saw Bridlington’s Warship Week, in which HMS Kittiwake was adopted by the town. It was hoped to raise sufficient money during that week to buy a ship in Bridlington’s case, HMS Kittiwake with a target of £100,000.

At the end of the year, the local papers declared that £12 per head of population had been raised by Warship Week, providing a total of £293,762. Plans to adopt the Kittiwake were changed and the town was able to adopt HMS Bridlington. The Admiralty said they would provide plaques from HMS Bridlington, which would be given to the Corporation.

The Chronicle said during its coverage of this event: “HMS Bridlington is the one selected as suitable for the town whose name it bears. She is a super minesweeper, and though not a fighting ship she fills a vital role in winning the war, by helping to keep the seas clear of the infernal devices which are sown in the waters surrounding our island to prevent the mercantile marine fulfilling their lawful occupations, and the important mission with which they are entrusted in seeing to it that the inhabitants of this land are not deprived of the necessaries of life which is one of the principal aims of our enemy.” By September 1942, the adoption of the vessel was completed, when an exchange of plaques took place between the ship and the Corporation and Rural District of Bridlington.

The captain of HMS Bridlington sent a message: “It has been a big disappointment not being able to bring the ship, and not even to be present myself at your ceremony that day, but pressure of work is too great to allow us of even a day off.”

Throughout the war the newspapers told of packages being sent to the vessel and thanks were returned

Yorkshire Film Achives holds a film recording the events of the 'Warship Week' fundraising appeal held in Bridlington in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Title – Bridlington launches a warship week.
Our target is £136,000.
To pay for H.M.S. ‘Bridlington’.

‘Warship week begins November 29. Lend to build H.M Minesweeper, Bridlington’.
Sat - Armed forces day 29 November
Civil Defence Day 30 November
Navy Day 1 December
Fire Service Day, 2 December
Traders Day 4 December
Schools Day Visit of the Princess Royal
Rural District Day

A wide shot captures the totals board in full detail: a caption at the bottom of the board reads, ‘Bridlington help to blast the Boche’, with the total at ‘£270,000. Sweeping shots capture the amounts made on each day of the week, with a close up showing the final, overall amount of ‘£293,762’.

In truth one Warship Week was held from 29 Nov to 6 Dec 1941 and the ship adopted was HMS Bridlington. HMS Kittiwake was probably changed before the Week to HMS Bridlington, the one thing in common is the total raised for the Week.

peter schofield
16-12-2012, 11:12
HMS Unison (P43) - Warship Week March 1942

The Ashby-de-la-Zouch Museum holds two Admiralty Type (fouled anchor)adoptions plaques for the submarine HMS Unison (P43). The submarine was adopted by both the Urban and Rural Districts therefore the reason for two plaques. This is unusual and the first time I have come across it but am sure there will be other eaxmples.

The plaques are engraved with HMS P43 and Unison does not appear, the name was probably given to the vessel at a later date but need to check

culverin
16-12-2012, 13:17
Peter and your #116 above.

P.43 was from the second 1940 U class order.
The numbering of these 22 1940 boats together with some subsequent renamings and transfers, all from Vickers Barrow, is complex. I shall avoid all the details here as it is not relevent to this thread.

P.43 was ordered 23 Aug 1940 and launched as such, 5 Nov 1941. She completed 19 Feb 1942 and had just been allocated her new name, Unison.
Her active RN service was as Unison until her transfer to Russia as their B.3 in 1944.

peter schofield
16-12-2012, 19:30
Peter and your #116 above.

P.43 was from the second 1940 U class order.
The numbering of these 22 1940 boats together with some subsequent renamings and transfers, all from Vickers Barrow, is complex. I shall avoid all the details here as it is not relevent to this thread.

P.43 was ordered 23 Aug 1940 and launched as such, 5 Nov 1941. She completed 19 Feb 1942 and had just been allocated her new name, Unison.
Her active RN service was as Unison until her transfer to Russia as their B.3 in 1944.

They would have adopted her as P43, although the plaques would have been presented some time in 1942. I will check with the Vickers launch book to get further details. The local papers at the time often just said they were adopting a submarine with the target. The name or number in this case was provided by the Admiralty after the target was raised i.e. after the Warship Week. The plaques were originally with the Submarine Museum but I sent an email to Ashby-de-la-Zouch council telling them where their adoption plaque was. I only found out by accident today that the plaques have been returned to the town recently. Sent a similar email to Coalville which is just down the road as they adopted the submarine HMS Taurus, still awaiting to hear if they have got their plaque back from the RN Submarine Museum.

peter schofield
25-12-2012, 10:32
In 1942 Unbeaten had been adopted by the town of Hove, Sussex. In March, Hove Borough Council organised ‘Warship Week’ commencing 14 March, a campaign to raise funds for their adopted submarine. The First Lord of the Admiralty officially opened a week of events which included parades, dances, a church service and a ball. The target of £425,000 was reached within a week and the total raised was £521,000, an amount equivalent to £10 per head of population in the town. Shortly after their return to England, Lieutenant Commander Woodward, accompanied by some of the officers and ratings from Unbeaten, were entertained to lunch at Hove by the Mayor, Councillor A H Clarke. Godfrey Place (later Godfrey Place, V.C.) attended this lunch, sitting next to his Commanding Officer. The Jolly Roger from Unbeaten was presented to the Mayor on this occasion; unfortunately it was later lost when Hove Town Hall was bombed during an air raid.

When Unbeaten was lost in Nov 1942 (sunk by the RAF), Hove adopted the submarine HMS Simoom. A year later Simoom was lost but it is not know if a third vessel was adopted.

peter schofield
25-12-2012, 20:19
East Kesteven and Sleaford, Lincolnshire adopted HMS Sheldrake (Kingfisher Class Corvette) during Warship Week, 1942 when £134,000 was raised. A party from the ship visited Sleaford at this time. There was a model of the ship in a glass case, (later used as a battering ram for a break-in at the Council Offices which since has been fully restored by the local branch of the RNA). The Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty presented the town with the ships crest (adoption plaque) and both items are still in the possession of the Town Council.

peter schofield
26-12-2012, 10:33
22-29 January 1942 - Penzance Adopts HMS Foresight during Warship Week
Penzance raised sufficient to pay for the hull of the destroyer HMS Witch. However, it transpired that Northwich, Cheshire was to adopt HMS Witch (Mar 1942) as its commander had associations with the town. Penzance adopted the destroyer HMS Foresight. A plaque was struck to present to the ship. Lord Kindersley thanked the citizens of Penzance for their efforts during Warship Week and for the result achieved, saying their success would provide yet another link in the chain between Penzance district and the Royal Navy. On 20 August 1942 ‘The Cornishman’ reported HMS Foresight sunk (Operation Pedestal to Malta).

peter schofield
01-01-2013, 19:43
The following is taken from a Warship Week Leaflet:

Conway and District Warship Week – November 15-22, 1941, £55,000 – A Corvette

During the above week we shall aim at raising, through all kinds of War Savings Investments at least £55,000 a sum equivalent to the cost of building a CORVETTE
To commemorate this achievement, the borough will adopt HMS Erica and will be presented with a replica of the Ship’s badge.
The NAVY’S task is gigantic – It keeps the enemy from these shores, it keeps open the lines of communication, it makes it possible for us to have our daily bread and it harasses the enemy on every occasion. Wonderful at all times, the Navy is putting up the most wonderful fight in history. In the last war it took FIVE Navies to do the work on which alone it is now engaged.
Our Navy is YOUR DEFENCE – and it is always ready to take the OFFENSIVE – in its task to of ridding the world of a terrible menace.
NELSON’S signal at Trafalgar is more compelling today than it ever was – and wider in its application.
We expect every man, woman and child to do their duty.

HELP TO DEFEND YOUR COUNTRY AND HELP YOUR ALLIES – INVEST IN

1. 3% SAVINGS BONDS
2. 3% DEFENCE BONDS
3. WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES
4. DEPOSITS IN POST OFFICE SAVINGS BANK SAVINGS STAMPS also count

LEND ALL YOU CAN TO WIN THE WAR DON’T LET THE NAVY DOWN

The rear of the leaflet states as follows:

To VISITORS AND TEMPORARY RESIDENTS
Please do not fail to read the appeal on the other side
These additional words are addressed to you. You may be seeking rest and health in our beautiful and historic district, or you may be engaged in some form of National Service. Whatever the reason for your sojourn here, we welcome you. And we believe you will wish to share citizenship with us by helping make Warship Week in Conway an outstanding success.

Forge with us here links in the chain of VICTORY!

It is worth pointing out the £55,000 was the target for the hull and would thus allow Conway to adopt the Flower Class Corvette, the target for the fully fitted vessel was £120,000. The Admiralty had also provided them with a vessel name before the Week, however this was an early Warship Week when not many Weeks were taking place so there would have been plenty of vessel names, the scramble for names came later when most of Weeks were held in late Feb and throughout Mar 1942.
There is also no mention of deposits in the Post Office and Trustee Savings Banks
The final figure is not known. HMS Erica was lost on 23 Feb 1943, there would most likely have been further savings and investments to adopt a replacement vessel but which vessel is not known.
The reference to visitors is interesting as no doubt they would have their own Warship Weeks to contribute to. In a way this did not matter as long as they were buying savings securities they were investing in the war effort and helping to prevent inflation. The savings committees were not averse to contacting expats living in other parts of the country to support their Warship Week.
This is partly a patriotic appeal but at the same time points out the duties of the RN and that the way from defence to offence is to have enough ships to win through to victory. It is therefore everyone’s duty to save all they can

peter schofield
04-01-2013, 08:58
Navy News, July 2012 – Barry Seeks Vanessa
Barry is the borough south-west of Cardiff and Vanessa is a V Class Destroyer. The ship was adopted by Barry during Warship Week, Dec 1941 when £214,000 was raised. In recognition of the effort a plaque was presented to the borough, but the whereabouts is unknown. Indeed it seems the only known tribute to the town is a small display in the Liberal Club in Thomson St. But Keith Greenway believes there should be more done to remind later generations of HMS Vanessa’s exploits. Keith says the plaque belongs in a heritage centre or museum, but that local historians aiming to recover other artefact, they simply wish to acknowledge them and record their location. It was suggested that the missing plaque was handed on to a reservist unit HMS Cambria after the mid - 1990’s, but once again the trail goes cold. ‘Can a town so easily forget her own part played in history, or seemingly just not care ‘ he asked If anyone knows of any artefacts related to the adoption of Vanessa by Barry, please contact Keith at kgmaritime.research@googlemail.com

Navy News, August 2012 – Scimitar Steams In
Pershore branch managed to squeeze a destroyer onto the back of a truck and haul it through the streets of the Worcestershire town. The shipmates’ HMS Scimitar was not the original; that was scrapped in 1947. But their ersatz Admiralty S-Class Destroyer was a reminder of the townspeople during the war when they raised £200,000 during Warship Week, 15-22 Nov 1941. As a reward Pershore was affiliated (adopted) with the World War 1 veteran destroyer HMS Scimitar which sank a U-boat and was part of the D-Day preparations. The branch’s HMS Scimitar built by Andy Burge and commanded by branch secretary S/M Trudy Burge steamed through the Pershore Jubilee Carnival manned by shipmates and sea cadets from TS Scimitar. Their efforts were rewarded with a ‘Highly Commended’ from the judges and the Association profile was boosted with the distribution of 500 promotional RNA sailors’ hats to onlookers.

peter schofield
04-01-2013, 12:06
Norwich Warship Week, 31 Jan to 7 Feb, 1942
Message from Robert Kindersley President of the National Savings Movement

I welcome the opportunity of sending a message to the citizens of Norwich on the launching of their Warship Week. You are proud of your historic city and you are proud of the British Navy. In this great effort you have a wonderful opportunity of providing a permanent link between your city and the Navy by the adoption of the cruiser HMS Norfolk.

You have set yourself the task of raising £1,000,000 and I am confident that Norwich will far exceed this objective. The results of the week’s effort will be the measure of the self sacrifice that you are prepared to make for victory and peace. I therefore appeal to all to play their part to the full, and wish you God speed in your effort.

peter schofield
08-01-2013, 10:35
Navy News, July 2012 – Barry Seeks Vanessa
Barry is the borough south-west of Cardiff and Vanessa is a V Class Destroyer. The ship was adopted by Barry during Warship Week, Dec 1941 when £214,000 was raised. In recognition of the effort a plaque was presented to the borough, but the whereabouts is unknown. Indeed it seems the only known tribute to the town is a small display in the Liberal Club in Thomson St. But Keith Greenway believes there should be more done to remind later generations of HMS Vanessa’s exploits. Keith says the plaque belongs in a heritage centre or museum, but that local historians aiming to recover other artefact, they simply wish to acknowledge them and record their location. It was suggested that the missing plaque was handed on to a reservist unit HMS Cambria after the mid - 1990’s, but once again the trail goes cold. ‘Can a town so easily forget her own part played in history, or seemingly just not care ‘ he asked If anyone knows of any artefacts related to the adoption of Vanessa by Barry, please contact Keith at kgmaritime.research@googlemail.com

Navy News, August 2012 – Scimitar Steams In
Pershore branch managed to squeeze a destroyer onto the back of a truck and haul it through the streets of the Worcestershire town. The shipmates’ HMS Scimitar was not the original; that was scrapped in 1947. But their ersatz Admiralty S-Class Destroyer was a reminder of the townspeople during the war when they raised £200,000 during Warship Week, 15-22 Nov 1941. As a reward Pershore was affiliated (adopted) with the World War 1 veteran destroyer HMS Scimitar which sank a U-boat and was part of the D-Day preparations. The branch’s HMS Scimitar built by Andy Burge and commanded by branch secretary S/M Trudy Burge steamed through the Pershore Jubilee Carnival manned by shipmates and sea cadets from TS Scimitar. Their efforts were rewarded with a ‘Highly Commended’ from the judges and the Association profile was boosted with the distribution of 500 promotional RNA sailors’ hats to onlookers.

Bit more on Pershore - April 2012
Pershore Revives Link with Scimitar

Historic links between a Worcestershire town and the RN warship have been revived with the affiliation of a new Sea Cadet unit, TS Scimitar. The name was chosen because the Old S Class Destroyer HMS Scimitar was adopted by Pershore during their Warship Week. Among the fund raising initiatives were:
• The Plaza cinema donating three evenings’ takings from the film ‘Target for Tonight’ shown together with a stage programme by local music hall performers.
• Two pigs were donated as prizes in a bowling competition at the Pershore Bowling Club
• The General Manager of Pershore Cooperative Fruit Market found a 16in marrow which roughly resembled a duck. Naming it Cuthbert, the resourceful official put the marrow, worth about 3d up for auction and attracted a bid of almost £3,098
• A flag was auctioned at the market raising £371

Other events included: whist drives, dances, sales, competitions, entertainments, fire brigade and ambulance demonstrations and a big rally by the Croome Hunt Pony Club.

For Warship Week launch day the main streets were decked with flags and bunting, while shop windows were filled with colourful displays. Thousands of people lined the streets for the opening ceremony in Broad Street led by Lt. Col WH Taylor (Chairman of Pershore Rural District Council) and Commander of the Evesham-Area Home Guard. A Grand Parade marched from the Co-operative Fruit Market in Defford Road up through the High Street and was headed by the bands of the Worcestershire Regiment and the Royal Marines. The parade was made up of detachments of many organisations including the Liverpool Scottish, colourfully clad in kilts. The salute was taken by Captain Spencer-Cooper RN and prominently displayed in the town was a 30ft long wooden model of a ship, labelled The Pershore Corvette.

Raised £16 per head at a time when weekly wage averaged £3. The £16 was probably made up of large and small investors/savers, the small savers would have been a smaller figure

TheFormerChief
08-01-2013, 13:24
Ely, Cambridgeshire adopted HMS Walpole, and there's a display on the ship in the town museum.

These are a few notes I made during a visit to the museum in October:

"HMS Walpole Display – A W Class Destroyer, built under the 1916-17 Programme in the 10th Destroyer order. HMS Walpole was assigned to the 13th Destroyer Flotilla in the Grand Fleet after completion, and served until almost the end of the Second World War. Her role was mostly convoy escort duties, but she took part in two combined arms operations (Operations Amsterdam and Jubilee) and the D-day landings (Operation Neptune). She hit a mine on 6 January 1945 and was subsequently declared a Constructive Total Loss and broken up in Grays, Essex in March 1945. The ship was adopted by the town of Ely in 1942."

From memory, the display is the adoption plaque and a painting of the ship; I'll have to look at the image I took and see what else there is. More to be added later!

:)

peter schofield
08-01-2013, 14:04
Ely, Cambridgeshire adopted HMS Walpole, and there's a display on the ship in the town museum.

These are a few notes I made during a visit to the museum in October:

"HMS Walpole Display – A W Class Destroyer, built under the 1916-17 Programme in the 10th Destroyer order. HMS Walpole was assigned to the 13th Destroyer Flotilla in the Grand Fleet after completion, and served until almost the end of the Second World War. Her role was mostly convoy escort duties, but she took part in two combined arms operations (Operations Amsterdam and Jubilee) and the D-day landings (Operation Neptune). She hit a mine on 6 January 1945 and was subsequently declared a Constructive Total Loss and broken up in Grays, Essex in March 1945. The ship was adopted by the town of Ely in 1942."

From memory, the display is the adoption plaque and a painting of the ship; I'll have to look at the image I took and see what else there is. More to be added later!

:)

Ely MB and RD adopted the destroyer sometime in March 1942.

TheFormerChief
08-01-2013, 17:13
The display in Ely Museum is made up of the following:

The Ship's Bell;
The Presentation Plaque;
A picture with an explanation of what it was all about (I've used some of the words in my previous post).

:)

peter schofield
10-01-2013, 20:48
Getting Closer to the Truth

Warship Weeks were held under the pretext of forging new and closer links between the people and the ships of the Fleet. In fact these weeks like War Weapons Weeks before them were held to boost savings. These weeks it was hoped would not only raise large amounts of money by concentrated effort but have a more permanent effect of forming habits of thrift and minor self-denial. Additionally they were intended to attract new and enthusiastic voluntary workers to strengthen the local savings machinery. One of their great values was that they attracted marginal savers the so called inflationary potential the type who only saved when a physical object prompted by propaganda stirred their emotional and patriotic feelings. Unless more marginal savers could be converted to regular savers then a succession of localized savings weeks would be needed at shorter intervals and for longer periods. It was of course far more difficult to inspire regular habits of saving than to try and catch up periodically with the growth of the inflationary potential but there was no doubt that this was one of the Savings Committee’s principal tasks and therefore a great and lasting value of these weeks. The general pattern however was for savings to increase during these special campaigns and fall away after.

Regarding savings figures there was no reason that the sum of £12 million (normal saving) per week from small securities postulated by Robert Kindersley should not be achieved, a figure coincidently calculated for in the 1941-42 budget. Further it was believed the surplus of possessors of large and institutional incomes was not being fully tapped and the £20 million a week asked for could be easily found. On 21 August 1941 it was announced that a new autumn savings campaign in the form of Warship Weeks should be able to realize from the small saver £15 million per week (increased from £12 million) over a twenty-four week period or £360 million (for England and Wales).

The aggregate Warship Week target figure for England and Wales has been quoted as £366.5 million an amount proportionally divided between counties. This however is only the small savers contribution, if the £20 million a week expected of the larger and institutional contributors for the twenty-four week period of £480 million is added then the final postulated figure was £840 million. During the twenty-four weeks of the Warship Week campaign an accumulative total of £955,611,589 flowed in as loans to the Exchequer including £545,640,770 realised during all Warship Weeks.

So for a weekly expected total of £35 million from corporate investors and small investors/savers there was an increase in average weekly savings to £39.8 million approximately. Of the £955,611,589 nearly one third £314,713,007 came from small savers made up as follows:

• National Savings Certificates £127,586,591
• 3% Defence Bonds £89,927,145
• POSB and TSB Deposits £97,199,271

Large and institutional savings accounted for approximately two-thirds namely £631,168,635 comprising:
• 2 1/2% War Bonds £317,117,516
• 3% Savings Bonds £314,051,119

The remaining £9,669,947 came from loans free of interest.

The amount realised in England and Wales alone for Warship Weeks with a target figure of £366.5 million was £477.766 million, Scotland raised £58 million and Northern Ireland £10 million (approximately). In the 984 England and Wales committee areas excluding London the total subscriptions during Warship Weeks amounted to approximately £300 million of which £196 million was in large and £104 million in small subscriptions representing £6 7s 6d per head of the population for large savings and £3 7s 1d for small savings. London and its environs had a target of £125 million this was exceeded when £146,065,225 was raised. For propaganda purposes these were impressive figures yet in reality the London target only met the current rate of military expenditure for just under ten-and-a-half days.

The £545,640,770 in terms of vessels as quoted by ‘What Britain Has Done’ was equivalent to the cost of building 5 battleships, 4 aircraft carries, 45 cruisers, 300 destroyers, 160 corvettes, 33 submarines, 267 minesweepers, 124 motor torpedo boats, 177 depot ships, sloops, monitors etc. These figures need further understanding in context with Warship Weeks; they were certainly good for propaganda. The Times also stated that over a thousand ships were included in the chosen targets as eight communities aimed at and reached the cost of a battleship while in the list were four aircraft carriers, 49 cruisers, 301 destroyers, 25 submarines, 288 minesweepers, 164 corvettes with a host of other craft. Again these figures require checking against the actual figures in my databases but they are almost certainly wrong.

The national savings campaign was a constant effort to ensure a steady flow of regular contributions to the national chest as war costs increased and the budget deficit expanded, it was always a game of catch up.

peter schofield
16-01-2013, 10:25
Inverness Burgh and County adopted the submarine HMS Saracen during their Warship Week 16-23 May 1942. Saracen was lost during August 1943 and HMS Thorough was then adopted through further fund raising. The target for Saracen was £400,000 and £568,281 was raised through Government securities by the following areas: Aird District, Inverness District, Badenoch, Kingussie Burgh, Lochaber, Fort William Burgh, Skye, Barra, North Uist, South Uist and Harris. The total raised by the Burgh of Inverness was £215,693 and County total was £352,588.

peter schofield
22-01-2013, 11:14
The Mystery of Merionethshire

The county was to adopt the destroyer HMS Celt ordered 3 Feb 1942 renamed HMS Sword. The RN in 1943 gave the name "Sword" to a ship at Newport News, Virginia, to be delivered as part of lend-lease. Before it was completed the deal was cancelled and the ship delivered to the USN, commissioned in 1944 as USS Rushmore.

Rushmore (LSD-14) was laid down as HMS Sword 31 December 1943 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va; launched as Rushmore 10 May 1944 sponsored by Miss Eleanor Vreelan Blewitt, and commissioned 3 July 1944, Lt. Comdr. E. A. Jansen, USNR, in command.

So the question is which vessel did Merionethshire adopt? I have reference MC/C/8/4-5 Warship Week Correspondence, Minutes etc., 1941-42 (569 X15) which might give reference to this but am unable to visit Kew.

Can anyone shed any light on this????

peter schofield
22-01-2013, 11:34
The Imperial War Museum has a Memorials website where Warship Week adoption plaques can be recorded. I am now assisting on a voluntary basis to add to the site via a contact at the IWM. There are standard things they require such as where they are held, inscription etc. If anyone is interested in assisting, knowing the whereabouts of any plaques, would they please contact me by PM.

peter schofield
22-01-2013, 13:14
JOHN BUCHANAN - ARTIST WITHOUT HANDS

John Buchanan was born in Glasgow in 1908, but soon after his birth his parents moved to the south of England, and it was in a Hampshire village near Portsmouth that most of his early boyhood was spent. Those early years were lived under very difficult conditions. His father served as a soldier in the Boer War, but in that war had had the misfortune to lose a leg. On his return to England he took various jobs as a labourer, working for a time in a Government Air Factory, but things were never easy for him. His physical disability made it more than usually difficult for him to obtain and keep suitable jobs, and there were frequent periods of unemployment.

John was born without hands and was crippled in other ways. He had two imperfectly formed fingers where his left hand should have been, and the right arm finished with a stump at the elbow. Home conditions made it almost impossible for John's parents to give to him the care and attention he needed, and eventually it was suggested by interested friends that he should be taken into the care of the National Children's Home, Chipping Norton. With his severe physical limitations, it had seemed beyond the realm of possibility that John would ever be able to hold a pen or a paint-brush in any effective way; but there was a way, and he speedily found it. He would hold his pen or brush between the stumps of his arms, the two imperfectly formed fingers on the left arm making this possible, and he soon began to produce work that would have been a credit to any ordinary child.

When it became clear that John possessed gifts and aptitudes calling for proper artistic training, he was enrolled as a student at the City of Oxford School of Art, and his progress there was rapid. He took the General Art Course, and it became apparent that his special genius lay in the illumination of literary quotations, with superbly decorated borders. He mastered the art of lettering, showed considerable originality of design and, above all, had a wonderful sense of colour. He loved colour, and rarely failed to find it in the life about him.

When working in his Studio at Highbury, John always set before himself a high standard, and much that he did had on it the stamp of originality. Commissions of all kinds now began to pour in upon him, and in a few short years he became fully self-supporting. He did not work quickly and did not tolerate slipshod work. There were occasions, however, when his output was amazingly high. During the war, the Admiralty were hard put to it to meet their commitments in connection with Warship Weeks. The Board of Admiralty had undertaken to present to each parish which reached its target of National Savings a certificate with the name of the parish, the ship adopted, and the week in which the effort was made, duly engrossed upon it. John Buchanan was eventually given the bulk of the work, and in the result completed over 3,500 certificates in less than twelve months.

