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ceylon220
22-05-2008, 17:15
These Fishery Protection vessels were based at Rosyth in the 60s when Iceland placed an exclusion zone for fishing boats, these ships were employed in protecting the fishing fleet from harasment from the Icelandic gunboats,one or two of the larger RN ships were in minor skirmishers with the Icelandic ships later on in the Cod War.

herakles
22-05-2008, 21:23
The RAF played an important role during this time also.

tim lewin
23-05-2008, 09:07
I recall that the main problem with these fag-paper thin skinned frigates was that the Icelanders using their super tough patrol craft could wreak serious damage just by leaning on them, and did. This was a very sad period in our maritme history when one considers how much we depended on the Icelanders a few years before for convoy routing. A consumate failure by our splendid politicians for which the RN and RAF then had to pay for with entirely the wrong equipment; I s'pose not unlike today vis-a-vis Nimrod, Iraq, Afganistan et al.................
tim

herakles
23-05-2008, 09:38
I gather it was fairly simple for the RAF as they were actively patrolling the area anyway looking for Russian subs.

qprdave
23-05-2008, 13:04
I agree with you Tim. I was on the Russell in the early 70s and we were told that we wouldn't be called upon to go to the Cod War for that reason.

On a visit to Grimsby, I'm afraid it didn't stop many of the ships company getting more than merry on the free beer that was received after saying "We're on our way to Iceland". I'm not sure how the Grimsby folk would have reacted if they saw that we turned right leaving the Humber and went south to go back to "Costa Del Portland"

I do think that these little ships were designed to work on the Serpentine and anywhere from London to Marlow on the Thames. They certainly didn't like anything over a Force 1/2 wind

NSR
24-05-2008, 16:49
The first cod war occurred in the 50s when the limit was moved from 3 to 12 miles. Perhaps a skirmish would be a better description. The work was mainly undertaken by the 3rd Minesweepers but, due to the shortage of vessels they would borrow one from the 4th to cover the various fishing grounds. That is how HMS Pincher finished up each year patrolling around Iceland during the September to November period.

Most of the time we kept an eye on the trawlers and on several occasions sent the Doctor across when injuries had occurred. We also had times when we had to run for shelter in a fiord along with the trawlers, particularly on the west coast, when the autumn gales got a bit rough. As a reward for helping the fishermen they would ask us if we would like some fresh fish. A yes reply usually meant that the whaler's crew rowed back with the bottom of the whaler covered in prime cod.

The photograph shows Pincher in the Humber on its way to Goole Docks for a Navy Days visit.

Odin
24-05-2008, 22:44
Although there are doubts about some of the vessels we used for fishery protection in the various Cod Wars, I found this photo of a fishery protection vessel from the 1920s - HMS Colne. This is hardly more than a fishing boat itself.

My interest in Colne sprung from a group of medals I have to a Gunner RN. His papers showed he ended up with a commission and finished his career as First Lieut on HMS Colne. His medals are in Photo 11 of the Medal thread - Naval General Service Medal 1915 Bar : Persian Gulf 1909-1914

jonti
25-05-2008, 02:38
I was serving on 'Lagos', Battle Class destroyer near the end of a 18 month commission in Sept 1958 when we were ordered to proceed at full speed from Chatham to Iceland where the first moves of the first 'Fish War' involving the Icelandic gunboat "Odin' had occured. 'Eastbourne' preceded us as she was already in the North Sea but left the fishery fleet as soon as we arrived. None of our families were aware of where 'Lagos' had gone as our mail from the ship had been taken south to Hull by a returning trawler, and deposited in the Hull Post Office. The Post Office incorrectly identified the mail bag as one for delivery to 'Lagos' and gave to a trawler about to leave for Iceland. 2 weeks later our outgoing mail was delivered to the ship! In the meantime an anxious wife had contacted her member of Parliament to ask why she had not heard for her husband and questions were raised in the House as to the whereabouts of HMS Lagos. 'Lagos' spent 6 weeks into late November standing by the trawlers and my recollection is of very short, cold days, heavy swells and a biting wind, along with a lifetime admiration for the fishermen.

tim lewin
27-05-2008, 04:27
A very fine ship Lagos, better to be there in her than one of the little captains! but again, completely the wrong kind of kit for the conditions.

jonti
27-05-2008, 07:19
Sorry. Mistake alarm! The Icelandic gunboat in 1958 was "Thor", not "Odin".
We had fish sent over from the trawlers by gash-bin because of the severe weather conditions but the selection received was amazing. Halibut, cod, haddock and the odd flounder. Upper deck hosed down to clear the ice from 1000 to 1200 hrs, dark by 1400. The Sea Lords saw fit to send me there again in Oct-Nov 1962 in Diamond just prior to the end of another commission and the conclusion of my naval career. Rob T

NSR
27-05-2008, 18:26
You are right about the variety of fish available. On our first visit we called in at Rekyavik for fuel and I went for a run ashore to see what the place looked like. Came back about two hours later and found that the tinned bacon (Ugh!!) earmarked for supper had been used by the mess caterer as bait. In the two hours he had caught 12 dabs and two plaice with a line over the bows. A dab each with chips that night. The trouble was that after the two patrol periods almost living on fish and chips it took me about three years before I could face them again. The local 'chippie' could never match the taste of really fresh fish.

Ken

astraltrader
27-05-2008, 19:04
Ken and Odin - thank you for the pictures.

ceylon220
30-05-2008, 23:53
Why can I not get NSRs photo up of PINCHER yet there is no trouble with other pics on site?
:confused:

Dave

NSR
02-06-2008, 16:34
I'm not sure. I went back to my earlier reply, clicked on the link and up it popped. Try this one. It shows Pincher and, I think, Cheerful in the Outer Pool by Tower Bridge. This was during 'Southern Families week' when the 4th Minsweepers visited London. The leader, Bramble and Rattlesnake were in the Inner Pool. (I hope that I have remembered the names correctly but it is 50 years ago and I didn't write it all down at the time).

Ken

tonclass
02-06-2008, 17:34
Another superb photo, Ken. Have you any more ?

astraltrader
02-06-2008, 22:38
Agree totally with Rik. Many thanks for that superb picture Ken. Anymore like that?

NSR
03-06-2008, 21:11
I do have another of Pincher which was posted for me on another site. The file size is large and I have yet to learn how to reduce it to make it accessible. Once I have done that I will have another try.

As an alternative I have included the following:-

While serving in HMS Contest, I was called to the pay office and given about £2 - 10 - 0 Salvage Money. As far as I can remember this represented two shares of the proceeds awarded to the crew of HMS Pincher, which went to the aid of a collier, SS Maidenhead, whose cargo had started to overheat due to spontaneous combustion. This was in 1954 and the two shares represented the proportion for a Petty Officer, as I was a Mechanician 2nd at the time. The location was off the East Coast near Harwich, which was the base for the 4th Minesweepers. We were at sea at the time and fairly close so were dispatched to her aid. This involved coming alongside and using fire hoses to keep the hull cool while firemen from Harwich, with specialist equipment, were brought out by tug. The following photos were taken at the time.

SS Maidenhead

Cooling the side to keep the cargo temperature down.

Tied alongside continuing the cooling process. The two tugs from Harwich that brought the firemen can be seen astern of Pincher

Firemen from Harwich on board Maidenhead with breating apparatus.

Photo taken from the forecastle of Maidenhead showing Pincher tied alongside. Hull cooling still in progress as Maidenhead is escorted into Harwich Docks.

Ken

tonclass
03-06-2008, 21:32
Another great set of photo's, Ken. Try posting your other pic and see if it'll upload onto here. It's worth a try.

astraltrader
03-06-2008, 21:59
Thanks from me as well Ken - many thanks...

tomsam
04-06-2008, 09:34
Hi all,just catching up after hols. NSR you should be promoted straight to Admiral for those pics. It is not everyday that gems like these surface on forums. I also agree with everything that has been said so far regarding the "Cod Wars" and the ships involved,but I think Tim was being a bit harsh on the poor old Nimrod. I am Navy but they have given Stirling service over many years in many roles.,Anti Submarine and Air sea rescue.Many people owe their lives to these aircraft when the have been lost at sea.

tim lewin
05-06-2008, 04:39
The service of the Nimrods has been exceptional and incredible as well as a huge credit to their crews and support teams, the sad part is the complete failure by successive Governments to find a worthy successor. I suspect that the MOD only gave up the "Shack" because the oil companies stopped making 5-star petrol. I remember seeing the Comet make its debut flight at Farnboro' Air Show as a child, that was a real eye-opener, this was the real crossing point between petrol, pistons and props to new technology. There were displays too by the FD2, Hunters and Seahawks as well if i remember correctly but to see the Comet flying down the runway in a low pass, completely silent as it came towards you and the roar as it swept up and away made a deep and lasting impression (clearly! as I must have been only 7-9 at the time). At school near Chichester we regularly heard sonic booms from the aircraft at Thorney Island testing their new toys.
tim

tim lewin
05-06-2008, 04:46
Sorry Tomsam, my coment about the dear old Nimrod was that it was not the ideal aircraft (wrong kit) to use for recon in a land-based conflict such as Iraq/Afganistan, and that the MoD had not dealt faily with their crews (and families thereof) in failing to undertake modifications long recomended by those that use these splendid aircraft on a daily basis. I know its necessary to be adaptable but our MoD has a unhappy history of using the "wrong tool for the task".

tomsam
05-06-2008, 12:39
On reflection Tim,I was a wee bit hasty. Yes you are quite right with your comments. It is as you say but in addition the MOD'ds attitude and assistance to Returned Servicemen is appalling.
Regards.
Tomsam

tim lewin
05-06-2008, 17:02
Sadly the shabby treatment of returning veterans is an embarassment to this country going back centuries; not much has changed since the days of Nelson, and before....which I think Kipling put most eloquently in "Tommy" if memory serves me right!

NSR
06-06-2008, 17:04
I have finally found how to reduce the file size so here is the other picture of HMS Pincher. The original was taken by a photographer on 'La Dernier Heure', the evening paper in Brussels and we were able to buy copies from them.

As we had carried out fishery protection duties around Iceland during the worst part of the year, Captain (M) had selected us to accompany him when the Belgians invited the RN to attend the opening of the Buda Bridge in 1954.

The photo shows HMS Pincher being guided up the Willbrooke Canal. The canal allows sea navigation to Brussels for coastal vessels as far as Schaerbeek, beyond there the bridges only permit the large ‘Rhine’ barges to pass. Between the entry locks and Schaerbeek there are a number of moveable bridges and the last one to be restored after the war was the Buda Bridge. The opening coincided with the 400th anniversary of sea navigation to the city so it formed part of a major celebration.

A number of navies participated. There were units from the Danish, Dutch, French, two USN Rhine Patrol boats and two Belgian minesweepers. The British contingent consisted of the Bramble (Leader) and Pincher. Initially we tied up to the canal bank near the outlying suburb of Villevoorde where a dance had been laid on in the main square for the visiting navies. With the cobbles, the accordion band and the cafes surrounding the square it could have been a scene from a pre-war French film. Those who have seen the Jaques Tati's film, 'Jour de Fete' will know exactly what I mean. The visiting sailors were also supplied with passes for the trams and tickets for a stand to see the procession in the city centre.

