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qprdave
28-07-2009, 14:45
Rear Admiral

Rear Admiral is a naval commissioned officer rank above that of a Commodore and Captain, and below that of a Vice Admiral. It is generally regarded as the lowest of the "Admiral" ranks, which are also sometimes referred to as "Flag officers" and/or "Flag ranks". In many armed forces it is referred to as a two-star rank.

It originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons and can trace its origins to the Royal Navy. Each Naval Squadron would be assigned an admiral as its head, who would command from the centre vessel and direct the activities of the squadron. The admiral would in turn be assisted by a vice admiral, who commanded the lead ships which would bear the brunt of a naval battle. In the rear of the Naval Squadron, a third admiral would command the remaining ships and, as this section of the squadron was considered to be in the least danger, the admiral in command of the rear would typically be the most junior of the squadron admirals. This has survived into the modern age, with the rank of rear admiral the most-junior of the admiralty ranks of many navies.

In some European navies (e.g., that of France), and in the Canadian Forces French rank translations, the rank of rear admiral is known as counter admiral. In the Royal Netherlands Navy, this rank is known as schout-bij-nacht, (lit.: supervisor during night), denoting the role junior to the squadron admiral, and fleet admiral.

Bee
28-07-2009, 15:15
A very educated description of the duties of a Rear Admiral (and others)...thankyou very much Dave.
Regards,
Bee

Kevin123
28-07-2009, 20:13
Dave, In my time in the MOD I noticed a lot of officers got to a certain rank and then stayed there untill they retired. A lot of them were lieutenant commanders, was this because they had reached the head of their branch, and couldn't go any further. Kevin.

Francis Stanley
29-07-2009, 12:03
Dave, In my time in the MOD I noticed a lot of officers got to a certain rank and then stayed there untill they retired. A lot of them were lieutenant commanders, was this because they had reached the head of their branch, and couldn't go any further. Kevin.

And every year when they were left off the promotion signals they would celebrate "the feast of the passover"

oldsalt
29-07-2009, 13:02
A general list officer was granted automatic promotion to Lieut. Cdr after 8yrs as a Lieutenant . After Lieut. Cdr. promotion was by selection. A special duties officer (promoted from lower deck) was given up to 7yrs to be promoted by selection, by that time if not promoted they were discharged. From Lieut. to Lieut. Cdr it was strictly by selection when compared with other SD Lieuts. The chance of a SD Lieut making Lieut. Cdr. was about 1 in 20. In my case I was promoted to Sub. Lieut. in Nov.63. Promotion to Lieut. came in 1969, 5yrs 6mths after being promoted from Chief Mechanician. In 1970 the General List officers asked the 2nd Sea Lord why they had to wait for 8yrs before getting the extra half stripe. The answer was that 8yrs was considered to be the correct period for promotion to Lieut. Cdr,a rank regarded as being a Senior Lieutenant. Where I was serving at that time there were SD Lieuts with much more seniority than 8yrs who would never make Lieut. Cdr. The rate of pay for SD Lieuts was favourable to senior general list Lieutenants, but the pension for a Lt. Cdr was more than for a SD Lieut. There were also issues regarding appointments to ships which I won't comment on here.So to cut a long story short,there was an option for SD officers to be placed on the retired officers by request, the request beihg made 2 yrs before retirement & you had to have served at least 22yrs. Faced with the probability of being still a Lieutenant with a seniority of more than 8yrs at retiring age of 50 , I opted for voluntarily being placed on the retired list. Since I left the RN in 1972 I expect, rightly, that the system in place then has been replaced with a much fairer way.

qprdave
29-07-2009, 13:37
I also think that promotion to Lt. Cdr was automatic due to time done. Promotion to Commander and above was solely Selection.


ooooppps

Sorry Keith

It will teach me to read all posts before responding!!!!!

qprdave
29-07-2009, 13:46
It seems to me to have been greatly unfair Keith. With the vast amount of experience that a P.O/C.P.O brought with him. Far more than Dartmouth could provide.

The P/O Instructor that I had at Ganges had been recommended for S.D. and passed the Selection Board. He failed because his wife wasn't deemed to be Wardroom material!!!!!!

Kevin123
29-07-2009, 23:16
Thanks Dave and oldsalt, your posts were interesting and informative. My grandad served in the royal navy from 1910-32 and 1939-45, and when he retired he was just an acting leading seaman, he was 53 in 1945, He must have looked quite old in his sailors uniform at that time. Kevin.

harry.gibbon
29-07-2009, 23:37
He must have looked quite old in his sailors uniform at that time.not a bit of it Kevin ... it is believed that Dave woz that age when he left the mob!!!! and nobody knows wot he looks like !!!!!!!!!!!!

take cover ... incoming!!

Kevin123
29-07-2009, 23:53
Dave taught my grandad every thing he knew Harry !!! Kevin.

qprdave
30-07-2009, 00:32
Hey, Hey, Hey

Wots goin on ere then

You think that I am old just because I was Beattie's Instructor at Dartmouth?????

ivorthediver
31-07-2009, 04:54
Hi Dave ,

Don't get to comfy here mate , wrong Sea Lane .........

What kind of pension could the Admirals look forward to and at what date would they retire please

oldsalt
31-07-2009, 18:17
Hi Dave ,

Don't get to comfy here mate , wrong Sea Lane .........

What kind of pension could the Admirals look forward to and at what date would they retire please

Stand by Ivor, I have an Appendix to the Navy List dated 1963, this little book has all the answers.
Retired pay for an Admiral with 34 yrs of service was 2,800 per year. Not a lot I suppose. In my case as Lieutenent retiring own request at age 40, pension was 1000 per year, 3000 gratuity. Pensions for service personnel remains static until the age of 50 when it is increased & then is index linked. An Ordinary Seaman on a 7yr engagement was paid 16/- per day , in new money 80 p. :eek::eek:

ivorthediver
31-07-2009, 18:42
Stand by Ivor, I have an Appendix to the Navy List dated 1963, this little book has all the answers.
Retired pay for an Admiral with 34 yrs of service was 2,800 per year. Not a lot I suppose. In my case as Lieutenent retiring own request at age 40, pension was 1000 per year, 3000 gratuity. Pensions for service personnel remains static until the age of 50 when it is increased & then is index linked. An Ordinary Seaman on a 7yr engagement was paid 16/- per day , in new money 80 p. :eek::eek:


Thank you Keith,
in 1963 2800 was not bad but less than I thought are you sure it wasn't 28,000 ?

oldsalt
01-08-2009, 19:48
It states:confused clearly that a Admiral with a total of 34 or more years served got 2800 per year he was also granted a gratuity of three times his annual pension. Bear in mind that at the age of 55 his pension would have been increased , I'm not sure but probably, by 6 times the original pension. If the Admirals reckonable service started form 18, add on 34 yrs , brings him to age 52, so he was on the 2800 for 3yrs. I hope that makes sense, my pension was the 1972 rate, I don't know what an Admirals pension would have been then. :confused::confused::confused:

oldsalt
01-08-2009, 20:00
Just to add another fact of pay, an Admiral was paid 13.16s a day, he was also entitled to some allowances. The daily rate in 63 for my rank was 3.2s6p
marriage allowance was about 1 per day. It was very difficult to maintain the playboy image, one small benefit in the Tiger's wardroom we paid 1 1/2 d for a tot of gin. That helped to make it all worth while. :cool::cool: