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bob shayler
06-05-2008, 18:34
Hi everyone,
For those mebers who served there, this is how it looks now. I have take some photos of the remaining original buildings but apart from the Admin block, do not know what they used to be. The site was sold off a number of years ago for development and is now known as Gunwharf Quays, a combination of housing, shops, restaurants, bars and night clubs. The site is dominated by the Spinnaker Tower which has viewing platforms which give a magnificent view accross the whole area including the Solent.
regards,
Bob

tonclass
06-05-2008, 18:47
Here are the pix I posted the other day that have since gone missing...

bob shayler
06-05-2008, 18:54
Thanks Rik,
I asked at the time if they were taken in the 70's as the RCT Maritime badge was on the main gate. You confirmed it was taken, I think, on the Silver Jubilee.
regards,
Bob

Batstiger
06-05-2008, 19:12
Here are the ones that I posted and disappeared.

Bob.

bob shayler
06-05-2008, 19:40
Thanks Bob,
regards,
Bob

Hopefully not too much was lost. Great to see everything up and running again.

tonclass
06-05-2008, 20:07
Some more from the Good Old Days.....

tonclass
06-05-2008, 20:09
And again.....

Batstiger
18-05-2008, 11:05
A well known piece of Vernon's history.

Bob.

astraltrader
18-05-2008, 14:13
It is sad indeed to see how much of our Naval heritage has been eroded away...

ceylon220
09-06-2008, 16:44
Right Bob you have got me here, what was your picture of the shed on stilts, can`t say that I saw that construction and what was its use?





Dave.

ceylon220
09-06-2008, 17:09
I`ve always said ,Why when military bases and camps are closed down why don`t they place a plaque telling what the base/camp was when in service, I do a lot of war walks with my son once or twice a year both in the UK and in Europe and we`ve come across USAAF and RN stations that took part in operations during WW2 but no info about them, a plaque would be nice, we have an ex FAA station near here now being used as a Transmitting station world wide, this was in its navy day called HMS NUTHATCH which consisted of an airfield and the living quartes for WRNS (camp 1) and males (camp 2)yet no signs saying what the stations service was during peace time and wartime, same with the RAF airfields around here, people who come here keep asking what aircraft etc flew from here ,some info on these would help a lot, VERNON when I was serving had a board with the history of the base outside for the public to read why not now since its change to a business estate.

Batstiger
09-06-2008, 18:52
It was a mining trials tank Dave.

ceylon220
10-06-2008, 10:05
Hi Bob,thanks for putting my mind at rest about the tower,was there any accidents from the testing, when you are young you don`t take the saME INTEREST IN THESE ESTABLISHMENTS and what they do or was that just me. great photos of VERNON on this forum.

stewart mcloughlin
10-06-2008, 11:03
As regards the 'local history' perspective, of what places were before what they are now. It really is down to enthusiasts, local history/heritage groups, Civic Trust and the local councils. Best if it is a Parish council who can usually be relied upon to put a bit of money aside where District and County councils are always 'strapped for cash'.
If you put up a decent proposal for a 'heritage information board' (whatever you want to call it), with some current information of places of interest, rural footpaths, nature viewing spots, you can probably find someone with a bit of spare cash to pay for it. You can however expect to pay up to £1,000 just for a simple wood/painted type of information board. There are companies who specialise in putting these up. Both my local Parish councils have done so and they are an asset to the village. Beware that you may need planning permission if it situated adjacent to the highway or depending on it's size.
A roadside bench is also a typical accompanyment which you again could get paid for by the Parish/County Council/Ramblers Association/Mayor's Charity, or get some local business to sponsor it.
Be on the lookout in large scale developments of former military sites, that under the planning application, a condition could be attached where the developer incorporates a heritage/information site/village hall that explains it's significance in previous times.
Locally here, a development took place where the land, originally bought in WW1 to teach returning soldiers husbandry, had all the access roads named after those soldiers who DIDN'T return to take up the offer, and a marker left behind also.
There are unlimited things that can be done to mark an areas previous life, it just takes someone with an interest to drive it forward. The bigger the development, usually the easier it is as the developer is keen to show their good intentions.
Stewart

bob shayler
12-06-2008, 19:13
These are some photo's of two minesweepers berthed at what used to be HMS Dolphin. I took them from Gosport and they are not too good due to the forest of masts between myself and them. I also had problems viewing what I had taken due to the bright sunshine and only captured a small part of the ships. I will go onto Haslar Bridge at the weekend and try to get better shots,
regards,
Bob

HMS Bergamot
12-06-2008, 19:40
In the first world war, Vernon was, as is now, the torpedo and mine school. Our mines weren't known for their reliability. Breaking away from their anchors was a common complaint, and their fuses were unreliable. The story is told (a little aside here) of the little trawler popping up next to the cruiser and calling to the OOD, "Scuse me....", "OI! Scuse me....." One OOD appears and says, "What do you want...?" "I think this is yours," says trawler skipper, pointing to a very big mine on his aft deck, about 3 feet from the side of the cruiser, and then, as the OOD goes into panic mode, adds, "It's alright, I've knocked its horns off wiv me chopper!")

Anyway, aside aside, the story I wanted to relate was the E class submarine that has dived into a minefield. Wires are scraping down the sides, and then, from forward, an almighty clang, followed by another one amidships, and finally, a 'bonk' from the stern, whereopon a matelot turns to his mate and says, "Good old Vernon, another bloody dud!"

I imagine the atmosphere was changed somewhat in that submarine at that time.