Come the opening day, Prince Albert of Liege arrived, gave a short speech to the crowds lining the canal bank, pressed a big brass knob and opened the bridge to allow the visiting ships to pass through.

To avoid argument the visitors were marshalled in alphabetical order with the Belgian hosts bringing up the rear. With guardrails manned they set off with the Danish ship leading. Next came the Americans (Etats Uni) followed by the French, then the Dutch (Nederland) and finally the British (Royaume Uni). As each ship approached the saluting platform, the band played the appropriate national anthem and the Captain and Officers on the bridge could be seen saluting the Prince.

Prior to the visit, because the bridge was to be opened by Prince Albert, we had been instructed by Captain (M) to practice the evolution ‘Man and Cheer Ship’. As Bramble approached, the band was briefly drowned out by the order over the tannoy, ’Off Caps’. Caps were removed and held up at arm’s length with the tops facing outboard in readiness. This was followed by, ‘Three cheers for Prince Albert’, Hip, Hip’. Each rousing ‘Hooray’ was accompanied by waving the hats in a circular motion. (Those who have taken part in the evolution will know it can be impressive for the viewer). This exercise was repeated as Pincher passed in front of the reviewing stand. The Belgians were delighted and RN personnel found them selves the recipients of a great deal of additional hospitality as a result. As Wallace said to Grommit, 'It was grand day out'.

Ken

tonclass
06-06-2008, 17:27
Yet another superb photo, Ken. Keep them coming !!

jbryce1437
07-06-2008, 21:09
A great story and I bet it was also a "great night out".
I did a similar trip on the Type 14 Frigate HMS Exmouth in 1973, when we visited Brussels. Not sure if we were the largest RN ship to make it that far up river. We also struck the bottom heavily a few times and ended up having to go into dry dock at Chatham, to replace the variable pitch propellors. Don't know if any similar sized ships have ever returned to Brussels after our problems.
On the trip there, and back, we were closed up at Special Sea Dutymen for hours and hours.

astraltrader
07-06-2008, 23:40
Just seen this Ken. Thank you very much for the story and excellent photograph.

ceylon220
11-06-2008, 08:29
In 1992 the M1200 HMS SOBERTON paid off at her home port of Rosyth, she was the longest serving active ship in the Royal Navy at the time, 35 years continuous service, she was built as a minesweeper but spent her time with the FISHERY PROTECTION Squadron,I remember doing maintenance on this vessel at Port Edgar when I was based there in the 60s.


Dave.

Odin
11-06-2008, 08:55
Even after she paid off HMS Soberton continued for a few years (in a static role) with the Sea Cadet Corps at Erith.

The idea was good but the health and safety aspects were horrendous. A floating vessel without maintained bilge and fire pumps, full of young kids and no recent fire/damage control training for the few adults supervising them. I was working in the MOD on the Minor Warships Section at the time and we were still responsible for Soberton. My colleagues on the hull side had nightmares over that ship. (Remember this wasn't that long after the collision between the Bowbelle and the Marchioness and the resulting large loss of life - 51 people). They weren't sorry when Soberton was finally taken out of service.

ltotenby
20-03-2009, 18:56
Ken , I'm just a 'new comer' to this site, and the last thing I thought I could ever see, was my first ship - PINCHER. Like you I was serving on her during the SS Maidenhead escapade and the Belgium cruise. I never thought I would ever see any photos of the ship during these times. I Never went on Fishery proection with the Pincher, that came later when I was on the CORUNNA. But what great photos and reflecting the stories... All I can say is many, many thanks, this alone has been more than GREAT just for these photos etc....
Cheers and best wishes.... George (One time signalman on the Pincher)....

NSR
03-04-2009, 17:58
George,

Just picked up your message from about two weeks ago as the topic had moved to page three in that time. I didn't write a diary so I am not sure of the dates or the sequence of visits but here goes.

Joined Pincher at Harwich (Parkstone Quay) and we sailed for Oslo on a visit. Passage across the North Sea was rough and, being a short fat ship, she kept lifting her stern out of the water. I spent my watch below continuously on the throttles keeping the revs down every time she lifted and the props began to churn. Kept the engine room gash bucket handy to be sick in every now and again. Finally got used to the motion after about two days of misery. Good visit to Oslo tied up to the pier close to the Town Hall and a night club.

Sailed for Copenhagen and tied up at Langelene (spelling?) near the statue of the Little Mermaid. Several good runs including the Golden Lamb run by an expat who had moved to Denmark after the war. Returned to Harwich via the Keil Canal. Later sailed to Goole for a visit to coincide with Navy Week.
Several good runs ashore with members of the local RNOC.

Given the late year slot to fill in for the Fishery Protection Squadron and sailed for Iceland about mid-September having picked up net gauges etc. in Hull. Arrived in Rekyavik and was able to take a tour organised by a local lecturer turned temporary guide. We were shown the hot springs and geysers and a hydro-power generating station and he kept up a fascinating commentry about Icelands history and its connection with Britain.

Returned to the UK at the beginning on December and tied up to Springfield Quay in Glasgow for Northern 'Families Week'. Then back to Harwich for Christmas.

In 1955 I am a bit vague on the sequence but we did Navy Week visits to Cromer, Broadstairs and Dartmouth. Dartmouth was in company with Rattlesnake and we took part in the decorated boats competition. Again a good run.

Apart from the Maidenhead incident and the Brussels visit there was also the Annual Gunnery shoot off Harwich when we got rammed by Rattlesnake. It was all Cheerful's fault but that is another story.

We also visited Bruges in Belgium where I learnt the phrase, 'Verboten te gaan opp der spoorweg'. Translated as, 'Don't walk on the tram tracks'. There was also a visit to the Dutch Naval base at Den Helder which gave us the opportunity to visit Amsterdam. Again dates are vague.

Once again back to Iceland and trawlers including taking a Lloyd's Surveyor to check a wrecked trawler on the north coast. We nearly had our tour extended as our relief, HMS Pickle, was suffering with 'condenseritis' in the evaporators and couldn't produce fresh water. We got a 'Proceed with all despatch' as a trawlerman in the Faroes was serioously ill and the Sunderland sent to bring him back had crashed on landing. We ended up bringing him, several DBS, the RAF survivors and the bodies of the other RAF crew members back to Port Edgar. We made 19 knots through the Pentland Firth with the help of a following sea.

Christmas this time was in the Outer Pool in London for Southern 'Families Week'. In 1956 we called in at Chatham where I got another ship-to-ship draft.

Does any of that tie upwith your memories.

Ken

ivorthediver
05-04-2009, 06:22
Well done Ken,

Seems strange to see a Greyship in such a narrow stretch of water......

ltotenby
08-04-2009, 18:47
Brilliant Ken.... it certainly has refreshed my grey cells quite a lot...The Pincher was my first ship, after training etc...'Scared the hell out of me'. But I certainly enjoyed my short stay on the little darlin'.... Many thanks Ken.
George.

harry.gibbon
08-04-2009, 19:21
Tim,

Although belatedly in terms of the running time of this thread, I am prompted to post a question regarding your input about sonic booms whilst at school in Chi'. I recall hearing the same in the 60's whilst in MQ's at Littlehampton and based at RN Unit, RAF Tangmere (say no more;);)!!!)... so to my point:- wasn't there a measured distance over which both RAF and RN fixed wing a/c flew just off the Littlehampton coast?? or were the pilots on other activities?

Regards

Little h

Glyn33
28-07-2009, 08:36
George,

Just picked up your message from about two weeks ago as the topic had moved to page three in that time. I didn't write a diary so I am not sure of the dates or the sequence of visits but here goes.


Does any of that tie upwith your memories.

Ken

Hi Ken,

Just picked up World Naval Ships Forums website for the first time and was surprised to read your posting. I served on Pincher from January, 1954 to August 1955.
I was part of the crew who sailed on her to Oslo, Copenhagen etc., also to Brussels and Iceland as you describe. I also recall the ramming of Rattlesnake as I was sitting on the heads at the time and vividly remember looking out to sea through the gaping hole. My name is Glyn Thomas (known as Tich or Taffy) and I was the LSA(S) on board, billeted in the forward messdeck. I am now living in Western Australia,having emigrated here in 1985.
It would be great to hear from you, to know your surname and most of all to know if we knew each other.

Cheers,

Glyn.

Rob Hoole
28-07-2009, 10:59
Although there are doubts about some of the vessels we used for fishery protection in the various Cod Wars, I found this photo of a fishery protection vessel from the 1920s - HMS Colne. This is hardly more than a fishing boat itself.

My interest in Colne sprung from a group of medals I have to a Gunner RN. His papers showed he ended up with a commission and finished his career as First Lieut on HMS Colne. His medals are in Photo 11 of the Medal thread - Naval General Service Medal 1915 Bar : Persian Gulf 1909-1914

According to 'Royal Navy Trawlers' by Gerald Toghill, HM Trawler Colne started off as the Isaac Chant launched at Lobnitz in Refrew in 1918. She was completed as a minesweeper, armed with a 12 pdr, renamed Colne and delivered to the Admiralty (Admty No. 3704) in September 1920. She served during WWII with the Pendant No. T17 and was sold to the Mercantile in May 1949.

The attached photo shows her early in her life as she is not yet fitted with wireless.

billbuntintosser
28-07-2009, 15:20
I was lucky enough to be on HMS Lincoln back in 1973 when we were despatched off to the Icelandic 12 mile limit. Cant remember a great deal about it other than the weather was great - other than a swell like I have never seen before. Not a hint of wind but the swell was maybe 50 feet....
We had two run-ins with the Icelandi gunboat Aegir. The little b*****d rammed us twice - once up the arse end and again in the midships. We were not allowed to retaliate and indeed some matelots got a bollocking for throwing Spuds......did you ever hear anything so daft....
Lincoln was despatched for a second time but this time the skipper had two railway lines welded to the arse end to keep the little blighters away and had the hull at the front end reinforced with dirty great timbers.
Sorry about the quality of photos but only had a Kodak Instamatic.....;)

Bill

NSR
28-07-2009, 17:51
Glyn,

Saw your note and have sent a PEM.

Ken

astraltrader
28-07-2009, 20:56
A lovely picture of Lincoln, Bill.

Very many thanks.

harry.gibbon
28-07-2009, 21:29
Did two stints up there in 59 then 60 on Battles ... tell you what, they'd be good allies these Vikings ... they always showed plenty tenacity although a tad reckless!

Little h

PS remember main armament/ammunition was hand thrown rotten spuds kept in the mesh spud lockers on the midships gun platform... and occasionally a fire hose.