John Buchanan’s life was a short one, in the accepted sense, for he died in his forty-fifth year on 12 January, 1953.

Taken from ‘Artist Without Hands’ by Cecil F Walpole former General Secretary of the National Children’s Home.

peter schofield
28-01-2013, 11:22
Dorset Warship Weeks
Beaminster – HMS Fluellen, Shakespeare Class Trawler
Blanford Forum RD and UD – HMS Stour, River Class Frigate
Bridport MB and RD - HMS Worthing, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Dorchester and District – HMS Valentine, V Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Gillingham – HMS Pine, Bay Class Trawler, 15-22 Nov 1941
Lyme Regis – HMS Lyme Regis, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Mar 1942
Portland - Kingston Onyx, Trawler AS
Poole – HMS Poole, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Shaftesbury – HMS Jennet, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Mar 1942
Sherborne RD – HMS Willow, Trawler Minesweeper, 1-8 Nov 1941
Sturminster Newton – L23, L Class Submarine
Swanage, Wareham and District – Cattistock, Type 1 Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Weymouth – HMS Roqual, R Class Submarine, Feb 1942
Wimborne – HMS Challenger, Surveying Vessel

Bournemouth is not included as the town was still in Hampshire before the 1974 county border changes.

Bournemouth - HMS Phoebe, Dido Class Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942

peter schofield
30-01-2013, 13:28
Northamptonshire Warship Weeks
Corby UD, Desborough UD, Rothwell UD, Burton Latimer, Kettering RD – HMS Redpole, Modified Black Swan Class, Mar 1942
Irthlingborough UD and Wellingborough UD – HMS Hydra, Algerine Class Minesweeper, 14 Mar 1942
Kettering MB – HMS Pytchley, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Northampton – HMS Laforey, L Class Destroyer, 25 Oct to 1 Nov 1941, Lost 30 Mar 1944, HMS Walnut adopted
Oundle UD and RD – HMS Nene, River Class Frigate, Mar 1942
Rushden District (Rushden, Higham Ferres and Raunds) – HMS Quorn, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942, Lost 2 Aug 1944 replacement not known
Wellingborough RD – HMS Hound, Algerine Class Minesweeper
Yelvertoft – HMS Cockatrice, Algerine Class Minesweeper

Leicestershire Warship Weeks
Ashby-de-la-Zouch UD and RD – HMS Unison (P43), U Class Submarine, Mar 1942, UD and RD adoption plaques held by Ashby-de-la Zouch Museum
Barrow-on-Soar - HMS Seawolf, S Class Submarine
Billesdon – HMS Lilac, Trawler – Minesweeper
Blaby RD – HMS Blackthorn, Bay Class Trawler
Coalville UD, Hugglescote – Taurus, T Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942
Hinkley – HMS Amazon, A Class Destroyer, Feb 1942
Kegworth UD – HMS Barbican, Boom Defence Vessel, Mar 1942
Leicester – HMS Renown, Battle-cruiser, Feb 1942
Loughborough – HMS Venomous, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, 7-14 Feb 1942
Lutterworth RD – Laurel, Trawler – Minesweeper
Market Bosworth – HMS Larch, Trawler – Minesweeper
Market Harborough – HMS Fernie, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, Feb 1942
Melton Mowbray, HMS Samphire, Flower Class Corvette, Feb 1942
Oadby UD – HMS Sphene, Trawler – AS, 21-28 Mar 1942
Wigston UD – HMS Speedy, Halcyon Class Minesweeper, 21-28 Mar 1942

There may be others???

peter schofield
31-01-2013, 17:23
Warwickshire Warship Weeks
Alcester – HMS Monkshood, Flower Class Corvette, Mar 1942
Atherstone RD - MTB 83, Motor Torpedo Boat 21-28 Mar 1942
Bedworth – HMS Alisma, Flower Class Corvette, 17-24 Jan 1942
Coventry - HMS Coventry, C Type Light Cruiser, 14-21 Feb 1942
Kenilworth - HMS Campanula, Flower Class Corvette
Leamington Spa – HMS Leamington, Town Class Destroyer Type 5, Mar 1942
Meridon RD – HMS Viceroy, Thorneycroft V and W Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Nuneaton – HMS Vanquisher, Admiralty V Class Destroyer, Nov 1941
Rugby UD and RD, HMS Keppel, Shakespeare Class Flotilla Leader, Mar 1942
Solihull – HMS Vivacious, Admiralty V Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942
Southam – HMS Sunrise, Trawler – BDV
Stratford-on-Avon – HMS Fame, F Class Destroyer, 7-14 Feb 1942
Stratford RD North – HMS Verity, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Sutton Coldfield – HMS Wanderer, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, Dec 1942
Warwick – HMS Warwick, Admiralty W Class Destroyer, Mar 1942

Herefordshire Warship Week
Bredwardine and Dore – HM ML 102, Motor Launch, 29 Nov to 6 Dec 1941
Bromyard – HMS Vivien, Admiralty V Class Destroyer
Hereford – HMS Volunteer, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer
Kington – HMS Gentian, Flower Class Corvette
Leominster and Wigmore – HMS Fitzroy, Albury Class Minesweeper, Lost June 43, adopted HMS Arcturus
Ross-on-Wye – HMS Ross, Albury Class Minesweeper
Weobley - HM ML 105, Motor Launch

peter schofield
02-02-2013, 11:42
Dorset Warship Weeks
Beaminster – HMS Fluellen, Shakespeare Class Trawler
Blanford Forum RD and UD – HMS Stour, River Class Frigate
Bridport MB and RD - HMS Worthing, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Dorchester and District – HMS Valentine, V Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Gillingham – HMS Pine, Bay Class Trawler, 15-22 Nov 1941
Lyme Regis – HMS Lyme Regis, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Mar 1942
Portland - Kingston Onyx, Trawler AS
Poole – HMS Poole, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Shaftesbury – HMS Jennet, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Mar 1942
Sherborne RD – HMS Willow, Trawler Minesweeper, 1-8 Nov 1941
Sturminster Newton – L23, L Class Submarine
Swanage, Wareham and District – Cattistock, Type 1 Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Weymouth – HMS Roqual, R Class Submarine, Feb 1942
Wimborne – HMS Challenger, Surveying Vessel

Bournemouth is not included as the town was still in Hampshire before the 1974 county border changes.

Bournemouth - HMS Phoebe, Dido Class Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942

Measuring the Effort – War Savings Vol. 3 No.9
An interesting feature of Dorsetshire’s combined effort to achieve over a period of six months ending December next (1942), a total savings equal to the cost of replacing the cruiser HMS Dorsetshire (lost Apr 42) is the Savings League run in conjunction with it.

In quite a number of cities and towns – in rural areas, industrial concerns, and other places – the Savings League as a means of group membership and savings has proved highly successful. Dorsetshire has, however, blazed the trail by the establishment of a League covering the whole county in connection with a special objective.

Dorsetshire aims at a combined total of £2,750,000 – the replacement cost of her cruiser. Each district has been set an objective of its own; and its position in the League Table is determined by the percentage reached, week by week of the areas target. Bridport which, proudly occupies the top position, was until the end of September, hovering about midway but a special drive took her to top place in one bound.

There, at the moment, Bridport is sitting pretty but with £30,000 odd to get before she can claim to be the first town to reach its target. This combination of County target, District target, Savings League and race is an innovation worth watching.

The booklet ‘Action Stations’ which relates the history of HMS Dorsetshire up to the time of her loss is a magnificent piece of specialised propaganda. Delightfully written and illustrated and sold at the modest price of 6d, it is the work of Mr. John Creasey well known as the author of a number of popular thrillers. Under another nom-de-plume Mr. Creasey has, amongst others, written a book in which the story moves round the activities of an ardent Savings worker, who after many setbacks, succeeds in getting a sticky local notability to tackle war savings in a black spot.

Notes:
HMS Dorsetshire was never replaced
John Creasey also wrote ‘Heroes of the Air’ (6d) in conjunction with Dorset Wings for Victory Weeks, he says that ‘not long ago the National Savings Committee of Dorset united in a drive to replace by war savings the cruiser HMS Dorsetshire. Over £3,000,000 was raised by savings and investments in six months’.
Gillingham, Dorset raised £114,898 as a proportion of the county target

peter schofield
04-02-2013, 14:34
Gloucestershire Warship Weeks
Bristol – HMS Jamaica, Colony Class Cruiser, 22-29 Nov 1941
Cheltenham and District – HMS Legion, L Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 25 Mar 1942, HMS Whitehall adopted. Adoption plaque Cheltenham Town Hall
Cirencester –HMS Uproar, U Class Submarine, 22-29 Nov 1941
Dursley RD – HMS Trident, T Class Submarine, 7-14 Feb 1942
Lydney RD (Forest of Dean) – H32, H Class Submarine
East Dean (Forest of Dean) - H33, H Class Submarine
West Dean (Forest of Dean) - H34, H Class Submarine
Gloucester, Down Hatherley HMS Jaguar, J Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 26 Mar 1942. Adoption Plaque Gloucester Yacht Club
North Cotswold RD, Lower Slaughter and Ebrington PC – HMS Cotswold, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Kingswood, Mangotsfield, Warmley – HMS Protector, Netlayer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Newwent - HMS Rumba, Dance Class Trawler
Northleach RD – HMS Starwort, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Shaftesbury – HMS Jenner, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Mar 1942
Sodbury RD, Filton, HMS Sunfish, S Class Submarine, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942
Stroud and Nailsworth District – HMS Usurper, U Class Submarine, Plaque to submarine RN Museum
Thornbury – HMS Severn, Severn Class Submarine
Tetbury – MTN 345, Motor Torpedo Boat


At Long Eaton, Derbyshire they used as a target the clothing and feeding of the ship’s company of HMS Atherstone (Type I Hunt Class Destroyer). This meant an increase of savings of 20 per cent on the previous six months total. Warship Week Mar 1942.

Now out of office until 19 Mar

ap1
15-02-2013, 16:03
Posting #87 could be in error for Warrington's Warship Week as I believe that Fleetwood in Lancashire adopted the submarine HMS Turbulent and that Warrington adopted the Onslow Class Destroyer HMS Obdurate (WW 7-14 March 1942)

The adoption plaques (two types) have a brass plaque stating the the plaque was presented to the town by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty.

It's nearly a year Peter, since I wrote the post quoted above. You are right though, I had made a mistake with the ship's name. It should have been Obdurate, as you quite rightly point out.

I have just posted a picture of the Obdurate's screen Badge, on the Warship Week Adoption Plaques & Crests photo (gallery) thread, with the typical brass plate inscribed and presented to the people of Warrington, as is exhibited in the Town's very fine museum.

By the way Peter, you are doing a cracking job on these two threads! B.Z. to you.

jbryce1437
23-02-2013, 21:08
Just came across this post (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=51403&postcount=7) on another thread

Jim

ap1
23-02-2013, 21:17
It certainly forced a smile out of me, Jim! :)

Plague, instead of Plaque!

Who said spelling wasn't important? :D

It's a good job we can laugh. :D

jbryce1437
23-02-2013, 21:40
Could have been a plague of plaques in the library:D

Jim

peter schofield
20-03-2013, 22:06
It's nearly a year Peter, since I wrote the post quoted above. You are right though, I had made a mistake with the ship's name. It should have been Obdurate, as you quite rightly point out.

I have just posted a picture of the Obdurate's screen Badge, on the Warship Week Adoption Plaques & Crests photo (gallery) thread, with the typical brass plate inscribed and presented to the people of Warrington, as is exhibited in the Town's very fine museum.

By the way Peter, you are doing a cracking job on these two threads! B.Z. to you.

Warrington Rural District also held a Warship Week between 21-28 Feb 1942 and adopted the flower class corvette HMS Vetch. The target was £120,000 and £150,135 was raised equivalent to £6 10s 11d per head of the population. Not aware of where the adoption plaque is held.

peter schofield
21-03-2013, 17:31
Warrington Rural District also held a Warship Week between 21-28 Feb 1942 and adopted the flower class corvette HMS Vetch. The target was £120,000 and £150,135 was raised equivalent to £6 10s 11d per head of the population. Not aware of where the adoption plaque is held.

In reply to AP1 posting No.139

Have received an email from Warrington Museum saying they have a plaque stating the following:

"THIS PLAQUE IS PRESENTED TO H.M.S. OBDURATE TO COMMEMORATE HER ADOPTION BY THE BURGESSES OF THE COUNTY BOROUGH of WARRINGTON DURING WARSHIP WEEK FEBRUARY 7TH - 14TH 1942". The plaque was placed on display in the "Story of Warrington" gallery in 2010.

This means the museum holds the plaque presented to the ship as well as the one presented by the Admiralty to the town.

Am awaiting confirmation and a photograph

Peter

ap1
21-03-2013, 17:46
Great stuff, Peter.

I can't say I saw two plaques on open display, though..:confused:

peter schofield
21-03-2013, 20:55
Northumberland Warship Weeks
Alnwick and Amble – HMS Cotillion, Dance Class AS Trawler, Mar-42
Ashington – HMS Blackpool, Dance Class AS Trawler, 07-Mar-42
Bedlington – MTB 230, Motor Torpedo Bo Harbour Motor Launch at
Belford RD - HM ML 151, 14-21 Mar 1942
Bellingham RD – HMS Birdlip, Trawler
Berwick-upon-Tweed – HMS Hazel, Bay Class Trawler, Feb-42
Blyth – HMS Blyth, Bangor Class Minesweeper, Mar-42
Haltwhistle – HMS Hornpipe, Dance Class AS Trawler, 14-21 Feb 1942
Hebburn – HMS Endeavour, Surveying Vessel
Hexham UD and RD – HMS Tynedale, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942
Longbenton - MTB 244, Motor Torpedo Boat
Morpeth MB and RD – HMS Cavalier, C Class Destroyer (Ca Group), 7-14 Mar 1942
Newburn - MTB 336, Motor Torpedo Boat
Newcastle and Gosforth – HMS Newcastle, Town Class Light Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Northam, Islandshire - HM ML 138, Harbour Motor Launch
Prudoe UD - HM ML 142, Harbour Motor Launch
Tynemouth – HMS Firedrake, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942 - Lost Dec-42 adopted HMS Myngs
Wallsend – HMS Haydon, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-28 Feb 1942

jbryce1437
21-03-2013, 21:02
An interesting list Peter. I had never seen the name Islandshire before but after consulting Wiki I find it was in North Northumberland. I think the Council may have been Norham and Islandshire.

Jim

peter schofield
22-03-2013, 10:09
Great stuff, Peter.

I can't say I saw two plaques on open display, though..:confused:

Received the following this morning:
Adoption plaque for the Obdurate (our reference WAGMG : 1943.28). The photograph was taken in our museum as the adoption plaque has been on display in the museum's 'Story of Warrington' gallery (gallery 2) since 2010. As you can see the plaque is a wooden shield with a circular plaque in the centre surmounted with a crown. The plaque depicts a mule in relief surrounded with a laurel leaf design painted gold. Over the top of the mule is the word OBDURATE in large letters. Beneath the plaque is an inscribed brass plate reading "PRESENTED BY THE LORD COMMISSIONERS OF THE ADMIRALITY TO WARRINGTON (LANCS) TO COMMEMORATE THE ADOPTION OF H.M.S. OBDURATE DURING WARSHIP WEEK FEB. 14TH 1942".This plaque was a gift from the Admiralty and has been in the museum collection since 1943.

We also have the presentation plaque (our reference WAGMG : 1957.15). This was also placed on display in our Story of Warrington gallery (gallery 2) in the 2010 redisplay in the same display case, below and to the left of the adoption plaque. The presentation plaque is a simple rectangular brass plaque with screw hole at each corner. It depicts the Warrington coat of arms beneath which is inscribed "THIS PLAQUE IS PRESENTED TO H.M.S. OBDURATE TO COMMEMORATE HER ADOPTION BY THE BURGESSES OF THE COUNTY BOROUGH of WARRINGTON DURING WARSHIP WEEK FEBRUARY 7TH - 14TH 1942" This was a gift from the Admiralty and has been in the museum collection since 1957.

Therefore I can confirm that both the _adoption_ and the _presentation_ plaque for the HMS Obdurate are in the collections of Warrington Museum and Art Gallery and both are currently on display. Warrington Museum and Art Gallery is part of Culture Warrington - a Charitable Trust.

The information and photographs have been forwarded to the IWM for inclusion on their Memorial Website

peter schofield
23-03-2013, 13:26
Worcestershire Warship Weeks
Bewdley – HMS Horatio, Shakespeare Class Trawler, Lost Jan 1943
Bromsgrove UD – HMS Croome, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Droitwich MB and RD – HMS Planet, Boom Defence Vessel
Dudley CB – HMS Kelvin, K Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941
Evesham – HMS Jupiter, J Class Destroyer, 25 Oct to1 Nov 1941, Lost 27 Feb1942, adopted HMS Venus
Halesowen MB – HMS Achates, A Class Destroyer, Feb-42, Foundered 31 Dec 1942, adopted HMS Contest
Kidderminster – HMS Vansittart, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, 6-13 Dec 1941
Ledbury – HMS Ledbury, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer, Dec-42
Malvern UD – HMS Tenacious, T Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Martley RD – HMS Teviot, River Class Frigate, 7-14 Mar 1942
Oldbury MB – HMS Griffin, Ex Brazilian Destroyer
Pershore – HMS Scimitar, Old Admiralty Class Destroyer, 15-22 Nov 1941
Redditch – HMS Kingfisher, Kingfisher Class Corvette, 15-22 Nov 1941
Stourbridge – HMS Faulknor, F Class Destroyer, Mar-42
Stourport-on-Seven – HMS Gavotte, Dance Class Trawler and HMS Sir Galahad, Knight Class Trawler
Worcester – HMS Worcester, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942

Choppy Sea
23-03-2013, 18:16
Peter, another one is HMS Kite if you haven't already got it, adopted by Braintree, Essex. Ray H

peter schofield
24-03-2013, 10:11
Peter, another one is HMS Kite if you haven't already got it, adopted by Braintree, Essex. Ray H

Essex Warship Weeks
Barking MB - HMS Undaunted, U Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Benfleet - MTB 32, Motor Torpedo Boat, 6-13 Dec 1941
Billericay UD – HMS Lark, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, Mar-42
Braintree and Bocking UD - HMS Kite, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, 7-14 Mar 1942
Brentwood - HMS Antelope, A Class Destroyer, Feb-42
Canvey Island - HM ML 115, Harbour Motor Launch, 7-14 Mar 1942
Chelmsford – HMS Hardy, V Class Destroyer, 14-21 Feb 1942
Chigwell UD – HMS Brighton, Town Class Destroyer Type 6, Mar-42
Chingford MB – HMS Reading, Town Class Destroyer Type 4, Mar-42
Clacton-on Sea – HMS Clacton, Bangor Class Minesweeper, Mar-42
Colchester MB Wivenhoe UD – HMS Unruffled, U Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
Dagengam MB – HMS Evenrode, River Class Frigate, Feb-42
Dunlow RD – HMS Plym, River Class Frigate, 21-28 Mar 1942
East Ham CB – HMS Sahib, S Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942, sunk Apr 1943 HMS Sceptre adopted
Halstead RD and UD – HMS Harrow, Albury Class Minesweeper
Hornchurch UD – HMS Hurricane, Ex-Brazilian Destroyer, Feb-42, torpedoed 24 Dec 1943 HMS Loch Ruthen adopted
Hornsea MB – HMS Impulsive, I Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Ilford MB – HMS Urchin, U Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Lexden and Winstree RD – HMS Dart, River Class Frigate,
Leyton MB – HMS Traveller, T Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942
Maldon – HMS Rockrose, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Rayleigh - MTB 207, Motor Torpedo Boat - 21-Feb-42
Rochford RD – HMS Magnolia, Trawler Minesweeper
Romford MB – HMS Raider, R Class Destroyer, Feb-42
Saffron Walden MB and RD – HMS Lapwing, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, Feb-42
Southend-on-Sea – HMS Ashanti, Tribal Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1941
Tendring RD – HMS Lagan, River Class Frigate, 21-28 Feb 1941
Thurrock UD and RD – HMS Porcupine, P Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942
Waltham, Holy Cross UD - MTB 35, Motor Torpedo Boat
Walthamstow MB – HMS Troubridge, T Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Wanstead and Woodford MB – HMS Churchill, Town Class Destroyer Type 4
West Ham CB – HMS Quiberon, Q Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942

The six Essex London Boroughs (Barking, East Ham, Ilford, Leyton, Walthamstow, West Ham) raised £3,226,000 during Londons Warship Week 21-28 Mar 1942

peter schofield
24-03-2013, 10:38
Bedfordshire Warship Weeks
Bigglesworth, Stotfold – HMS Balsam, Flower Class Corvette, Jan-42
Borough of Bedford, Kempston UD and Bedford RD _HMS Thorn, T Class Submarine, 21-28 Feb 1942
Dunstable – HMS Burwell, Town Class Destroyer Type 4, Mar-42
Leighton Buzzard – HMS Oakley, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer
Luton MB – HMS Ceres, C Type Light Cruiser, 7-14 Mar 1942
Luton Borough – HMS Diadem, Improved Dido Class AA Cruiser
Luton RD – HMS Rockwood, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer
Sandy - HM ML 121, Motor Launch

Interesting that Luton adopted two cruisers, worthy of further investigation

ap1
24-03-2013, 20:00
...

We also have the presentation plaque (our reference WAGMG : 1957.15). This was also placed on display in our Story of Warrington gallery (gallery 2) in the 2010 redisplay in the same display case, below and to the left of the adoption plaque. The presentation plaque is a simple rectangular brass plaque with screw hole at each corner. It depicts the Warrington coat of arms beneath which is inscribed "THIS PLAQUE IS PRESENTED TO H.M.S. OBDURATE TO COMMEMORATE HER ADOPTION BY THE BURGESSES OF THE COUNTY BOROUGH of WARRINGTON DURING WARSHIP WEEK FEBRUARY 7TH - 14TH 1942" This was a gift from the Admiralty and has been in the museum collection since 1957.

Therefore I can confirm that both the _adoption_ and the _presentation_ plaque for the HMS Obdurate are in the collections of Warrington Museum and Art Gallery and both are currently on display. Warrington Museum and Art Gallery is part of Culture Warrington - a Charitable Trust.

The information and photographs have been forwarded to the IWM for inclusion on their Memorial Website

Forgive me Peter, I did have the picture of the second 'plaque'; it is hereby attached. (lower left; that brown square)

129862

Compared to the Admiralty's Badge with the plaque; it is pretty dismal, and that is why it didn't register at first.
But reading your post above, it has prompted me to post it. Sorry it is not in much detail, but it gives the general appearance.
As the saying goes, "it's the thought, that counts!"

peter schofield
24-03-2013, 21:02
Forgive me Peter, I did have the picture of the second 'plaque'; it is hereby attached. (lower left; that brown square)

129862

Compared to the Admiralty's Badge with the plaque; it is pretty dismal, and that is why it didn't register at first.
But reading your post above, it has prompted me to post it. Sorry it is not in much detail, but it gives the general appearance.
As the saying goes, "it's the thought, that counts!"

Hi Andy did you see post 148, Warrington Museum sent me a copy of the presentation plaque to the ship. This rectangular presentation plaque was designed to an Admiralty recomended template with a towns coat of arms and suitable words. They were generally made of a metal capable of withstanding a seawater environment for when onboard the vessel. Others were made of wood. The RN Museum Portsmouth holds a number of these as they were returned to stores when ships decommissioned, there may still be some posted on their website. These of course are much rarer than the adoption plaques presented to the towns by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty as no doubt many of the presentation plaques were lost when ships payed off. I have copies of the Warrington Guardian for their Warship Week if you need further information.

ap1
24-03-2013, 21:13
Hi Andy did you see post 148.

