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NSR
26-06-2008, 15:49
Found this in the ditty box. It is my class at the passing out parade performing guard duties. Me and Wiggy are at the back and have our rifles at slightly the wrong angle. Luckily the Class PO had his back to us and didn't see it so we wern't given a rollocking. That was the last time I had to wave a rifle about for several years.

Ken

Joseph
26-06-2008, 17:01
Fine photo Ken, them bayonets look dangerous.

Regards Charles

Batstiger
26-06-2008, 19:47
The old SMLE's and 18" bayonets, takes me back to my sea cadet days in 1951!

Bob.

Donkey
28-10-2010, 12:33
St George (Gosport) May1947

Doc
28-10-2010, 13:36
Well, I'm blowed! I don't think I've ever seen an image of matelots at St George's Barracks. I have only ever heard of it as a Pongo (Army) base. You learn something new every day.

What date is this from, Donkey?

Doc

Donkey
28-10-2010, 14:45
Sorry Doc I am a little new to this I have edited it now the date was May 47 after a freezing cold February did Rifle drill in gloves, not touched one since or worn Boots.

Polycell
28-10-2010, 16:31
Well, I'm blowed! I don't think I've ever seen an image of matelots at St George's Barracks. I have only ever heard of it as a Pongo (Army) base. You learn something new every day.

What date is this from, Donkey?

DocThat makes two of us. I always thought it was a Pongo camp. So come on Donkey what was it a training camp for? New Entries? I see a stokers badge on one of the guys.

alanbenn
28-10-2010, 20:09
During the period 1940 to 1945 Hms Ganges was closed to boy entrants and used for Hostility Only trainees.

The boys who joined between this period did their training at Hms St George, I think some lads from Raleigh and St Vincent were also moved to Hms St George, perhaps other members could explain more, bit before my time.

Regards
Alan

Polycell
29-10-2010, 08:26
Originally a small fishing village, Gosport grew by the mid 19th century into a major military and naval town. Forton Barracks was completed in 1807 and was the home of the Royal Marine Light Infantry from 1848 until 1923. From 1927 until 1965 it was the home of H.M.S. St Vincent Boys' Training Establishment. The Royal Navy moved out in 1968 and the site was used as a Sixth Form School, later to become St Vincent College. Gosport Barracks (New Barracks and later St George Barracks) was completed in 1859 and housed several Army Regiments until 1941 when the barracks became the responsibility of the Admiralty and renamed H.M.S. Victory IV and then St George. In 1947 the Army were back in the form of the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment and the buildings were renamed St George Barracks. The last Regiment, which took up residence in 1971, was 20 Maritime Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport who in turn moved out and the buildings became surplus to requirements in 1991. St George Barracks has been sold to developers and has now been redeveloped as a housing complex.


Thanks to the Gosport Society web site.

kenharrow
29-10-2010, 18:34
According to Ben Warlow's book, Shore Establishments of the Royal Navy:-
St Georges's Barrack's was commissioned into the RN on 1 Dec 1945 as HMS ST GEORGE 11 ( ST GEORGE itself being in Douglas, Isle of Man, and Paid Off on 31 Dec 1945). ST GEORGE 11 became ST GEORGE on 1 Jan 1946 and was returned to the War Office in 1948.

Donkey
01-11-2010, 11:05
Our class were all Stokers, we were Drake 7 in 47. Names I had forgotten and now I find them on the back of the photo in signatures so will type them I didnt get them all sadly.
K.J Green, H.E Hopkins, A.L Brine, W.C Naylor, K Tanton, J Hewlett, D.W. King, P.W Neaves, P Cox, D Manouch, G Wood, R Brown, J.a.Lidbetter, A.F Ayres, C.F Cook, D Bond. A Mornington-West

D01Caprice
11-01-2011, 10:29
Well, certainly not an honour guard are they? I would expect a G.I. to go bananas about the way they are holding those rifles. Did not the P.O. know anything about the tallest on the flanks, shortest in the middle? Oh! They're stokers. Well, that explains it all then. :)

NSR
11-01-2011, 19:08
Our class was Fisher 3, joined 7 November 1946. Of the four classes that started that week, three were stokers and one was cooks. Our Training PO used to threaten us that if we didn't pass out properly we would be remustered as cooks. Judging by my later culinary efforts on a canteen messing boat, it might have helped. Sadly my father died while I was on Christmas leave and was granted extra leave to attend the funeral. As a result I missed the Class photo but I do have the guard photos from the passing out parade. I'm second from the left in the rear rank - you can just see the top of my hat.

The other photo was taken just before a run ashore. I'm front left and 'Wiggy' Worral is next to me. Back row right is Thompson but I have forgotten the others and didn't note their names on the back.

Ken

Gordon Brown
29-11-2011, 12:08
HMS St George , Isle of Man . My father John Harbin Brown ( Jack ) did his training to be a telegraphist here then went on to be a crew member on the submarine HMS Tantalus

Gordon Brown
29-11-2011, 12:13
Found this in the ditty box. It is my class at the passing out parade performing guard duties. Me and Wiggy are at the back and have our rifles at slightly the wrong angle. Luckily the Class PO had his back to us and didn't see it so we wern't given a rollocking. That was the last time I had to wave a rifle about for several years.

Ken

Was this in the Isle of Man or Gosport as there were two St Georges ?

Fairlead
29-11-2011, 15:36
There was of course another one in the 1960'/70's - HMS St GEORGE, the SD Officers School at Frazer Gunnery Range Eastleigh.