Always plenty of fresh fish from UK trawler lads though

qprdave
28-07-2009, 21:55
"they always showed plenty tenacity"

How much tenacity would they have shown if they were at a wrong end of a 4.5 inch shell. If the ships up there could have protected themselves as they should have done it would have lasted a forenoon. After all it was called the Cod WAR

harry.gibbon
28-07-2009, 22:11
"they always showed plenty tenacity"

How much tenacity would they have shown if they were at a wrong end of a 4.5 inch shell. If the ships up there could have protected themselves as they should have done it would have lasted a forenoon. After all it was called the Cod WAR
no argument with your response!!! per say... If we as a country showed the same tenacity at looking after our fishing fleets surrounding quotas; and protecting our manufacturing industries... then I would be more sympathic!!

The Icelanders pursued their declared intentions irrespective of the powerfully armed ships we sent up there... and in your head and heart I feel sure you know why!!!

It most certainly wasn't a war... far from it .. we FOUGHT campaigns in Malaya and Insurgency against Indonesia and they were never called wars.

benbow30
28-07-2009, 23:00
I was up in Iceland on Fishery Protection on the Contest in early 1959 and we had a few run ins with both Odin and Thor
Benbow30

Dave Hutson
31-07-2009, 19:04
Hi Bill,
Nice shots of the Icelanders and Lincoln. I did two stints up there in 72-74 on Lynx and marvelled at the ship handling of the Icelanders but then they were experts with ships built for that sort of WORK. But to be honest our skipper a Long "C" - Kit Layman [later to be decorated at the Falklands] was the best ship handler I ever came across. He could play chicken with the best of the Icelanders and many a time sped straight for them resulting in them veering off.

Our only complaint with him was that when we gave assistance to broken down trawlers he refused fish as thanks - and us with two empty fridge spaces kept that way for fish to take home - still he eventually got the message and all was well.

I still think the one thing worse than the weather was the long dark day/nights.

Happy Days ...... glad you were on the bridge/flagdeck and me in the MWO.;)

Dave H

billbuntintosser
06-08-2009, 09:51
Hi Bill,
Nice shots of the Icelanders and Lincoln. I did two stints up there in 72-74 on Lynx and marvelled at the ship handling of the Icelanders but then they were experts with ships built for that sort of WORK. But to be honest our skipper a Long "C" - Kit Layman [later to be decorated at the Falklands] was the best ship handler I ever came across. He could play chicken with the best of the Icelanders and many a time sped straight for them resulting in them veering off.

Our only complaint with him was that when we gave assistance to broken down trawlers he refused fish as thanks - and us with two empty fridge spaces kept that way for fish to take home - still he eventually got the message and all was well.

I still think the one thing worse than the weather was the long dark day/nights.

Happy Days ...... glad you were on the bridge/flagdeck and me in the MWO.;)

Dave H

Our first trip to the Icelandic waters was in May/June 1973. The weather was absolutly glorious and doing the "middle" was sheer joy (not sure if joy is the right word). The sun dipping down to the horizon and then starting to rise again - amazing. Played havoc with the old body clock tho.

astraltrader
06-08-2009, 13:12
Iceland is really lovely at that time of year.

Odin
06-08-2009, 14:56
Somewhat belatedly but thank you very much Rob for the information on HMS Colne. My man had a beard for much of his naval career but couldn't spot him in the photo!

Haven't been able to visit this Forum much lately due to other things going on, hence the delay, but thanks again Rob.

billbuntintosser
22-08-2009, 15:12
Just got this photo from my old Killick Gollie on the Lincoln. The Aegir about to ram us stbd midships - 1500hrs 22nd September 1973.

Bill

Sheltie55
04-09-2009, 13:12
Hi I was on the Lincoln when that picture was taken, I was closed up in the ops room.

billbuntintosser
04-09-2009, 16:45
Hi I was on the Lincoln when that picture was taken, I was closed up in the ops room.

Always nice to meet an ol Lincoln man.

Bill

harry.gibbon
30-11-2009, 11:07
Looked for an appropriate place to drop in this article from the 'net... a kind of postscript so to speak:-

....

Trawlermen from Aberdeen are among those set to benefit from the first
compensation payments to be made to those who lost their livelihoods in the Cod
Wars 30 years ago.

Business Secretary Lord Mandelson will pay cheques to around 1,000 people who
fished in Icelandic waters.

Those involved will receive payments totalling between £5 million and £10
million.

Lord Mandelson said: "I'm pleased to be able to start this new scheme off by
meeting some of the people who will benefit from further compensation.

"These men lost their livelihoods through no fault of their own and deserve just
treatment. The new scheme is a much fairer deal and means that the group of
trawlermen that received unreasonably low payments under the previous scheme -
around one in six - will now receive additional compensation."

Former trawlermen from Aberdeen, Hull, Grimsby, and Fleetwood will benefit from
the scheme.

The Cod Wars refer to a series of confrontations between UK and Iceland in the
1950s and 1970s regarding fishing rights in the North Atlantic.

The Royal Navy was deployed to protect British ships from harassment from
Icelandic counterparts after Iceland declared fishing rights to an area beyond
its territorial waters.

Last updated: 27 November 2009, 15:15

STV News

....
Little h

harry.gibbon
01-12-2009, 12:52
Further to my post #41 here are my two Blue Nose Certificates (cropped a little to fit) dated 366 days apart; whilst on Battle Class destroyers in the 1st of the 3 so called Cod Wars. Some 53 RN warships are said to have taken their share of the rotation in the '3 boxes'.

Little h

ltotenby
01-12-2009, 13:38
Was up in Iceland myself on the Corunna and Agincourt etc. Had a 'set-to' with Thor simply because a trawler had been caught fishing inside the limit. The last I saw of the trawler was the back end of her and black smoke belching out like some thick cloud. But sadly she was 'called back' and took the punishment handed out by Iceland.. One thing I learnt during that spell on Fishery Protection, was that the trawlermen were a special breed. Hard as nails and I 'took my hat off to them'.... (Some of the Icelandic women were quite 'charming' too...................... George:)

oldsalt
01-12-2009, 13:41
Did a trip up to Iceland in the Vigilant, got a bit fed up with eating fish, I think it was about 1960. You never see fish like those caught then, cod was 3ft. long & 12" in circumference.

Scurs
01-12-2009, 15:00
Keith - KEPPEL was also involved in 1960..........only trouble with getting fresh fish from Trawlers to me, is that I don't like fish of any shape, size or form! Spent days living on cans of soup from canteen!

Got a Bluenose certficate............somewhere in house.........but not from Fishery Protection (although we flew the Fishery Protection flag as "disguise"), when CHICHESTER shadowed the Russian Fleet exercises off North Cape in 1967/68.

tonclass
16-12-2009, 22:34
SFPA ship 'WESTRA' as she appears today as the Protest Ship M/V 'STEVE IRWIN'.....

ekd
16-12-2009, 22:38
Attached a fine photo of H.M.S. Palliser, en route to a six week Iceland patrol from a St Malo flag waving visit, after a hard work-up at Portland.
Photo taken from coastal command aircraft, in the Irish sea off Anglesey on 17th May 1962.

Yes, these ships would roll on a wet lawn, but you got used to it.
The most sobering thing was the paint shop was full of quick-drying cement.
(Yes, This would protect you!)

The welded seams leaked like sieves, and FFO regularly flooded the messdecks. The constant pounding of the massive 'green seas' broke the ship's bridge armour-plated windows to bits. The bridge was regularly evacuated, hatches battened down, and we steamed from the ops room during the worst weather.
One night in November 1962, the ship nearly turned turtle after hitting a 'rouge' wave in a force 10. These 'rouge waves' are what they make documentaries about these days. It caused a few ships to disappear before the waves were even recognised as abnormally high.
'Emergency stations' were ordered after our hammocks were parallel with the deckhead!
It was horrendous. But deemed normal for the patrol conditions.

Our ship's boats; a motor cutter and a whaler were usually matchsticks on return to Rosyth in the winter months.
Having said this, the huge fleet of Grimsby, Hull and Fleetwood trawlers, not to mention the Scottish fleets, took it all in their stride. I never knew what these people had to contend with, as I ate my fish and chips as a lad.
They deserved medals!

We did some great things in the summer months, though. The Captain was a 'twitcher'. He did'nt care if you saw a Russian sub, or a Soviet passive sonar device being recovered from a fishing net; he wanted to know what unusual birds you had seen! The rarer the better!
We set a surface ship record for penetrating the ice up to the highest latitude towards the North pole. But we nearly came unstuck doing this.

Earlier that year, I remember the ship's hull was so thin, we got iced up in Seydesffiord when refuelling. The ice was only one inch thick! But we could'nt move for fear of rupturing the hull.

We also had a competition to devise a way of catching a Basking shark. These were 45 footers. Loads of 'em. I will not say what happened, for fear of the repercussions of the modern day.. nancy wancy, iffy wiffy, dodgy wodgy P.C. brigade.

The other type 14's would have similar stories to relate.

One thing for sure, it made you a man pretty damn quick! Even though you were so young. And that was just Nature in the raw, it made you think.
Imagine a hostile force also on your back; like our guys in both World Wars had to contend with!

Apart from Icelanders chucking spuds at us in Reykyavik harbour, we wished them no harm, really.

The Norwiegians were superb. We visited Hammerfest, Honnigsvaarg, Tromso, Harstad, Bodo, Narvik, Trondheim and Bergen, to name a few.
Everwhere we went, we seemed to be welcomed, and that I will never forget.

I later went to Narvik for the 20th year celabrations on board H.M.S. Tiger in 1965.

Anyway, good luck to all those who served in the Arctic!

harry.gibbon
30-12-2009, 23:12
This pic of a trawler was taken (by me) whilst on one of my two Patrols in either 1959 or 1960 on Saintes or Camperdown.

Having just found the pic again and scanned it into computer, I see what appears to be a 'liferaft' alongside the trawlers' port side ... this appears to be the reason we were both stopped!

But what is it really? because I can not remember!

Little h

fleetchief
31-12-2009, 05:28
Attached a fine photo of H.M.S. Palliser, en route to a six week Iceland patrol from a St Malo flag waving visit, after a hard work-up at Portland.
Photo taken from coastal command aircraft, in the Irish sea off Anglesey on 17th May 1962.


Anyway, good luck to all those who served in the Arctic!

If memory serves me correctly, after 47 years, the skipper was "The Honourable John Freeman". Used to play music over the upper deck speakers when entering and leaving harbour.

I met my "Best Man" onboard, RS (or in those days, PO Tel) Brian Snell, now sadly no longer with us.

I remember we lost a seaman PO over the side, while he was trying to secure the 2 man-inflatable. Pulled on his safety line but it had "sawed off" on the guard rail.

We went into Rejavik to fuel and give a night's leave. The OA (Jim Bell) was working on the jetty side Bofor, greasing the track, and therefore was moving the Bofor a few degrees at a time. At one point, it was pointing directly towards Rejavik and a local photographer took a snap. Headline in evening paper was British Warship enters harbour, gun trained on Capital. Needless to say, we didn't get leave.