Regards,

bob shayler
12-06-2008, 20:21
Great story Berg. I can imagine the relief inside the sub,
regards,
Bob

bob shayler
14-06-2008, 17:08
The Haslar Bridge perspective proved no better but there were fewer masts in the way today and I managed to take some relatively uncluttered shots from a pier,
regards,
Bob
These were the best shots. I will post the rest next

bob shayler
14-06-2008, 17:22
The rest,
regards,
Bob
Sorry, missed on the last one and found a Submarine

bob shayler
14-06-2008, 17:52
And some more,
regards,
Bob

tonclass
15-06-2008, 07:01
I believe they are DULVERTON & COTTESMORE. BRECON was also laid up with them, but she is now the RALEIGH training ship at Jupiter Point.

bob shayler
15-06-2008, 07:08
Thank you very muc for the ID Rick,
regards,
Bob

doug.birch
25-06-2008, 12:34
Hi Bob.Shayler,I did my electrical & torpedo training at H.M.S.Vernon 1941,but it was Brighton at Roedean girls school we had cabins & a bell to ring for a mistress, when we rang it all we got was a irate C.P.O.we were housed at St. Dunstans (the blind institute ) Doug. birch Ex.-EA

bob shayler
26-06-2008, 21:12
Hi Doug,
Found your story really funny, I can imagine the irate CPO charging in to find out who had rung the bell,
regards,
Bob

doug.birch
30-06-2008, 14:51
Hi bob, Ithink I had a strange introduction to the navy,it started with a stint at Borstal Rochester for drill.We were sleeping in cells(doors open).borstal boys in the next block, then Roedean, then the blind institute,I
thought what comes next Doug.Biirch.

bob shayler
08-07-2008, 20:29
These are some views, (one at the far end showing the Isle of Wight car ferry terminal) of what used to be HMS Vernon, now Gun Wharf Quays. Hopefully, Bob can sharpen these up as well. Bob, I would be gratefull if you could tell me how you do it,
regards,
Bob

Batstiger
08-07-2008, 22:18
Here you are then Bob, hope you got my PM.

Bob.

bob shayler
20-07-2008, 07:55
Lively Lady berthed at Gun Wharf, photo taken yesterday. She recently returned from the 'Ray Marine Lively Lady Project' round the world voyage, the aim of which was to help young adults turn their lives around. She is also renowned for being the yacht in which Sir Alec Rose completed a solo circumnavigation in 1968.
(Apologies for the standard of photography but they were taken using a mobile phone and I could hardly see the screen in the sunlight),
regards,
Bob

bob shayler
03-08-2008, 10:04
These are photo's of HMS Vernon Auxilliary Company operating just before WW2. Found these on the HMS Vernon Web Site. My friend Roy, now 90, enlisted into this in 1938. He said they used to carry out exercises in the channel as far out as the Channel Islands using trawlers,
regards,
Bob

designeraccd
03-08-2008, 11:01
Nice pics of the famous UK port! That tower "looks" to be quite something....from my side of the pond here is the last big ferry operating on the Great Lakes: S.S. Badger. She sails from Ludington, MI to Manitowac, Wisconsin now. I saw her launched-sideways of course-in 1952 in Sturgeon Bay, WI while sitting on my dads' shoulders. Still steaming, on coal, all these decades later...gr8 4 hour one way ride! All loading/unloading is done through her stern; hence the "seagate" that lifts. She must turn 180 degrees in each basin to come in stern first. DFO :D

Batstiger
03-08-2008, 14:07
Is it me??????????

bob shayler
03-08-2008, 16:44
Bob, you're not in the photo are you,
regards,
Bob

Batstiger
03-08-2008, 19:32
No I'm not Bob, I just wondered what it had to do with HMS Vernon!

Bob.

bob shayler
03-08-2008, 19:47
Hi Bob. It has everything to do with Vernon as it was the HMS Vernon Auxilliary Company was based there. These men went on to crew the MMS throughout WW2 serving in the RNR. Very brave men,
regards,
Bob

tonclass
03-08-2008, 21:16
Bob2, I think Bob1's referring to DFO's post. Nothing to do with Vernon whatsoever ?????????

bob shayler
04-08-2008, 03:39
Hi Rik,
Thank you for clearing this up. Sorry Bob, I completely mis-understood you,
regards,
Bob

doug.birch
04-08-2008, 07:36
Thats not the Vernon I knew in 1942,this is the one I went to & not a girl in site.doug.birch

Gary Charles
04-08-2008, 12:34
One part of this post reminded me of my Grandfather. He was posted to HMS Vernon during the First World War and served on the attached trawlers Russell II and Welbeck. He was Mentioned in Dispatches on 3.8.1917 because he went aft to secure a mine that had come adrift during a storm. I understand that in those days HMS Vernon was the name given to the ship that was attached to the mine school. During this period the former HMS Warrior served as HMS Vernon, so it is good that she is back there now.
best wishes Gary.