Gordon

Wellbran
29-11-2011, 18:44
My Father went to St George Isle of Man from Ganges, as what I understand because the signal and Radio boys were moved there as they did not want those trained to get bombed by the luftwaffe before they had a chance to get drafted. I think approx He went there just before joining HMS Exeter at Plymouth, so that would be about 1940?...ish.

NSR
29-11-2011, 19:40
Gordon,

It was the Gosport one.

Ken

siggy63
08-02-2012, 20:14
Excellent Photos - just goes to show the best guards are made up of Comms Ratings LOL

Thanks
Danny

fleetchief
07-04-2012, 03:46
Originally a small fishing village, Gosport grew by the mid 19th century into a major military and naval town. Forton Barracks was completed in 1807 and was the home of the Royal Marine Light Infantry from 1848 until 1923. From 1927 until 1965 it was the home of H.M.S. St Vincent Boys' Training Establishment. The Royal Navy moved out in 1968 and the site was used as a Sixth Form School, later to become St Vincent College. Gosport Barracks (New Barracks and later St George Barracks) was completed in 1859 and housed several Army Regiments until 1941 when the barracks became the responsibility of the Admiralty and renamed H.M.S. Victory IV and then St George. In 1947 the Army were back in the form of the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment and the buildings were renamed St George Barracks. The last Regiment, which took up residence in 1971, was 20 Maritime Regiment, Royal Corps of Transport who in turn moved out and the buildings became surplus to requirements in 1991. St George Barracks has been sold to developers and has now been redeveloped as a housing complex.


Thanks to the Gosport Society web site.

While I was the CREA on Eskimo, in the early 70's, I slapped in to do the "Small Boat Handling Course" (still have all the handouts!) because I was a Sub-Acqua diver. Much to my amazement instead of being run by the Navy, at somewhere like Whale Island, it was run by the Army at St. George's Barracks.

Those members that have seen it, will notice one peculiarity. The main block is 2 story with a verandah running all around the second storey. Apparently two barracks were being designed, in Bath, one for Gosport and one for the Army in India. Due to a clerical error the Gosport Barrack drawings were sent to India and the India Barrack drawings were sent to Gosport. The result was that the builder in Gosport built a lovely barracks designed to let the cooling breezes flow through. I was told by the WOII in charge of the course, that somwhere in India there is a lovely "British" barracks.

The Gosport one proved somewhat unsuitable for the English Climate, and vice versa in India.

Cheers,

Ed

g4v1n
16-02-2013, 14:28
Hi my grandad was on st George in 1940 im trying to find some stuff out I know he was on H.M.S WILDFIRE and was suppose to be on H.M.S HOOD but he got Rheumatic fever so couldnt go on it and hms hood was sunk by the Germans my grandads name was willie mills and if any one has information please let me know

Forester
08-06-2013, 18:23
Gordon Brown - in your group photo of Hawke, July 1942, my father is eighth from the left of the picture on the back row. He was drafted into HMS King George V as a signaller, then to Forester in April '43. He left the Royal Navy as a Yeoman after 12 years service.

Pelican
22-08-2013, 15:08
JUST FOR INFO

In case you knew Ivor Rothewell. Following from Ivor Rothewell as the result of a discussion between Ganges Boys as to whether smoking was or was not allowed. He joined Ganges in Jan 1946 from St George to become a Boy Tel in 205 Class Collingwood. He finished his naval life a Commander RAN.
"Smoking was permitted (and cigarettes sold) at HMS St George when we joined there in Oct 1945 and the Shotley Boys - same date of entry as us - were smoking with cigs sold in the canteen when we got there in January 1946. I believe that the ban was lifted during the War years but exactly when I don't know."

johnny07
22-08-2013, 15:37
Was St. George at one time the place where newly commissioned officers went to learn how to use a knife and fork and pass the port to the left?

Dave Hutson
22-08-2013, 17:25
Was St. George at one time the place where newly commissioned officers went to learn how to use a knife and fork and pass the port to the left?

Hi Johnny,

I think that could have been HMS KING ALFRED, at least during the War, it was located on the Sea Front at Hove, Sussex.

Dave H

Fairlead
23-08-2013, 10:11
Johnny, you are right - there was another HMS St GEORGE in the 60's/70's - at Eastney in the Fraser Gunnery Range site. It was the SD Officers School where the candidates (all Senior Rates), were put through 2 terms of unnecessary physical and mental abuse and some Navigation and Seamanship before going to RNC Greenwich on being commissioned and joined by the Engineers who came (Via Gieves) straight from their last job. It only lasted about 10 years before being moved to BRNC and integrated into the college.

Pelican
05-02-2014, 18:37
BILLY HALL

BILLY HALL D/JX778035 Who joined St George Oct 1945 then Ganges 1946 Is returning home for a 'walkabout' in May this year. He is very keen to make contact with with any 'oppos' who remember him. He can be contacted at:-
billyboy2@oneseniors.com.au

Wobblycogs
24-07-2014, 09:06
Hi All.

My Senior Instructor at Ganges (1954-55) was a POGI Gausden (Gus). He made Chief later. Gus always told us he had been trained at St.George. That must have been the Isle of Man Establishment. It's difficult to give an age for Gus as when you are a kid, anyone in the 20 plus bracket seems really old! I would say he was about 35 at the time. Which means he would have been about 25 at close of hostilities. So yes, he could have served as a boy, and trained at St. George.

I hope that helps someone.

Cheers Hookie, L/S. retired! http://www.cool-smileys.com/images/280.gif (http://cool-smileys.com//smiley-with-a-thumb-up)
(Served Sept 1954 to Sept 1964)

phill rose
24-07-2014, 14:36
Confirms St George was going in 72, and mentions Candidates, so that slots in with the training function.

Phill