Yes, that is the post I was answering.:rolleyes:

peter schofield
25-03-2013, 16:23
Durham Warship Weeks
Barnard Castle – HMS Zetland, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer, Mar-42
Billingham – HMS Verbena, Flower Class Corvette, Dec-41
Birtley and District - MTBs 14 and 75, Motor Torpedo Boat, 18-25 Oct 1941
Bishop Auckland – HMS Gleaner, Halcyon Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Feb 1942
Blaydon - MTB 91, Motor Torpedo Boat, 31 Jan 7 Feb 1942
Bolden – HMS Bownet, Boom Defence Vessel, 15-22 Nov 1942
Chester-le-Street – HMS Ruby, Trawler Anti-submarine Training
Consett – HMS Hydrandea
Darlington – HMS Nizam, N Class Destroyer, Feb-42, Manned by Australian Navy, HMS Barfleur also claimed as adopted
Darlington RD - MTB 52, Motor Torpedo Boat
Durham – HMS Witherington, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, Feb-42
Ferryhill - MTB 83, Motor Torpedo Boat
Gateshead - HMS Eskimo, Tribal Class Destroyer
Hartlepool – HMS Ludlow, Type 7 Town Class Destroyer
Hetton-le-Hole - MTB 218, Motor Torpedo Boat, 21-28 Feb 1942
Houghton-le-Spring – HMS Wellard, Trawler Anti-submarine, 6-13 Dec 1941
Jarrow – HMS Abelia, Flower Class Corvette, 13-20 Dec 1941
Lanchester - MTB 36, Motor Torpedo Boat
North Easington – HMS Hawthorn, Trawler – Minesweeper, 17-24 Jan 1942
Seaham – HMS Seaham, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 7-14 Mar 1942
Sedgefield RD - MTB 341, Motor Torpedo Boat
Shildon – HMS Saon, Trawler Anti-submarine, 21-28 Feb 1942
South Easington - MTB 38, Motor Torpedo Boat, 14-21 Feb 1942
South Shields – HMS Chaplet, C Class Destroyer (Ch Group), 24-31 Jan 1942, Completed 1945???
Spennymoor – HMS Wolsey, Thorneycroft V and W Class Destroyer, Dec-41
Stanley UD – HMS Anchusa, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Stockton-on-Tees MB – HMS Hurworth, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer, Mar-42, Oct 1943, Struck nine in Aegean and sunk frigate adopted £100k raised
Sunderland – HMS Delhi, D Type Light Cruiser, 14-21 Feb 1942
Washington – HMS Sarabande, Dance Class Trawler
Weardale RD – HMS Kingston Amber, Trawler Anti-submarine
West Hartlepool, Wivern, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, Mar-42
Whickham - MTB 50, Motor Torpedo Boat, 14-21 Jan 1942

Westmorland Warship Weeks
Appleby and North Westmorland – HMS Ullswater, U Class Submarine
Kendal and Westmorland RD HMS Eskdale, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942, Lost Apr 43, adopted HMS Cavendish
Windermere UD and Lakes UD – HMS Undine, U Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942

Yorkshire East Riding
Beverley and District – HMS Azalea, Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Mar 1942
Bridlington – HMS Bridlington, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 29 Nov to 6 Dec 1941, Originall going to adopt HMS Kittiwake
Driffield and District – HMS Crocus, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Mar 1942
Goole – HMS Honeysuckle, Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Mar 1942
Hornsea UD – HMS Whimbrel, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, 7-14 Feb 1942
Howden RD - HMS Istria, Trawler – AS, 21-28 Feb 1942
Hull, Haltemprice and Hedon – HMS Mauritius, Colony Class Light Cruiser, 21-28 Feb 1942
Ottringham, Burswick, Paull, Patrington - HM ML 345, Motor Launch, 24-31 Jan 1942
Pocklington RD (http://www.pocklingtonhistory.com/history/20thcentury/pocklingtoninww2/hmsvolage/) – HMS Volage, V Class Destroyer, Mar-42
Withernsea – HMS Withernsea, Trawler – Minesweeper, 1-8 Nov 1941

peter schofield
26-03-2013, 09:23
Essex Warship Weeks
Barking MB - HMS Undaunted, U Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Benfleet - MTB 32, Motor Torpedo Boat, 6-13 Dec 1941
Billericay UD – HMS Lark, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, Mar-42
Braintree and Bocking UD - HMS Kite, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, 7-14 Mar 1942
Brentwood - HMS Antelope, A Class Destroyer, Feb-42
Canvey Island - HM ML 115, Harbour Motor Launch, 7-14 Mar 1942
Chelmsford – HMS Hardy, V Class Destroyer, 14-21 Feb 1942
Chigwell UD – HMS Brighton, Town Class Destroyer Type 6, Mar-42
Chingford MB – HMS Reading, Town Class Destroyer Type 4, Mar-42
Clacton-on Sea – HMS Clacton, Bangor Class Minesweeper, Mar-42
Colchester MB Wivenhoe UD – HMS Unruffled, U Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
Dagengam MB – HMS Evenrode, River Class Frigate, Feb-42
Dunlow RD – HMS Plym, River Class Frigate, 21-28 Mar 1942
East Ham CB – HMS Sahib, S Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942, sunk Apr 1943 HMS Sceptre adopted
Halstead RD and UD – HMS Harrow, Albury Class Minesweeper
Hornchurch UD – HMS Hurricane, Ex-Brazilian Destroyer, Feb-42, torpedoed 24 Dec 1943 HMS Loch Ruthen adopted
Hornsea MB – HMS Impulsive, I Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Ilford MB – HMS Urchin, U Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Lexden and Winstree RD – HMS Dart, River Class Frigate,
Leyton MB – HMS Traveller, T Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942
Maldon – HMS Rockrose, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Rayleigh - MTB 207, Motor Torpedo Boat - 21-Feb-42
Rochford RD – HMS Magnolia, Trawler Minesweeper
Romford MB – HMS Raider, R Class Destroyer, Feb-42
Saffron Walden MB and RD – HMS Lapwing, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, Feb-42
Southend-on-Sea – HMS Ashanti, Tribal Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1941
Tendring RD – HMS Lagan, River Class Frigate, 21-28 Feb 1941
Thurrock UD and RD – HMS Porcupine, P Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942
Waltham, Holy Cross UD - MTB 35, Motor Torpedo Boat
Walthamstow MB – HMS Troubridge, T Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Wanstead and Woodford MB – HMS Churchill, Town Class Destroyer Type 4
West Ham CB – HMS Quiberon, Q Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942

The six Essex London Boroughs (Barking, East Ham, Ilford, Leyton, Walthamstow, West Ham) raised £3,226,000 during Londons Warship Week 21-28 Mar 1942

A and As for Essex

Ongar - HMS Kingston Beryl, Trawler Minesweper, 7-14 Mar 1942, lost Dec 1943
Witham UD and District - HMS Chelmer, River Class Frigate, 7-14 Mar 1942

peter schofield
26-03-2013, 17:54
Northumberland Warship Weeks
Alnwick and Amble – HMS Cotillion, Dance Class AS Trawler, Mar-42
Ashington – HMS Blackpool, Dance Class AS Trawler, 07-Mar-42
Bedlington – MTB 230, Motor Torpedo Bo Harbour Motor Launch at
Belford RD - HM ML 151, 14-21 Mar 1942
Bellingham RD – HMS Birdlip, Trawler
Berwick-upon-Tweed – HMS Hazel, Bay Class Trawler, Feb-42
Blyth – HMS Blyth, Bangor Class Minesweeper, Mar-42
Haltwhistle – HMS Hornpipe, Dance Class AS Trawler, 14-21 Feb 1942
Hebburn – HMS Endeavour, Surveying Vessel
Hexham UD and RD – HMS Tynedale, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942
Longbenton - MTB 244, Motor Torpedo Boat
Morpeth MB and RD – HMS Cavalier, C Class Destroyer (Ca Group), 7-14 Mar 1942
Newburn - MTB 336, Motor Torpedo Boat
Newcastle and Gosforth – HMS Newcastle, Town Class Light Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Northam, Islandshire - HM ML 138, Harbour Motor Launch
Prudoe UD - HM ML 142, Harbour Motor Launch
Tynemouth – HMS Firedrake, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942 - Lost Dec-42 adopted HMS Myngs
Wallsend – HMS Haydon, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-28 Feb 1942

Another Warship Week mystery
Morpeth Herald and Reporter – Fri 6 Mar 1942
Reported: Morpeth and District were to adopt HMS Mantis, Gunboat, target £75,000 for the hull, 7-14 Mar 1942
Mantis was sold in 1940 so could not possibly be adopted
later there is a claim to adopting HMS Cavalier which was not started until 1943 ?????

peter schofield
27-03-2013, 11:57
Northumberland Warship Weeks
Alnwick and Amble – HMS Cotillion, Dance Class AS Trawler, Mar-42
Ashington – HMS Blackpool, Dance Class AS Trawler, 07-Mar-42
Bedlington – MTB 230, Motor Torpedo Bo Harbour Motor Launch at
Belford RD - HM ML 151, 14-21 Mar 1942
Bellingham RD – HMS Birdlip, Trawler
Berwick-upon-Tweed – HMS Hazel, Bay Class Trawler, Feb-42
Blyth – HMS Blyth, Bangor Class Minesweeper, Mar-42
Haltwhistle – HMS Hornpipe, Dance Class AS Trawler, 14-21 Feb 1942
Hebburn – HMS Endeavour, Surveying Vessel
Hexham UD and RD – HMS Tynedale, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942
Longbenton - MTB 244, Motor Torpedo Boat
Morpeth MB and RD – HMS Cavalier, C Class Destroyer (Ca Group), 7-14 Mar 1942
Newburn - MTB 336, Motor Torpedo Boat
Newcastle and Gosforth – HMS Newcastle, Town Class Light Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Northam, Islandshire - HM ML 138, Harbour Motor Launch
Prudoe UD - HM ML 142, Harbour Motor Launch
Tynemouth – HMS Firedrake, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Feb 1942 - Lost Dec-42 adopted HMS Myngs
Wallsend – HMS Haydon, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-28 Feb 1942

As and As for Northumberland
Castleward 1-8 Nov Objective £40,000 cost of the hull of a Trawler Minesweeper NAME UNKNOWN
Ashington 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Alnwick – Morpeth Herald and Reporter: Alnwick 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942 Objective £55,000 cost of the hull of a corvette – probably ran out of corvette hulls and thus adopted the trawler but dates differ

peter schofield
27-03-2013, 21:44
Chelmsford and Distict (including the rural district) started with the intention of adopting two corvettes, target £240,000. The Warship Week was from 14-21 Feb. After tracking down the newspaper reports the Admiralty would not allow one area to adopt two vessels and therfore Chelmsford Borough adopted the destroyer HMS Hardy while Chelmsford RD adopted HMS Cyclamen (Flower Class Corvette). Read on:

The Essex Chronicle Friday 20 March 1942, Destroyer for Chelmsford - Warship Week Reward
The Major of Chelmsford Cr. Sidney Taylor informed us yesterday that he had received a letter from the Admiralty announcing the award of a destroyer to Chelmsford and rural district as a more appropriate ship for the splendid efforts made during Warship Week from Feb 14-21. The original target was £240,000 the price of two corvettes but £770,710 was raised. Thus disappointment was general when it was reported in the Essex Chronicle that the authorities had decided that not one than more corvette could be adopted. The corvettes chosen for adoption before the Week started were HMS Cyclamen and HMS Corriander. After it was all over Cyclamen was taken from us. The Essex Man’s Diary which gave the first news of this decision said ‘here is disappointing news, only one corvette, only one plaque. What nonsense’. The Mayor in his capacity as Chairman of the Warship Week Committee then wrote to the Admiralty and protested with the result that we are now to have a destroyer for our plaque of honour. A destroyer costs £700,000.

Essex Newsman Saturday 28 November 1942 - Cyclamen Ensign for Chelmsford – From Adopted Corvette
A white ensign from HMS Cyclamen was hung in the Chelsford Rural Council at Chelmsford on Tuesday, a happy link between the ship and the Council which adopted this corvette after doing so well in Warship Week in February. Mr AG Faulknor chairman of the Council who performed the ceremony of ‘hanging’ the ensign on Tuesday, said as a result of Warship Week the Rural Council obtained £230,000 in savings which was an exceptionally good effort. The sum enabled the Council to adopt one of the corvettes and HMS Cyclamen was allocated
Eventually Mr Faulkner proceeded ‘we hope to exchange commemorative plaques, but in the meantime I got in touch with the commanding officer of the corvette, and he has sent one of the white ensigns. It has been well salted in it voyages with the corvette in scores of operations covering thousands of miles and the members no doubt will share my pride in receiving it’. ‘While we are proud to have this ensign, I hope we shall not look upon it merely as a decoration of the Council Chamber, but as a symbol of the spirit of freedom for which we fight. I hope it will also constitute a continual source of inspiration to go forward with out work in local government with the courage and efficiency so exemplified by the Royal Navy'. Mr Faulkner then proceeded amid applause to hang the ensign on the wall of the Council Chamber, remarking ‘we are proud to honour the heroic services of the Royal Navy. In particular we wish God-speed and successful voyages to the officers and men of HMS Cyclamen.

Essex Newsman Saturday 5 June 1943 – Comforts Fund for Men of Corvette
Last year following the Chelmsford RD’s splendid response to Warship Week the Chelmsford Rural Council adopted HMS Cyclamen a corvette whose weather worn ensign hangs in the Council Chamber. At the suggestion of the Chairman of the Council Mr. AG Falkner JP an HMS Cyclamen Comforts Fund is to be started. At the meeting of the council on Tuesday the Chairman said ‘we want to make this fund worthy of the council and the district’. It was mentioned that work on the plaque which the council are to present to Cyclamen is well in hand.

peter schofield
28-03-2013, 19:07
Another Warship Week mystery
Morpeth Herald and Reporter – Fri 6 Mar 1942
Reported: Morpeth and District were to adopt HMS Mantis, Gunboat, target £75,000 for the hull, 7-14 Mar 1942
Mantis was sold in 1940 so could not possibly be adopted
later there is a claim to adopting HMS Cavalier which was not started until 1943 ?????

Morpeth Herald Fri 16 Jan 1942 – Morpeth and District Warship Week – Name of Ship to be adopted
Just before going to Press the Secretary has received intimation that the Admiralty has allotted HMS Mantis as the ship to be adopted by Morpeth and District if they should succeed in raising the amount decided upon viz £75,000. Now Morpeth and district here is something to stir your blood, a ship to call your own, a concrete and definite object to go for. The Navy has never let you down; now is your chance to respond; but you must raise that £75,000 (for the hull) and the dates to bear in mind are 7-14 Mar 1942.

HMS Mantis was sold in 1940

Morpeth Herald – Fri 7 July 1944, HMS Morpeth Castle
It will be seen from your columns that Morpeth and District are adopting the above ship, and the public ceremony of adoption will take place in the Town Hall on Wednesday 12th instant at 7pm; when the plaque commemorating Warship Week will be handed over to Lt Cdr Pate DSC, RNR. I wish to appeal to the public for gifts of books, gramophone records, indoor games and sports equipment which are greatly needed by the ship’s company. Those who wish to help in this way will they kindly leave their gifts at my address, if possible by Wednesday 12th. I have also opened a fund for this purpose and I shall be glad to receive contributions to hand over to the commander for the purchase of sports equipment. JS Joblin, Mayor of Morpeth.

See updated post here (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10075764&postcount=175)

peter schofield
01-04-2013, 17:51
Gloucester Warship Weeks
Bristol – HMS Jamaica, Colony Class Cruiser, 6-13 Dec 1941
Cheltenham and District – HMS Legion, L Class Destroyer, L Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 25 Mar 1942, HMS Whitehall adopted
Cirencester - HMS Uproar, U Class Submarine, 7-14 Mar 1942
Dursley RD – HMS Trident, T Class Submarine, 7-14 Feb 1942
Lydney RD (Forest of Dean) – H32, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
East Dean (Forest of Dean) – H33, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
West Dean (Forest of Dean) – H34, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
Gloucester, Down Hatherley – HMS Jaguar, J Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 26 Mar 1942
Kingswood, Mangotsfield, Warmley – HMS Protector, Netlayer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Newwent – HMS Rumba, Dance Class Trawler, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
North Cotswold RD – HMS Cotswold, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Northleach RD - HMS Starwort, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Sodbury RD, Filton – HMS Sunfish, S Class Submarine, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942
Stroud and Nailsworth District – P56 (HMS Usurper), U Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942, Lost 3 Oct 1943
Tewkesbury - HMS TBA, Corvette, 6-13 Dec 1941
Thornbury – HMS Severn, Severn Class Submarine, 14-21 Feb 1942
Tetbury – MTB 345, Motor Torpedo Boat, 21-28 Feb 1942, Originally adopted HMS Tern - Scuttled 19 Dec 1941 in Hong Kong; MTB 345 transferred to Norway finally HMS Grayling AS Trawler adopted

Almost a complete list apart from Tewkesbury which adopted a corvette but name unknown, also not known which ship replaced HMS Jaguar

The targets and amounts raised can also be provided

Total raised by the county = £7,720,609

Bristol raised £3,738,652
Cheltenham and District raised £1,046,941

peter schofield
03-04-2013, 18:39
The Western Gazette Fri 9 Jan 1942 - Dorchester Warship Week Target is £330,000
The target for Dorchester and Rural District Warship Week to be held from 7-14 March is the hull of a destroyer and half its armaments and ammunition at a cost of £330,000. Admiral Mackinnon (Chairman of the local savings association) said it was the recommendation of the Executive Committee of the local Association that the aim of Dorchester and the rural district should be the hull of a destroyer costing £210,000 and half the armaments and ammunition costing £118,000. If they raised enough to buy the hull they would receive the plaque bearing the name of the ship they adopted.

Western Morning News Wed 18 Mar 1942 – HMS Mobury Parish Contributes to Its Namesake
The destroyer HMS Mobury was allotted to the borough of Dorchester whose Warship Week took place between 7-14 Mar. The Mayor of Dorchester appealed to the inhabitants of Modbury through the Parish Council for their support to their Warship Fund. Inhabitants in Modbury and district made a generous response to the appeal.

The Western Gazette Fri 10 Apr 1942
The final figure for Dorchester and District Warship Week was announced at the Executive Committee’s winding up meeting as £284,330. Congratulating all concerned, the Mayor, Mr A R Jeffrey said that by aiming high at a target of £330,000 they had, no doubt raised more money for the nation than they would have done with a less ambitious objective. The question of presenting a plaque of the Dorchester arms to HMS Modbury was left to the Town Council and the RD Council and it is hoped that the town and the district may each receive a plaque of the arms of the ship.

The villages saved £98,000 during the Week


HMS Modbury was a Type 3 Hunt Class Destroyer was transferred to Greece 25 Nov 1942

The Naval Historical Branch (1983) lists HMS Valentine as being adopted by Dorchester - there were two World War II vessels
1. HMS Valentine (1917) –beached on the banks of the River Scheldt on 15 May 1940 after aircraft attack
2. HMS Valentine (ex Kempenfelt) during build Valentine (completed 1944) transferred to Canadian Navy as HMCS Algonquin on 7 Feb 1944

It is therefore highly likely that HMS Valentine was adopted in place of HMS Mobury after she was transferred to the Hellenic Navy

peter schofield
05-04-2013, 14:37
Gloucester Warship Weeks
Bristol – HMS Jamaica, Colony Class Cruiser, 6-13 Dec 1941
Cheltenham and District – HMS Legion, L Class Destroyer, L Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 25 Mar 1942, HMS Whitehall adopted
Cirencester - HMS Uproar, U Class Submarine, 7-14 Mar 1942
Dursley RD – HMS Trident, T Class Submarine, 7-14 Feb 1942
Lydney RD (Forest of Dean) – H32, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
East Dean (Forest of Dean) – H33, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
West Dean (Forest of Dean) – H34, H Class Submarine, 14-21 Mar 1942
Gloucester, Down Hatherley – HMS Jaguar, J Class Destroyer, 22-29 Nov 1941, Lost 26 Mar 1942
Kingswood, Mangotsfield, Warmley – HMS Protector, Netlayer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Newwent – HMS Rumba, Dance Class Trawler, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
North Cotswold RD – HMS Cotswold, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Northleach RD - HMS Starwort, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Sodbury RD, Filton – HMS Sunfish, S Class Submarine, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942
Stroud and Nailsworth District – P56 (HMS Usurper), U Class Submarine, 21-28 Mar 1942, Lost 3 Oct 1943
Tewkesbury - HMS TBA, Corvette, 6-13 Dec 1941
Thornbury – HMS Severn, Severn Class Submarine, 14-21 Feb 1942
Tetbury – MTB 345, Motor Torpedo Boat, 21-28 Feb 1942, Originally adopted HMS Tern - Scuttled 19 Dec 1941 in Hong Kong; MTB 345 transferred to Norway finally HMS Grayling AS Trawler adopted

Almost a complete list apart from Tewkesbury which adopted a corvette but name unknown, also not known which ship replaced HMS Jaguar

The targets and amounts raised can also be provided

Total raised by the county = £7,720,609

Bristol raised £3,738,652
Cheltenham and District raised £1,046,941

Tewkesbury was down to adopt a corvette but it turns out that they adopted HMS Luminary a trawler converted to a Boom Defence Vessel.
Launched 1919. American fishing vessel. 1940 Purchased into the RN in Sept and converted to BDV. Sold to mercantile 1946. Ex Kingfisher, P No. Z189 displacement 414 Ton. Source G. Toghill, 'RN Trawlers Part 2 Requisitioned Trawlers'.

peter schofield
07-04-2013, 09:15
Yorkshire East Riding Warship Weeks
Beverley and District – HM S Azalea, Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Mar 1942
Bridlington and District – HMS Bridlington, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 26 Nov to 6 Dec 1941, Originally going to adopt HMS Kittiwake
Driffield and District – HMS Crocus, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Mar 1942
Filey – MTB 241, Motor Torpedo Boat, 14-21 Mar 1942
Goole – Honeysuckle, Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Mar 192
Hornsea and District – HMS Whimbrel, Modified Black Swan Class Sloop, 7-14 Feb 1942
Howden RD – HMS Istria, Trawler –AS, 21-28 Feb 1942
Hull, Haltemprice and Hedon – HMS Mauritius, Colony Class Light Cruiser, 21-28 Feb 1942
Withernsea – MTB 100 Motor Torpedo Boat, 1-8 Nov 1941, MTB 100 reclassified as CT 11 in 1943 - HMS Withernsea stated as adopted

jbryce1437
07-04-2013, 19:38
Many thanks for your continued dedication to this thread Peter, which is proving a great source of information.

Jim

peter schofield
08-04-2013, 12:57
Beaminster – HMS Fluellen, Shakespeare Class Trawler
Blanford Forum RD and UD – HMS Stour, River Class Frigate
Bridport MB and RD - HMS Worthing, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Dorchester and District – HMS Valentine, V Class Destroyer, Mar 1942
Gillingham – HMS Pine, Bay Class Trawler, 15-22 Nov 1941
Lyme Regis – HMS Lyme Regis, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Mar 1942
Portland - Kingston Onyx, Trawler AS
Poole – HMS Poole, Bangor Class Minesweeper
Shaftesbury – HMS Jennet, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Mar 1942
Sherborne RD – HMS Willow, Trawler Minesweeper, 1-8 Nov 1941
Sturminster Newton – L23, L Class Submarine
Swanage, Wareham and District – Cattistock, Type 1 Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Weymouth – HMS Roqual, R Class Submarine, Feb 1942
Wimborne – HMS Challenger, Surveying Vessel

Bournemouth is not included as the town was still in Hampshire before the 1974 county border changes.

Bournemouth - HMS Phoebe, Dido Class Cruiser, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942[/QUOTE]

Update for Dorset Warship Weeks
Dorset Warship Weeks
Beaminster – HMS Fluellen, Shakespeare Class Trawler, 21-28 Mar 1942
Blandford Forum RD and UD – HMS Stour, River Class Frigate, 14-21 Feb 1942
Bridport MB and RD - HMS Worthing, Bangor Class Minesweeper 21-28 Mar 1942
Dorchester and District – HMS Modbury, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 7-14 Mar 1942, HMS Modbury transferred to Greece 25 Nov 1942; Valentine (adopted?) transferred to Canadian Navy as HMCS Algonquin 7 Feb 1944
Gillingham – HMS Pine, Bay Class Trawler, 15-22 Nov 1941, Lost Apr 1943
Lyme Regis – HMS Lyme Regis, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Mar 1942
Portland - Kingston Onyx, Trawler AS, 28 Feb to 7 Mar
Poole – HMS Poole, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 6-13 Dec 1941
Shaftesbury – HMS Jennet, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Mar 1942
Shaftesbury RD – HMS ???, Trawler Minesweeper, 15 -22 Nov 1941
Sherborne RD – HMS Willow, Trawler Minesweeper, 1-8 Nov 1941
Sturminster Newton – L23, L Class Submarine, 21-28 Feb 1942
Swanage, Wareham and District – Cattistock, Type 1 Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Weymouth – HMS Roqual, R Class Submarine, 7-14 Feb 1942
Wimborne – HMS Challenger, Surveying Vessel, 22-29 Nov 1941

peter schofield
08-04-2013, 20:03
Lichfield Mercury Fri 8 Sept 1944 - Lichfield’s Motor Torpedo Boat – Crew Would Welcome Letters and Literature
The Town Clerk has received the following letter from the officer commanding MTB 206 which Lichfield provided as a result of Warship Week.

HMMTB 206
c/o GPO
London
August 29th 1944
Dears Sir
I have been in command of HMMTB 206 since the middle of February this year and have been intending to write to you ever since that time. You can see from that procrastination what a bad letter writer I am. In any case I expect that you will be surprised to hear from your adopted. So far as I can discover there had not been any contact with you before I assumed command, and that was due largely to the fact that the boat had several commanding officers within a comparatively short space of time. But the present crew and myself feel that we would like to have some sort of link with you and know more about Lichfield itself. Most of us hail from London and the southern counties and no one seems to have been to your town. Maybe it is a bit late in the war to build up any strong links of this sort but who knows, the final round may last longer than we anticipate.

I don’t know if there are any kind folk in Lichfield who would like to write to us and tell us something about the town and its life. In my last boat we used to correspond fairly regularly with pupils of the senior school, and I think that much enjoyment was had by both sides. For obvious reasons we could not write very ‘newsy’ letters, but there are always tit-bits of life afloat which the sensor does not object to. We are pretty comfortable on board and do not want for much, except, perhaps, for reading matter. It would be greatly appreciated if books and periodicals could be diverted from salvage heaps for an extra week or two – we’d see that they were salvaged when they had been devoured by all on board.

The plaque which you so kindly presented to the original crew is still on the mess deck and I have a copy in the wardroom, we would like to know more of what the crest stands for. My first lieutenant and the crew wish to you join me in sending you our greetings and our hopes that a real link may be forged between MTB 206 and the townsfolk of Lichfield. Maybe one day some of us can come and visit you.

peter schofield
10-04-2013, 12:18
Tewkesbury was down to adopt a corvette but it turns out that they adopted HMS Luminary a trawler converted to a Boom Defence Vessel.
Launched 1919. American fishing vessel. 1940 Purchased into the RN in Sept and converted to BDV. Sold to mercantile 1946. Ex Kingfisher, P No. Z189 displacement 414 Ton. Source G. Toghill, 'RN Trawlers Part 2 Requisitioned Trawlers'.