Batstiger
04-08-2008, 14:05
If that's the case Doug this should bring back some memories!

http://aolsearch.aol.co.uk/aol/imageDetails?invocationType=imageDetails&query=hms+vernon&img=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mybrightonandhove.org.uk%2Fim ages%2Fuploaded%2Fscaled%2Ftorpedo_wrens_pollock_d ock_s.jpg&site=&host=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mybrightonandhove.org.uk%2Fp age_id__5824_path__0p214p216p.aspx&width=116&height=88&thumbUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fimages-partners-tbn.google.com%2Fimages%3Fq%3Dtbn%3AuraEvfz8bAiv_M %3Awww.mybrightonandhove.org.uk%2Fimages%2Fuploade d%2Fscaled%2Ftorpedo_wrens_pollock_dock_s.jpg&b=image%3Fquery%3Dhms%2Bvernon%26page%3D2%26isinit %3Dtrue%26restrict%3Dwholeweb%26avtype%3D%26invoca tionType%3Dhf_aoluk_cl_ws_registered%26clickstream id%3D-6940353423972175256%26rp%3D%26displayCount%3D18

Regards, Bob.

bob shayler
05-08-2008, 19:38
Hi Doug,
The HMS Vernon web site mentions, among others, Roedean. Here is the reason why they dispersed there,
regards,
Bob

Various sections of HMS Vernon were dispersed to sites throughout the country following heavy air raids, one of which demolished Dido Building and killed 100 people in a single night. On 3 May 1941, the main part of HMS Vernon was evacuated to Roedean Girls’ School at Brighton (HMS Vernon(R)) where bell pushes on the dormitory bulkhead were purportedly labelled ‘Ring for Mistress”. Other sites included Havant, Purbrook, West Leigh, Stokes Bay, Hove, Dartmouth/Brixham, Helensburgh, Edinburgh and Port Edgar.

bob shayler
05-08-2008, 22:01
Hi Doug,
Looking at your photo of Roedean, I am sure I saw this when we travelled by train to Brighton last year. Looked unchanged,
regards,
Bob

doug.birch
12-08-2008, 10:09
This is the other accommodation facilities provided for naval personnel at Vernon St. Dunstan's Ovingdean, Sussex. I spent many nights doing lookout on this roof. It was still vulnerable to air attacks, for 1 person was killed whilst sitting down to a meal by enemy plane. Doug.Birch
18011

Batstiger
12-08-2008, 12:22
Thanks for that Doug, we learn something every day!

Bob.

Rob Hoole
23-03-2010, 10:06
Ladies and Gentlemen,

HMS Vernon's Badge

Historical information and photos regarding HMS Vernon can be seen on the MCDOA website here (http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/HMS_Vernon_Master_Page_Frames.htm) and on Tony Drury's excellent website here (http://www.royalnavyresearcharchive.org.uk/Vernon/Vernon_1.htm). Many of the images have already been reproduced in this thread.

HMS Vernon seems to have had two ship's badges in its time:

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Vernon_old_badge_small.jpg http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Vernon_Badge.gif

I scanned the first version from the frontispiece of 'HMS Vernon - A short History from 1930 to 1955' by Cdr E. D. Webb RN and the Wardroom Mess Committee, published in 1955. The design is also evident on the music stands of HMS Vernon's wartime volunteer band, seen playing in the theatre here:

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/HMS_Vernon_Band_small.jpg

I would like to know when the more familiar second badge superseded the first. I suspect it was in 1961 when, according to 'The Torpedomen - HMS Vernon's story 1872-1986' by Rear Admiral Nicho Poland CB, CBE, Osprey closed down as an A/S school and all training was transferred to Vernon along with the various caravans containing mobile teachers (ASUATs as I remember them). Does anyone know the answer?

Project Vernon

Project Vernon is the campaign to erect a monument at Gunwharf Quays to commemorate the Minewarfare and Diving heritage of HMS Vernon which previously stood on the site. This is intended as a legacy for future generations and will honour a broad range of people including:


First World War naval personnel involved in the development, laying and sweeping of mines.

Second World War mine designers, mine countermeasures boffins, RMS (Rendering Mines Safe) personnel, BSOs (Bomb Safety Officers and other RN EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) personnel as well as those who have since dealt with bombs, mines and other explosive devices all over the world and, even now, are serving in Afghanistan.

MX Wrens who put together 'special' mine assemblies designed to thwart German minesweeping efforts during the Second World War.

All those who were trained in minewarfare at HMS Vernon or were involved in designing, laying, sweeping, hunting or rendering safe mines. Before the advent of the MW Branch, these included Torpedo and TAS Branch personnel as well as surface ship crew members, aviators and submariners.

All those trained or involved in experimental diving, deep diving, clearance diving and ship's diving or who were based in diving teams at HMS Vernon.

All those RN and RNR personnel who have served in minesweepers, minehunters and diving tenders operating out of HMS Vernon or even visiting it for exercises.

Here is an artist's impression of the finished monument:

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/10020901ax_w600h600.jpg

If any of you would like to help see this exciting vision come to fruition, please go to the Project Vernon website here (http://vernon-monument.org/default.aspx) and either make a donation and/or offer your services. The next promotional event is planned for the weekend of 1st/2nd May at Gunwharf Quays. This will coincide with the Sea Cadet Festival 2010 (http://www.gunwharf-quays.com/gunwharf_quays_events%28Sea_Cadet_Festival_2010%29-252.htm) celebrating the 150th anniversary of the formation of the Cadet movement. Even if you don't get involved in running it, make a point of coming to the Project Vernon stand, having a chat, seeing the exhibits and purchasing some of the merchandise or raffle tickets. This is what the stand looked like last July:

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Project%20Vernon%20promo%20weekend%20Gunwharf%20Qu ays%20July%202009%20a%20med.jpg http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Project%20Vernon%20promo%20weekend%20Gunwharf%20Qu ays%20July%202009%20h%20med.jpg

Thank you.