I did a transfer to a trawler to fix their radar, being the only REA onboard, and we used the 2 man-inflatable. I passed up a small kitbag with my test gear and a couple of trawler guys grabbed each arm. just as they did, the inflatable "fell away" on the wave and I was left dangling down the trawler side. Even though I had an immersion suit on, I remember praying "Don't drop me".

Palliser steamed off to transfer an ERA to do a job elsewhere in the trawler fleet. Somehow they lost track of where I was. We could hear the skipper on Palliser's radio saying, "I'm steaming down your port side and I've got the 20" on you. Why can't you see me?" Because he had the wrong trawler and I was 20 miles away. It took them 3 days to find me!!!! But the trawler had lots of booze!!!

Always brought fresh fish back from any job on a trawler. I got first pick (for the PO's mess); the Ldg. Seaman of the inflatable got 2nd pick; the wardroom got the next pick and the ship's company got what was left. I remember the Supply Officer wanting to freeze it down because, 'We must use up the fish provided by Naval Victualling first'. Yeah, right!!!

Brian Snell and I was in the skipper's cabin one night, playing bridge with the skipper and the Electrical Officer. Skipper's usual partner was the MO but he was tied up doing something. I opened 1 club; skipper went 1 spade; Brian went 2 clubs, and then there was a long, long wait. Finally Brian leant over, looked at the Electrical Officer's hand and said "Your call is 3 bloody spades"!!

Rough time playing tag with the gunboats, but some happy memories (Other than Captain F, on Duncan calling up and telling us he had mechanical problems and we had to do our 4 week stint and then his 4 week stint. Bastard).

Cheers,

Ed

nigelweysom
31-12-2009, 15:19
[quote=Odin;12432]Although there are doubts about some of the vessels we used for fishery protection in the various Cod Wars, I found this photo of a fishery protection vessel from the 1920s - HMS Colne. This is hardly more than a fishing boat itself.

it would seem that the navy have been involved in Fishery Protection for a long time on March 29Th 1901 it was reported that HMS Onyx Torpedo gunboat was involved in fishery protection in the North Sea
Nigel

tonclass
31-12-2009, 16:41
If memory serves, the FPS is the oldest squadron in the RN...

qprdave
31-12-2009, 18:42
I have seen a bit, in the Times Archive dated 5th Feb 1890 that HMS Hearty was at Chatham "To be refitted for service in the North Sea Fishery Protection"

whalerman
02-01-2010, 18:14
Served on HMS Keppel when we left the Derry (Red Hand) Squadron to go to FP Squadron. I think it was 69-70 when we were the first British warship to carryout an official visit to Rekyavik since the first Cod war. As the Admiralty didn't want Jack spoiling the visit they got the US Navy to send buses to take us to Keflavik airbase, absolutely brilliant idea. I don't think anyone was sober for three days the yanks wouldn't let us spend money so all drinks and food were free.

alanandbren
03-01-2010, 06:09
Further to my post #41 here are my two Blue Nose Certificates (cropped a little to fit) dated 366 days apart; whilst on Battle Class destroyers in the 1st of the 3 so called Cod Wars. Some 53 RN warships are said to have taken their share of the rotation in the '3 boxes'.

Little h

Good photo Harry, I was on Camperdown the previous commish' and my bluenose certificate is dated 26 sept 1959. happy days.
Alan

nigelweysom
03-01-2010, 17:23
I have seen a bit, in the Times Archive dated 5th Feb 1890 that HMS Hearty was at Chatham "To be refitted for service in the North Sea Fishery Protection" do we have any idea who they were protecting , i assume it was the fishermen as in the Cod wars but if so who were they protecting them from , or was it the fish stocks as they do today ?
Nigel

nigelweysom
15-02-2010, 22:52
watching the programme empire of the seas i have just found the answer to my question, it was to protect south west fishermen from North African pirates
Nigel

sonofdave
24-02-2010, 22:30
Hello to all. This is my first post on this foram. My father, David Anderson, served on HMS Pincher between late 1952 and 1954. In the process of looking for pictures of HMS Pincher, to compare in relation to HMS Bramble, i found this site and previous posts from 2008 relate to a certain incident that my dad had mentioned, the fire on the SS Maidenhead. To anyone who may be interested, my dad also has some pictures and his receipts for 'salvage'. These pictures are attached here as well as some of fellow crew. If you know anyone in the pictures or know Dave Anderson, feel free to say here.

sonofdave
24-02-2010, 22:41
Oppp's, got that wrong!! he served between '54 and '56!

ekd
24-02-2010, 22:46
How good is this?

Your certificate is provided by the same Plymouth company as mine!

Horns and Miller. (wonder what they are doing now?)

Some years between, though!

regards

NSR
25-02-2010, 16:27
Hi Sonofdave,

I posted the SS Maidenhead photos and a copy of the ship's company photo on an earlier thread. Picked up my salvage money about a year or so after leaving Pincher but no longer have the receipt. I recognise a couple of faces from the photos you have posted but regret that I cannot remember any names.

Did your dad get any photos of the regatta at Dartmouth? I have added some below where the seamen rigged the whaler as a St Trinian's outing. They went round Dartmouth cadging old laddered stockings from the shop girls as part of their rig. The object covered with bunting was revealed once the judging was over. It was a manual fire pump that was used to fight off the Rattlesnake's 'war canoe' when they attacked with bailers. In the ensuing battle several crew members on both sides dramatically fell into the water, much to the delight of the visitors on the quayside.

I would like to get photos of Rattlesnake's war canoe as it was a brilliant idea. The side was covered in canvas painted to look like a native canoe and was propelled by 10 blacked up 'warriors' facing forward and using Carley Float paddles.

Ken

ekd
25-02-2010, 20:39
Cracking photos, Ken.

Big Al
27-02-2010, 21:27
I was on the Gurkha during the last Cod War and she had the distinction of being one of the most rammed ships during this period. If memory serves me right it was 11 times that we were bumped.and some of the weather conditions were attrocious. Our mess ran out of cups at one stage as they were being hurtled at either the crew of the Odin or Thor. The photo,s I sent to a guy called Pusser Hill who posted them on the HMS JUNO site I will post on here.

astraltrader
27-02-2010, 22:28
No offence Al, but it is a pity that you didnt scan the original photos at a size that allowed the subject matter to be seen properly.

They would have been interesting photos.

sonofdave
27-02-2010, 22:38
Hello NSR and EKD. Thanks for taking an interest in my post and replying.
I've gone through earlier posts on this thread with my dad and he remembers most of the places/events that have been mentioned. He was on board when the two RAF men were picked up for example and says he went to the brewery when the ship was in London!
He does remember a few names. Spelling may be wrong but here they are. Charlie Dodge, chief era, Bud Abbot, Mike Brady,Dick Richardson, Neil Puncher, Basil Such, John Roe. Apparently, John Roe was always late back from leave and his best late excuse was he in was in the rear section of the train that got disconnected from the front and left behind!!
He also remembers playing the police team at football in Rekyavik but the Pincher team lost.
The picture of the four in uniform i posted [my dad is on the left of the pic] was taken during training at Torpoint. He was actually a stoker mec, mei on the Pincher, on board from August '54 to may '56.
No, he didn't get any photo's of the regatta and doesn't really remember much about it saying he must have been elsewhere at the time. Personally, i suspect in was in a pub somewhere!
The reason i was looking for pictures of Pincher in the first place was because of a 96th scale model of HMS Bramble that is available. I wanted to see if it looked anything like Pincher, if so, i'd consider buying it [i like doing that sort of thing, i'm currently building the 200th scale Bismarck]. However, things got very confusing and worse the more i looked!! I know that there were two Brambles built in the early '40's but which one was the model? I ruled out it was the first one quite quickly [ the model has one mast for example, the real one two] but even that didn't follow when i found a pic of the first Bramble with only one mast!!! How could that be i thought until i read that a mast was lost during a shoot up with a German plane off of Harwich in 1941, trust me to find the only pic in the world of a two masted ship with only one mast!!!!! So the model had to be the second Bramble. But something was just not right, comparing pic's of the model against the real thing found loads of differences. Cut a long story of looking at every Algerine class minesweeper short, it works out that the model is actually of HMS Marvel!!!!! I've spent a week and a half of my life to find that out!!!! I've aslo found some really good pics of the model, it looks good but is it good enough to buy it saying , well, it's nearly HMS Pincher!! I'll have to think on that one. I can't put pics of the model here, seems it exceeds file size but google HMS Marvel Solent model club and you'll be able to see them forself. Please do, i'd like to know what you think of it as a model.Thanks.

Big Al
27-02-2010, 22:56
Hi Terry,
Point taken, the originals are with my daughter down south and these were taken from a copy of the disk I sent to Pusser Hills. I will try again.

astraltrader
27-02-2010, 23:13
Son of Dave - I am sorry my friend but I have had to move your last 6 posts to the thread I have shown a link to below, as we have a designated section for posts and pictures of model ships.


http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5332&page=2


Many thanks.

sonofdave
27-02-2010, 23:20
Hello Terry. Will NSR be able to know that? The point of the model pics related to my original post asking about HMS Pincher, my dad serving on and so on. Will NSR see the first post i put on tonight, basically a reply to his reply!!

sonofdave
27-02-2010, 23:22
Ok Terry, i now see my first reply is where it should be. Thanks for leaving it there. I'm new at all this!!

sonofdave
27-02-2010, 23:25
NSR, please can you follow terry's link above, i'd like you to know what you think. Thanks, it was my whole point of looking in the first place!!

NSR
28-02-2010, 11:34
Followed the link and added my reply.

Ken

Dick Davis
01-03-2010, 16:54
Hello to all. This is my first post on this foram. My father, David Anderson, served on HMS Pincher between late 1952 and 1954. In the process of looking for pictures of HMS Pincher, to compare in relation to HMS Bramble, i found this site and previous posts from 2008 relate to a certain incident that my dad had mentioned, the fire on the SS Maidenhead. To anyone who may be interested, my dad also has some pictures and his receipts for 'salvage'. These pictures are attached here as well as some of fellow crew. If you know anyone in the pictures or know Dave Anderson, feel free to say here.
Hello SonofDave. This is my first post and I was fascinated to see that I served on the same ship and at the same time as your Dad. I was onboard with him during the Maidenhead fire, but don't remember it so I may well have been on duty down the boiler room. I also crossed the Arctic Circle with him so I wonder if we knew each other. It seems such a coincidence that we were both stokers at the same time, but the only name I can remember at the moment is Johnny Schofield who came from Huddersfield. Also, I was aMaldon boy and see from some of the documents you posted that your Dad hailed from Colchester...my my what a small world. I too am enlisting help with this site from my daughter! It would be great to hear from you. Were you known by a nickname? I guess I was known as Dick but the old grey cells are firing up slowly at the moment. Things are coming back to me as I read what you have had to say. Looking forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Dick.

Dick Davis
01-03-2010, 17:12
Hi Sonofdave,

I posted the SS Maidenhead photos and a copy of the ship's company photo on an earlier thread. Picked up my salvage money about a year or so after leaving Pincher but no longer have the receipt. I recognise a couple of faces from the photos you have posted but regret that I cannot remember any names.