Tewkesbury were set to raise £55,000 the cost of the hull of the Flower Class Corvette HMS Fleur-de-Lys (Lt. Alexander Collins, RNR) but the ship was torpedoed and sunk on 14 October 1941 by the German submarine U-206 about 55 nautical miles west of Gibraltar in position 36º00'N, 06º30'W. There were only three survivors.

peter schofield
13-04-2013, 13:04
During the period of Warship Weeks a number of short films were shown in cinema houses and travelling daylight cinemas to promote the National Savings Movement and boost savings. The following are directly linked to Warship Weeks some of which can be viewed on cinema websites:

Give Us More Ships (Merton Park Studios) Produced for the National Savings Committee With Leslie Banks Poem: Gilbert Frankau (December 1941) - Your Warship Week (4min) - A stirring appeal during the Second World War narrated by Leslie Banks for the public to help the navy buy more warships and cargo ships "to win this war". The film featured footage of the war in the Atlantic, convoys of ships at sea, sea battles, tanks and aircraft being unloaded from ships, shipbuilding and Nelson's flagship 'Victory'.

Sam Pepys Joins the Navy (G.B. Screen Services). Production and direction: Francis Searle, for the National Savings Committee. Photography: Walter Harvey. (December, 1941) – 35mm, 7mins, a record of a young recruit, salute to great naval traditions in support of the War Savings Scheme. Sam Pepys, a new recruit, joins up, to the amusement of the officer, who comments on his namesake's "energy, foresight and guts" as Secretary of the Admiralty. Good shots of basic training, knots, steering in a simulator, lifeboat drill, model showing how to drop anchor, gunnery practice on simulator, operation of torpedo (costs nearly 3,000 pounds), ack-ack practice. The officer then sees that Sam has been recommended for a commission, saying "bet old Sam will be proud of him." Pepys' portrait nods agreement, and asks the officer how the navy is financed. The officers reel off current prices: destroyer over £400,000; cruiser £2,000,000; battleship £8,000,000. Pepys is confounded. All this is achieved by the citizen saver.

Seaman Frank Goes Back to Sea (Concanen Films). Production: Derrick de Marney, for the National Savings Committee. Direction and photography: Eugene Cekalski. Commentary: Terrence de Marney, Frank Laskier. (February, 1942) - A promotional film made for the National Savings by the Crown Film Unit sought to capitalise on the critical success of Frank Laskier’s radio broadcasts. Frank Laskier, an ex-ship’s steward and gunner, and disabled by enemy action, had been transferred into an icon. Discovered in a Liverpool public house by a young BBC producer, Laskier became a Stankhanov. Lionised in the press after his broadcasts, his talks were quickly published. This was followed by a confessional autobiography, the promotional film, a speaking tour in the USA and a disappearance from public view. A measure of how this seaman was used is in the extract from the Spectator review of his book ‘My Name is Frank’, Frank Laskier’s broadcasts had the stuff of greatness; put into print they loose nothing in the reading. By a natural genius this seaman has found an expression and a rhythm which the poets and artists of the modern world have been striving after for generations. The film Seaman Frank Goes Back to Sea opened with scenes of men at a Mercantile Marine Office and the narrator instructing the audience ‘waiting around to be signed on. These are men of the Merchant Navy. None of the glamour of the Royal Navy but sailors of the finest type for all that’ Cutting then to Laskier being signed on and then in a launch on his way out to the ship, the narrator resumed: This one-legged merchant seaman has been called the English Conrad and who was described in a recent column as a man who can make words burn and sear. We are looking at a real Englishman. How easy it was for him after his sensational success as a broadcaster to sit back and relax on his laurels. Every newspaper in the country would have paid him handsomely to write his stories. He chose instead to go back to the job he was doing all his life. The job of bringing food to his country

Who’ll Buy a Warship: Director: Richard Massingham, Production Company: Public Relationship Films, Sponsor: National Savings Committee; Sponsor Warship Week Savings Committee, Producer: Lewis Grant Wallace: Director of Photography: Alex Strasser (1942) An appeal to Londoners to contribute to their Warship Savings Week. Titles followed by busy London street scenes. Action freezes in response to commentator's appeal for Londoners to stop spending? Shots of London in the Blitz. Commentary speaks of Navy's role for safeguarding supplies during Blitz - shots of warships, merchant vessels, a sinking ship and the need to replace losses. Savings posters: commentary outlines the various savings option available. Action restarts. Commentary urges Londoners to hit back at the Hun by helping to buy warships. Ship-building scenes, aircraft carrier launch. Credits

peter schofield
15-04-2013, 17:33
Devonshire Warship Weeks
Axminster – MGB 40, Motor Gun Boat, 21-28 Mar 1942
Bideford and District – HMS Bideford, Shoreham Class Sloop, 21-28 Feb 1942
Barnstaple MB, RD – HMS Stevenstone, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Brixham – HMS Brixham, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Budleigh Salterton – HMS Polruan, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 7-14 Mar 1942
Buckfastleigh and Ashburton UD – HMS Kelt, Trawler AS, 21-28 Mar 1942
Crediton – HMS Snowdrop, Flower Class Corvette, 29 Nov to 6 Dec 1941
Dartmouth, Kingswear – HMS Haldon, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942, HMS Haldon (La Combattante Dec 1942), HMS Caesar adopted
Dawlish – HMS Bay, Bay Class Trawler, 22-29 Nov 1941
Exeter - HMS Exeter, Cathedral Class Cruiser, 21-28 Mar 1942
Exmouth and Liskeard – HMS Jasmine, Flower Class Corvette, 6-13 Dec 1941
Holsworthy and District – HMS Peony, Flower Class Corvette, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Honiton and District – MTB 85, Motor Torpedo Boat, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942, 899 Squadron
Ilfracombe – HMS Ilfracombe, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 8-15 Nov 1941
Kingsbridge and District – HMS Leda, Halcyon Class Minesweeper 7-14 Feb 1942, lost sept 1942, adopted HMS Loch Gorm
Lynton and Lynmouth – HM ML 103, Harbour Motor Launch, 15-22 Nov 1941
Newton Abbot UD and RD – HMS Beagle, B Class Destroyer, 6-13 Dec 1941
North and South Molton – HMS Eggesford, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Feb 1942
Okehampton and District – HMS Onyx, Algerine Class Minesweeper, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942
Ottery St Mary UD and District – MTB 92, Motor Torpedo Boat, 7-14 Mar 1942
Paignton – HMS Torbay, T Class Submarine, 21-28 Feb 1942
Plymouth – HMS Adventure, Cruiser-Minelayer, 21-28 Mar 1942
Plympton St Mary, HMS Harrier, Halcyon Class Minesweeper, 17-24 Jan 1942
Seaton and District – HMS Scarborough, Hastings Class Sloop, 21-28 Feb 1942
Sidmouth – HMS Sidmouth, Bangor Class Minesweeper, 14-21 Feb 1942
St Thomas RD – MGB 52, Motor Torpedo Boat, 22-29 Nov 1941
Tavistock UD and RD – HMS Lamerton, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Teignmouth and Shaldon – HMS Widgeon, Kingfisher Class Corvette, 25 Oct to 1 Nov 1941
Tiverton and District – HMS Bluebell, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942
Torquay – HMS Devonshire, County Class Heavy Cruiser, 7-14 Mar 1942
Torrington and District – HMS Delphinium, Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Feb 1942
Totnes – HMS Sunflower. Flower Class Corvette, 7-14 Feb 1942

County Total £7,279,778

peter schofield
18-04-2013, 09:45
The competitive element was strongly in vogue. When Luton challenged by Watford to raise more money for Warship Week, the challenge was delivered at the Town Hall by a knight in shining armour, but alas - the days of chivalry were dead and Luton won, collecting £1,400,000, £200,000 more than Watford. Competition was particularly effective when two towns had traditionally been rivals, Huddersfield for example had always been his own town’s rival in cricket, football, music and everything else wrote one Halifax man. Having ascertained their chosen date we fixed ours for a week later. When it was learned that Huddersfield’s target was sufficient money to buy three destroyers, someone suggested that we should go all out for three submarines so that we could torpedo Huddersfield’s destroyers, but this was regarded as not quite the right spirit. Halifax in the end set its sights on three destroyers and easily achieved its target, although the Royal Engineers who were to have been the centre piece of the parade never turned up, they were busy in Sheffield clearing up the damage after a heavy air raid the night before.

Extract from ‘How We Lived Then, History of Every Day Life During The Second World War’ by Norman Longmate

Luton – HMS Ceres, C Class Light Cruiser, 7-14 Mar 1942, raised £1,421,714
Watford – HMS Capetown, C Type Light Cruiser, 7-14 Mar 1942

Huddersfield – HMS Gambia, Colony Class Cruiser, 14-21 Mar 1942
Halifax – HMS Ajax, Leander Class Cruiser, 7-14 Feb 1942, raised £2,077,565
The dates are a month apart not the following week as stated

peter schofield
22-04-2013, 18:28
The Press and Journal, Saturday 10 Apr 1943, Second Warship for County – Aberdeenshire Owns HMS Carysfort
Aberdeenshire exceeded its mark by close on £80,000 in the campaign to raise the cost of HMS Carysfort to replace the county’s lost destroyer Somali. The target was well in sight a fortnight before the end of the four-month drive, but Aberdeenshire folk did not relax their efforts. They saved £254,098 during March to bring the total for the four months up to £779,774. As a result of this campaign we can claim that the Somali has been avenged, writes Lord Forbes chairman of the county War Savings Committee, in a letter thanking district committees for their efforts.

HMS Somali was lost September 1942, they raised £465,405 to adopt this vessel during their Warship Week, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942

peter schofield
04-05-2013, 10:58
Assistance needed.
I am now a registered volunteer for the UK National Inventory of War Memorials and am assisting with the populating of their Memorial website with information regarding Warship Week adoption and presentation plaques plus illuminated certificates. The site can be accessed through the UK Inventory of War Memorials - Search the Memorials - Simple Search (type Warship Week) - Search.

A number of people have already kindly contacted me to provide information regarding their local Warship Week. I hold a mainly complete list of Warship Weeks for the UK and can provide locations with their adopted vessels. Most of the adoption plaques can still be found in Town Halls, Council Offices, Museums, Libraries, British Legions etc.

If anyone would like to assist please could they PM me and I will provide them with what is required by the IWM

Many thanks
Peter

peter schofield
18-05-2013, 20:36
Another Warship Week mystery Post #161
Morpeth Herald and Reporter – Fri 6 Mar 1942
Reported: Morpeth and District were to adopt HMS Mantis, Gunboat, target £75,000 for the hull, 7-14 Mar 1942
Mantis was sold in 1940 so could not possibly be adopted
later there is a claim to adopting HMS Cavalier which was not started until 1943 ?????

The full story:

Morpeth Herald and Reporter – Fri 6 Mar 1942
Reported: Morpeth and District were to adopt HMS Mantis, Gunboat, target £75,000 for the hull, 7-14 Mar 1942 Mantis was sold in 1940 so could not be adopted.

The Morpeth Herald and Reporter Friday 19 March 1943 – HMS Cavalier
It has been necessary for the authorities to change Morpeth and District’s adopted ship. HMS Cavalier a destroyer has been allocated to the area, and the committee will shortly be considering ways and means of celebrating the adoption.

The Morpeth Herald and Reporter Friday 14 April 1944
HMS Morpeth Castle – The Town Clerk submitted a letter from the National Savings Committee as to the official adoption of Morpeth Castle instead of HMS Cavalier when it was resolved that HMS Morpeth Castle be officially adopted.

The Morpeth Herald and Reporter, Friday, 7 July 1944 – HMS Morpeth Castle
Sir – It will be seen from your columns that Morpeth and District are adopting the above ship and the public ceremony of adoption will take place in the Town Hall on Wednesday 12 July at 7 pm when the plaque commemorating Warship Week will be handed over to Lt Cdr Pate DSC, RNR
J S Jobling
Mayor of Morpeth

HMS Morpeth Castle finally adopted - solved

peter schofield
18-05-2013, 21:21
When Launceston and Districts adopted warship HMS Hatherleigh was transferred to Greece in the summer of 1942 HMS Vigiliant was adopted.

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 June 1942 - HMS Vigilant
The Mayor reported that at a Warship Week Committee meeting last week it was reported that the Admiralty had transferred the ship allotted to the area from HMS Hatherleigh to HMS Vigilant, and it was suggested that Launceston and District might like to present the ship with a plaque. In return a plaque would be sent to be fixed in some public building and another in the rural district. The cost would be about £12.
Mr Doidge thought it a pity to use money in that way, the Mayor pointing out that the idea was the public would take an interest in the ship.
The Deouty Mayor thought that a bond of friendship which would be forged and the comforts which the men were likely to get justified the spending of £12. He proposed that the scheme be adopted, and that other Councillors concerned be asked to cooperate. Mr Fitze seconded and it was agreed.

peter schofield
21-05-2013, 18:12
Cheltenham's three adoption plaques; the loss of HMS Legion and adoption of HMS Whitehall

Gloucestershire Echo, Tuesday 8 December 1942 - HMS Legion Public Ceremony the Exchange of the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the Badge of HMS Legion
Public ceremony for the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the badge of HMS Legion in commemoration of the adoption of the ship by the Cheltenham district in Warship Week will be held in the Town Hall, Cheltenham on Wednesday, December 9th at 3 p.m. Vice Admiral Sir Robert Hornell DSO RN, representing the Admiralty will present mounted badges of HMS Legion to Cheltenham Borough, Charlton Kings Urban District and Cheltenham Rural District.
He will receive a plaque bearing the Borough Arms from the Mayor of Cheltenham (Councillor T Wilfred Waite) chairman of the Cheltenham and District National Savings Committee, who will preside.
A short programme of Naval Films will be shown after the ceremony.
The general public is cordially invited to attend.
Seats after 2.45 pm

Cheltenham Chronicle and Gloucestershire Graphic, Saturday 12 Dec 1942 – Presentation of Plaques
Cheltenham’s fine feat in raising more than £1,000,000 in Warship Week was recalled at an exchange of plaques ceremony in the Town Hall on Wednesday when Vice Admiral Sir Robert Hornell RN represented the Admiralty. The occasion was and exchange of the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the badge of HMS Legion in commemoration of the adoption of that ship by the Cheltenham district in Warship Week. Sir Robert on behalf of the Admiralty presented badges of HMS Legion to Cheltenham Borough, Charlton Kings Urban District and Cheltenham Rural District. The Mayor in his capacity as chairman of the Cheltenham and District National Savings Committee presided over an enthusiastic gathering, which included members of the Town Council and other public figures. Major W Shakspeare?, Chairman of Cheltenham Rural District accepted the plaque presented by Sir Robert to his Council and Mr. W S F Harris chairman of Charlton Kings Urban Council, received the badge presented to that Council.

Information
The target was £700,000 for the L Class Destroyer and a sum of £1,049,951 (£11 5s 0d per head) was achieved during Warship Week 22-29 Nov 1941
On 23 March 1942 Legion was detached to join HMS Eridge in escorting the SS Clan Campbell. During this operation the ships came under air attack and Legion was damaged by a near miss. She proceeded on one engine after a successful damage control prevented her from sinking and was then beached at Malta. She was towed to the docks on 25 March and was tied up alongside the Boiler Wharf on 26 March. Whilst awaiting repair, the docks were the target of an air raid. Legion was hit by two bombs and sustained further serious damage when her forward magazine exploded. She sank into the harbour and rolled over, with her bridge and funnel lying on the jetty. She was cut in two during 1943 and attempts were made to refloat her. They were unsuccessful however. After the end of the war Legion was broken up in situ. This was not completed until 1946.

On the loss of HMS Legion, HMS Whitehall was adopted but not immediately, there is no indication that further savings were raised to adopt Whitehall. Maybe there was still hope of salvaging Legion?

Gloucester Echo, Thursday 6 April 1944 HMS Whitehall - Cheltenham has a new ship Two years ago the Borough and Rural District of Cheltenham with the Urban District of Charlton Kings were given the privilege of adopting HMS Legion. This ship has now been withdrawn from the adoption scheme and its place has been taken by the destroyer HMS Whitehall and already cordial greetings have been exchanged between the committee of which the Town Clerk is the hon. secretary, and the ships commanding officer Lt Cmdr P J Cowell. HMS Whitehall is a destroyer of the Modified W type constructed under the 1918 Emergency Building programme.
New Adoption: The town’s newly adopted ship has a complement of about 134 and a displacement of 1,120 to 1,500 tons, with an overall length of 312 ft. The adoption of this ship has given greatest pleasure to the ship’s company, for although she has been at sea during the whole of the war she has not been previously adopted.
Crew’s Gift: A ship’s badge, which was made on board by members of the destroyer’s crew, and the ensign, which was last flown when the ship was in action, have been presented to the local committee and these will be placed on view to the public at the art gallery forthwith. The ship’s badge is cast iron is a most handsome emblem and is coloured in silver, blue and red. The ensign shows signs of wear and tear and at the outer edge are frayed

peter schofield
24-05-2013, 10:10
Cardiganshire Warship Week 14-21 Mar 1942

Ceredigion Museum holds two adoption plaques and a presentation plaque

The first adoption plaque is held at the museum while the second is held in storage nine miles away. Interestingly the museum adoption plaque has two brass plates. The one beneath the crest states as follows 'Presented by the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty to the Rural District of Aberayron to commemorate the adoption of H.M.S. Tanatside during Warship Week March 21st 1942' while the second plate (upper left) states 'Presented by the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty to the Municipal Borough of Lampeter to commemorate the adoption of H.M.S. Tanatside during Warship Week March 21st 1942'

It is believed that the upper left plate possibly belongs to the identical plaque in storage, awaiting further news on this

The presentation plaque states as follows:
This Plaque is Presented to HMS Tanatside to Commemorate her Adoption by the People of Cardiganshire during Warship Week March 14 - 21 1942
War Savings Campaign Cardiganshire War Savings Committee

HMS Tanatside was a Type 3 Hunt class destroyer. It took its name from a Cardiganshire local hunt using the initial letters of Tregaron, Aberayron, New Quay, Aberystwyth and Teifside with the addition of the word ‘side’.

There could be other adotion plaques held in the region???

peter schofield
27-05-2013, 15:22
Items on presentations for CORNWALL

Western Morning News, Thus 6 May 1943 – (Council) - Bodmin
Approval was given to the suggestion that the plaque of HMS Coverley, the corvette adopted by the town as a result of its Warship Week should be exchanged with the crest of the borough at the opening ceremony of Wings for Victory Week. HMS Coverley was not a corvette but a Dance Class Trawler which survived the war

Western Morning News, Monday 8 November 1943 – Dual Plaque Ceremony
The presentation of a brass tablet bearing a representation of Kit Hill to the minelayer HMS Linnet to commemorate her adoption by Callington and district, who raised £81,000 during Warship Week took place at Callington on Saturday. The tablet presented by Mr Fred Rogers chairman of the Savings Committee, was formally received by a naval officer who deputized for the captain of HMS Linnet. The officer said that the minelayer had done invaluable service in all theatres of sea warfare, especially in the Mediterranean. Launched in 1938 she took part in the North African Campaign and the invasion of Sicily and Italy. On behalf of the Admiralty he presented the chairman with a certificate (plaque??) to commemorating the adoption.

Western Morning News Sat 5 June 1943 - Plaque for Camelford
At Camelford on Thursday Vice Admiral AG Craufurd, on behalf of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty presented to Mr J H Slee (chairman of the Rural Council) a plaque to commemorate the adoption by the district during their Warship Week of the minesweeper HMS Birch. A naval officer received from Mr J M Olde (chairman of the Warship Week) a plaque made of Delabole slate and given by the vice chairman of the Week (Mr W T Setchell)

Western Morning News Fri 31 July 1942 – Adoption Plaques
The mayor Mr LW Oliver reported to Thursday’s meeting of Helston Borough Council that the plaque the borough intended presenting to HMS Hazard the ship the borough and Kerrier RD had adopted as a result of their Warship Week was available for presentation. It had been suggested that the presentation of plaques from the Admiralty to the borough and rural district and those from the borough and rural area to the ship should take place on Harvest Fair Day. The Town Clerk (Mr JP Rogers) was directed to write to the Admiralty inquiring whether that date would be convenient.

Western Morning News, Monday 28 February 1944 – Plaques Presented Penryn and District Warship Week
A large number attended Penryn Town Hall on Saturday when the exchange of plaques in conjunction with the town and district Warship Week took place. The Mayor Ald. W C Basher presided and welcomed Admiral Thesiger, who said he was authorised by the Lords Commissioners to present the plaque to the borough of Penryn. He also presented certificates to the parishes of St Buddock, Constantine, Mawnan, Mylor, St Gluvias and St Mabe. The Mayor the called upon Mr George McLeod Chairman of the local War Savings Committee to hand their plaque to a naval officer.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 13 December 1944 – Savings Plaques
Plaques for Warship Week and Salute the Soldier were presented by the Mayor (Ald. J F Ashton) chairman of Saltash and District War Savings Committee to Ald. E Webber Deputy Mayor, in the Council Chamber at Saltash yesterday. A plaque for Wings for Victory had already been fixed in the Council Chamber.

The Cornishman and Cornish Telegraph Thus 13 May 1943
At a public meeting at the Guild Hall over which the Mayor Mr W C Drage presided plaques were exchanged between the Corporation and HMS Rowan the ship adopted by St Ives during Warship Week. The ship’s plaque was presented to the Mayor by Commander Pilcher on behalf of the Admiralty.

Western Morning News, Thursday 19 Nov 1942 Truro Accepts Plaques – HMS Triumph
At Truro RDC yesterday Mr WJ Gerran said he had accepted a plaque of the badge of HMS Triumph in connection with the city and district Warship Week and remarked that it would serve them to remind them of not only of success and victory during time of war, but for the need of constructive effort for the days of peace.

peter schofield
27-05-2013, 15:28
Some presentations for DEVONSHIRE

The Western Times, Friday 21 January 1944 – Axminster and Warship Weeks
The presentation of Warship Week and Wings for Victory Week plaques, log books and certificates of honour in Axminster Senior School Hall on Saturday evening was attended by a large gathering. Captain Walcot presented to Mr Crawley the plaque given by the Admiralty to the Urban District Council and to Mr White the plaque given to the Rural Council. Both commemorating the gunboat (MGB 40), A plaque commemorating the adoption of HMS Scarborough by the rural parishes in the Seaton area was also presented. Mr Crawley presented too Captain Walcott on behalf of Axminster townspeople the token of a plaque shortly to be sent to the Admiralty for the gunboat.

The North Devon Journal – Herald, 28 October 1943 – Exchange of Plaques between Barnstaple and HMS Stevenstone
The Guildhall, Barnstaple was the scene of a pleasing ceremony on Wednesday afternoon last week when Lt J H P Fligg RN presented to the town a plaque recording the adoption by Barnstaple and district of HMS Stevenstone which followed the gratifying success of Warship Week when the huge sum of £386,510 was subscribed. A plaque was handed over to Lt. Fligg (Admiralty representative) for presentation to the ship. Lt Fligg who had served on the Hunt Class destroyer HMS Stevenstone said he had great pleasure in handing the Deputy Mayor a plaque bearing the ship’s crest, which was taken from the crest of the Hon. Mark Rolle who left the hounds and the hunt in 1907.

Western Morning News, Wednesday 23 Dec 1942 – Bond with Navy
A further bond between Bideford and the RN was marked when in Bideford Town Hall presentation was made to the town of a replica of the crest of HMS Bideford and the Warship Week Committee reciprocated with the gift of a panel representing the arms of the borough to be placed in the wardroom of the ship. Ever since the first keel-plate was of the sloop was laid at Devonport in June 1930 by the Mayoress the closest contact has been maintained between the ship and its company and the North Devon borough. Several gifts from Bideford adorn the wardroom, while incorporated in Bideford Mayoral chain is a gold naval officers crown presented by the officers and men of the ship.

Western Morning News Fri 9 Oct 1942 - Plaque Presented to Northam Council
Formal presentation to Northam Urban Council of a commemorative plaque in connection with the part played by the by the district in a recent Warship Week was made yesterday by Rear-Admiral H. G. C. Franklin on behalf of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. The plaque is a replica of the crest of HMS Bideford the sloop adopted as the result of the Bideford and district in which Northam combined. Admiral Franklin said Warship Week were a very good earnest of the interest which was taken continually in the working of HM Navy.

Western Times, Friday 12 November 1943 - Presentation of Plaques at Buckfastleigh
In connection with the National Savings Movement there was a moderate attendance in the Town Hall Buckfastleigh when plaques were presented in connection with the recent Warshp and Wings for Victory Weeks. Mr. L R Dinwiddy asked Naval Rating Hallett to present the plaque to the Chairman in commemorating Warship Week.

Western Morning News Tues 31 Aug 1943 – Plaques Exchanged, Interesting Ceremony at Lynton
A ceremony of much interest which took place at Lynton Town Hall on Saturday was the official exchange of suitably engraved plaques between the Admiralty and Lynton Urban Council to mark the adoption of the latter during the 1941 Warship Week adoption of a warship. The Admiralty plaque was presented by a Rear Admiral to the chairman of the Council.

The Western Times Friday 12 February 1943 – Presentation of Plaque, Admiral Keyes at Ottery
During Warship Week nearly a year ago, Ottery St Mary and district raised double the sum aimed at. To commemorate this achievement a plaque bearing the Ottery St Mary coat of arms was on Saturday through the Admiral presented to Captain Ree (representing the Admiralty) to be forwarded to HMMTB 92, the motor torpedo boat adopted by the town. In exchange a replica of the ship’s badge was presented to Ottery St Mary. Captain Ree said the ship adopted by Ottery St Mary would only be too proud to carry the plaque presented to the town.