Paddy
23-03-2010, 11:06
Hi Bob,thanks for putting my mind at rest about the tower,was there any accidents from the testing, when you are young you don`t take the saME INTEREST IN THESE ESTABLISHMENTS and what they do or was that just me. great photos of VERNON on this forum.

I was in Vernon in1956, in 1962 and in 1964 as diving school ships co.
Somwhere I belive between 62 and 64 some bright spark "litorally" thought it a good idea to grease the connection threads of the gages on a compressed O2 cylinder, the resulting explosion I was told, turned the cylinder into a high speed torpedo and demollished most of the main shed.

Were any of you there at the time? what were the repercussions?.
I know that in 64 there were plenty of warning notices telling all to keep grease a million miles away from O2.
Paddy

Paddy
23-03-2010, 11:24
I have perused all of the great pictures on site but I find it very difficult to get my bearings, except maybe for the harbour side dock where we trained the sub aqua clubs and african army "volunteer?" divers.
The main "deepwater" shed was somewhere over to the right and further back from that but it is hard to visulise, even though I worked there for six months feeding all you old divers with Canadian chees and Bluebird corned dog rolls.
I still have my register of every diver and every roll he ate over my six months.
And one or two still have not paid, so dont think I'v forgot.
Paddy

Batstiger
23-03-2010, 12:02
If you fancy a nostalgia trip have a look at this one!

Enjoy, Bob.

Batstiger
23-03-2010, 12:08
And how about this one for a tear jerker?
We didn't have cars parked on the parade ground in my days there!

Bob.

Batstiger
23-03-2010, 12:13
Familiar sights in new surroundings.

Bob.

Paddy
23-03-2010, 12:54
And how about this one for a tear jerker?
We didn't have cars parked on the parade ground in my days there!

Bob.

when did the NAAFI and the Duchess of kent go from top right.
Paddy

Paddy
23-03-2010, 12:59
Just a short walk from Vernon, those big shady trees outside the Duchess of Kent had about 50% ocupancy after dark. A matelot never needed to be alone in that road.

Paddy.

Rob Hoole
23-03-2010, 15:47
when did the NAAFI and the Duchess of kent go from top right.
Paddy

Duchess of Kent and Victoria Barracks (see pictures) closed down in the early 1960s. A very small part of it is now the Portsmouth City Museum but most of it was redeveloped as the Pembroke Park estate. Portsmouth Grammar School remains in the top left hand corner.

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Victoria%20Barracks%20Southsea.jpg

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Site%20of%20Victoria%20Barracks%20today.jpg
Site of Victoria Barracks today

Paddy
23-03-2010, 17:22
Duchess of Kent and Victoria Barracks (see pictures) closed down in the early 1960s. A very small part of it is now the Portsmouth City Museum but most of it was redeveloped as the Pembroke Park estate. Portsmouth Grammar School remains in the top left hand corner.

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Victoria%20Barracks%20Southsea.jpg

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Site%20of%20Victoria%20Barracks%20today.jpg
Site of Victoria Barracks today

Great pics Rob but my memory was always looking up at victory barracks and the Duchess of kent, we did not have Google earth in those days.
Also my orientation is a bit out, I visualise walking from Vernon gate to the NAAFI then with Vernon behind me the NAAFI would be on the left with the Duchess oposite.
If the trees botom right of the top pic are the ones I spoke of it puts me wrong way round.
Which tree was your's.
Paddy

Rob Hoole
23-03-2010, 19:03
Paddy,

If you follow Museum Road upwards and to the left, then cross the roundabout at the top of the High Street coming up from old Portsmouth, you will eventually arrive at Vernon's main gate.

The extension of Pembroke Road at the bottom of the picture eventually hits the High Street opposite the Cathedral and eventually leads to Vernon's back (south) gate.

Paddy
23-03-2010, 20:06
Paddy,

If you follow Museum Road upwards and to the left, then cross the roundabout at the top of the High Street coming up from old Portsmouth, you will eventually arrive at Vernon's main gate.

The extension of Pembroke Road at the bottom of the picture eventually hits the High Street opposite the Cathedral and eventually leads to Vernon's back (south) gate.

Yes,,, sort of getting there now, I will dig out my old portsmouth map and compare.
Paddy.

qprdave
24-03-2010, 01:37
Interesting trial carried out by HMS Vernon Officers that took place on 21st Jan 1890

Published in the Times 22nd Jan 1890

Dave Hutson
24-03-2010, 10:31
Nice one Dave .... someone was definitely thinking ahead at that time.

I still think of the HMS Vernon and cringe on our infrequent visits to Gunwharf as it is now. As you enter thru the old Main Gate with the Jaunty's Office to the left and Captain's House to the right I can still hear the old man's wife complaining about the noise of libertymen returning.:eek: But that memory is dimmed when you sit in the Captain's Office having a pint. :cool:

Dave H

Ednamay
24-03-2010, 10:35
HMS Vernon? Nowadays? Do you mean that monstrous block of flats ("desirable residences")?

Don't think I'll ever move back to Pompey!!!

Edna

Dave Hutson
24-03-2010, 10:38
Oh my, don't tell me you would stand in the way of progress Edna ?

Only kidding, put the rolling pin down. I agree with you wholeheartedly.