Did your dad get any photos of the regatta at Dartmouth? I have added some below where the seamen rigged the whaler as a St Trinian's outing. They went round Dartmouth cadging old laddered stockings from the shop girls as part of their rig. The object covered with bunting was revealed once the judging was over. It was a manual fire pump that was used to fight off the Rattlesnake's 'war canoe' when they attacked with bailers. In the ensuing battle several crew members on both sides dramatically fell into the water, much to the delight of the visitors on the quayside.

I would like to get photos of Rattlesnake's war canoe as it was a brilliant idea. The side was covered in canvas painted to look like a native canoe and was propelled by 10 blacked up 'warriors' facing forward and using Carley Float paddles.

Ken
Hello Ken, I am new to this site and read with interest that you were at Dartmouth regatta. I was also there but wasn't one of the St Trinians girls. I also remember someone always in trouble for being late back. I clearly remember leaving Iceland, going to Cuxhaven, Hamburg and Brussels where I had to march in front of the King of the Belgians. I remember holding (trying) a rifle for what seemed like an eternity. There were only a few of us made to do this so maybe you escaped that pleasure? Would love to hear from you as the memories are really coming back through joining this site and it appears that I was in the same mess as Dave Anderson, although I joined the Pincher later than him (April '55). Maybe we served together as well? Best regards, Dick.

NSR
01-03-2010, 19:35
Hello Dick,

I was on Pincher from May 54 to January 56 so we would have served together. I joined on a ship-to-ship from Corunna as a Mech 2 and after promotion to Mech 1 got a ship-to-ship to Superb. If you put Pincher in the search you should find quite a number of references that should bring back memories. You may well be able to add to them. It's a great forum.

Ken

sonofdave
02-03-2010, 22:22
Hello Dick. just a quick reply for now, it's getting late! Thanks for the reply, i've spoken to my dad about it but he hasn't actually read it for himself yet. He say's his nickname on board was 'Hans' [Anderson]> When i put the salavge receipts here i did wonder if anyone would pick up on the address and as to if it was actually safe to but on the grounds the house is no longer there, i thought it was ok to!! He does still live in Colchester.

sonofdave
02-03-2010, 22:27
hello Ken. thanks for looking at the model pics. Personally, i think it does look quite good as a model but will have to see what my dad thinks as to if it is close enough to be a pretend Pincher!!
My dad was one holding a rifle as well and he remembers an american GI dropping his!!

siggy63
03-03-2010, 09:08
Hello
Being only a youngster I joined after the fun and games with the gun boats but a mate from the RN Comms Association sent me a few photos of his time onboard HMS Diomede. Heres a few and will see if I can find the rest.

Danny

harry.gibbon
03-03-2010, 09:13
Siggy, they are very dramatic pics ... and people ask about the price of fish:(

Little h

Dick Davis
03-03-2010, 09:23
Hello Dick,

I was on Pincher from May 54 to January 56 so we would have served together. I joined on a ship-to-ship from Corunna as a Mech 2 and after promotion to Mech 1 got a ship-to-ship to Superb. If you put Pincher in the search you should find quite a number of references that should bring back memories. You may well be able to add to them. It's a great forum.

Ken
Hi Ken,
Thanks so much for replying, it has been really interesting for me to recall so many memories of old times! How amazing that we could have served together all those years ago and here I am connecting with those people on this site....the wonders of the internet! I will go through all of the links thanks for the advice (I am new to this and have enlisted help from my daughter) and have attached (I hope) a picture of the SS Maidenhead fire being put out and my bluenose certificate.
I will come back to you once I read the other posts!

7218172182

Dick Davis
03-03-2010, 09:38
Hello Dick. just a quick reply for now, it's getting late! Thanks for the reply, i've spoken to my dad about it but he hasn't actually read it for himself yet. He say's his nickname on board was 'Hans' [Anderson]> When i put the salavge receipts here i did wonder if anyone would pick up on the address and as to if it was actually safe to but on the grounds the house is no longer there, i thought it was ok to!! He does still live in Colchester.

Hi Sonofdave,
How incredible that we can only be a few miles apart as I am still in the area as well!
I can't bring 'Hans' to mind but I was only national service so maybe he was a regular? Also of course this was all so many years ago! This is bringing back so many amazing memories such as getting loads of the best tasting fish you can imagine from the trawlermen so we were able to save our mess money. The tinned loganberries were also absolutely lovely, I have never had ones like that since. I remember one of the trawler men being brought on board because he nearly cut his finger off and had to stay in our sick bay. Your Dad may remember steaming our overalls in a bucket in the boiler room to make them look old so we seemed like we were old hands! Much is coming back to me so I will reply again as I think of more. I uploaded a picture in a reply to Ken that your Dad may like to see of the SS Maidenhead fire with a good veiw of the Pincher. Thanks so much for replying. Dick.

tonclass
03-03-2010, 15:32
Hi Ken,
Thanks so much for replying, it has been really interesting for me to recall so many memories of old times! How amazing that we could have served together all those years ago and here I am connecting with those people on this site....the wonders of the internet! I will go through all of the links thanks for the advice (I am new to this and have enlisted help from my daughter) and have attached (I hope) a picture of the SS Maidenhead fire being put out and my bluenose certificate.
I will come back to you once I read the other posts!

7218172182

Superb pic Dick. The other ship appears to be HMS BEVINGTON (M1108)

NSR
03-03-2010, 16:15
Hello Dick,

Thanks for posting the aerial shot of Pincher alongside Maidenhead; it's one that I haven't got. If you have no objection I will add it to my collection. Now, if I could locate a picture of Rattlesnake's whaler at Dartmouth that would really complete the set.

I hope you enjoy the other posts about Pincher. I wonder if you and Sonofdave' s dad were among the group of stokers that went ashore in Aukerari to see the film Anna on my recommendation. Sorry about that, when I saw it in Chatham it had been dubbed in English. Seeing it in Italian with Icelandic subtitles may have detracted from the enjoyment, although the killick stoker didn't quite use terms like that when the group got back to the ship.

Ken

sonofdave
03-03-2010, 19:39
Hello Dick and Ken.
One thing i've got wrong!! I said it was an american GI who dropped his rifle. Well, when my dad said GI, i just assummed he was an american. Works out it was actually the Gunnery Instuctor!!!! Can you tell i wasn't in the navy!!
The irony being, as you've said, having trouble holding the rifle, never having been used to it in the past yet it's the instuctor who drops his! My dad thought that was rather funny. So Dick, yes, my dad was one of the few you mentioned earlier, for all we know, he could have been standing right beside you at the time.
My dad was also doing his national service, so, he wasn't a regular and yes, he does rember the overalls in the bucket thing! I aslo think the pic you've posted is very good. As i said earlier, i've been trying to campare Pincher with Marvel and to see Pincher from that angle is good. The deck seems more 'busy' than that of the model but then radio controlled models are usually less detailed than static ones just to be more robust. It sort of makes me laugh a bit, to think, while you were all on the Pincher, having fun with the Maidenhead, i was yet to be even born for another 10 years!!
I'll have to ask about the film Anna.
Sonofdave, Geoff [now learning quite a bit about algerine minesweepers!!]

Dick Davis
04-03-2010, 16:39
Hello Dick,

Thanks for posting the aerial shot of Pincher alongside Maidenhead; it's one that I haven't got. If you have no objection I will add it to my collection. Now, if I could locate a picture of Rattlesnake's whaler at Dartmouth that would really complete the set.

I hope you enjoy the other posts about Pincher. I wonder if you and Sonofdave' s dad were among the group of stokers that went ashore in Aukerari to see the film Anna on my recommendation. Sorry about that, when I saw it in Chatham it had been dubbed in English. Seeing it in Italian with Icelandic subtitles may have detracted from the enjoyment, although the killick stoker didn't quite use terms like that when the group got back to the ship.

Ken

Hi Ken,
Of course I have no objections to you using the picture, only glad it helps.
I was not one of the lucky ones who went ashore as I always seemed to be on duty, especially when we dragged anchor in Seydesford Harbour and had to put to sea to ride out the storm!
Did you go to the American Airbase at Keflevik with the other 2 thirds of the crew?
I wonder if the killick was Sticks Attwell?
By the way, it was 1955 that we marched in front of the king of the Belgians.......I gather you were one of the lucky ones who just waved your hats?
Regards, Dick.

Dick Davis
04-03-2010, 16:51
Hello Dick and Ken.
One thing i've got wrong!! I said it was an american GI who dropped his rifle. Well, when my dad said GI, i just assummed he was an american. Works out it was actually the Gunnery Instuctor!!!! Can you tell i wasn't in the navy!!
The irony being, as you've said, having trouble holding the rifle, never having been used to it in the past yet it's the instuctor who drops his! My dad thought that was rather funny. So Dick, yes, my dad was one of the few you mentioned earlier, for all we know, he could have been standing right beside you at the time.
My dad was also doing his national service, so, he wasn't a regular and yes, he does rember the overalls in the bucket thing! I aslo think the pic you've posted is very good. As i said earlier, i've been trying to campare Pincher with Marvel and to see Pincher from that angle is good. The deck seems more 'busy' than that of the model but then radio controlled models are usually less detailed than static ones just to be more robust. It sort of makes me laugh a bit, to think, while you were all on the Pincher, having fun with the Maidenhead, i was yet to be even born for another 10 years!!
I'll have to ask about the film Anna.
Sonofdave, Geoff [now learning quite a bit about algerine minesweepers!!]

Thats great that your Dad was one of the marchers.... Tell your Dad I don't remember the GI dropping his rifle, but I do know that he said we would change arms several times during the march and that never happened so maybe thats because he had dropped his own rifle eh? By the time we had gone round our rifles were parallel to our bodies and I felt like my arm was going to fall off! No doubt he will remember that...
Did your Dad go ashore to the American airbase in Keflevik? Maybe he was one of the lucky ones left on board!
My first memory of coming into Iceland is sailing into Reykavik harbour and seeing a line of girls gutting fish into barrels....we all cheered and waved, but all we got back were rude gestures (and probably Icelandic swear words!). Your Dad and I should know each other really......and the irony of us living in the same neighbourhood all this time is amazing! No doubt we will chat again, regards, Dick

Dick Davis
04-03-2010, 16:52
Superb pic Dick. The other ship appears to be HMS BEVINGTON (M1108)

Glad you enjoyed the pic, hope it is of interest or use to others and thanks for the info regarding the Bevington. Regards, Dick

Dick Davis
04-03-2010, 16:58
Hello Dick and Ken.
One thing i've got wrong!! I said it was an american GI who dropped his rifle. Well, when my dad said GI, i just assummed he was an american. Works out it was actually the Gunnery Instuctor!!!! Can you tell i wasn't in the navy!!
The irony being, as you've said, having trouble holding the rifle, never having been used to it in the past yet it's the instuctor who drops his! My dad thought that was rather funny. So Dick, yes, my dad was one of the few you mentioned earlier, for all we know, he could have been standing right beside you at the time.
My dad was also doing his national service, so, he wasn't a regular and yes, he does rember the overalls in the bucket thing! I aslo think the pic you've posted is very good. As i said earlier, i've been trying to campare Pincher with Marvel and to see Pincher from that angle is good. The deck seems more 'busy' than that of the model but then radio controlled models are usually less detailed than static ones just to be more robust. It sort of makes me laugh a bit, to think, while you were all on the Pincher, having fun with the Maidenhead, i was yet to be even born for another 10 years!!
I'll have to ask about the film Anna.
Sonofdave, Geoff [now learning quite a bit about algerine minesweepers!!]