Western Morning News, Sat 13 Dec 1947 Plymouth Gift To Be Returned
As there is no warship bearing the name Adventure on the active service list, the Admiralty has directed that the plaque which the city of Plymouth presented to the minelayer HMS Adventure in 1943 commemorating Warship Week shall be returned to the donors. It is hoped that the return of this plaque will be marked by ceremonial suitable to the occasion. The plaque was presented to Adventure on behalf of Plymouth by the Lord Mayor (Lord Astor) on the quarter-deck of the ship at Devonport.

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Thursday 6 April 1944 – St Thomas Rural Presentation
Plaques from the Admiralty and Air Ministry were presented on 30 March to St Thomas District Rural Council in recognition of the success achieved in Warship and Wings for Victory campaigns. Vice-Admiral J L Pearson presented a plaque on behalf of the Admiralty to St Thomas RD Council.

The Western Morning News Monday 30 Mar 1942
It was reported that at a meeting at Teignmouth Warship Week Committee that the plaque for presentation to HMS Widgeon had arrived and also the one from the Admiralty for the Urban Council. It was agreed to have an open air presentation.

The Western Morning News, Thursday 16 December 1943 – Savings Plaques Exchanged
Ceremony of the exchange of plaques commemorating Warship and Wings for Victory Weeks was held at the Pavilion, Torquay yesterday. Admiral J L Pearson presented the Admiralty plaque to Ald. R. J. Bulleid. Ald. Bulleid asked Admiral Pearson to accept the town plaque for HMS Devonshire.

peter schofield
05-06-2013, 13:32
GLOUCESTERSHIRE
Gloucestershire Echo, Tuesday 8 December 1942 - HMS Legion Public Ceremony the Exchange of the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the Badge of HMS Legion
Public ceremony for the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the badge of HMS Legion in commemoration of the adoption of the ship by the Cheltenham district in Warship Week will be held in the Town Hall, Cheltenham on Wednesday, December 9th at 3 p.m.
Vice Admiral Sir Robert Hornell DSO RN, representing the Admiralty will present mounted badges of HMS Legion to Cheltenham Borough, Charlton Kings Urban District and Cheltenham Rural District.
He will receive a plaque bearing the Borough Arms from the Mayor of Cheltenham (Councillor T Wilfred Waite) chairman of the Cheltenham and District National Savings Committee, who will preside.
A short programme of Naval Films will be shown after the ceremony.
The general public is cordially invited to attend. Seats after 2.45 p.m.

Cheltenham Chronicle and Gloucestershire Graphic, Saturday 12 Dec 1942 – Presentation of Plaques
Cheltenham’s fine feat in raising more than £1,000,000 in Warship Week was recalled at an exchange of plaques ceremony in the Town Hall on Wednesday when Vice Admiral Sir Robert Hornell RN represented the Admiralty. The occasion was and exchange of the Cheltenham Borough Arms and the badge of HMS Legion in commemoration of the adoption of that ship by the Cheltenham district in Warship Week. Sir Robert on behalf of the Admiralty presented badges of HMS Legion to Cheltenham Borough, Charlton Kings Urban District and Cheltenham Rural District. The Mayor in his capacity as chairman of the Cheltenham and District National Savings Committee presided over an enthusiastic gathering, which included members of the Town Council and other public figures. Major W Shakspeare?, Chairman of Cheltenham Rural District accepted the plaque presented by Sir Robert to his Council and Mr. W S F Harris chairman of Charlton Kings Urban Council, received the badge presented to that Council.

Gloucestershire Echo – Tues 23 Mar 1943 - Warship Week Plaque
The Chairman drew attention to a plaque which had been received from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty which would be placed in the Council’s meeting room. The inscription on the plaque was as follows ‘Presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Cirencester Rural District Council to commemorate the adoption of HMS P31 during Warship Week March 1942’

Gloucestershire Echo, 29 July 1942, Warship Weeks Plaques Exchanged at Evesham
A sequel to Evesham and District’s Warship Week effort of last autumn took place in the Council Chamber of the Town Hall on Tuesday afternoon, when borough and rural district officials exchanged inscribed plaques with Vice-Admiral Hornell DSO representing the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. With the Mayor (Ald James Hemming) and Vice-Admiral Hornell on the platform were Mr. CA Binyon, chairman of the RDC; Councillor JW Mason (Deputy Mayor); chairman of the Warship Week Committee and secretary of National Savings Committee; Mr Sydney Idiens, joint secretary of the Warship Week; and Mr Oliver Hunt, Town Clerk. There were three plaques tastefully coloured and inscribed, one for the borough, one for the rural district, and one for the Admiralty. The Mayor in opening the proceedings recalled Warship Week when the target of £210,000 had been exceeded, they were permitted to adopt the destroyer HMS Jupiter but, before the commanding officer could be contacted, every one was sorry to hear that the Jupiter had been sunk.

Gloucester Citizen – Wed 6 May 1942, Gloucester and District Warship Week
Adoption of HMS Jaguar by Gloucester and District – On Saturday Next, May 9th At 3pm at the Guildhall, Gloucester. His Grace the Duke of Beaufort, KG, KCVO, Lord High Steward of the City and Lord Lieutenant of the County will receive the Admiralty plaques on behalf of Gloucester and District, from Vice-Admiral L D I Mackinnon, representing the Admiralty, CB, GVO, and present to the Admiral, for HMS Jaguar, a plaque to be placed on the ship. While the general public will be welcome to attend this very interesting ceremony, it is hoped that all those who took an active part in accomplishing the great success of Warship Week will endeavour to be present.

Gloucester Citizen Fri 8 May 1942 Gloucester and District Warship Week
The meeting arranged for tomorrow (9 May) at the Guildhall Gloucester, 3 pm by the Gloucester and District Savings Committee for the presentation of the plaques has been cancelled

Gloucester Journal, Saturday 22 May 1943 – Newent Exchange of Plaques
Commander Townshend on behalf of the Admiralty presented at Newham a replica of the crest of HMS Runba to Mr A W Southall Chairman of Newent and District Savings Committee and of the Rural District Council to commemorate the effort during Newent and District Warship Week. Mr Southall asked Commander Townshend to accept an oak plaque on which was carved a representation of a sheaf of wheat. This represented the chief industry of the district which was purely agriculture.

Cheltenham Chronicle, Sat 16 Jan 1943 - Warship Building Delays Plaques
A letter was read at Northleach RDC meeting on Wednesday from Mr Oliver Stanley chairman National Savings Committee, saying he had been much concerned about the delay in executing the commemorative plaques to be sent to local authorities who had adopted ships in connection with Warship Weeks. Mr Stanley added that the First Lord of the Admiralty had reported that this delay was due to the necessary labour being required on vital work for the fleet. It was hoped to complete delivery of the plaques by June. The council readily accepted the reason given. Mrs W S Morrison who forwarded the letter to the council
also stated that she would be pleased to serve on the sub-committee for devising ways and means for the Northleach district keeping in touch with the officers and men of their adopted ship HMS Starwart even after the exchange of plaques. Mr Brigstoke who first mentioned this idea, said that the necessary machinery was being set up in the district towards establishing such a link. He suggested that Mr Abell of Foxcote be added to the sub-committee. Mr Brigstoke also informed the Council that the Northleach plaque executed by Messrs. Martin of Cheltenham was finished.

Cheltenham Chronicle and Gloucestershire Graphic, Saturday 29 May 1943
At the Tewksbury Town Hall on Friday evening the Mayor received from the Admiralty a plaque and presented one on behalf of the borough to be placed on HMS Luminary the ship adopted by Tewksbury as a result of their Warship Week effort. The Mayor introduced Lt Cmdr Mordaunt representing the RN as Vice-Admiral Hornell was not able to attend. The town’s plaque was presented to Lt Cmdr Mordaunt for display onboard the vessel.

Western Daily Express Monday 8 Feb 1943 – Exchange of Plaques at Thornbury, Adoption of HM Submarine Severn
The exchange of plaques commemorating the adoption of HMS Severn by the Thornbury Rural District took place at a public meeting at the Cosham Hall, Thornbury yesterday. Mjor Howard chairman of the Warship Week Committee presided. Vice-Admiral Sir Robert Hornell on behalf of the Admiralty handed to Mr J H Cooke chairman of Thornbury Rural Council a handsome replica of the HMS Severn badge and in exchange gave Sir Robert a wooden plaque commemorating the adoption of the submarine by the district. Cheques were them passed for comforts for the crew of the submarine.

peter schofield
06-06-2013, 14:01
HMS Dorsetshire
Western Gazette - 24 October 1941, County Cruiser Project Not Adopted
At the invitation of the Lord Lieutenant, war savings organisers from all parts of Dorset met at Dorchester on Saturday for a conference on the organisation of Warship Weeks in the county.
An idea that the whole of the county might work together to raise the price of the cruiser ‘Dorsetshire’ made a strong appeal but after reviewing the factors the principle difficulty being that some areas had already made their plans – the conference voted against it and it was decided instead that each town or district would select its own target. The general opinion of the committees was that in the long run more interest an enthusiasm would be raised and more money obtained if each district had its own target and ship to work for. The cost of the Dorsetshire was about £2,750,000.

HMS Dorsetshire was lost during April 1942 and there was a replacement campaign

Western Gazette Friday 10 July 1942 - HMS Dorsetshire County’s Effort to Double Savings
Savings Commitees in Dorset are now settling down to the big task of raising £2,750,000 within the six months ending 31 December 1942 for the replacement of HMS Dorsetshire lost on 4 April in the Indian Ocean. In many areas indicators are being used to show how the campaign is going so far as those districts are concerned and from time to time special events will be held to whip up interest. In the Dorchester and Rural District Committee’s areas most group secretaries have received a leaflet setting out details of what is expected of them. It explains that the total cost of the new cruiser has been broken up between are committee’s and targets have been accepted. Dorchester and RD is £305,000 and other areas are as follows:
Wimborne £207,000
Poole £661,000
Portland £61,000
Bridport £168,000
Beaminster £96,000
Sherborne £169,000
Shaftesbury £81.000
Wareham (96,000) and Swanage (£140,000) = £236,000
Blanford £105,000
Weymouth £411,000
Lyme Regis £48,000
Sturminster £88,000
Gillingham £114,000
For the whole county it meant doubling their savings. It would also be an opportunity to win the James Day Cup which would be presented to the County Committee for the area showing the highest percentage of group members to population over periods of six months. Since the Dorsetshire campaign was conceived by Lord Shaftesbury a tank drive has been started by the National Savings Committee, but Lord Shaftesbury hopes that all member will agree to make the replacement HMS Dorsteshire their main objective for the next six months. Any local committee’s and groups qualifying for the right to have their names on tanks will undoubtedly claim this additional privilege.

Western Gazette, Friday 22 January 1943 – Earl of Shaftesbury’s Thanks
The Earl of Shaftesbury President of the HMS Dorsetshire Campaign writes: ‘May I be allowed to express to all concerned my grateful thanks for and appreciation of the wonderful success of our Savings Campaign. The HMS Dorsetshire Replacement Campaign was a truly remarkable effort. The result achieved surpassed all expectations. Dorset men and women may well be proud of their county. We may certainly hope that some day another HMS Dorsetshire will be found amongst the ships of the Royal Navy’.


When the idea to replace HMS Dorsetshire was muted in May 1942 there was one dissenter Mr J Creasey (Wimborne). There were he said very great doubts among Wimborne Committee members as to the wisdom of embarking on such a campaign at that time. Practically every area in Dorset had already adopted a vessel as a result of its Warship Week effort and it was feared that a new campaign for a warship would cause some confusion of interest. He also understood that the Admiralty would not during the war give a new ship the name of one which had been lost. It would take a long time, he said, before a new HMS Dorsetshire could be launched, and a wartime launch would have to be done in secret with the result that people would be saving for something which they could not see. Referring to the Navy not giving the same name to a new ship Lord Shaftsbury in reply said he had no such information and felt that they could confidently leave that in Admiralty hands.

Although Lord Shaftesbury won the day the ship was not replaced even though the cost was raised through National Savings investments. The final total raised was £3,057,703. The Navy lost a ship with some 236 casualties. However the savers and investors would eventually get there money back, the savings committees increased their savings and the additional money went into the Treasury coffers. Ironically this was a sad loss for the Navy but a victory for the National Savings Movement; that was they way of the war, money had to be raised for the war effort to ensure victory was the final outcome.

peter schofield
12-06-2013, 20:00
Couple of articles about Frome

Western Daily Press and Bristol Mirror, Fri 10 July 1942 - Plaque for HMS Thunderbolt
The council approved a design of a plaque for presentation to the submarine Thunderbolt, the ship adopted by the Frome urban and rural districts as a result of the Warship Week achievement. The cost of the plaque and presentation is to be shared by the two districts, the money being raised by subscription.

Western Daily Express, Wednesday 22 November 1944 – Dedication at Frome Parish Church
A plaque and tablet installed in the west wall of the Frome Parish Church to commemorate the officers and men of Frome and Districts first adopted ship, the submarine HMS Thunderbolt, lost in March 1943 was unveiled by Admiral of the Fleet the Earl of Cork and Orrery and dedicated by the Bishop of Bath and Wells (the Right Rev Dr Wand). The plaque which had been presented to the Admiralty to commemorate the districts adoption of the Thunderbolt never reached the ship owing to its loss while on active service. The vicar of Frome (the Rev W J Torrance), Mr AF Ames (president of the District Savings Committee) and the Rev AE Paterson (President of the Frome Free Church Council) also took part in the dedication service, during which the Last Post and Reveille were sounded. The Thunderbolt was originally the Thetis which sank with heavy loss of life during her trials.

Trying to chase this plaque.

peter schofield
18-06-2013, 18:53
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE WARSHIP WEEKS
Arnold and District – HMS Pennywort, Flower Class Corvette, 21-28 Mar 1942
Beeston and Stapleford – HMS Active, A Class Destroyer, 7-14 Feb 1942
Bingham RD – HMS Snapdragon, Flower Class Corvette, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942
Carlton UD and District – HMS Rosario, Algerine Class Minesweeper, 7-14 Mar 1942
East Retford – HMS Grove, Type II Hunt Class Destroyer, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942
Eastwood, Kimberley – HMS Kimberley, K Class Destroyer, 14-21 Feb 1942
Hucknall UD and District – HMS Vimy, Admiralty Modified W Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Kirby-in-Ashfield – HMS Abingdon, Albury Class Minesweeper, 21-28 Feb 1942, Lost Apr 1942
Mansfield and Mansfield Woodhouse – HMS Icarus, I Class Destroyer, 14-21 Mar 1942
Nottingham – HMS Orion, Leander Class Cruiser, 22-29 Nov 1941
South Basford – HMS Tarantella, Dance Class AS Trawler, 21-28 Mar 1942
Sutton-in-Ashfield – HMS Belvoir, Type III Hunt Class Destroyer, 14-21 Feb 1942
Warsop – HMS Guava, Trawler – AS, 17-24 Jan 1942
West Bridgford UD – HMS Fury, F Class Destroyer, 24-31 Jan 1942, beached 21 June 1944
Worksop UD and RD – HMS P39, U Class Submarine, 7-14 Mar 1942, Lost 26 Mar 1942, adopted Ex US S-1 (P522)

peter schofield
20-06-2013, 09:20
The Nottingham Evening Post, Wednesday 25 Feb 1942
The Mayor of Ilkeston (Councillor D Barton) has received the following letter from Sir Robert Kindersley. I am writing to ask you to accept personally and to convey to all others who have contributed to the success of Ilkeston’s Warship Week my thanks and appreciation, This fine effort resulting in the adoption of HM Motor Launch will not only afford a closer link between the town of Ilkeston and the RN, but will provide a lasting record of their patriotism.

The Nottingham Evening Post, Tuesday 10 March 1942 Ilkeston receives an apology
The Chief Commissioner of the National Savings Committee has written to the Mayor of Ilkeston apologising for a mistake made by Lord Kindersley in alluding to Ilkeston Warship Week objective as the adoption of a motor launch when actually the target was to adopt HM Submarine L27. Ilkeston raised over £185,000 during Warship Week from 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942.

peter schofield
30-06-2013, 11:26
Angus County Warship Week was held from 25 Apr to 2 May 1942

The target was £720,000 to adopt HMS Duncan

Quota’s in parenthesis

Brechin (£100,000), £137,613
Arbroath (£200,000), £171,576
Forfar (£150,000), £162,549
Montrose (£120,000), £136,854
Monifieth (£50,000), £80,918
Carnoustie (£50,000), £77,562
Kilrriemuir (£50,000), £68,500

Total Raised £835,572

When HMS Duncan was de-commissioned in 1945 HMS Abercrombie was affiliated to the county of Angus

peter schofield
02-07-2013, 19:22
The Post Sunday 22 March 1942 – Fifeshire to Replace HMS Dunedin
With a target of two and a half million pounds for Fife Warship Week, it was agreed at a meeting at Kirkaldy yesterday to seek to replace HMS Dunedin which was lost in the Far East by adopting HMS Bellona now under construction.

Aberdeen Journal, 11 Feb 1943 – Replacing of HMS Somalia
Aberdeenshire has not yet reached the half-way stage in the amount to be raised to replace HMS Somalia which was sunk when escorting a convoy to Russia. The sum aimed at is £700,000. To date the total subscribed is £341,393 - £185,221 in January and £156,172 in December. Over two months have elapsed since the campaign opened and it is hoped that a special effort will be made between now and the end of March the closing period to make up the leeway and help the promoters to achieve their objective. The Admiralty has allocated HMS Carysfort to Aberdeenshire. There has been many donations and subscriptions to the fund and all donors have expressed their good wishes and good luck to the county’s new warship.

peter schofield
03-07-2013, 19:58
The Glasgow Herald 2 September 1957, City’s Adopted Battleship Plaque Returned to Glasgow
Commemorating Glasgow’s adoption of the battleship Duke-of-York after £13,510,424 had been raised in National Savings in the city during Warship Week in 1941, a brass plaque from the ship was returned to Glasgow Corporation yesterday by Captain M. J. Ross senior officer, Reserve Fleet, Clyde. The Duke-of-York which had been laid up in the Gareloch is to be broken up, but her association with the city will continue to be marked by the plaque, which said the Lord Provost Mr. Andrew Hood in accepting it from Captain Ross will be placed in the loggia of the City Chambers along with the plaque given to the city by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in recognition of the achievement during Warship Week.

The Glasgow Herald 26 Mar 1945 – Admiralty Plaque Presented
Following the Warship Week saving campaign in the first district of Renfrewshire when the target figure was £250,000 and the amount raised was over £300,000 presentations of commemorative plaques took place recently at a social meeting of the local branch of the British Legion held at the Tudor Ballroom, Giffneck and presided over by Mr John Stewart. The District Council adopted HMS Amethyst and a plaque from the Admiralty was presented to the Council by Commander Scott Elliot. Another plaque from the Council was presented to the ship by the Rev D Langlands Seath, Eaglesham the Council Chairman.

The Glagow Herald 10 July 1942 Bridge of Allan Adopts Corvette
Bridge of Allan Town Council received a letter from the Admiralty expressing their pleasure at the burgh’s decision to adopt the corvette HMS Tay as a result of their recent Warship Week effort. It was suggested that the Council might wish to have prepared a commemorative plaque which will eventually be placed in the wardroom of the ship as a mark of lasting friendship between the ship and the Bridge of Allan. Provost Suttie suggested a small committee be appointed to inquire into the matter.

The Glasgow Herald 22 Mar 1942 - Plaque Presented to Perth
Thirty officers and ratings of the crew of HMS Highlander visited Perth recently and were presented by Lord Kinnaird Lord Lieutenant of the county with a plaque to commemorate their adoption by the city in the Perth and Perthshire Warship Week two years ago. They also received a gift of £50 at the hands of the Lord Provost Sir Robert Nimmo for the entertainment of the entire ship’s company.

peter schofield
02-09-2013, 09:56
Articles that may be of interest

Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 June 1942 - HMS Vigilant
The mayor reported that at the Warship Week Committee meeting last week it was reported that the Admiralty had transferred the ship allotted to the area from HMS Hatherleigh to HMS Vigilant and it was suggested that Launceston and district might like to present the ship with a plaque. In return a plaque would be sent to be fixed in some public building and another in the rural district. The cost would be about £12. Mr Doidge thought it a pity to use the money in this way; the Mayor pointing out that the idea was that the public would take an interest in the ship. Mr. Gregg, the Deputy Mayor though that the bond of friendship which would be forged and the comforts which the men were likely to get justified the spending of £12. He proposed the scheme be adopted and that other councils concerned be asked to co-operate. Mr Fitze seconded and it was agreed.

HMS Hatherleigh was a Type III Hunt Class destroyer but was never commissioned in the RN.

In order to relieve the heavy losses of ships sustained by the Royal Hellenic Navy during the German invasion of 1941, RN ships were transferred to the RHN and manned by Greek crews. HMS Hatherleigh was transferred and commissioned as RHN Kanaris on 27 July 1942. Launceston and district held their Warship Week during 7-14 Mar 1942 raising £103,603, the original target being £100,000 for the adoption of HMS Hatherleigh.

HMS Vigilant was a V Class destroyer commissioned on 10 September 1943.

Evening Telegraph, Monday 27 March 1944, Whole Thing Was Very Secret
The Earl of Elgin, convener, reported to Fife War Savings Committee in Kircaldy today that HMS Bellona the warship adopted by the county was now on active service. The Earl said at first the idea had been to replace HMS Dunedin then it had been suggested to adopt HMS Edinburgh, but a number of other members at that time wanted to raise money for a new vessel. After a long struggle the Admiralty had agreed to let them have HMS Bellona, then being built. The whole thing was very secret and I was not even told where she was being built or the progress that was being made by the Admiralty, but the truth of the matter was that she was being built at a Govan shipyard of which I happened to be deputy chairman so I new all about it. Now he was free to speak and it was with great pleasure he told the committee that she was on active service and doing her bit for the Royal Navy.

HMS Bellona was adopted after the loss of HMS Dunedin on 24/11/41. Warship Week 18-25 Apr 1942

Chelmsford Chronicle, Friday 29 Sept 1944
The Commanding Officer of HMS Storm-cloud (Algerine Class Minesweeper), Ongar’s adopted ship wrote expressing his thanks for the games etc., which had been sent. They had proved a perfect God-send to the crew.

Ongar and District had originally adopted the trawler HMS Kingston Berly during their Warship Week 7-14 Feb 1942 when they raised £94,701. Kingston Beryl was lost during Dec 1943. HMS Storm-cloud was then adopted

The Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 November 1944 – Destroyer for Dartmouth
It is so long ago that that we held our Warship Week that we had almost given up hopes of hearing further about the matter. Firstly we were given HMS Haldon and we got our plaque already for the same. Then the Admiralty wrote to say that as the Haldon was going to the Free French would we stick to her or have another ship. We preferred to have a British ship and a British crew. Then they promised us HMS Caesar and we had the plaque altered. After a while the Admiralty sent us their plaque of Haldon. This had to be sent back and they acknowledged their mistake. Months have passed. Naturally we had more or less forgotten the Caesar and our plaque has been kicking around all the time.
Plaque Exchange: However all is well at last. When we get the Caesar’s plaque from the Admiralty we will arrange a formal exchange.

HMS Caesar was a C Class (Ca Group) Destroyer commissioned Oct 1944

Dover Express – Friday 5 December 1947, Dover’s Adopted Warship
HMS Peterhead which was adopted by Dover under the Warship Weeks Adoption Scheme is no longer in commission and the Mayor had received a letter from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty regretting that the association between the ship and the people of Dover will necessary be brought to a conclusion. The plaque of the Borough Arms presented by the town to HMS Peterhead has been handed back and the Major has offered it to the local Sea Cadets Corps for placing in their headquarters building. It is hoped to arrange a formal ceremony for the handing over of the plaque to the Sea Cadets in the near future.

peter schofield
22-09-2013, 10:56
SOMERSET
Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, Saturday 13 December 1941 – Bridgwater Plaque for Destroyer
The final meeting of Bridgwater Executive Committee was held on Friday under the chairmanship of Alderman Deacon CBE. It was reported that the proceeds of the sale of programmes was £12 3s 3d and badges £76 11s 4d and after deducting the cost there remained a profit of £44 6s 1d. The Committee decided to pay £2 10s out of this balance for expenses incurred in entertaining the visiting bands and to utilise a portion of the remainder in payment of the plaque which is being prepared and which will be affixed to the quarterdeck of HMS Wolfhound. Thus all who purchased a badge or a programme during Warship Week will have an interest in the plaque. It is intended to display the plaque for a week or so before it is dispatched to the Admiralty.

Western Gazette, Friday 19 March 1943 – Plaques of HMS Stour
Following a communication from the Secretary of the Admiralty concerning the inscription on the plaque proposed to be presented to Blandford Rural District Council to commemorate the adoption of HMS Stour as a result of Warship Week it was decided at Thursday meeting to reply that it was the councils opinion it would be advisable not to present plaques having regard to all the present day circumstances.

Somerset County Herald, Saturday 17 June 1944 - Plaques Exchanged
The official opening on Saturday of Salute the Soldier Week was marked with a parade and meeting at the Athletic Ground at which presentations were made of plaques in connection with Warships and Wings for Victory Weeks. At the opening of the ceremony Mr Howard Fox presiding. Admiral Caserment presented Warship Week plaques to Mr Fox for the Urban Council and Mr Thomas for the District Council. Mr Harry Fox on behalf of the district presented Admiral Casement with a plaque to be given to HMS Wellington the towns adopted ship. Similar presentations were made to commemorate Wings for Victory Week.