Dave H

Rob Hoole
24-03-2010, 11:53
I may be bucking the trend but I think they've done an exceptionally good job with the marina, shopping centre, housing development and leisure centre that is now Gunwharf Quays (http://www.gunwharf-quays.com/), especially with the Spinnaker Tower (http://www.spinnakertower.co.uk/). When my wife and I visited the development soon after its opening, she felt far more emotion than me, probably because all three of our children were christened in the diver's helmet in Vernon's tiny chapel of St Adjutor and she had particularly fond memories of the friendly atmosphere and mess staff at the family Sunday lunches, balls, dinners, parties and other events like the annual Searchlight Tattoo. I was much less affected even though I had two Vernon-based ships, undertook several courses there and served on the staff in many different training posts, much of the time as a single 'liver-in'. You can't hold on to the past forever and things must inevitably change, especially with a shrinking navy like ours. There were far more unpleasant alternatives for the use of the site than what we see now, a modernised yet historic area open to the general public.

The developers have rebuilt the north wing of Vulcan building and replaced the clock tower, both victims of the Blitz. They have also retained Ariadne building (the admin block, now the Old Customs House pub), the Old Infirmary, the Lock-Keeper's Cottage at the top of the Creek and the dockside crane. My ex-US Navy American brother was most impressed when I took him there for lunch outside one of the terrace bars on a sunny summer's day.

The Director of Gunwharf Quays is extremely sympathetic to the RN and has tried to acquire various artefacts to reflect Gunwharf's naval past; he even surveyed Prince Charles' minehunter HMS Bronington with a view to putting her alongside but the cost of restoration would be prohibitive. His videos of Bronny can be seen on You Tube here but have your hankies at the ready:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_cGaNjqQ_g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsZWOGDYMc4

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Gunwharf_Quays_2005.jpg

Dave Hutson
24-03-2010, 11:58
Apart from the Blocks of Flats I agree with you Rob. My wife like Gunwharf as do I.

Dave H

Rob Hoole
24-03-2010, 12:27
Nice one Dave .... someone was definitely thinking ahead at that time.

I still think of the HMS Vernon and cringe on our infrequent visits to Gunwharf as it is now. As you enter thru the old Main Gate with the Jaunty's Office to the left and Captain's House to the right I can still hear the old man's wife complaining about the noise of libertymen returning.:eek: But that memory is dimmed when you sit in the Captain's Office having a pint. :cool:

Dave H

Hello Dave,

The original Captain's House (Vernon House) was just inside the back (south) gate but it was destroyed during the Blitz. This is where the infamous 'Bone of Contention' arose. Submariner libertymen kept the Captain awake as they returned in the wee small hours to take the ferries from Vernon back across the harbour to Dolphin. This led to an annual competition between the submariner officers' long course and the Torpedo (later TAS) officers' long course which culminated in the presentation of a huge silver inlaid bone on a plinth to the victors at a mess dinner. The result was engineered so that the venue alternated each year. During 'away' years, Vernon's Long Course hosted Excellent's Long 'G' Course at an 'Olympiad'. As with the 'Bone of Contention', the venue alternated each year and the silly games culminated in a mess dinner.

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/Vernon_House_1930s.jpg

The Captain of Vernon subsequently moved into Donegal Lodge, the Chaplain's house just inside the main gate.

Francis Stanley
24-03-2010, 14:32
Thankyou for this thread and all the great images on it.
I also like what they have done to Vernon, a lot of people dismissed the tower and complex as being a waste of money and doomed to failure. I am pleased that they are wrong as it is more popular than ever. I do however have the age old fault of looking at what used to be my parent establishment through rose coloured specs and wistfully remembering times gone by.
In reality most divers avoided Vernon like the plague and couldn't wait to get away from it, still a matelot is never happier than when he is moaning about something.
As this website sometimes proves:D:D:D

Rob Hoole
24-03-2010, 15:23
These are some views, (one at the far end showing the Isle of Wight car ferry terminal) of what used to be HMS Vernon, now Gun Wharf Quays. Hopefully, Bob can sharpen these up as well. Bob, I would be gratefull if you could tell me how you do it,
regards,
Bob

Bob,

The Isle of Wight car ferry is in the Camber which was never part of HMS Vernon. Apart from fising vessels, it also housed Vosper Thornycroft's Broad Street Yard (link (http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/vosper_thornycroft.htm)):

http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/images/vosperthornycroft2.jpg

http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/images/broadstreet.jpg

Dave Hutson
24-03-2010, 16:12
Thanks for setting the record straight Rob

Dave H

Ednamay
25-03-2010, 12:07
[quote=Rob Hoole;107123]Bob,

The Isle of Wight car ferry is in the Camber which was never part of HMS Vernon. Apart from fishing vessels, it also housed Vosper Thornycroft's Broad Street Yard.





Apart from Vosper Thornycroft, The Camber also housed Channel Transporters (Portsmouth) Ltd (shippers) and Care Lines (Cardiff) (wharfingers), who together shipped, offloaded and arranged carriage for cauliflowers and onions from Brittany, potatoes and tomatoes from Jersey, and holly and mistletoe from wherever! British Road Services had a depot there, the French onion 'boys' rented garages (and often slept in them!) to plait and store their strings of onions and, of course, there was the old coal-fired generating station and its overhead conveyor belt which scattered coal dust in every direction. Oh, and the Harbour Master had his office over No. 10 shed, where the other onions were stored!

Rob Hoole
26-03-2010, 09:37
Thanks for the extra information Edna. Can you remember where the bananas arrived too?

Ednamay
26-03-2010, 14:51
Thanks for the extra information Edna. Can you remember where the bananas arrived too?

Yes, Rob, I am pretty sure they too were carried by Channel Transporters, but, by that time, I had left them to work in local government.

