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AngusOg
11-05-2009, 04:28
I'm looking for any info on Blackburn, Aircraft Tender. She was based in Greenock as an RNR training ship into the late 60's. This was one of the first welded ships of the RN, but the Lordships had her riveted to boot, like wearing suspenders and a belt at the same time. I recall seeing a photograph of her @ the 1953 review.

John Brown
11-05-2009, 07:48
Angus

Not much I'm afraid but I did find this reference to Blackburn:

HMS Blackburn (1944), an aircraft transport launched 25 March 1944. She became a RNVR drillship in 1950, and was sold in 1968 to become "RV Gardline Locator". Broken up 1997.


When I lived near Great Yarmouth there was a survey company operating out of there called 'Gardline'. Perhaps the ship was bought by them???


Regards...John

PS......Just found this reference to the ship although there seems to be a difference in the date the vessel was built and the article must have been written in 1997.....

The LOCATOR was an RAF salvage ship - H.M.S. Blackburn, built 1946 but extensively altered since. She is today (1997) the oldest vessel on the British register still regularly sailing deep-sea. (Noted in Spring 1997 Hydrographic Journal that she was decommissioned.. shame!)

The Gardline vessels were employed as general purpose survey/research ships and worked for oil and gas companies in offshore exploration. They were also chartered by government bodies for environmental, hydrographic and oceanographic research.

CanuckFan
11-05-2009, 08:03
http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20B/slides/Blackburn-02.html

navalis
11-05-2009, 08:14
BLACKBURN was one of a class of five ships, officially classed as "naval aviation stores carriers".

990 tons (displacement) 172ft x 30ft two shafts/8 cylinder Diesel engines

They were used to carry aircraft and aviation spares around the coast. The five were - Blackburn, Ripon, Roc, Walrus (later renamed Skua) and Seafox - the latter being RFA manned, the previous four RN.

Blackburn was built by Blyth Dry Dock, launched in February 1946.

They were all withdrawn from service and sold out in the 1950s; Blackburn went to the Clyde as a Reserve training ship; I have her being sold to Pounds (shipbreakers) in July 1968, but they may well have sold her on for further service.

John Brown
11-05-2009, 11:21
Angus

Further to my earlier post, you will find a great photo of The Gardline Locator (as I had guessed, with the Gardline Company that operate from,among other places, Gt Yarmouth) here....

http://eastcoasters.fotopic.net/p42909299.html


Regards...John

alanbenn
12-05-2009, 09:27
Here's a larger, clearer version of the photo of Hms Blackburn.

Regards
Alan

AngusOg
13-05-2009, 16:00
Thanks all, once again the members of this forum come thru.

Canuk Fan !!! ..Ohhh my Gawd ... is there is no cure ???

Scot by birth .. Canadian by choice ...

John Brown
13-05-2009, 16:14
Thanks all, once again the members of this forum come thru.

Canuk Fan !!! ..Ohhh my Gawd ... is there is no cure ???

Scot by birth .. Canadian by choice ...



Angus

You are most welcome!


Regards.....John

Oh, by the way.....

British by birth........English by Grace of God.

qprdave
13-05-2009, 16:22
I'm almost in the same position

English by birth and American by....errrr. uuuummmm. What am I doing here!!!!!!

Vegaskip
13-05-2009, 18:44
Hi guys thought you might like to see the a/c the ship was named after.

46154

Ps "there but for the grace of god go I"

pps, if coming from Scotland, I'm a Scot, Would I be an Eng if I came from England, just a thought.

MelQuick
12-04-2010, 05:26
Hi guys thought you might like to see the a/c the ship was named after.

46154

Ps "there but for the grace of god go I"

pps, if comming from Scotland, I'm a Scot, Would I be an Eng if I came from England, just a thought.

Hi

Blackburn made some good aircraft - the Buccaneer comes easily to mind.

They also made some that were not so good. The Blackburn Botha was a twin-engined aircraft, designed as a torpedo bomber. It was under-powered and its handling at low speeds was dubious, to say the least. One of the first service pilots to test fly a prototype Botha, at Boscombe Down, included this gem in the flight test report:

'The cockpit is difficult to enter. It should be made impossible.'

Mel

qprdave
12-04-2010, 16:14
if, coming from Scotland, I'm a Scot

Jim.
Did you know that by saying that you are a Scot you are really saying that you are from Ireland. They crossed the Irish sea rather like the Saxons came to England.

The Picts and Caledonii are the true "Scots!!!!"

Dave

tonclass
12-04-2010, 16:23
I have her being sold to Pounds (shipbreakers) in July 1968, but they may well have sold her on for further service.

She was sold to Pounds and renamed M/V HARPOUNDS before Harry sold her on again.

Scot at Sea
27-06-2011, 17:52
Hi,

I have a large wooden plate/dish with the relief image of a peasant woman that has written around the edges "HMS Blackburn - 1951 - Stavanger". My grandad whom it came from was in the RNR in the 1950's.

Derek.

chris westwood
28-06-2011, 19:31
Angus

Not much I'm afraid but I did find this reference to Blackburn:

HMS Blackburn (1944), an aircraft transport launched 25 March 1944. She became a RNVR drillship in 1950, and was sold in 1968 to become "RV Gardline Locator". Broken up 1997.


When I lived near Great Yarmouth there was a survey company operating out of there called 'Gardline'. Perhaps the ship was bought by them???


Regards...John

PS......Just found this reference to the ship although there seems to be a difference in the date the vessel was built and the article must have been written in 1997.....

The LOCATOR was an RAF salvage ship - H.M.S. Blackburn, built 1946 but extensively altered since. She is today (1997) the oldest vessel on the British register still regularly sailing deep-sea. (Noted in Spring 1997 Hydrographic Journal that she was decommissioned.. shame!)

The Gardline vessels were employed as general purpose survey/research ships and worked for oil and gas companies in offshore exploration. They were also chartered by government bodies for environmental, hydrographic and oceanographic research.


I lived in little plumstead for a few years in the early 80s , and visited Yarmough Docks regularly. Gardline were a major presence. All sorts of exotic converted vessels would turn up.

John Brown
28-06-2011, 21:35
I lived in little plumstead for a few years in the early 80s , and visited Yarmough Docks regularly. Gardline were a major presence. All sorts of exotic converted vessels would turn up.

Chris

We may have passed each other on the street or been drinking in the same pub at the same time. I lived in Ormesby-St-Margaret from 1979 to 1983 but still owned my house there until 1984. I used to have a small business manufacturing dipped rubber products and actually made a few bits and pieces for use on the Gardline Company ships. Do you remember a ship called the 'Celtic Surveyor' that was turned into a restaurant and moored on the river in Great Yarmouth? The food was great and it was the first place I ever tried l'escargot and frogs legs.

Regards...John

medway508
28-06-2011, 22:55
Model Shipright had a plans article on this class. John Bowen's drawings I think.