Western Daily Express, Friday 3 March 1944 – Borough and Urban District Warship Week
To commemorate the adoption of HMS Helford by Glastonbury and district during Warship Week an Admiral visited Glastonbury to present plaques of the ships badge to Glastonbury and Street. The Mayor presided and was supported by Aldermen and Councillors of the Borough representatives of Street Urban Council and many War Savings workers. The Admiral said that presentation was a little belated be he took the opportunity to congratulate Glastonbury and the Urban Council of Street on raising £122,068 during Warship Week and providing the Admiralty with the cost of the Hunt Class destroyer which was doing good work. Mr Percy Holley accepting the plaque on behalf of Street and Walton said that they knew little about HMS Helford but had decided to get better acquainted with the ship and their crew.

HMS Helford was a River Class Frigate not a Hunt Class Destroyer

Historian and author Dr. David Davies pointed out that Margaret Thatcher's constitutency of Finchley had adopted HMS Tartar during Warship Week, wonder if this would have raised a smile if the Lady knew?

peter schofield
02-10-2013, 17:39
South Shields Warship Week

During Warship Week 24-31 January 1942 South Shields adopted the Tribal Class Destroyer HMS Maori which was sunk twelve days later after an aircraft attack off Malta. The Council were either not aware of the loss or still expecting to adopt HMS Maori. In a letter from South Shields Council dated 17 May 1943 the Hon. Secretary of the Savings Committee pointed out that they had not received the replica of the badge (adoption plaque) of HMS Maori and that the presentation plaque to the vessel bearing the towns coat of arms had been ready for some time. It was mentioned that a good time to exchange plaques would be during the period 12-19 June 1943 when South Shields ‘Wings for Victory Week would be held. On the 29 May the Military Branch of the Admiralty informed the Council that HMS Maori had been withdrawn from the adoption scheme and the destroyer HMS Chaplet allocated instead. The euphemism ‘withdrawn from the adoption scheme’ being the Admiralty’s way of politely saying sunk or lost.

On the 31 May the Council replied as follows: ‘I am obliged for your letter of the 29th instant from which I am sorry to note that HMS Maori has been withdrawn from the adoption scheme. I am sure that South Shields will be quite ready to adopt the destroyer HMS Chaplet instead of HMS Maori. Am I correct in assuming from your letter that while the replica of the badge of HMS Maori is practically ready it will have to be scrapped and a new one prepared for HMS Chaplet? If this is so I am afraid it will be difficult to arrange for the exchange of tokens during ‘Wings for Victory Week but no doubt this ceremony can take place at a convenient time in the future.’

The Admiralty in reply on 4 June confirmed that the replica badge of HMS Maori would be despatched to the Council shortly. However if the Council desired, the replica plaque could be returned to Chatham Dockyard and a replica badge of HMS Chaplet would be sent, of course it would be some time before they received it. The badge of HMS Maori was duly received on 7 June 1943 and the Council replied to the Admiralty saying they proposed to return it to Chatham so that a replica of the badge of HMS Chaplet could be prepared and sent to South Shields in its place. The Council then wrote on the 30 July to say that the South Shields National Savings Committee had agreed to adopt HMS Chaplet in place of HMS Maori and that arrangements were being made to prepare an amended presentation plaque for HMS Chaplet. On 4 August the Admiralty requested that the badge of HMS Maori be returned to Chatham.

Having accepted HMS Chaplet as a replacement for HMS Maori, South Shields set up an adoption fund which on 28 August 1943 amounted to between £50 and £100 for comforts for the ships complement. To this the Admiralty pointed out that the Council could not contact the Commanding Officer of HMS Chaplet regarding comforts. The fact that the vessel had been allocated for adoption gave no indication to whether she was in commission, building or yet to be laid down. No details of the vessel other than the name or type could be released for security reasons and direct communication could not be given until the Admiralty gave permission.

South Shields must have had some inkling regarding the sinking of HMS Maori as people would want to know why their adopted vessel had been withdrawn and replaced by another. Having adopted HMS Maori in early 1942 the exchange of plaques would eventually have taken place sometime late 1943 or early 1944, local papers will report this. HMS Chaplet was launched July 1944 and commissioned 24 Aug 1945 by which time the war was over so the town was not able to read of the heroics of their adopted ship unlike other towns. However allowance must be made for the fact that at the time of the communications between South Shields Council and the Admiralty it was not know how long the war would last and if it had continued after 1945 HMS Chaplet would no doubt have played her part.

Information taken from Admiralty records held at Kew kindly supplied by Dr David Davies Historian and Author

HMS Maori - Located a few hundred metres from the shore from Valletta, HMS Maori is now a popular dive site. The bow section lies in white sand at a depth of 14m, the aft section of the ship having been abandoned in deep water during the tow from Grand Harbour to Marsamxett Harbour. Much of the forward superstructure is still extant, including the two front gun bases.

Update: Having trawled through the many archived files regarding South Shields the saga carries on into 1945 and it appears that the Council were not happy with the adoption of Chaplet as they could not communicate directly with the ships CO and out of frustration asked to be adopted by a ship they could communicate with. The Admiralty then offered them HMS Cavalier which they adopted. There is then communication between the CO of Chaplet and the Admiralty as to who was going to adopt Chaplet. Will write this up in due course but it appears that South Shields adopted HMS Cavalier. Oddly the post following this on the Forum was for HMS Cavalier.

peter schofield
02-12-2013, 11:24
The Sussex Agricultural Express, 6 February 1942 - Lewes Increases Warship Week Tasks – No More Corvettes Minesweeper Instead - £136,485 Wanted
Corvettes all gone: Please select a warship in some other category. A letter to this effect was received this week by Mr Muddell campaign secretary in connection with the Lewes Borough Warship Week (Feb 28 – 7 Mar 1942) from the regional office of the National Savings Committee. The General Committee have decided to purchase a minesweeper in place of a corvette. In this direction the people of Lewes are asked to make even greater efforts to save, as it requires £136,485 to buy a minesweeper. Originally Lewes set out to raise £100,000.

Minesweepers costs: Hull £62,450; main and auxiliary machinery £55,120; armament and ammunition £7,585; other equipment £11,330; total £136,485.

The Sussex Agricultural Express, Friday 3 July 1942 County Town’s Commemorative Plaque
The plaque which is to be presented by the town of Lewes to the destroyer HMS Lewes adopted as the county town as the result of Warship Week was on view at a meeting of Lewes Town Council on Wednesday evening. It is of bronze mounted on teak. It has the borough arms emblazoned in colour at the top, with the following inscription below: ‘This plaque is presented to HMS Lewes to commemorate her adoption during Warship Week March 1942.’ The Mayor remarked that a plaque was to come from HMS Lewes to be placed in a suitable position in the Town Hall, but he had been informed that this was not ready. It was intended that an officer from the ship should pay a visit to Lewes for the exchange of the plaques and an opportunity would be given to the burgesses especially those who served on the committee of Warship Week to attend on this occasion.

The Sussex Agricultural Express, Friday 2 October 1942
An interesting chapter in the long history of Lewes was added on Friday afternoon at the Town Hall when plaques were exchanged between the county town and HMS Lewes the destroyer adopted by the borough as a result of Warship Week. The plaque from the town of Lewes was of bronze bearing the Borough Arms and the inscription ‘This plaque is presented to HMS Lewes to commemorate her adoption during Warship Week March 1942.’ The plaque presented to Lewes bore the badge of HMS Lewes in colour on an ebony shield which had a brass plate engraves as follows ‘Presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Lewes (Sussex) to Commemorate the Adoption of HMS Lewes during 7th March 1942.’ The target was originally £100,000 for a corvette this was then changed to a minesweeper when the Admiralty ran out of corvette names. The people responded so well that Mr James an active worker for the local savings movement thought they should go all out for £200,000 for a destroyer, and by raising £200,972 12s 2d they had the honour of adopting HMS Lewes.

peter schofield
07-12-2013, 10:29
The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 12 April 1943 – Plaque and Red Ensign for Keighley
At a ceremony in Keighley Town Hall Square on Saturday the Mayor (Mr. T. Snowden) handed to Vice Admiral L.D.I. Mackinnon (representing the Admiralty) a replica of the borough coat of arms to be placed on the destroyer Marne which the town adopted in Warship Week, and Admiral Mackinnon presented to the town the ships plaque. In recognition of the town’s successful Merchant Navy Week when £271,951 was raised, Mr. Hector McNeil MP representing the Minister of War Transport presented to Sir William Prince-Smith (Chairman of Keighley Savings Committee) a miniature Red Ensign. Sir William handed the flag to the Mayor.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 5 July 1943 – Exchange of Plaques at Hemsworth
During the Wings for Victory Week proceedings at Hemsworth on Saturday there was an exchange of plaques between the Council and the Admiralty to mark the successful result of Warship Week last year when the people of Hemsworth district raised £67,000 to cover the cost of the building of HM Minesweeper Kingtone Olivine. The Council’s plaque was handed over by Chairman of the Council (Councillor Pawson) and Lt. Evers RNVR a native of Brisbane, Australia, one time first officer of the Kingstone Olivine officiated for the Admiralty. The Rector of Hemsworth who is chairman of the War Savings Committee presided.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Saturday 9 October 1943
An officer of Pudsey’s adopted destroyer HMS Saladin, Surgeon Lt. Theo Schofield visited Pudsey yesterday and was presented with a plaque given by the Corporation to be placed on the quarter-deck of the ship to commemorate Pudsey’s achievement during its Warship Week savings effort last year, when it raised over £400,000. The good wishes of the townspeople to the officers and men of Saladin were expressed by the Mayor (Mr. E Dufton) etc. etc.

peter schofield
21-12-2013, 12:05
Lincolnshire Warship Weeks
The campaign in Lincolnshire would continue over a 23 week period starting on 18 October 1941 when the signing of contracts at HMS Royal Arthur, Skegness would take place. The contracts were divided into two parts, one provided for 23 weeks regular saving throughout the period of the campaign with a second part dealing with the amount aimed at for the district’s particular maximum aim in its appointed Warship Week. The contracts pledged to provide a sum no less than £7,473,566. By weekly savings the committees contracted to provide three cruisers at a cost of £3,466,566 and four destroyers, two submarines, five corvettes and other craft at a cost of £4,007,000 saved through Warship Weeks. Contracts for the campaign were signed by representatives of the savings committees throughout the county and by Commodore Buckley on behalf of the Royal Navy and Captain Crookshank MP as Financial Secretary to the Treasury. The signatories gathered round a central table in chronological order of their respective Warship Weeks and simultaneously signed their contracts which were then passed on to the Commodore’s table where they were signed before countersigning by Captain Crookshank. The completed contracts were handed to the Master of Ceremonies who read out the tenders. After the signing the contracts were eventually returned to the chairmen of the savings committees before being publicly displayed in the appropriate districts. Three county indicators would show the progress of Warships Weeks and make provision for display of the county total as well as the local amount. HMS Royal Arthur also produced three wooden model warships which toured the county.

johnny07
21-12-2013, 12:12
This reminds me of conversations with old ww2 army commandos. One of them told me that during the war one of their passwords was Weymouth war weapons week. This was because the hun could'nt pronounce their Ws

peter schofield
24-12-2013, 11:40
The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Saturday 26 June 1943 – Admiralty Offer to Bingley
At Bingley last night Rear Admiral the Hon. Lionel Forbes-Sempill presented to Mr. Jonas Hanson, chairman of Bingley Warship Week campaign, a replica of HMS Electra, the destroyer which the town adopted during Warship Week. Mr Hanson handed the replica to Mr F Ellison chairman of Bingley Urban Council who received it on behalf of the town. Rear Admiral Forbes-Sempill announced that if Bingley saving group could raise £100,000 by the end of the present year the Admiralty had offered to let Bingley adopt the Norwegian destroyer Glaisdale. HMS Electra lost 27 Feb 1942.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 1 November 1943 - Plaque Ceremony for Knaresborough
The ceremony of exchanging Warship Week and Wings for Victory plaques took place in Knaresborough Town Hall on Saturday. The town’s Warship Week plaque carved from local oak by Miss D Fretwell (head mistress of the Castle Girl’s School) and Mrs. Wignall (an assistant teacher) was presented by Councillor Broadbelt to Lt Greaves RNR who presented in return the Admiralty’s plaque commemorating the adoption of the ship.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Monday 19 June 1944 - Warship Week Plaques at Selby
Warship Week plaques were presented by Vice Admiral Mackinnon to Mr. Cochrane and Mr. Webster chairmen of the Urban and Rural Councils.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Tuesday 11 July 1944 – Plaques Presentation
An Exchange of plaques between Harrogate and HMS Cleopatra, which Harrogate adopted after Warship Week took place at a meeting of the Town Council yesterday. The presentation was made by Rear Admiral Slattery, who when as captain was in command of Cleopatra. The Deputy Mayor (Alderman H Bolland making the presentation said Harrogate would be proud of the association and look forward to long years of friendship with the officers and crew.

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, Saturday 20 September 1944 - Submarine Crew Guests at Sowerby Bridge
Residents of Sowerby Bridge yesterday gave a warm-hearted welcome to Lt Piper DSO and the crew of HMS Unsparing the submarine adopted by Sowerby after the Warship Week campaign. It was the first official visit which the crew had been able to pay to the district and they brought with them the Jolly Roger which records the boats famous exploits in the Mediterranean when several enemy ships were sunk and others damaged. At the station they were welcomed by Mr P Carter, chairman of the Savings Appeal Committee and Councillor Butterworth chairman of the Council. During their stay in the town the visitors will be billeted with local people. A full round of social and other events has been planned.

peter schofield
09-01-2014, 11:14
AFO 1495 Gifts to HM Ships in Connection with Warship Weeks etc 2/4/42
1. Attention is drawn to KRs and AIs Article 28 which forbid, except with prior Admiralty authority the acceptance by Naval personnel of gifts from private sources for acts performed by them in their official capacity
2. Wherever information is received of a proposal to make a monetary presentation to a ship by a town or a proposal is made by a firm or organisation to make a gift in recognition of rescue work etc., or in any other similar circumstances, the correct course is to suggest that the money should be forwarded to the RN War Amenities Fund, Rex House, Lower Regent Street, London, SW1, in order that arrangements may be made for it to be spent on the provision of amenities for the crew of the ship. At the same time the secretary of the fund should be informed of the proposal in order that arrangements may be made in consultation with the Commanding Officer for the money to be spent in the most appropriate way.

CHIEF STOKER
20-02-2014, 19:19
I was doing some research in to which ship my home town COULD have adopted if any ,and in doing so found this list of other ships,and many from surrounding towns,it may just intrest other members.


http://www.godfreydykes.info/WARSHIP%20ADOPTIONS%20IN%20WW2.htm

cylla

Hi, do you have confirmation of an adopted town for HMS JUPITER please, the following village and town are claiming they did so. The village of Church Lench, in Worcestershire, adopted HMS Jupiter in 1941 as part of Warship week and Evesham Borough Council during WWII.

jbryce1437
20-02-2014, 20:01
Hi, do you have confirmation of an adopted town for HMS JUPITER please, the following village and town are claiming they did so. The village of Church Lench, in Worcestershire, adopted HMS Jupiter in 1941 as part of Warship week and Evesham Borough Council during WWII.
There is reference to Jupiter's adoption on this post
http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10078132&postcount=181
and here
http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10069104&postcount=149

Jim

peter schofield
22-02-2014, 09:38
There is reference to Jupiter's adoption on this post
http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10078132&postcount=181
and here
http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10069104&postcount=149

Jim

Evesham and District Warship Week was held between 25 Oct and 1 Nov 1941 when they raised £578,390 to adopt HMS Jupiter. On the loss of Jupiter, 27 Feb 1942 they adopted HMS Venus. There should be adoption plaques for Evesham Borough and Rural District somewhere. I would be glad to hear of their whereabouts

peter schofield
22-02-2014, 10:24
Hi, do you have confirmation of an adopted town for HMS JUPITER please, the following village and town are claiming they did so. The village of Church Lench, in Worcestershire, adopted HMS Jupiter in 1941 as part of Warship week and Evesham Borough Council during WWII.

This item may be of interest:

Gloucestershire Echo, Tuesday 4 November 1941
Evesham and Districts Warship Week total was on Monday night announced to be £571,072. The original aim was £210,000 for the purchase of the hull of a destroyer. The £571,000 is enough to provide not only the hull but the engines and machinery with a good balance towards other equipment and armaments. The 25 village areas contributed no less than £227,600 and Broadway contributed the splendid sum of £64,108.
Village Contributions
The results from some of the smaller villages were quite remarkable. Adlington with less than 150 people raised £2,152 and Aston Somerville with 120, £1,755 including £177 by 22 children in the infants school. Harvington with a population of 700 produced £12,807 and of the larger villages Badsey with 1,200 produced £37,677; Bretford (less than 800) £18,109; the Littletons, three villages with just over 1,000, £13,278; Norton and Lenchwick (800) £11,464; and Offenham (1,100) £18,694. Kemerton’s place at the bottom of the list with £100 is explained by the fact that the village has been engaged on a big summer drive in which they have raised money for ambulances and other purposes. Other village contributions are:
Abbot’s Morton £679
Ashton-under-Hill £4,053
Ashton Somerville £1,755
Beckford £2,828
Childswickham £4,964
Church Lench £3,575
Cleeve Priory £531
Cookhill £8,168
Honeybourne £1,553
Hinton-on-the-Green £1,355
Inkberrow £4,487
Overbury £2,987
Pebworth £1,257
Rouse Lench £3,802
Sedgeberrow £3,369
Wickhamford £3,842
The balance of £343,372 may be attributed to Evesham Borough, but this amount includes the big contributions of banks and insurance companies, which were not apportioned between the borough and outside areas.


Many of the villages who exceeded their targets would have been presented with Illuminated Certificates

peter schofield
22-04-2014, 17:26
Stamford Mercury Friday, 24 April 1942 – Grantham Warship Week Success
Final figures for Grantham and West Kesteven were made know last weekend. These reveal that people in the area responded magnificently to the appeal. The borough and district aimed at two targets - £240,000 to be raised during Warship Week to provide two corvettes, HMS Egret and HMS Halcyon and the second a weekly contract of £11,000 over the 22 weeks of the campaign. Both of these were greatly exceeded, the Warship Week total by £106,910 while the weekly average amount was £14 13s. The grand total raised over the whole period including Warship Week was £657,772 against the contracted figure of £482,000 which was thus exceeded by £175,772.

Working out the figures: £11,000 x 22 = £242,000 over the 22 weeks not including Warship Week
For Warship Week the target was £120,000 for the adoption of HMS Egret
HMS Egret was lost on 23 Aug 1943 then a further £120,000 was raised to adopt HMS Halcyon
The total contracted target therefore came to £482,000

Lincolnshire’s county target of £7,473,566 was announced in November 1941 revealing that the savings target would enable the Admiralty to sign contracts for three cruisers at a cost of £3,466,566 saved through normal weekly savings plus four destroyers, two submarines and other craft at a cost of £4,007,000 saved through Warship Weeks. As a commitment before the inauguration of Warship Weeks representatives of the savings committees from 26 Lincolnshire’s districts visited HMS Royal Arthur at Skegness to hand Rear Admiral Buckley (Commodore Royal Arthur) signed contracts guaranteeing the cost of the £7,473,566.

Grantham and West Kesteven was one of the 26 districts.

peter schofield
23-04-2014, 09:10
Following on from the previous post:

‘The savings target would enable the Admiralty to sign contracts for three cruisers at a cost of £3,466,566 saved through normal weekly savings.’

For the cost of three cruisers the 26 districts of Lincolnshire were split into three areas each with a final target of £1,200,000. Charts were provided to show how each area was progressing through the 23 weeks of the Warship Week campaign, this of course added to the competition between areas.

Area 1 – West Kesteven, Grantham, Stamford, East Elloe, Bourne and South Kesteven, Sleaford and East Kesteven, Welton RD, N Kesteven, Spalding, Horncastle, Spilsby RD.

Area 2 – Lincoln, Skegness, Louth and RD, Mablethorpe, Alford, Boston and RD

Area 3 – Brigg and District, Barton-on-Humber, Isle of Axholme, Scunthorpe, Grimsby, Gainsborough and RD, Cleethorpes, Market Rasen and Caistor, Grimsby RD.

peter schofield
11-07-2014, 13:35
When the Forest of Dean held its Warship Weeks between 14-21 March 1942 the area was split into the three rural districts of Lydney, East Dean and West Dean. Each areas target was £60,000 to adopt a submarine as follows:

Lydney RD H32
East Dean RD H33
West Dean RD H34

While searching on the web it was discovered that at a recent auction by Nesbits, Southsea that the adoption plaques for Lydney and West Dean had been put up for sale with an estimate of £200 to £300 each. There were no bids, so they remain unsold.

The question was where was the third adoption plaque. The following article may answer the question.

Gloucester Journal, Saturday 12 June 1943 - Affairs in the Forest of Dean
The Admiralty has now ceased their practice of giving plaques to those local authorities and organizations who achieved their Warship Week objectives. But East Dean will not get a plaque because, said the secretary of the local saving committee (Mr. A. Bengough) at the annual meeting of the Rural District Council had failed in its responsibility. The subject of the plaque has been a feature of correspondence between the Committee and the Council and the local authority explained that they were unable to buy it because the auditor would not pass the expenditure. Obviously the Savings Committee thought the arrangement were possible in the same way as they were in West Dean and Lydney, where plaques had also been awarded. There was something lacking in East Dean Rural District Council, which was present in the other two local authorities, Mr. Bengough told the latter. East Dean will have no plaque to hang on the wall of the Council Chamber because there was no more being made. The cost would have been £6.


It was normal for the Admiralty to award adoption plaques if a district had met its target, which East Dean had managed raising £81,289 some £10,000 more than West Dean. The £6 may have been the cost of a presentation plaque to the submarine, which the council turned down. Whether this held back the adoption plaque presentation until it was too late as the Admiralty had stopped manufacturing them is not known.

Finally I personally feel that the selling of an areas heritage should not be condoned, the plaques should be displayed in the Forest of Dean Heritage Centre

dave.moscow1
13-07-2014, 22:01
H32 and H34 plaques are still up for sale at Nesbits on 16Th July14 lot No 404 and 405.

Dave K

peter schofield
17-07-2014, 21:33
The interesting thing about Ilminster and HMS Ready is that they carried on saving after the completion of Warship Weeks to raise the full amount of the vessel in national savings:

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, Saturday 28 March 1942
Mr. Bartle chairman of the Ilminster Council and president of the Warship and Savings Committee has received a letter from Lord Kindersle, president of the National Savings Committee, asking him to accept personally and convey to all other who have contributed to the success of Ilminster Warship Week his warmest thanks and appreciation. This effort resulting in the adoption of HMS Ready will not only forge a closer link with the people of Ilminster and the RN but will also provide a lasting record of their patriotism.

23 May 1942; Getting ‘The Ready’ Ready – Summer Savings Drive
Since Warship Week when the people of Ilminster and district invested £74,011 towards the cost of the minesweeper HMS Ready, a further sum has been raised during the thirteen weeks ended May 16th. This brings the total sum invested so far to £102,513, leaving £33,972 to be lent in order that the full cost of the ship may be discharged. The following is a list of items and their costs, and Savings Groups are urged to make use of them as an objective for a summer drive:
£15,057 for auxiliary machinery;
£7,585 for armament and ammunition;
£1,930 for gun mountings;
£5,000 for naval stores;
£3,600 for fitting stores;
£500 for survey dinghy;
£300 for extras
The Executive of the Ilminster and District Savings Committee appreciate fully the patient and persistent efforts of all those who have helped to get the ‘Ready’ in action. They express the hope everyone will do his upmost to save what he can.

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, Saturday 11 July, 1942; Savings Committee Meeting – Paying for HMS Ready
A meeting of the Ilminster and District War Savings Committee was held at the Council Chamber on Saturday. Mrs. Kemmis (chairman) presided supported by etc. etc. Mr. I. L. Morgan presented a suggested design for the plaque to be presented to HMS Ready. This is to be made from local well seasoned oak about 16ins x 11ins with the wording ‘This plaque is presented to HMS Ready to commemorate her adoption by the people of Ilminster and district, Somerset, 1942’. After discussion as to adding a design it was suggested that the Somerset dragon would be appropriate and on Mr. Morgan saying he would get a design drawn out in detail, the suggested plaque was agreed to. Mr. Talbot in his report said there were 48 savings groups in the district. The half-yearly returns showed that the average amount invested for members was £11 4s 11d per head or £3 3s 2d of the population. This is 28 per cent of the population; they must try to get more groups and more members. He gave a progress report of ‘The Ready Fund’, and said it was hoped to clear the debt by the end of August. The subject of a summer campaign on ‘Tanks for Attack’ was discussed and it was agreed not to start any further campaign until the on HMS Ready had been cleared. Mrs. Sweeting (Dowlish Wake) said her group had decided on a special week with a target of £250. Mrs. Kemmis said she had received sums of £24 and some articles for the Comforts Fund for men serving on HMS Ready.
Progress of the ‘Ready Fund’ – The National Savings Total in the Ilminster and District Committee’s area for the week ending 4 July was £2,015. The present position towards paying of the cost of HMS Ready, target £136,485: amounts invested in: Warship Week £74,011; 20 weeks to 4 July £46,012; total £120,023; amount owing £16,462.