CTP used to charter vessels to do their shipping; for the Channel Islands, they chartered from ??Ipswich, a firm who named all their ships after members of the family - Gladonia, Jackonia, two others I can't remember. There might be evidence of their past!

For Britany, they chartered from Holland, primarily the Ellewousdijk (pronounced Ella-woosh-dike) - again, there may still be traces!

I was not involved with the charter parties, my job was to copy with claims!!!!! Amazing, how many crates of cauliflowers got broken!!!

Edna

Ednamay
27-03-2010, 15:51
PS While googling around, I found a picture of mv Gladonia - try
photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old

There is also a postcard up for sale on eBay, but I couldn't get anywhere with Stevonia and Jackonia; I wouldn't even think about the Ellawotsit (which is what our transport staff used to call the Dutch lady!)

My, how the time has flown!

Edna

qprdave
25-04-2010, 21:03
Introduction to the new torpedo called "The Victoria Torpedo"

Posted in The Times on 15th August 1890

qprdave
27-04-2010, 02:58
The Sims-Edison Torpedo

Reported in The Times on 4th Feb and 17th Feb 1892

Paddy
07-10-2010, 10:47
One good thing about Vernon is that it is not far from the Duchess of kent where many a matelot (who shall remain nameless) would while away many an evening savoring all sorts of delights under the shelter of the big trees which line the road outside.

I paid a visit to the Portsmouth museum and record office a few weeks back researching my wife's father and grandfather who lived in Reginald Road, Southsea and it was more than an hour of reading documents before I realised that I was sitting in the Duchess of kent barracks but then, I had never seen the inside before.

It was also handy for the NAAFI over the road.

ajd84
29-11-2010, 14:33
Ladies and Gentlemen,

HMS Vernon's Badge

HMS Vernon seems to have had two ship's badges in its time:

I would like to know when the more familiar second badge superseded the first. I suspect it was in 1961...

Hi Rob,

It was 1962 - here (attached) is the entry from 'Admiralty Badges' (CD ROM) by TP Stopford.

I didn't know this until you contacted me recently to point out there was a war-time one, I shall be amending my site to show the right one.

Tony Drury
http://www.royalnavyresearcharchive.org.uk/

Rob Hoole
29-11-2010, 18:40
Thanks Tony,

That's solved a riddle that's been puzzling me for some time.

paulus
07-04-2011, 17:27
Spent many a happy and not so happy hour at HMS Vernon in the 70's and 80's. Long gone now, the site used as a shopping centre. :(

qprdave
07-04-2011, 17:36
Lots of memories of HMS Vernon too, Paulus.

Best thing about Vernon was the closeness to the Harbour railway station and long week end.

Dave

Old Seaman
07-04-2011, 18:00
Some historical pages re HMS Vernon are here:

http://www.twogreens.co.uk/navy/SHIPS/VERNON.htm

Regards,
Serge.

dtski
29-05-2011, 03:31
I have just found that my great Uncle Richard Dunn was posted to HMS Vernon in 1925. Is there any way to find out more about the period he was there & perhaps his service in particular? Thank you.

Mike_H
01-06-2011, 13:13
Thank you for a wonderful trip down memory lane. I was at Portsmouth Polytechnic (Now Portsmouth University) from 1976 to 1980. I was a Mid in the Southampton University Royal Naval Unit (SURNU) one of 4 URNUs at that time in the 1970's. I used to walk down the road, from the Engineering Dept at Anglessey Road to the main gate and join the ship berthed in the creek there. We then went up to the RNR base at HMS Wessex. Dock Gate 4 where we picked up the rest of the Uni members.

Training was every Thursday evening (RNR night at Southampton) and at the weekends we had the training trips. We had 3 cruises per year of 14 days onboard, one at Easter and 2 in the Summer. Training at Dartmouth was in the Summer.

I still have the battledress uniform somewhere.... not that I can fit into it now!:D

The pictures of HMS Vernon shows HMS Isis, the URNUs ship, moored in Vernon Creek.

Intersetingly the pictures also shows thye old Portsmouth Power Station which ceased generating in 1976 and was later demolished, making way for a housing estate.

Happy Days

Mike_H:)

Soapy ex diamond
23-07-2011, 20:37
Hi as the title says I am reading a very good book about Vernon and can recommend it to any one interested in the complete history of torpedoes,mine warfare,and of course Vernon.
Very good read. :)
Does any one know what happened to the model ships which were in the Captains office?

Dreadnought
23-07-2011, 20:51
Soapy,

There is already a thread regarding HMS Vernon here. (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1621&highlight=vernon)

Perhaps I could ask you to use the search facility before submitting new posts, in order to avoid duplication and ensure that all available information is kept together as far as possible.

If you need help mastering the search facility, have a look at the guidance here:

http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7499 (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7499)


We also have a Naval Book Forum for posts/threads about books.


I will leave your thread up for 24 hours and then move it to the existing thread.


Cheers

D01Caprice
24-07-2011, 07:07
Hi Bob.Shayler,I did my electrical & torpedo training at H.M.S.Vernon 1941,but it was Brighton at Roedean girls school we had cabins & a bell to ring for a mistress, when we rang it all we got was a irate C.P.O.we were housed at St. Dunstans (the blind institute ) Doug. birch Ex.-EA

Send not to ask for whom the bell tolls. It tolls for thee, Chiefy.