By the way Sonofdave... I was minus 22 when our Dads were there!! Rachel.....(daughterofdick)

NSR
05-03-2010, 18:10
Thanks Dick, picture added to the collection.

I remember the trips to Keflavik air base and the football match between the seamen and stokers using oil drums for goal posts. In view of the state of the ground with its mix of mud and snow, I was happy to just spectate. There was the truck that came to a screeching halt and the driver jumped out with his camera and shouted, 'I've gotta have a shot of these crazy Limeys'. An American Air Force Sergeant fixed the players up with hot showers and we adjourned to their club room afterwards for a very good evening.

Ken

NSR
05-03-2010, 18:16
Nearly missed the bit about Prince Albert. No I didn't wave my hat as I was watch below in the engine room. I did wave it at King George VI some eight years earlier in the Clyde when I had reached the rank of Stoker 2.

Ken

Dick Davis
05-03-2010, 18:51
Thanks Dick, picture added to the collection.

I remember the trips to Keflavik air base and the football match between the seamen and stokers using oil drums for goal posts. In view of the state of the ground with its mix of mud and snow, I was happy to just spectate. There was the truck that came to a screeching halt and the driver jumped out with his camera and shouted, 'I've gotta have a shot of these crazy Limeys'. An American Air Force Sergeant fixed the players up with hot showers and we adjourned to their club room afterwards for a very good evening.

Ken

I dont remember any of that Ken as at the time we were being put through our paces running the ship with about a third of the ships company on board riding out a storm that was threatening to drag us on the rocks in I think it was Seydesford harbour but thats another story. Can you help me to remember the ports we called at in europe after we left Invergordon on to the Faroes and then after our Cod war experience im pretty sure the first port of call was Cuxhaven then onto Hamurg or Brussells. After that im not at all sure. was it you who mentioned the chief ERA? I was Messman for sometime and remember getting my ration neat with sippers on my birthday I was prettywell out of it after that. Back to the chief ERA canny bloke he took his fishing gear with him, we all had our photo taken with this really big Tope that he had caught and we helped get it on board with poles and nets that one of the dabtoes had produced, needless to say I havent got the pic now. thanks in anticipation D1ck

sonofdave
05-03-2010, 21:39
Hello Dick.
Ok, i've found out a bit about what my dad got up to!!! No, he didn't go to see the film Anna in Aukerari but maybe, the next day he wished he had done! He decided to meet up with some merchant men who had a supply of drink with them. He tells me, the next thing he knew was that it was morning and he was hand cuffed in the back of an Icelandic police van!!! I have given him a suitable telling off for bringing disgrace on the family! Once back on board his punishment was given out: no more going ashore! Of course, this leads on to him not going to the American base at Keflevik [one of the lucky ones] on the grounds he wasn't allowed to! He says seeing the state of a lot of people who did go, he's glad he didn't. I take it there was some sort of punch up?! I take it you know all about that? He also says he can remember the Yellow Rose of Texas being on the ships radio, the signal being picked up from the americans who played the song a lot.
Another one of his escapades was falling of off Cromer pier while waiting to get back to the ship. It would seem that while he was doing that, the sick bay attendant, Sinha [spelling?] was having great fun sliding down the life boat slipway ramp, the greasy bit in the middle, in his best uniform! Again, it would appear drink may have had some involvement in this pairs activities!
He aslo remembers the ship being off the west coast of Scotland and the double L sweep cable getting lost. From there , it was on to Glasgow.
So there is a bit more from memory lane, perhaps you could enlighten us all as to what did happen at Keflevik!
Geoff [sonofdavetheonewhoseemedtoquiteenjoyhimselfwhenheg othechance!]

sonofdave
05-03-2010, 21:46
Hello Rachel. Well, this is fun isn't it, all these old stories coming out of the woodwork! Seems my dad could be a bit of a naughty boy, best you find out what your dad was really like!!

sonofdave
05-03-2010, 21:54
Dick, i've only just seen your post to Ken. Go back to my first post on page 3, the one with the indivdual pics together as a group. There is a pic there of four people holding fish. I'll check but i'm sure the one bobbing down at the front is Charlie Dodge, Chief ERA. My dad, is in the middle back. Surley you're not one of the other two are you!!

sonofdave
06-03-2010, 12:34
Dick, no, it's Bud Abbot in the front of the 'fish' pic but look at the 'swimming trunk' pic. Charlie Dodge is the one bobbing down in the front of that pic. My dad is the one behind him, the only one with his trousers on!

Dick Davis
06-03-2010, 15:16
Hello Dick.
Ok, i've found out a bit about what my dad got up to!!! No, he didn't go to see the film Anna in Aukerari but maybe, the next day he wished he had done! He decided to meet up with some merchant men who had a supply of drink with them. He tells me, the next thing he knew was that it was morning and he was hand cuffed in the back of an Icelandic police van!!! I have given him a suitable telling off for bringing disgrace on the family! Once back on board his punishment was given out: no more going ashore! Of course, this leads on to him not going to the American base at Keflevik [one of the lucky ones] on the grounds he wasn't allowed to! He says seeing the state of a lot of people who did go, he's glad he didn't. I take it there was some sort of punch up?! I take it you know all about that? He also says he can remember the Yellow Rose of Texas being on the ships radio, the signal being picked up from the americans who played the song a lot.
Another one of his escapades was falling of off Cromer pier while waiting to get back to the ship. It would seem that while he was doing that, the sick bay attendant, Sinha [spelling?] was having great fun sliding down the life boat slipway ramp, the greasy bit in the middle, in his best uniform! Again, it would appear drink may have had some involvement in this pairs activities!
He aslo remembers the ship being off the west coast of Scotland and the double L sweep cable getting lost. From there , it was on to Glasgow.
So there is a bit more from memory lane, perhaps you could enlighten us all as to what did happen at Keflevik!
Geoff [sonofdavetheonewhoseemedtoquiteenjoyhimselfwhenheg othechance!]
Hi sonofdave and Dave You certainly got into more mischief than I did my conduct was classed as VG on the record sheet. Good job they didnt here about the nightclub incident in brussells.I didnt go to the Airforce base in Keflevik either we will have to rely on Ken for that info. What are your memories of the storm in Seydesford harbouir ? or am I dreaming it happened there. I dont even remember going to Cromer yet ( things are starting to come back though)but can see how Dave did. What about the dance at Invergordon with the Scottish lassies? according to my Service record I joined thr Pincher at Mull of Galloway, wherever that is perhaps Ken can help with that it would have been on 29 april 55 when I joined and off on the 23 march 56. I recognise Dave in the photo but wouldnt have been able to place him their I have a photo of me in uniform but will have to await Rachels return far too complicated all that scanning and that All the best Dick

sonofdave
08-03-2010, 12:36
Hello Dick.
I'll do a reply to your post but in the meantime my dad has come up with a whole load of goodies related to his service. He may have been a naughty boy but has pointed out his 'superior' rating!

Dick Davis
08-03-2010, 13:25
Hello Dick.
I'll do a reply to your post but in the meantime my dad has come up with a whole load of goodies related to his service. He may have been a naughty boy but has pointed out his 'superior' rating!

ive got my cert as well but will have to await the return of Rachel to post them cheers for now dave and I must phone or meet sometime Dick

NSR
08-03-2010, 18:39
Hello Dick and Sonofdave,

There are two other ex Pincher rates on this forum; itotenby was a signalman and Glyn33 was a TAS rating and both could have been crew members about the same time as you. I wrote a list of visits from memory and posted it on this thread on page 2, post No 32 and they recognised a lot of the places mentioned.

My first visit to Keflavik was at the end of 1954 when we had the football match I mentioned in an earlier post. Afterwards we used the air base Sergeant’s Mess which was quite something and included an elaborately decorated dining area where hot meals were available. One rule that provided some amusement concerned resting one’s head on the bar. The Chief ERA was sitting on one of the bar stools and feeling tired rested his head on his arms. The American Sergeant seated next to him immediately nudged him to wake up. He explained that the American Military Police assumed that anyone resting their head on the bar had collapsed due to drink and would be carried off to the cells and charged. Anyone becoming drunk would slowly collapse backwards off the stool if possible. The truth of this was borne out a little later when the sergeant next to me suddenly called, ‘I’m going Limey, grab me quick’ as he started to fall backwards off the stool. I managed to grab him and, with the help of another American who was on the other side, supported him until his friends took him off to his barrack to sleep it off.

The following year, which I think is when you were aboard, we paid another visit and found that the Sergeant’s Bar had been transformed into a miniature Las Vegas complete with Faro and Blackjack tables and a Country and Western group playing in a corner. As we were limited to the amount of American ‘Script Dollars’ we could exchange we stayed well clear of the tables. That was the night that the anchor dragged and we had to remain ashore at the base until the following morning. We finished up in a Quonset hut with a row of beds and a couple of issue blankets each.

As you both live near to each other I hope that you can get together and have the lamp swinging quite rapidly.

Ken

oldsalt
08-03-2010, 19:01
I was in Vigilant when we did a spell off Iceland in 60 during the cod war, to describe the fish that was caught then brings the usual reaction to a fisherman's story " how big?" & a tell me another grin. I kid you not the cod was around a yard long & at least 10" in diameter. I can confirm that you can get sick of the sight of fish after having it for every meal :eek::eek::rolleyes:;).

Dick Davis
08-03-2010, 19:55
Hello Dick and Sonofdave,

There are two other ex Pincher rates on this forum; itotenby was a signalman and Glyn33 was a TAS rating and both could have been crew members about the same time as you. I wrote a list of visits from memory and posted it on this thread on page 2, post No 32 and they recognised a lot of the places mentioned.

My first visit to Keflavik was at the end of 1954 when we had the football match I mentioned in an earlier post. Afterwards we used the air base Sergeant’s Mess which was quite something and included an elaborately decorated dining area where hot meals were available. One rule that provided some amusement concerned resting one’s head on the bar. The Chief ERA was sitting on one of the bar stools and feeling tired rested his head on his arms. The American Sergeant seated next to him immediately nudged him to wake up. He explained that the American Military Police assumed that anyone resting their head on the bar had collapsed due to drink and would be carried off to the cells and charged. Anyone becoming drunk would slowly collapse backwards off the stool if possible. The truth of this was borne out a little later when the sergeant next to me suddenly called, ‘I’m going Limey, grab me quick’ as he started to fall backwards off the stool. I managed to grab him and, with the help of another American who was on the other side, supported him until his friends took him off to his barrack to sleep it off.