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, Saturday 8 August, 1942
The present position of ‘The Ready Fund’ is: target £136,485: amounts invested in: Warship Week £74,011; amount invested 23 weeks ended 25 July £55,197; total £129,208; amount owing £7,277.

Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, Saturday 15 August, 1942
The position of The Ready Fund is now: target £136,485: amounts invested in: Warship Week £74,011; amount invested 25 weeks ended 8 August £59,573; total £133,764; amount owing £2,721. This sum is required to pay for the remaining items of the fitting stores. When this

jbryce1437
07-08-2014, 21:49
Durham Warship Weeks

Lanchester - MTB 36, Motor Torpedo Boat

I visited Beamish Museum today and was surprised to see a leaflet for the Lanchester and District Warship Week - Nov 29th - Dec 6th 1941, lying on a table. Consequently, I took some photos of it and have attached them to this post.
[It is interesting to see the terms of the various Saving Schemes on the back page, together with the interest rates - although you had to wait 10 years for your return.
My grandmother ran a street savings group and I inherited the delivery round from my oldest brother, and I passed it on to my younger brother, who eventually passed it on to our youngest brother. We used to deliver the 2/6d and 6d stamps to members of the group on a Sunday morning. My grandmother lost her son on HMS Royal Oak and fervently supported the war effort].

Jim

Scatari
07-08-2014, 23:32
I visited Beamish Museum today and was surprised to see a leaflet for the Lanchester and District Warship Week - Nov 29th - Dec 6th 1941, lying on a table. Consequently, I took some photos of it and have attached them to this post.

Jim

What a wonderful piece of history Jim - many thanks for posting it.

TheFormerChief
07-09-2014, 15:17
This is some information relating to the Warship Weeks held by the communities in the old county of Monmouthshire during the first quarter of 1942.

It has been obtained by a search through the copies of the South Wales Argus for the same period. The information is not totally complete, as some details (i.e. the final figure) could not be found.

The details, listed in alphabetical order and using the following key

Community Name / Target / Amount Raised / Ship to be purchased / Date of Week

are as follows are as follows:

Abercarn / £70,000 / £49, 621 / Not known / Not known

Abergavenny / £75,000 / £125,000 / Unnamed MTB / 14 - 21 March 1942

Abertillery / £120,000 / £128,727 / Not known / 31 January - 7 February 1942

Bedwas & Machen / £30,000 / Not known / Unnamed MTB / 21 - 28 February 1942

Bedwellty / £120,000 / £83,417 / Not known / 14 - 21 February 1942

Blaenavon / £35,000 / £61,348 / Unnamed MTB / 7 - 14 February 1942

Chepstow / £62,000 / £26,541 / HMS Cape Warwick (Minesweeper) / Not known

Cwmbran & Pontnewydd / £70,000 / £60,000 / HMS Turquoise (Minesweeper / Trawler) / Not known

Ebbw Vale / £136,000 / £124,000 / An unnamed Large Minesweeper / 28 February - 7 March 1942

Gellygaer / £120,000 / £114,300 / Not known / Not known

Magor & St Mellons with Rogerstone, High Cross and Langstone / £85,000 / £89,596 / Not known / Not known

Monmouth / Not known / not known / 7 - 14 February 1942
Note: No details have been found apart from the dates.

Mynyddislwyn / £40,000 / £26,000 / not known / 17 - 24 January 1942

Nantyglo & Blaina / £40,000 / £43,147 / HMS Cedar (Minesweeper) / 28 February - 7 March 1942

Risca / £120,000 / £70,272 / HMS Primrose (Corvette) / 21 - 28 January 1942

Tredegar / 55,000 / £57,293 / Unnamed Trawler/Minesweeper / 14 - 21 March 1942

Usk / £40,000 / £40,000 / HMS Tango (ASW Trawler) / 31 January - 7 February 1942

If you have any questions, please let me know.

TheFormerChief
07-09-2014, 15:39
Whilst looking at the old copies of the South Wales Argus, I found the following additional information about some of the English Warship Weeks.

It is listed in this way - Community / Target / Amount Raised (Where available) / Ship to be purchased.

Halifax / £1.5m / £2m / HMS Ajax (Cruiser)
Oxford / £1.25m / £1.4m / HMS Enterprise (Cruiser)
Chesterfield / £1m / Not known / (Cruiser)
Croydon / £750,000 / Not known / HMS Milne (Destroyer)
Brighton / £700,000 / Not known / HMS Kipling (Destroyer)
Doncaster / £700,000/ Not known / HMS Lightening (Destroyer)
Hornchurch / £700,000/ Not known / HMS Hurricane (Destroyer)
Oldham & Lees / £700,000 / £1.6m / HMS Onslow (Destroyer)
Walsall / £700,000 / £870,000 / HMS Marksman (Destroyer)
Warrington / £700,000 / Not known / HMS Obdurate (Destroyer)
West Riding of Yorkshire (Upper Nidderdale) / £25,000 / Not known /Not known
Manchester / £10m / £10.9m / HMS Nelson (Battleship)
Hull / £1.2m / Not known / Not known / Not known
Stockport / £1m / Not known /Not known / Not known.

I also found an article saying that London had committed itself to a target of £125m. This would be used to provide four battleships, three aircraft carriers, five cruisers, five submarines and forty destroyers, corvettes and smaller craft. This article was dated 23rd March 1942, by which date a total of £42.5m had been raised.

Again, if you have any questions, please let me know.

peter schofield
20-09-2014, 15:48
This is some information relating to the Warship Weeks held by the communities in the old county of Monmouthshire during the first quarter of 1942.

It has been obtained by a search through the copies of the South Wales Argus for the same period. The information is not totally complete, as some details (i.e. the final figure) could not be found.

The details, listed in alphabetical order and using the following key

Community Name / Target / Amount Raised / Ship to be purchased / Date of Week

are as follows are as follows:

Abercarn / £70,000 / £49, 621 / Not known / Not known

Abergavenny / £75,000 / £125,000 / Unnamed MTB / 14 - 21 March 1942

Abertillery / £120,000 / £128,727 / Not known / 31 January - 7 February 1942

Bedwas & Machen / £30,000 / Not known / Unnamed MTB / 21 - 28 February 1942

Bedwellty / £120,000 / £83,417 / Not known / 14 - 21 February 1942

Blaenavon / £35,000 / £61,348 / Unnamed MTB / 7 - 14 February 1942

Chepstow / £62,000 / £26,541 / HMS Cape Warwick (Minesweeper) / Not known

Cwmbran & Pontnewydd / £70,000 / £60,000 / HMS Turquoise (Minesweeper / Trawler) / Not known

Ebbw Vale / £136,000 / £124,000 / An unnamed Large Minesweeper / 28 February - 7 March 1942

Gellygaer / £120,000 / £114,300 / Not known / Not known

Magor & St Mellons with Rogerstone, High Cross and Langstone / £85,000 / £89,596 / Not known / Not known

Monmouth / Not known / not known / 7 - 14 February 1942
Note: No details have been found apart from the dates.

Mynyddislwyn / £40,000 / £26,000 / not known / 17 - 24 January 1942

Nantyglo & Blaina / £40,000 / £43,147 / HMS Cedar (Minesweeper) / 28 February - 7 March 1942

Risca / £120,000 / £70,272 / HMS Primrose (Corvette) / 21 - 28 January 1942

Tredegar / 55,000 / £57,293 / Unnamed Trawler/Minesweeper / 14 - 21 March 1942

Usk / £40,000 / £40,000 / HMS Tango (ASW Trawler) / 31 January - 7 February 1942

If you have any questions, please let me know.


Information for Monmouth Warship Weeks, I hold complete lists on North and South Wales if anyone wants to know more. I am interested if anyone knows the whereabouts of any Warship Week plaques

Abergele UD, HMS Holyhock, Flower Class Corvette, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942, raised £106,441
Aberearn UD, MTB 256, Motor Torpedo Boat, 24-31 Jan 1942, £59,135
Abertillery,HMS Nigella, Flower Class Corvette, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942, raised £129,585
Bedwas and Machen, MTB 62, 21-28 Feb 1942, raised £38,907
Bedwellty UD, HMS Buttercup, Flower Class Corvette, 14-21 Feb 1942, raised £81,400
Blaenavon, MTB 79, Motor Torpedo Boat, 7-14 Mar 1942, raised £62,973
Chepstow and District, HMS Cape Warwick, Trawler A/S, 7-14 Mar 1942, raised £210,039
Blaina and Nantyglo, HMS Cedar, Tree Class Trawler, 26 Feb to 7 Mar 1942, raised £45,011
Cwmbran and Pontnewydd, HMS Turquoise, Gem Class A/S Trawler, 17-24 Jan 1942, raised £60,000
Ebbw Vale, HMS Alresford, Albury Class Minesweeper, 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942, raised £160,000
Magor and St Mellons, HMS Magnet, Boom Defence Vessel, 14-21 Feb 1942, raised £91,811
Monmouth MB and RD, HMS Coral, Gem Class A/S Trawler, 7-14 Mar 1942, £110,516
Mynyddislwyn, HMS Sapphire, Gem Class AS Trawler, 17-24 Jan 1942, raised £217,154
Newport, HMS Newport, Town Class Destroyer Type 6, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942, £840,212
Penygroes, HMS Corena, Trawler – Minesweeper, TBA, TBA
Pontypool and Panteg, Kittiwake, Kingfisher Class Corvette, 6-13 Dec 1941, raised £137,560
Rhymney UD, MTB 69, Motor Torpedo Boat, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942, raised £44,660
Risca, HMS Primrose, Flower Class Corvette, 24-31 Jan 1942, £70,273
Tredegar UD, HMS Inken, Hills Class A/S Trawler, 14-21 Mar 1942, £83,856
Usk, HMS Tango, Dance Class Trawler, 31 Jan to 7 Feb 1942, raised £48,349

peter schofield
06-10-2014, 12:56
Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, Saturday 25 April 1942 - £18,500,000 Raised in 70 Durham County Warship Weeks
The results of Warship Weeks in Durham County were reported at a meeting of Durham County Advisory Committee in Durham City yesterday. The Regional Commissioner for National Savings Committee, Mr. Gatenby, who made the report, said that in the whole region over 70 weeks were held and about £18,500,000 raised. Durham County’s share was £7,888,892, including £2,369,968 in small savings. The grand total equalled something under £6 per head of the population. Outstanding results were Sunderland (Rural Area) £1,000,000, Hartlepool £17 13s 7d per head, Darlington RD £12 7s 8d per head, Stockton £10 13s 6d per head, West Hartlepool £10 9s 5d per head, Darlington £9 0s 4d per head. Mr. Gatenby said that since the campaign started in November 1939 to 4 April last, the county had subscribed £29,983,364. It now had 8,128 Savings Groups, of which 2,639 were in places of employment, 1,009 in schools, 3,665 in streets and villages and 815 social organizations and miscellaneous categories. Big totals included Sunderland (rural areas) 5.5 million pound. West Hartlepool nearly 5 million, Darlington £3,667,000, Stockton £2,825,000, South Shields nearly £2,500,000, Gateshead over two million, Consett nearly 1.5 million, Durham City nearly 1.25 million. Mr. E Potts who presided stated that activities for the next few months would be concentrated upon the numbers and membership of savings groups.

This is an interesting piece of reporting which points to the positives of the campaign, however there are a number of mistakes and omissions. Firstly the headline notes the money was raised in Durham County region weeks but they actually mean the Northern Savings Region which composed of the counties of Cumberland, Durham, Northumberland and Westmorland where a total of 74 Warship Weeks were held of which 36 were held in Durham County. The total for the Northern area was £17,968,398. The article completely ignores the Newcastle and Gosforth effort which raised £4,035,513 at £14 11s 0d per head and the towns of Haltwhistle and Whitley Bay who both raised over £10 per head, or the fact that Sunderland RD (HMS Jade) raised £6 17s 5d per head, more than Sunderland. It further states the Sunderland rural district as raising £1,000,000 which as can be seen below was in fact Sunderland who adopted HMS Delhi.
For morale reasons the paper does not provided the bad news that Durham County at £5 9s 0d per head ended up at the bottom of the county championship league for counties over 500,000 inhabitants or that one of it places taking part was the lowest savings area in the whole of England and Wales at £1 9s 9d per head. Northumberland was also in this league. This does not take away the actual effort of the people and there is much to be proud of, what it does show is the way that events were reported. There are many other factors which need to be taken into account when assessing this effort, such as the amount of money available, the type and level of industry and wages etc. etc. One or two additional larger savings sums would have made all the difference. Windsor RD which raised £1,916,294 at £208 5s 10d per head for the adoption of HMS Euryalus was the highest in the country but a one off, without which the County of Berkshire would not have topped the under 500,000 inhabitants savings league and without Windsor would have been basically an above average savings county. Even with the inclusion of this huge per capita sum Berkshire managed £14 9s 10d per head, only 1s more than Montgomery and 5s more than Westmorland (three Warship Weeks).

Official Figures produced by the Admiralty
Hartlepool £275,271 £17 13s 7d per head
Darlington RD £117,163 £12 6s 8d
Stockton-on-Tees £701,535 £10 13s 5d
West Hartlepool £656,012 £10 9s 5d
Darlington £721,415 £9 0s 4d
Consett £223,127 £5 19s 4d
Gateshead £632,677 £5 17s 11d
South Shields £537,250 £5 13s 2d
Sunderland £1,136,002 £4 19s 9d
Durham City £305,252 £4 10s 0d

CYLLA
17-12-2014, 12:24
I have just come across this image ....

peter schofield
25-12-2014, 10:26
I have just come across this image ....
Its a MOI mobile cinema van, this one is at Keighley. They toured the country lending support to National Savings by showing short films, typically:

Norwich Warship Week Program
Monday, Feb 2, Daylight Cinema Van Visits
1500 Market Place, between ornamental gardens and stalls
1545 Tombland, facing the Central Hotel
1630 St. George’s Plain widest part
Tuesday, Feb 3, Daylight Cinema Van Visits
1100 All Saints Green
1215 At rear of City Hall, facing St. Giles Street
1430 In front of Larkman Public House (North Earlham)
1530 Shopping centre, Drayton Road
1630 Colman Road, Earlham; near Library
Wednesday Feb 4, Daylight Cinema Van Visits
1100 St. Martins at Palace Plain
1145 Gloucester Street by Rupert Street
1230 At rear of City Hall

Warship Week Propaganda Films will be shown in the leading cinemas during the week.

peter schofield
25-12-2014, 10:28
These are the sorts of films shown to stimulate savings:

Seaman Frank Goes Back to Sea (Concanen Films). Production: Derrick de Marney, for the National Savings Committee. Direction and photography: Eugene Cekalski. Commentary: Terrence de Marney, Frank Laskier. (February, 1942) - A promotional film made for the National Savings by the Crown Film Unit sought to capitalise on the critical success of Frank Laskier’s radio broadcasts. Frank Laskier, an ex-ship’s steward and gunner, and disabled by enemy action, had been transferred into an icon. Discovered in a Liverpool public house by a young BBC producer, Laskier became a Stankhanov. Lionised in the press after his broadcasts, his talks were quickly published. This was followed by a confessional autobiography, the promotional film, a speaking tour in the USA and a disappearance from public view. A measure of how this seaman was used is in the extract from the Spectator review of his book ‘My Name is Frank’, Frank Laskier’s broadcasts had the stuff of greatness; put into print they loose nothing in the reading. By a natural genius this seaman has found an expression and a rhythm which the poets and artists of the modern world have been striving after for generations. The film Seaman Frank Goes Back to Sea opened with scenes of men at a Mercantile Marine Office and the narrator instructing the audience ‘waiting around to be signed on. These are men of the Merchant Navy. None of the glamour of the Royal Navy but sailors of the finest type for all that’ Cutting then to Laskier being signed on and then in a launch on his way out to the ship, the narrator resumed: This one-legged merchant seaman has been called the English Conrad and who was described in a recent column as a man who can make words burn and sear. We are looking at a real Englishman. How easy it was for him after his sensational success as a broadcaster to sit back and relax on his laurels. Every newspaper in the country would have paid him handsomely to write his stories. He chose instead to go back to the job he was doing all his life. The job of bringing food to his country

Who’ll Buy a Warship: Director: Richard Massingham, Production Company: Public Relationship Films, Sponsor: National Savings Committee; Sponsor Warship Week Savings Committee, Producer: Lewis Grant Wallace: Director of Photography: Alex Strasser (1942). An appeal to Londoners to contribute to their Warship Savings Week. Titles followed by busy London street scenes. Action freezes in response to commentator's appeal for Londoners to stop spending? Shots of London in the Blitz. Commentary speaks of Navy's role for safeguarding supplies during Blitz - shots of warships, merchant vessels, a sinking ship and the need to replace losses. Savings posters: commentary outlines the various savings option available. Action restarts. Commentary urges Londoners to hit back at the Hun by helping to buy warships. Ship-building scenes, aircraft carrier launch. Credits

Down Our Street (Merton Park) Sponsor MoI, Direction: Terence Bishop, for the National Savings Committee (June, I942). An appeal for the establishment of street savings groups. Three housewives in a 'typical' urban street representing the social classes at the top, middle and bottom of the street have not been brought together by any aspect of their pre-war life, or even by their shared wartime experiences; suddenly they are seen collaborating. The mystery of what has worked this change is finally explained; they are establishing a street savings group. The point of such groups is explained: a husband says they supplement already-existing works groups; the photos of sons in the forces which are being passed around "come to life" to explain the need for savings and the weapons they can buy. The three women hope the idea will spread ("The savings group up our street ought to be up
every street"); the 'End' title changes to 'No end to savings'.

Sam Pepys Joins the Navy (G.B. Screen Services). Production and direction: Francis Searle, for the National Savings Committee. Photography: Walter Harvey. (December, 1941) – 35mm, 7mins, a record of a young recruit, salute to great naval traditions in support of the War Savings Scheme. Sam Pepys, a new recruit, joins up, to the amusement of the officer, who comments on his namesake's "energy, foresight and guts" as Secretary of the Admiralty. Good shots of basic training, knots, steering in a simulator, lifeboat drill, model showing how to drop anchor, gunnery practice on simulator, operation of torpedo (costs nearly 3,000 pounds), ack-ack practice. The officer then sees that Sam has been recommended for a commission, saying "bet old Sam will be proud of him." Pepys' portrait nods agreement, and asks the officer how the navy is financed. The officers reel off current prices: destroyer over 400,000; cruiser 2,000,000; battleship 8,000,000. Pepys is confounded. All this is achieved by the citizen saver.

peter schofield
21-02-2015, 09:22
Western Morning News, Tuesday 16 June 1942 - HMS Vigilant
The Mayor reported that at the Warship Week Committee meeting last week it was reported that the Admiralty had transferred the ship allotted to the area from HMS Hatherleigh to HMS Vigilant and it was suggested that Launceston and district might like to present the ship with a plaque. In return a plaque would be sent to be fixed in some public building and another in the rural district. The cost would be about £12. Mr Doidge thought it a pity to use the money in this way; the Mayor pointing out that the idea was that the public would take an interest in the ship. Mr. Gregg, the Deputy Mayor though that the bond of friendship which would be forged and the comforts which the men were likely to get justified the spending of £12. He proposed the scheme be adopted and that other councils concerned be asked to co-operate. Mr Fitze seconded and it was agreed.

HMS Hatherleigh was a Type III Hunt Class destroyer but was never commissioned in the RN.

In order to relieve the heavy losses of ships sustained by the Royal Hellenic Navy during the German invasion of 1941, RN ships were transferred to the RHN and manned by Greek crews. HMS Hatherleigh was transferred and commissioned as RHN Kanaris on 27 July 1942. Launceston and district held their Warship Week during 7-14 Mar 1942 raising £103,603, the original target being £100,000 for the adoption of HMS Hatherleigh.

HMS Vigilant was a V Class destroyer commissioned on 10 September 1943.

The Western Morning News, Tuesday 21 November 1944 – Destroyer for Dartmouth
It is so long ago that that we held our Warship Week that we had almost given up hopes of hearing further about the matter. Firstly we were given HMS Haldon and we got our plaque already for the same. Then the Admiralty wrote to say that as the Haldon was going to the Free French would we stick to her or have another ship. We preferred to have a British ship and a British crew. Then they promised us HMS Caesar and we had the plaque altered. After a while the Admiralty sent us their plaque of Haldon. This had to be sent back and they acknowledged their mistake. Months have passed. Naturally we had more or less forgotten the Caesar and our plaque has been kicking around all the time.
Plaque Exchange: However all is well at last. When we get the Caesar’s plaque from the Admiralty we will arrange a formal exchange.

peter schofield
21-02-2015, 10:12
Burnley Express Wednesday 8 April 1942 – Barnoldswick
The District Council has decided to purchase a plaque for HMS Blackwater the vessel adopted by the town for Warship Week. A commemorative plaque is to be presented to Barnoldswick by the Admiralty

Burnley Express Saturday, 27 Feb 1943 - Warship Week Plaque
The report of the sub-committee regarding the provision of a plaque for HMS Pearl was received and the Council approved a design submitted by the makers. The plaque which incorporates the townships coat-of-arms is to cost £13.

Burnley Express, Saturday 1 May 1943
At a special Council meeting on Thursday arrangements were made for the exchange of plaques with a representative of HMS Pearl the trawler adopted by Padiham during Warship Week. It was decided that Councillor H Bradshaw who was chairman of the Council during Warship Week should hand over the town’s plaque at a special ceremony on 15 May the opening of Wings for Victory Week.

Burnley Express, Saturday 30 May 1942 – Lookout’s Plaque
Burnley General Purposes Committee at the request of the Warship Week Committee, have undertaken, on behalf of the Corporation to provide a plaque for presentation on behalf of the townspeople of Burnley to HMS Lookout

Burnley Express, Saturday 31 October 1942 – Tokens Exchanged at Town Hall Ceremony
In the presence of a large and representative gathering assembled in the Council Chamber of the Town Hall, on Wednesday afternoon, the presentation took place of a plaque to be affixed on Burnley’s adopted destroyer, HMS Lookout, the gift being handed to Captain E Elgood, Command Liaison Officer representing the Admiralty by the Mayor Alderman R Broadley. Who in turn, received from the naval officer a replica of the ship’s badge.

Burnley Express Wednesday 2 June 1943
Plaques for HMS Liddlesdale, the ship adopted by the Nelson, Barrowford and other districts during Warship Week were officially handed over to Nelson and Barrowford at a ceremony at Nelson Town Hall on Saturday afternoon by Captain Elgood RNVR. The Mayor (Councillor H Dewhurst) presided and was supported by the Town Clerk, Councillor MR Hindley JP (chairman of Barrowford UDC) and Mr A Armistead (clerk to the Barrowford UDC) etc..

Burnley Express, Wednesday 16 June 1943 - Brierfield
Next Saturday the exchange of Warship Week plaques will take place at the Town Hall. The presentation of the Admiralty’s plaque will be performed by Lt. Cdr. D. Vaudreuil, RNVR, Councillor F Cuncliffe will make the presentation on behalf of the township. Councillor W Williams will preside.

Burnley Express, Wednesday 23 June 1943 – Brierfield
The badge of HMS Coriolanus, the warship which Brierfield adopted in Warship Week, was presented to the township at the Town Hall on Saturday and in return Brierfield gave a plaque to be affixed to the vessel.

Burnley Express, Saturday 13 October 1945
The handsome council chamber of the Brierfield Urban District Council has been further enhanced by the addition of the plaque for the Salute the Soldier campaign which had been hung in position this week. It joins the Wings for Victory plaque and the Warship Week plaque the anchor embossed shield of HMS Coriolanus, Brierfield’s ship, which was lost just befor the end of the war. Each trophy occupies a separate wall panel, and are a distinct addition to the civic headquarters as well as a permanent record of the efforts of the townsfolk during the war years.

peter schofield
11-03-2015, 11:21
Update of Scotland's Warship Weeks

Scotland’s Warship Weeks were projected to be held throughout the same twenty-four weeks as in England and Wales yet as early as 27 October 1941 it was reported in view of Stirlingshire having already raised £1.5 million for War Weapons Week and as large sums had left the county to Glasgow Warship Week the local committee would delay fixing a week until ascertained whether a week in April or May 1942 was acceptable to headquarters. In January 1942 the Chairman of the Scottish Savings Committee informed the Lord Lieutenant of Stirlingshire that the Chancellor was willing to authorize an extension in Scotland until the end of May for the time allotted for holding Warship Weeks. Nonetheless where an extension was sanctioned it had to be through exceptional local conditions that justified relaxation. Exceptional conditions applied to Roxburghshire which held its county effort between 2 February and 23 May 1942, during which period all money subscribed was credited to Warship Week. This meant the towns of Hawick, Jedburgh, Kelso and Montrose could hold their Warship Week during this period e.g. Hawick Warship Week was held from 16-23 May 1942. Meanwhile the Chancellor stressed the urgency of pressing forward Warship Weeks concluding them wherever possible by the end of March 1942. In actuality a high percentage of Scotland’s Warship Weeks were held throughout April and May 1942. The number of adoptions normally mentioned are for England and Wales and generally accepted as final totals, however to this figure must be added at least 53 Warship Weeks that took place in Scotland and a further seven in Northern Ireland.
In Scotland the tendency was for a county to adopt a single vessel with the exceptions of cities and some major towns which adopted their own vessels. A county was divided into districts and divisions including towns each provided with a quota objective. The County of Argyll for example was contested between Kintyre and Campbeltown and Cowal and Dunoon the remaining districts making up the smaller figures; the aim to raise £300,000 to adopt the destroyer HMS Inglefield.