Quote : No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee." Unquote. John Donne

Taking the message here to heart, I feel that the reductions in the Royal Navy diminishes myself and all those who served alongside me. I'm still in touch with some 60 years on and they serve to remind of what we were and how proud we were to be part of it. I still recall the stentorian voice of CPOGI "Ginger" Young when drilling my class at ST. VINCENT. 'Head up, shoulders back, chest out , stomach in, and dig those heels in. You are fledgling members of the finest fighting force the World has ever seen." Some things you never forget, and and go on to live by.

Rob Hoole
24-07-2011, 08:54
The aim of Project Vernon (http://vernon-monument.org/default.aspx) is to erect a monument at Gunwharf Quays to commemorate the minewarfare and diving heritage of HMS Vernon which formerly stood on the site (see Post #44 (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=106841&postcount=44)). The involvement of the pre-MW Branch TAS Branch will be explained on an accompanying display as will be all those others involved in mine design, naval bomb & mine disposal, minesweeping, minehunting, suface ship minelaying, submarine minelaying, aircraft minelaying, naval control of shipping, deep diving, experimental diving, ships' diving, clearance diving, X-Craft and Chariot diving, SAR diving, etc. Online donations can be made via the charity's webpage here: The Vernon Mine Warfare And Diving Monument (http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charity-web/charity/finalCharityHomepage.action?charityId=1003875)

http://vernon-monument.org/images/Monument%20-%20Artists%20Impression%20-%20Thumbnail.jpg
Artist's impression of the Vernon Monument

1,200 Mile Cycle Marathon

Next Wednesday afternoon (27 July), a team of eight cyclists from the Minewarfare Operational Training Centre at HMS Collingwood is due to arrive at Gunwharf Quays after having cycled the 1,200 miles between each of the towns and villages in England and Wales after which the 13 Hunt Class minehunters have been named. The aim of their epic ride is to raise funds for Project Vernon and the RN & RM Charity (RNRMC) and you can sponsor them via their online charity webpage here: mwcharityriders's fundraising page (http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fundraiser-web/fundraiser/showFundraiserPage.action?userUrl=mwcharityriders&pageUrl=2)

Portsea Island Charity Swm

Next Saturday (30 July), a team of serving and ex-serving divers and minewarfare personnel will attempt to swim anti-clockwise around Portsea Island to raise funds for Project Vernon, Cystic Fibrosis Kids of Portsmouth (CFK) and the RN & RM Charity (RNRMC). See coverage in the Portsmouth News here (http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/local/east-hampshire/royal_navy_divers_ready_for_portsea_island_swim_1_ 2880491). A Project Vernon stand will be open in Gunwharf Quays to take donations and offer merchandise for sale including prints of this specially commissioned painting of HMS Vernon in its heyday.

http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/images/John%20Terry%20with%20Vernon%20Creek%20painting%20 med.jpg
Artist John Terry FCSD in his studio with 'Vernon Creek'

Alternatively, you can support the swimmers and their worthy causes by visiting their online charity webpage here: Royal Navy Clearance Divers & Friends Portsea Island Swim 30 July 2011 (http://www.justgiving.com/Royal-navy-clearance-divers-and-friends-portsea-island-swim)

ted short
24-07-2011, 10:49
Hi everyone,
For those mebers who served there, this is how it looks now. I have take some photos of the remaining original buildings but apart from the Admin block, do not know what they used to be. The site was sold off a number of years ago for development and is now known as Gunwharf Quays, a combination of housing, shops, restaurants, bars and night clubs. The site is dominated by the Spinnaker Tower which has viewing platforms which give a magnificent view accross the whole area including the Solent.
regards,
Bob

HI Bob thanks for the pictures of HMS VERNON it sure dont look like it was when I was there
Ted

Soapy ex diamond
24-07-2011, 10:52
Thank you for that, I will do my home work in future.

Ednamay
24-07-2011, 10:57
Thank you for a wonderful trip down memory lane. I was at Portsmouth Polytechnic (Now Portsmouth University) from 1976 to 1980. I was a Mid in the Southampton University Royal Naval Unit (SURNU) one of 4 URNUs at that time in the 1970's. I used to walk down the road, from the Engineering Dept at Anglessey Road to the main gate and join the ship berthed in the creek there. We then went up to the RNR base at HMS Wessex. Dock Gate 4 where we picked up the rest of the Uni members.

Training was every Thursday evening (RNR night at Southampton) and at the weekends we had the training trips. We had 3 cruises per year of 14 days onboard, one at Easter and 2 in the Summer. Training at Dartmouth was in the Summer.

I still have the battledress uniform somewhere.... not that I can fit into it now!:D

The pictures of HMS Vernon shows HMS Isis, the URNUs ship, moored in Vernon Creek.

Intersetingly the pictures also shows thye old Portsmouth Power Station which ceased generating in 1976 and was later demolished, making way for a housing estate.

Happy Days

Mike_H:)

Mike - there were two parts to the power station - the generating bit and the offices. The generating bit and conveyor belt (offloading coal!) was quite close to where the Wightlink Ferry site is now, the offices were across the road. The offices were taken over and used by the local authority for two departments, (I know, I worked there!) then later sold off to a developer who converted them into flats.

Edna

ted short
24-07-2011, 11:58
Here are the pix I posted the other day that have since gone missing...

Thanks Rik for the two main gate pictures of HMS VERNON like the old one better
Ted

Here are the ones that I posted and disappeared.

Bob.

Great pictures of HMS VERNON Bob Thanks for sharing. love the one with the Ton class minesweepers berthed alongside
Ted

And again.....