The following year, which I think is when you were aboard, we paid another visit and found that the Sergeant’s Bar had been transformed into a miniature Las Vegas complete with Faro and Blackjack tables and a Country and Western group playing in a corner. As we were limited to the amount of American ‘Script Dollars’ we could exchange we stayed well clear of the tables. That was the night that the anchor dragged and we had to remain ashore at the base until the following morning. We finished up in a Quonset hut with a row of beds and a couple of issue blankets each.

As you both live near to each other I hope that you can get together and have the lamp swinging quite rapidly.

Ken

Ken thanks for the info regarding your spell ashore at the american base and for the info about Itotenby and Glynn. Ive been reading their posts and I hope theyve been reading mine and I best make contact with them. Did you know about the Chief ERA bringing his fishing gear, every time we were in harbour out came the line. we just used to put a line over the side and within a couple of minutes up came a dab or small plaice. I wonder if there is as many fish now? by the way you still had the best deal in your Quonset huts. when we dragged anchor towards the rocks we only had a limited no on board they wanted a full head of steam all the time as we set off out into the gale if thats what it was, anyway it was the mother and father of all blows, and we had to rope ourselves up in the boiler room. I think I only had 8 hrs kip all the while and they gave us a whole days leave. What a little trooper Pincher was Id never heard rhe rivets creak as much at any other time and as you know it was never exactly calm up there, I well remember sitting round the funnel quite often. memories are flooding back as we chat What rank were you in those days i wondered what mess you were on, as you know we were only NS but what a privelege it was, and how all my mates were secretly jealous back home, I loved it and wish I had signed on like we were asked if we had thought about it , but everyone used to say roll on civvy street (bah humbug) Cheers for now Dick

sonofdave
08-03-2010, 22:40
Hello Dick and NSR.
As i type this, my dad hasn't seen the last couple of posts so i'm going back a bit. As best as he can remember and says it's by no means certain, the 'Goodwill' Tour went as such. Chatham, [possibly] Portsmouth, Dartmouth, Portland, Harwich, Cuxhaven, Hamburg, Brussels,Zeebruge, Denhelder [i'm guessing at the spelling!] and back to Chatham. He then had leave and then it was on to Iceland for the trip the other stories are related to. He has no idea of the Brussels nightclub, he must have been elsewhere for that one but does remember the dance at Invergordon. After that he remembers parking up [ that's mooring for all you navy people!] near the Forth bridge for Edinburgh.
His story for the Double L generator is that it broke down and he and Charlie Dodge had to fix it. They had it totally in bits and apparently the rest of the crew were laughing/taking the micky that they'd never be able to put it all back together or they'd have bits left over!! Dad seems rather pleased with himself that they did fix it, had no bits left over and it worked perfectly! I detect a certain smug feeling in that story!
He has given me a whole heap of papers and letters, you can see the history sheet already. I'll have a look through and post anything i think may be of interest. Personally, i like the HMS Raleigh traning book. I've scaned a page totally at random.
Geoff [sonofdave]
ps. no one has said what did happen at the Keflevik base that night!!

sonofdave
08-03-2010, 22:44
Actually, i've only just read that. You are not sick until someone has told you that you are!!!! How funny is that!! Good to see you were all kept in order!!

sonofdave
08-03-2010, 22:49
Have a few more rules, just for good measure!

NSR
09-03-2010, 12:25
Re Keflavik. Because we couldn't return to Pincher we were to be temporarily housed at the International Hotel which is part of the airport - Keflavik was also Iceland's main airport. On arrival at reception I found about 4 or 5 crew members looking a bit worried and saying that there was some trouble in the next room. As I was the only PO there I decided to have a look and found two POs and a Leading Hand wrestling around on the floor. One of the POs shouted that the Leading Hand had gone berserk and they were trying to calm him down. Other crew members began to come through the room on their way to their beds: most were persuaded to carry on but a few thought that the odds were unfair and tried to join in which meant that I got involved in dragging them off and sending them on their way. Shortly afterwards two American MPs and a couple of medics appeared and the leading hand was strapped up and taken away. The hotel decided that they didn't want to house us and the MPs fixed us up in the Quonset hut until the morning. Back on board I saw one of the stokers who claimed that I had given him his black eye (I honestly don't think I did but it was all a bit confused) but, far from being aggrieved, he seemed remarkably cheerful about it and thought it had been a good run ashore. Later an enquiry was held but I can't remember the outcome only that the leading hand left the ship. And that is the sad story of the Keflavik 'punch up'.

Ken

Dick Davis
13-03-2010, 12:54
Hello Rachel. Well, this is fun isn't it, all these old stories coming out of the woodwork! Seems my dad could be a bit of a naughty boy, best you find out what your dad was really like!!

Hi Geoff........Oh yes I certainly intend to and of course you will be the first to know!!

Dick Davis
13-03-2010, 13:03
ive got my cert as well but will have to await the return of Rachel to post them cheers for now dave and I must phone or meet sometime Dick

OK,
Rachel is back so attached is the pic of a very young me at HMS Raleigh.

shawrybob
27-03-2010, 16:52
Having read through the postings for "Fishery Protection Ships" it seems that they mainly refer to the 1950/60's.

Can any one enlighten me as whether we did the same job at the end of 1945, to protect the "Murmansk Trawl Fleet"?

Bob

Macnab
28-03-2010, 13:07
The Destroyers , Contest, Cavendish, Carysfort, and Comet, were up there in the late 50`s

alanandbren
28-03-2010, 13:11
The Destroyers , Contest, Cavendish, Carysfort, and Comet, were up there in the late 50`s

Camperdown was there in 59

shawrybob
28-03-2010, 13:23
To AlanandBren & Macnab,

Thanks for your quick response, really appreciated, I am actually trying to pin point the time between 2 Dec to 27 Dec 1945.

From what I can see Fishery Protection has been going on for ever, but very little if anything seems to be mentioned for the end of WW2.

BobRob
28-07-2010, 13:32
OK,
Rachel is back so attached is the pic of a very young me at HMS Raleigh.

Hello Dick
I recently came across this site and I wonder if the name Bob Roberts means anything to you?

BobRob
28-07-2010, 13:46
Hello to all. This is my first post on this foram. My father, David Anderson, served on HMS Pincher between late 1952 and 1954. In the process of looking for pictures of HMS Pincher, to compare in relation to HMS Bramble, i found this site and previous posts from 2008 relate to a certain incident that my dad had mentioned, the fire on the SS Maidenhead. To anyone who may be interested, my dad also has some pictures and his receipts for 'salvage'. These pictures are attached here as well as some of fellow crew. If you know anyone in the pictures or know Dave Anderson, feel free to say here.

Dear Sonofdave
The lower left picture on page 1
Left unsure
Next left Bob Roberts
Next your dad
Next,I am unsure but possibly Vardy
Bottom I believe Manzi
Bob

Bonzo
01-06-2011, 18:58
I was on Palliser in the early 60's on Icelandic patrol when the volcano erupted and created what is now called Surtsea Island. See attached picture
We were signal I believe by Admiralty to steam under the cloud to catch a small sample of the volcanic ash, which we did that subsequently covered the ship with several inches of the stuff that required several hours of firemain hosing to clear.

chef
24-11-2011, 18:23
remember football match ih
n reckavicgreatgamelost 2-1would like toheaRFROMOTHER CREW MEMBERS Several good runs ashore with members of the local RNOC.

Given the late year slot to fill in for the Fishery Protection Squadron and sailed for Iceland about mid-September having picked up net gauges etc. in Hull. Arrived in Rekyavik and was able to take a tour organised by a local lecturer turned temporary guide. We were shown the hot springs and geysers and a hydro-power generating station and he kept up a fascinating commentry about Icelands history and its connection with Britain.

Returned to the UK at the beginning on December and tied up to Springfield Quay in Glasgow for Northern 'Families Week'. Then back to Harwich for Christmas.

In 1955 I am a bit vague on the sequence but we did Navy Week visits to Cromer, Broadstairs and Dartmouth. Dartmouth was in company with Rattlesnake and we took part in the decorated boats competition. Again a good run.

Apart from the Maidenhead incident and the Brussels visit there was also the Annual Gunnery shoot off Harwich when we got rammed by Rattlesnake. It was all Cheerful's fault but that is another story.

We also visited Bruges in Belgium where I learnt the phrase, 'Verboten te gaan opp der spoorweg'. Translated as, 'Don't walk on the tram tracks'. There was also a visit to the Dutch Naval base at Den Helder which gave us the opportunity to visit Amsterdam. Again dates are vague.

Once again back to Iceland and trawlers including taking a Lloyd's Surveyor to check a wrecked trawler on the north coast. We nearly had our tour extended as our relief, HMS Pickle, was suffering with 'condenseritis' in the evaporators and couldn't produce fresh water. We got a 'Proceed with all despatch' as a trawlerman in the Faroes was serioously ill and the Sunderland sent to bring him back had crashed on landing. We ended up bringing him, several DBS, the RAF survivors and the bodies of the other RAF crew members back to Port Edgar. We made 19 knots through the Pentland Firth with the help of a following sea.

Christmas this time was in the Outer Pool in London for Southern 'Families Week'. In 1956 we called in at Chatham where I got another ship-to-ship draft.

Does any of that tie upwith your memories.

Ken[/quote]

Mike B
25-11-2011, 09:41
I was serving on 'Lagos', Battle Class destroyer near the end of a 18 month commission in Sept 1958 when we were ordered to proceed at full speed from Chatham to Iceland where the first moves of the first 'Fish War' involving the Icelandic gunboat "Odin' had occured. 'Eastbourne' preceded us as she was already in the North Sea but left the fishery fleet as soon as we arrived. None of our families were aware of where 'Lagos' had gone as our mail from the ship had been taken south to Hull by a returning trawler, and deposited in the Hull Post Office. The Post Office incorrectly identified the mail bag as one for delivery to 'Lagos' and gave to a trawler about to leave for Iceland. 2 weeks later our outgoing mail was delivered to the ship! In the meantime an anxious wife had contacted her member of Parliament to ask why she had not heard for her husband and questions were raised in the House as to the whereabouts of HMS Lagos. 'Lagos' spent 6 weeks into late November standing by the trawlers and my recollection is of very short, cold days, heavy swells and a biting wind, along with a lifetime admiration for the fishermen.