Argyll Warship Week

District and Quota
Kintyre and Campbeltown £70,000
Cowal and Dunoon £70,000
South Lorne and Oban £70,000
Mid Argyll £15,000
Mull £15,000
Islay £15,000
North Lorne £15,000
Ardnamurchan £15,000
Tiree and Coll £15,000
Total £300,000


I hold a comprehensive list of Scotland Warship Week but there are still a few adrift including Roxburghshire

peter schofield
19-06-2015, 09:49
Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, Friday 2 April 1943 – Exchange of Plaques
The Emergency Committee were given the power to act with regard to the exchange of plaques for HMS Geranium and HMS Eridge. The Clerk stated that the cost of the plaques was £12 each and that several parishes had not yet sent in their quotas toward the cost. It was decided the plaques should be on view for two days in each parish, and that the date of the formal handing over would be announced later. The plaque containing the arms of the Marquess of Abergavenny and the Sussex arms bear the inscription: ‘To commemorate the adoption of the inhabitants of the Rural District of Uckfield – Warship Week 1942

Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser, Friday 17 April 1942
Final figures for Warship Week in Uckfield Rural District were before the meeting of the General Committee at Crowborough on Saturday, when it was stated that the total for the whole district (excluding Forest Row, which cooperated in the East Grinstead effort) was £786,000. Fairwarp, which subscribed £402,000, topped the list, with Crowborough (£66,000) second.

HMS Eridge was adopted by Uckfield RD – Warship Week 14-21 Mar. 1942. Raised £784,569
HMS Geranium was adopted by East Grinstead and District – Warship Week 21-28 Mar. 1942. Raised £204,787

tim lewin
20-06-2015, 18:13
the destroyer in #207 is Tartar, just for observation...
tim

tim lewin
20-06-2015, 18:16
David, ships are just metal boxes without the human element; this is our most precious element for preservation, all too easily lost. And there are no "spare numbers" in a warship, so every aspect of the human element is a tale that needs to be told.
good luck
tim

tim lewin
20-06-2015, 18:18
by some blip in the system i just noticed i was replying to post #25, made five years ago, with that last message! but the sentiment remains unchanged.
tim

peter schofield
21-06-2015, 10:25
Not always plain sailing:

Northampton Mercury, Friday 8 May 1942 – Warship Week Misunderstanding
The amazing misunderstanding which has arisen over the adoption of HMS Whaddon during the Warship Weeks of the area covered by Newport Pagnell Urban and Rural Councils and Wolverton Urban area was mentioned at a special meeting at Wolverton Council. A statement was read by the Chairman who is also chairman of the Savings Committee and at the conclusion a vote of confidence in him was passed. The Chairman outlined the steps for co-operation which had been taken before the effort began. He was frequently in touch with Newport he said, and it was not until the week was over that there was the slightest hint that the two districts would not cooperate. He though it was improbable that they did not know what the object was of Wolverton Warship Week although it had been stated at a recent meeting at Newport that no one had any idea of what Wolverton was doing. If the Newport Committee did not advise the Councils of what was taking place it was no business of theirs (Wolverton’s). The decision of the Admiralty was that Wolverton would be included in the adoption of HMS Whaddon. He was in their hands and if they wished to censure him they could do so. The Savings Committee could appoint a new chairman and if he had not got the confidence of the Council they could appoint a new chairman. He had worked hard to make the week a success and there was nothing underhand in any shape or form. Mr Brown remarked that he did not think anyone could say that their chairman had done other than what was right. It was publicly stated in open Council that they were going in with Newport, and he failed to see how the difficulty had arisen. The Chairman: So do I. It is amazing, and it was not fair to me or the committee. Mr. Brown: Who is raising the controversy? – The Chairman Newport Urban Council. Mr Brown moved that they congratulate the chairman for what he did in Warship Week and express full confidence in him. This was seconded and carried unanimously.

Wolverton UD, Newport Pagnell UD and RD Warship Week 21-28 Feb 1942 adopted HMS Whaddon, Type I Hunt Class Destroyer, raised £160,479

Euryalus
30-06-2015, 09:27
HMS Aldenham, a Class III 'Hunt' class escort destroyer, was completed on 5 February 1942 and, following a successful 'warship Week' National Savings campaign, she was 'adopted' by the people of Witney as part of the wartime scheme whereby towns and cities would sponsor particular warships. Sadly, HMS Aldenham struck a mine in the Adriatic on 14 December 1944 and immediately broke into two halves; an eye witness remembered that 'the fore part had turned over and was going straight down, while the after part was rising well out of the water – her screws still turning'. Cold weather hampered rescue operations, and 128 were lost, although 63 survivors were picked up by the Aldenham's sister ship HMS Atherton. A copy of the ship's plaque has, for many years, been kept in the Town Hall, and this interesting relic has now been transferred to the Witney & District Museum, where it will be placed on permanent display. My question is this: how many such plaques would have been made - was it one for the ship and another for the associated town, or would several haver been cast? It has been suggested that there were just two plaques, the one on the ship and the "adoption" plaque that is now displayed in the Witney & District Museum (?)

Euryalus
30-06-2015, 09:42
The Aldenham plaque that has been donated to the Witney & District Museum.n

peter schofield
01-07-2015, 17:55
HMS Aldenham, a Class III 'Hunt' class escort destroyer, was completed on 5 February 1942 and, following a successful 'warship Week' National Savings campaign, she was 'adopted' by the people of Witney as part of the wartime scheme whereby towns and cities would sponsor particular warships. Sadly, HMS Aldenham struck a mine in the Adriatic on 14 December 1944 and immediately broke into two halves; an eye witness remembered that 'the fore part had turned over and was going straight down, while the after part was rising well out of the water – her screws still turning'. Cold weather hampered rescue operations, and 128 were lost, although 63 survivors were picked up by the Aldenham's sister ship HMS Atherton. A copy of the ship's plaque has, for many years, been kept in the Town Hall, and this interesting relic has now been transferred to the Witney & District Museum, where it will be placed on permanent display. My question is this: how many such plaques would have been made - was it one for the ship and another for the associated town, or would several haver been cast? It has been suggested that there were just two plaques, the one on the ship and the "adoption" plaque that is now displayed in the Witney & District Museum (?)

The plaque you have posted is the Presentation Plaque from the Admiralty. Originally there would have only been one inscription plate this one says Presented by / The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty / to / Whitney Urban District / to Commemorate the Adoption of / HMS Aldenham / Warship Week March 7, 1942. Cannot make out the lower plate but would be interested to know the wording. Depending on who took part in the Warship Week and the size of the area depended on how many plaques were presented, but yes quite often more then one presentation plaque would have been made. For example if a UD and RD took part two plaques would be presented. A single commemorative plaque was given to the ship from the adopter or adopters, but these took different formats although the National Savings Movement provided guidelines. If the ship was lost the plaque would have been lost with it, however many plaques were returned to the adopters after the war. The Admiralty plaques were made at Chatham Dockyard and the Commemorative plaques for the ship were made and funded locally.

Whitney UD and RD and Eynsham adopted HMS Aldenham so there is a good possibility that three plaques were presented, their Warship Week was held between 28 Feb and 7 Mar 1942 and the total raised through National Savings was £219,933

Hope this is of some help

Euryalus
02-07-2015, 08:10
Hello Peter. Thank you for the information. The lower plaque records the loss of the ship while engaged in operations in support of Yugoslavian partisans; I will make a note of the exact wording when I am next in the museum. Eynsham is only a few miles from Witney, so it would make sense for both places to "adopt" the same sheip.

peter schofield
05-07-2015, 10:12
Sussex Agricultural Express, Friday, 3 July 1942
The plaque which is to be presented to the town of Lewes to the destroyer HMS Lewes adopted by the county town as the result of Warship Week at the beginning of March was on view at a meeting of Lewes Town Council on Wednesday evening. It is of gun metal mounted on teak. It has the borough arms emblazoned in colour at the top with the following inscription below: ‘This plaque is presented to HMS Lewes to commemorate her adoption by the people of Lewes during Warship Week March 1942’. The Mayor (Alderman Crisp) remarked that a plaque was to come from HMS Lewes to be placed in a suitable position in the Town Hall, but he had been informed this was not yet ready. It was intended that an officer form the ship should pay a visit to Lewes for the exchange of plaques and an opportunity would be given to the burgesses, especially those who served on the committee of Warship Week to attend on that occasion.

Lewes Borough and Chailey RD adopted HMS Lewes, Town Class Destroyer and raised £200,972, Warship Week 28 Feb to 7 Mar 1942 – The Commemorative and Presentation Plaques are on display in Lewes Town Hall

tim lewin
05-07-2015, 21:20
re the posts about HMS Aldenham, there is an excellent book called "The Last Destroyer" about this ship, the last destroyer to be sunk in WW2, my dear old chum Chalky White who was friends with the author, presented me my copy but i commend it to you all as a memorial to the ship and her company....
tim

peter schofield
24-07-2015, 15:17
If local parishes met their target they would be presented with an Admiralty Certificate. Thousand of these were presented and here are a few examples:

Wells Journal, Friday 9 April 1943 – Warship Week Certificate Received
A Wedmore Parish Council meeting on Thursday evening, Dr W E Bracey (Chairman) said the council had recently received a handsome certificate from the Admiralty to commemorate Wedmore’s participation in last years Warship Week and the adoption by the Axbridge RD of the destroyer HMS Goathland. The parish invested £30,000 of the total of £260,000 subscribed in the Axbridge RD. It was decided to purchase an oak frame and to ask the church authorities for permission to hang the framed certificate in the Parish Church particularly in the porch.

Wells Journal, Friday 23 July 1943 – Admiralty Certificates
It was stated that the Admiralty Certificates for the villages participating in the Glastonbury and Wells Warship Weeks had now been received. In view of the exchange in Plaques which had already taken place the Committee did not consider it necessary to hold another public ceremony and the Clerk was instructed to forward the Certificates to the Savings Committee of each parish.

Wells Journal, Friday 10 December 1943 – Certificate of Honour
The Clerk stated that he had received a Certificate of Honour commemorating the adoption of HMS Fleetwood during Warship Week. The certificate was presented to the Out Parish Council. It was decided to frame the certificate and ask the Rural Council to hang it in their Council Chamber.

Axbridge adopted HMS Goathland 14-21 Mar 1942
Glastonbury MB and Street UD adopted HMS Helford, Warship Week 14-21 Mar 1942
Wells MB and Willington adopted HMS Fleetwood, Warship Week 7-14 Mar 1942

peter schofield
25-07-2015, 12:06
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Friday 21 January 1944
The presentation of Warship Week and Wings for Victory Week plaques, log books and certificates of honour in Axminster Senior School Hall on Saturday evening was attended by a large gathering. Plaques and certificates linked the people with the services. Captain Walcot describing the motor gunboats, such as the savings areas had adopted, as magnificent small craft, the finest commands for young naval officers. He presented Mr Cawley the plaque given by the Admiralty to the Urban Council and to Mr White the plaque given to the Rural Council. Both commemorated the adoption of the gunboat, and the second plaque commemorated also the adoption of HMS Scarborough by the rural parishes in the Seaton area. Mr Cawley presented to Captain Walcot on behalf of the Axminster townspeople the token of a plaque shortly to be sent to the Admiralty for the gunboat. ‘We shall be interested to learn not only of the activities of the boat, but also of the Captain and the crew, and we hope one day to have them with us and spend a happy time together. The rural parishes greatly appreciated the presentation of a plaque said Mr Cawley. They were desirous of doing what they could for the crew and he had no doubt that they in due course would get in touch with the Commander and follow the townspeople’s lead.

Axminster adopted MGB 40, Warship Week 21-28 Mar 1942
Seaton and District adopted HMS Scarborough, Warship Week 21-28 Mar 1942

peter schofield
09-08-2015, 12:55
The majority of plaques were presented at the opening of Wings for Victory Week in 1943 here are a few later ones.

Lincolnshire Echo, Saturday 8 January 1944
It is only a few weeks ago that at a Wings for Victory savings function for the North Kesteven RD somewhat tart reference was made to the fact that Warship Week campaign of 1942 had not yet been finished off. Possibly the comments made then caused somebody’s ear to burn for it is now announced that Warship Week presentation ceremonies for both the North Kesteven and Welton districts will take place next week. Both are to be held in the district council offices in Lincoln, North Kesteven presentation being on Friday and Welton’s on Saturday. Lincoln has still a plaque to receive and to donate in the connection with the same campaign.

Stamford Mercury, Friday 21 Jan 1944 - North Kesteven Plaque
North Kesteven Rural Council, on Friday received from Vice-Admiral A.L. Snagge, a replica of the ships badge of HMS Mallard, which the district adopted in Warship Week. The chairman of the Council in return handed a plaque commemorating the event to Admiral Snagge.

Lincoln adopted HMS Wrangler, 21-28 Mar 1942, raised £733,750
North Kesteven adopted HMS Mallard, Warship Week 7-14 Mar 1942, raised £120,977
Welton RD adopted HMS Pelican, Warship Week 14-21 Feb 1942 raised £60,987

peter schofield
09-08-2015, 13:14
Warship Week Plaques and Certificates

These are recognised as memorials and a large number are recorded on the IWM War Memorial Website. I personally have chased down and recorded a considerable number. If any reader is interested in assisting in adding further plaques and certificates to the IWM website I would be interested to hear from them. I hold tables of adoptions for the whole of UK and can also provide information where they are likely to be held and what to look for. I will also complete recording form for which certain information and an image will be required and forward it to the IWM. Again this is basic information the format of which I will supply. No doubt much satisfaction in uncovering local history and sharing that information can be gained from finding local ship adoptions.

TheFormerChief
11-09-2015, 06:27
I was in the Civic Centre, Newport, South Wales last night and saw a plaque relating to the Warship Week in 1942.

I hadn't seen this before, so I don't think that I've previously posted details, but my apologies if I have. It is a wooden plaque, about two foot high and about a foot wide, with the wording:

"This plaque is presented to HMS Newport to commemorate their adoption by the citizens of Newport Mon. during Warship Week January 31 to February 7 1942."

As I say, I hadn't seen this before, and I'm sure that I would have as I've been in that area of the building before. It looks, therefore, as if it's been put on display recently, although why now I don't know.

I didn't have my camera with me last night, but I'll try to get a photo of it as soon as I can.

Here's some background information (from those nice people over at Wikipedia) on the ship.

HMS Newport was a Wickes class destroyer and was built as USS Sigourney (DD–81). She was laid down on 25th August 1917 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, and was launched on 16 December 1917. Sponsored by Mrs. Granville W. Johnson, she was commissioned on 15 May 1918, Commander W. N. Vernon in command.

She was the first ship named for James Butler Sigourney (about 1790 – 14 July 1813), who was an officer in the United States Navy who was killed during the War of 1812.

On 27 May, Sigourney sailed from the United States escorting a troopship to France. On arrival at Brest, she was assigned to Commander Naval Forces, France. For the remainder of World War I, she escorted convoys through the submarine danger zone extending approximately 500 miles west of Brest. During most of her convoys, Sigourney was the flagship of the screen commander but did not herself have any confirmed submarine contacts.

After the armistice on 11 November, she performed miscellaneous duties in European waters, including service in early December as flagship of the four-destroyer screen that escorted George Washington on the middle part of that transport's voyage to carry President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France for the Versailles Peace Conference. Sigourney sailed from Brest for the United States on 26 December 1918 and arrived at Boston on 8 January 1919. After overhaul at Boston and summer training at Newport, Sigourney was placed in reserve status at Philadelphia on 1 November 1919, and decommissioned there on 26 June 1922.

Sigourney was recommissioned at Philadelphia on 23 August 1940 and sailed to Halifax, Nova Scotia. There, on 26 November, she was decommissioned and turned over to a Canadian care-and-maintenance party. Commissioned by the British as HMS Newport on 5 December, she was transferred as part of the Destroyers for Bases Agreement. Sigourney was struck from the Navy list on 8 January 1941.

After engine repairs in England, Newport operated on convoy duty as a unit of the exiled Royal Norwegian Navy from March 1941 to June 1942. She then reverted to the British, and after repairs, served as an aircraft target ship from June 1943 until placed in reserve in January 1945. Newport was scrapped at Granton, Scotland, on 18 February 1947."

Returning to the plaque, it looks as if this was what was given to the ship by Newport, and then returned, presumably when the ship was scrapped or before. As I haven't seen it before, it's probably been in a cupboard somewhere for a long time, and only now been put on display.

peter schofield
11-09-2015, 10:00
I was in the Civic Centre, Newport, South Wales last night and saw a plaque relating to the Warship Week in 1942.

I hadn't seen this before, so I don't think that I've previously posted details, but my apologies if I have. It is a wooden plaque, about two foot high and about a foot wide, with the wording:

"This plaque is presented to HMS Newport to commemorate their adoption by the citizens of Newport Mon. during Warship Week January 31 to February 7 1942."

As I say, I hadn't seen this before, and I'm sure that I would have as I've been in that area of the building before. It looks, therefore, as if it's been put on display recently, although why now I don't know.

I didn't have my camera with me last night, but I'll try to get a photo of it as soon as I can.

Here's some background information (from those nice people over at Wikipedia) on the ship.

HMS Newport was a Wickes class destroyer and was built as USS Sigourney (DD–81). She was laid down on 25th August 1917 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, and was launched on 16 December 1917. Sponsored by Mrs. Granville W. Johnson, she was commissioned on 15 May 1918, Commander W. N. Vernon in command.

She was the first ship named for James Butler Sigourney (about 1790 – 14 July 1813), who was an officer in the United States Navy who was killed during the War of 1812.

On 27 May, Sigourney sailed from the United States escorting a troopship to France. On arrival at Brest, she was assigned to Commander Naval Forces, France. For the remainder of World War I, she escorted convoys through the submarine danger zone extending approximately 500 miles west of Brest. During most of her convoys, Sigourney was the flagship of the screen commander but did not herself have any confirmed submarine contacts.

After the armistice on 11 November, she performed miscellaneous duties in European waters, including service in early December as flagship of the four-destroyer screen that escorted George Washington on the middle part of that transport's voyage to carry President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France for the Versailles Peace Conference. Sigourney sailed from Brest for the United States on 26 December 1918 and arrived at Boston on 8 January 1919. After overhaul at Boston and summer training at Newport, Sigourney was placed in reserve status at Philadelphia on 1 November 1919, and decommissioned there on 26 June 1922.

Sigourney was recommissioned at Philadelphia on 23 August 1940 and sailed to Halifax, Nova Scotia. There, on 26 November, she was decommissioned and turned over to a Canadian care-and-maintenance party. Commissioned by the British as HMS Newport on 5 December, she was transferred as part of the Destroyers for Bases Agreement. Sigourney was struck from the Navy list on 8 January 1941.

After engine repairs in England, Newport operated on convoy duty as a unit of the exiled Royal Norwegian Navy from March 1941 to June 1942. She then reverted to the British, and after repairs, served as an aircraft target ship from June 1943 until placed in reserve in January 1945. Newport was scrapped at Granton, Scotland, on 18 February 1947."

Returning to the plaque, it looks as if this was what was given to the ship by Newport, and then returned, presumably when the ship was scrapped or before. As I haven't seen it before, it's probably been in a cupboard somewhere for a long time, and only now been put on display.

I have an image of the plaque mounted on the board but no full image which I discovered on the web some time ago. The star on the plaque represents a lend-lease ship from the US. Newport raised £840,212 which represented £8 13s 6d per capita in old money. If you could provide an image I will send it along with details of where it is held to the IWM for recording on their memorial archive.

TheFormerChief
11-09-2015, 14:26
I have an image of the plaque mounted on the board but no full image which I discovered on the web some time ago. The star on the plaque represents a lend-lease ship from the US. Newport raised £840,212 which represented £8 13s 6d per capita in old money. If you could provide an image I will send it along with details of where it is held to the IWM for recording on their memorial archive.

Yes, I'll do this as soon as I can.

peter schofield
29-10-2015, 12:34
The Daily Mirror as a national newspaper tended to report or more personal and controversial matters, here are a few articles:

Daily Mirror, Friday 24 October 1941 - Girls Sell Kisses
A team of beautiful girls, all single, in an armament factory are selling kisses to help their cities Warship Week. An ordinary kiss costs 1s. Customers who want to linger pay 2s 6d. In three days the girls have sold kisses and booked orders amounting to £42. At first only the office girls were offering them, but the factory girls soon wanted to do the same. Now there is competition between them to see who can sell the most. Birmingham has raised £6,770,000 towards the £10,000,000 aimed at by this weekend. The War Savings Certificates bought with the kiss cash will be balloted for between the sellers and buyers.

Daily Mirror, Friday 7 November 1941 – Metal Wasted Making Savings Week Appeal
A tin brass-pinned badge weighs a trivial 24 grains. Multiply the weight by 10,000 and you have approximately 35lb. And that is the amount of precious metal which the organisers of Surbiton, Surrey, Warship Week have wasted so far in publicising their effort. So far 10,000 of the badges have been made. A little paper flag would save the same purpose. The symbol is merely a receipt for money subscribed. The metal in the badge and the workers time could have been put to better account. Obviously a waste of good material a Ministry of Supply official told the Daily Mirror, ‘the matter will have to be looked into’. At the expense of the paper supply, Surbiton is also being treated to a free art exhibition. Six posters advertising the towns warship week have been designed by a well know cartoonist. Thousands of these posters are being pasted on windows and hoardings. And 12,000 booklets are being prepared for distribution.

Daily Mirror, Monday 24 November 1941 – Her 3d Helped Record Total
Threepence given by a pensioner to Liverpool Warship Week is the smallest subscription for the largest total. For Liverpool, with another day to go has beaten Glasgow’s record £13,510,000 with a total of £14,100,000. The 3d came from and elderly woman who lives on her old age pension in a room in Liverpool’s Irish quarter,

Daily Mirror, Thursday 12 February 1942 – No Live Bullets Now at Demonstrations
On behalf of the military authorities Major Cotton of the Canadian Forces gave assurance to the Brighton coroner yesterday that in future no live ammunition would be used in public exhibitions. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death in the case of a Canadian private who was fatally shot by a tommy gun at the Brighton Warship Week exhibition when a comrade was demonstrating a new magazine to two naval officers.

peter schofield
07-11-2015, 19:58
The Glasgow Herald, 15 January 1970 - Submarine Emergency
The patrol submarine Osiris had to make and emergency surfacing in the Gare Loch yesterday with several civilians on board. When she dived water started to pour into a forward compartment, and Lieutenant Commander E. S. J. Larken, the captain ordered the blowing of the submarines ballast tanks. The gentle, seven degree dive was immediately reversed, before Osiris reached periscope depth and she surfaced safely. In addition to her normal complement of seven officers and 65 men, Osiris had on board Councillor Ray P. Bushell, aged 51 of Ilkley Urban District Council, Yorkshire; Mrs. Bushell, who originally came from Johnstone and several officers wives. The dive was planned as a routine showpiece for the councillor who was renewing a 29 year old link between Ilkley and a former submarine of the same name. After the submarine surfaced, the trouble was traced to a securing nut near the forward hatch. After repairs the submarine dived again, and the councillor was given a periscope view of the Clyde estuary. Councillor Bushell later praised the efficiency of the Navy. He said ‘it might not be the biggest navy in the world, but I have been impressed by the teamwork shown today'.
Ilkley gained their sea links during the Second World War, when £702,091 during a Warship Week National Saving drive. They adopted the former Osiris, and presented her with a plaque which was preserved when the submarine was scrapped after the war and which Councillor Bushell re-presented yesterday to the new Oberon Class Submarine. On behalf of the council and other local organisations Councillor Bushell presented the crew with a tape recorder adapted to work from the submarines electrical supply, and assured them that Ilkley would give a warm welcome any time they cared to visit the area.

The Adoption plaque is held by the RN Submarine Museum, but it would be interesting to find out what happened to the Presentation plaque which must have stayed with the submarine until de-commissioning.

peter schofield
15-11-2015, 14:43
Belfast County Borough, HMS Indomitable, Warship Week 2-9 March 1942, raised £5,617,561
Antrim County Council, HMS Emerald, 30 May to 6 June 1942, £1,058,342
Armagh County Council, HMS Bann, 20-27 June 1942, £708,627
Down County Council (Downpatrick), HMS Ulster, 13-20 June 1942, £1,444,000
Fermanagh County Council (Eniskillen), HMS Sir Lancelot, 6-13 June 1942, £323,140
Tyrone County Council (Omagh), HMS Mourne, 16-23 May 1942, £531,209
Londonderry City and County Council, HMS Londonderry, 18-25 April 1942, £535,325

Northern Ireland Total £10,218,604

Euryalus
16-06-2016, 10:26
The Aldenham plaque that has been donated to the Witney & District Museum.n

I am still not sure about the origins of this plaque. It appears to me to be a "proper" ship's plaque, rather than a replica, and, as such, it must have been cast along with HMS Aldenham's own plaque, which is presumably still attached to the wreck?

TheFormerChief
24-06-2016, 13:34
I've re-visited this topic after a while away, and I've realised that I haven't sent you the images of the HMS Newport plaque yet.

Many apologies, and I'll do it as soon as I can next week.

TheFormerChief
12-02-2017, 11:26
This is a link to an article which appeared in our local newspaper, the South Wales Argus last Friday, 27th January 2017.

http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/15052577.Warship_Week___the_Gwent_fundraising_craz e_which_paid_for_fighting_ships/

The author has a regular column every Friday and covers a lot of history from all periods. He’s the paper’s Digital Editor, apparently, and I’m sure that he’d be willing to give the events another bit of publicity, especially the Weeks held elsewhere in the old County of Gwent. I'll send you his e-mail address by PM.