Hi Jonti,
I also was on Lagos during the 'fish war' in 1957. I recall there were times when we had to protect Icelandic gunboats from irate trawlermen who were throwing spuds at them. If my memory serves me right I believe that our Commodore used to have tea with the icelandic Commodore on occasions.
Mike B

Forester
25-11-2011, 12:37
My Dad was in Rinaldo during the '50s confrontation. We never missed a shipping forecast when he was Iceland way and they experienced some really filthy weather at the time "Storm Force 10 and rising" . [That sort of weather could sink a 960 tonner.] At one point, there was an armed forces recruiting campaign with the three services putting up tents with displays and exhibitions on the recreation ground at Tilery (Stockton on Tees) and "Our Mam" took me for a visit. The Royal Navy exhibit included a working radio station and Mam asked the operator if he could call any ships. He was keen to show off, and said he could call any ship in home waters. So Mam asked him to call Rinaldo and we had a quick chat with a rather surprised Yeoman. "Hallo Ron. Is that you?" is hardly standard RT procedure. :)

jainso31
27-02-2013, 11:53
Icelandic Patrols

Letter in response to the article on Icelandic Patrols in Issue 56 of the South West Maritime History Society:

I was very interested to read the article by Chris Handley on his experiences in HMS Yarmouth on Icelandic patrol. Further, I was particularly impressed with his attention to detail and his memory of events. Unfortunately whilst I did take part in such a patrol in HMS Rhyl, I have on recent investigation, seemingly deleted a good deal of the experience from my personal ‘hard drive’. What remains is a reference in my Royal Navy diving log, which contains some sparse detail on a diving operation on the ship alongside in Rosyth. This was undertaken on the morning of the day we sailed for patrol on the 15 December 1972.

Thereafter, we fuelled in the lee of the Faeroes on Christmas Eve and I believe, crossed the Arctic Circle two days later, no doubt hoping to meet Father Christmas! Because of a combination of severe winter storms and seasonal dates there was little involvement with the Icelandic coast guard vessels. There was one incident of a Hull fishing trawler that we came across, where the majority of the wheelhouse had been carried away in a storm, forcing those onboard to rig emergency steering. Having lashed canvas covers in place over the damage and despite their precarious circumstances, they continued to fish.

Other than the Aurora Borealis wheeling overhead in the night sky, having to go to emergency stations on two occasions, there were no further incidents and the ship eventually arrived home on the 24 January 1973. I owe I think, my good fortune on this occasion because I had earlier been declared a ‘loyal and trusty Bluenose’ by no less a personage than Neptunus Rex whilst serving in HMS Eagle in September 1968. A usual custom in the Royal Navy when a ship crossed the Arctic Circle, although not all the time. Related to this experience was a meeting with a Mr Gudni Johannesson at the Anglo-American Conference on ‘The Sea’ in July 2001. Both of us were attending the postgraduate session and Gudni gave an excellent paper on the ‘Cod War and Cold War’.

He knew of the patrol by HMS Rhyl and told me that he is actively seeking information for his research on the subject. If any of our members would like to share their experiences on this topic Gudni would, I am sure, be only to pleased to hear from them. He can be contacted at : gudnijohannesson at yahoo.com. He did disclose incidentally, that the Icelanders called Royal Navy personnel, ‘cod warriors’, an interesting epithet perhaps for such as Chris Handley and myself.
From Mike Baker


jainso31

sonofdave
12-04-2013, 11:52
Hello to all on this thread. I know I've not been here recently, a lot has been going on in my life ( major surgery, looking for a new line of work). To all those who I've previously posted, I now have to sad duty to inform you that my dad, Dave Anderson passed away on Saturday 30th March. My sister and I were with him at the time and he died at his home so he got what he wanted in the end.
I have chosen to have a picture of HMS Pincher and of dad in his dirty stoker boiler suit on the funeral service leaflet. He would have liked that.
Should there be anyone reading this who knew him and would like to attend the service, it will be at Colchester Crematorium on Thursday 18th April at 11.00 am.
Thanks to all who have posted to me a while ago, it was good to find more out about part of my dad's life

Sonofdave

jainso31
12-04-2013, 12:42
1973: Royal Navy moves to protect trawlers
Britain has sent in Royal Navy ships to protect trawlers in the disputed Icelandic 50-mile zone as the so-called "cod war" escalates.
Three frigates - the Cleopatra, the Plymouth and the Lincoln - are sailing alongside the British trawlers now fishing in box formation.

The skippers had said they would not return to the seas without naval protection against Icelandic gunboats. They have been cruising the area since Iceland extended its fishing from three to 50 miles eight months ago.

"The Navy is not going to stand idly by and see trawlers chivvied as they have been chivvied recently. The Navy has a job to do" said Joseph Godber, Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries
He said the frigates, armed with light guns and rocket missiles, would take "appropriate action" if necessary.

The decision to send in the Navy was made three days ago by the Cabinet Defence and Overseas Policy Committee with the Prime Minister Edward Heath present.

The trawler owners and the skippers had disagreed over whether or not to accept naval assistance.
The trawler owners feared that the Royal Navy's presence would restrict fishing as happened some 13 years ago during the first cod war.
But they have since agreed to let the frigates accompany the fishing boats because three tugs - the Statesman, the Irishman and the Lloydsman - would also be present and allow the trawlers to fish more freely.

The Icelandic ambassador in London, Niel Siguurdsson, said last night he was "surprised and disappointed" by the move.
Last week, the British ambassador, Sir Ian MacKenzie, failed to get assurances from Iceland's prime minister, Olafur Johannesson, that its ships would stop threatening British trawlers.

jainso31

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/may/20/newsid_2510000/2510837.stm

ivorthediver
12-04-2013, 14:04
Hello to all on this thread. I know I've not been here recently, a lot has been going on in my life ( major surgery, looking for a new line of work). To all those who I've previously posted, I now have to sad duty to inform you that my dad, Dave Anderson passed away on Saturday 30th March. My sister and I were with him at the time and he died at his home so he got what he wanted in the end.
I have chosen to have a picture of HMS Pincher and of dad in his dirty stoker boiler suit on the funeral service leaflet. He would have liked that.
Should there be anyone reading this who knew him and would like to attend the service, it will be at Colchester Crematorium on Thursday 18th April at 11.00 am.
Thanks to all who have posted to me a while ago, it was good to find more out about part of my dad's life

Sonofdave

Sorry to hear that sonodave , please convey our sympathy to your family from us all here .

Yes I bet he would have loved that bless him .......once a Stoker Always a Stoker

Hope everything goes well for you during this sad time

Warm Regards to you and yours...... Ivor

sonofdave
17-04-2013, 18:58
ivorthediver

Thanks for your reply. It does mean something to me that there are others out there who can give a nod regarding my dad. I have no idea if the people I spoke to here about HMS Pincher a while ago still use this forum but thanks for your thoughts.
sonofdave

Scatari
17-04-2013, 20:15
Hello to all on this thread.
I have chosen to have a picture of HMS Pincher and of dad in his dirty stoker boiler suit on the funeral service leaflet. He would have liked that.
Sonofdave

My most sincere condolences on your loss Sonofdave.

A great choice of photo for the leaflet - I'm sure he would approve.

Clive 58
17-04-2013, 22:43
Sorry to hear of your loss, sonofdave.

I'm not sure who posted those 3 pics of HMS Pincher on these forums (Tower of London, fire fighting, in a canal) but they are 3 of the best Algerine's photo's I've ever seen and I look at them every day as I go up the stairs.

I watched Maggie Thatchers funeral today, and seeing the flag covered carriage reminded me of my Dad's funeral. The Algerines Association sent standard bearers and an RN ensign for the coffin.

I couldn't have been prouder of my Dad, and I'm sure you feel the same about yours.

God Bless.

Clive.

ivorthediver
18-04-2013, 07:41
Sorry to hear of all your losses lads and know just how you feel ...as you look back at the hole left in your lives once they have Crossed the Bar.:o

Great to hear your recollections though , and the time capsule you opened for us ...thank you .

Kind regards Ivor

sonofdave
19-04-2013, 23:47
ivorthediver, Scatari, Clive 58 and any one who is reading this.
Thankyou so much for your kind comments. I read them today, Friday 19th April after dad's funeral yesterday and I have no shame in admitting my eyes watered at what i saw written here.
The 'boiler suit' pic and the 'Pincher' pic both looked good on the service leaflet.
Scatari, i especially noticed that you high lighted that i'd written ' dad in his dirty stoker boiler suit '. I know exactly what you mean by that. Dad was 'a get on with the job' man, not someone who wanted to wear a 'stuffy' uniform and that's exactly why i chose that picture, so well done to you for picking up on that.
Clive, some of the original pictures were posted by me, several pages back on this thread ( along with the tales that dad told me) and other's posted by those who knew my dad, who were on HMS Pincher at the same time as him. Yes, the 'canal' pic is good. I even enlarged it once and said to dad, hey look, that's you standing there having a cigerette! He said no it isn't, I never stood there!
I know this is not the place to get angry but one thing really pissed me off about the 'drink down the pub' after ther service yesterday. I know it's life and people pop up out of the woodwork but just a few comments here from people I don't even know mean more to me than false feelings from a few people who had no idea of what it's like to be on mine sweeper for National Service ( or any other ship for that matter) or why I chose that boiler suit picture. You people here have more idea of my dad than so called 'friends' who attended. Fact is, they weren't his friends, just people who someone else dragged along. I hate that sort of thing.
The good thing I'd like you all to know is that I have all of any paperwork/pics that my dad had relating to his National service. Most of it i have scanned and posted here before. I will never have children ( at least I hope not now at my age, I'm 47! ) but I have promised dad, my nephew ( his grandson) will get then when I die. Ok, just a few bits of paper but those bits of paper tell more about my dad than a few people yesterday will ever know.
Sorry if this reads as if I'm angry, I'm not, i'm just so pleased that you blokes here have the knowledge and decency to ,as a said before, give a nod to a fellow sailor.
You are a good bunch and thanks again.

Scatari
20-04-2013, 01:00
The good thing I'd like you all to know is that I have all of any paperwork/pics that my dad had relating to his National service ... I have promised dad, my nephew (his grandson) will get then when I die. Ok, just a few bits of paper ... Sonofdave:

They may be "just a few bits of paper" to others, but to you and your nephew I'm sure they will be priceless pieces of your family's history and therefore of tremendous value. Well done to you for planning to pass them on.

astraltrader
20-04-2013, 17:07
Only just seen this thread again.

Just like to add my condolences for your sad loss Son of Dave.

Definitely a father to be proud of.

NSR
22-04-2013, 22:35
Son of Dave.
I haven't visited the site for several days and have only just read about your sad loss. First of all my condolences on your Dad's passing. With the passage of time I have only faint memories of him as, although we must have often worked together, we lived in different parts of the ship. (I was a Mech and lived in the POSMs mess). The photo of him in overalls I think says it all. The only thing I can't remember is if, like many of us, he grew a set during our visits to Iceland because of the icy cold wind when we had to venture on to the upper deck.

My best wishes to you and all of Dave's family.

Ken

paulus
08-04-2014, 18:07
I have just put a video on You Tube of Leanders operating off Iceland during the Cod War. Some amazing seamanship from the RN.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LhQ64CP1xo

I have a few photos which I will dig out and post.

ap1
08-04-2014, 18:46
Already covered in " Icelandic Cod Wars" thread.

jbryce1437
08-04-2014, 19:35
Thanks Andy, threads merged.
The video of the encounters between the Frigates and the Icelandic gunboats was very interesting and also graphically illustrates the conditions that fishermen have to work in, with their small trawlers.


Jim