LOVELY pictures of HMS VERNON in her Glory days Rik
Ted

These are photo's of HMS Vernon Auxilliary Company operating just before WW2. Found these on the HMS Vernon Web Site. My friend Roy, now 90, enlisted into this in 1938. He said they used to carry out exercises in the channel as far out as the Channel Islands using trawlers,
regards,
Bob

Two very nice pictures of days gone By. Bob
Ted

If you fancy a nostalgia trip have a look at this one!

Enjoy, Bob.

great picture Bob it how vernon looked when I was there for a short stay in 1955
Ted

Rob Hoole
12-04-2012, 07:23
This weekend, Gunwharf Quays (http://www.gunwharf-quays.com/) and the Winchester-based Wet Picnic Theatre Company (http://www.wetpicnic.com/about.html) will come together again to create an exciting afternoon performance for all the family. The 'Depth Charge (http://wetpicnic.com/depthcharge.html)' project events will culminate in an explosive finale starting at 1500 on Sunday 15 April when a grand procession will parade around Gunwharf Quays. I am attaching images of a poster of this event plus the spectacular finale of the show in December last year.

"Focusing on the mystery of Commander 'Buster' Crabb, a missing post World War II Royal Navy diver, this parade will end with a beautiful aerial performance from the crane on the waterfront (by Cafe Rouge). With daytime activities for the children and treasure trails for all the family, Sunday promises to be a fun day out for everyone."

To accompany this event, Project Vernon (http://www.vernon-monument.org/news/press-release-007/), the campaign to erect a monument at Gunwharf Quays commemorating the Minewarfare & Diving heritage of HMS Vernon which formerly stood on the site, will have a stand at Gunwharf Quays over the weekend too. The latest Project Vernon newsletter can be downloaded here (http://www.vernon-monument.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/PV-Newsletter5-March-2012.pdf).

Rob Hoole
13-04-2012, 10:38
From today's Pompey News:

Learning about Gunwharf Quays’ naval past (http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/education/learning-about-gunwharf-quays-naval-past-1-3729658)
NICOLE Oliver was among dozens of children who have been learning about Gunwharf Quays’ naval past during the Easter school break. Eight-year-old Nicole, of Watford, who is on holiday in Portsmouth with her family, made a Royal Navy diver out of clay at the Depth Charge workshops in the shopping centre. Centre staff and the international theatre company Wet Picnic have been running events all week to celebrate Gunwharf’s history as the naval mine warfare and diving establishment HMS Vernon. It saw Nicole and other youngsters get hands on to create their own navy divers out of clay.

‘It was a lot of fun. I called my one Dave,’ said Nicole.

Her dad Shay said: ‘It’s a great event to learn a bit more about Portsmouth and get kids involved in a bit history. It was good entertainment as well.’

The Depth Charge workshops are running until Sunday afternoon. It will conclude with a ‘flash mob’ at 2pm on Sunday, which will see dozens of divers appear across the shopping and leisure centre for an hour. There will then be a final procession at 3pm for youngsters to show off their clay divers and other crafty creations before it ends with a show by the Wet Picnic performers.

Attached image shows Nicole Oliver on holiday visiting Gunwharf Quays with her diver made out of clay.

Rob Hoole
07-05-2012, 23:22
Further to my Post #44 (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=106841&postcount=44) regarding HMS Vernon's ship's badges, Duncan Vincent, the proprietor of Galloway Angling (http://www.gallowayangling.co.uk/links.php?page=home) in Newton Stewart, Wigtownshire, Dumfries & Galloway in Scotland, has sent me the attached image of a cast metal ship's badge in his possession and is curious about its provenance.

This design was used by HMS Vernon until replaced by the more familiar arm and trident in, I believe, 1961. According to 'The Torpedomen - HMS Vernon's story 1872-1986' by Rear Admiral Nicho Poland CB, CBE, this was the year Osprey closed down as a school and all A/S (Anti-Submarine) training was transferred to Vernon. I suspect the badge in question was mounted on one of the diving boats or other tenders that might have been broken up at nearby Cairn Ryan. Does anyone have any other ideas where it could have come from?

Polycell
08-05-2012, 11:47
What happened to the ASUATs that were around the heliport?
I was the maintainer of ASUAT 1 in the late 60s
Fred

Rob Hoole
09-05-2012, 00:52
Fred - As far I remember, the remaining ASUATs and MASTUs were transferred to DRYAD when the Passive Sonar section (the last vestiges of ASW training) moved out of VERNON in the mid-1980s. The attached photo shows them still on the heliport in 1977.

Polycell
09-05-2012, 09:09
Bit of light relieve re Vernon.
I was in Vernon December 68 thru to mid 70 as the maintainer of ASUAT 1. My mate one LEM White, Knocker to us was a single LEM with loads of spare money so he bought himself a 4.2 litre Jaguar. When he first arrived at Vernon in his new Jag the gate staff, as he drove thru the gate, saluted him thinking he was an officer. Knocker quick to the front acknowledged the salaute and thought bugger if they realise I'm just a lowly LEM I'm in for an ear bashing so he drove his car down the main drag and parked up then returned to the main gate for his station card.
The unfortunate thing was he had to carry on this pretence for months receiving a kindly saluate every morning from the friendly gate staff.

Batstiger
09-05-2012, 11:24
As a matter of curiousity when were the MASTUs taken to Vernon.
In the dark ages when taking UC courses ( itwas called ASDICs in those days ) the first part of the course was at Vernon and then we were drafted to HMS Osprey to complete the course. This was of course before the Helicopter days.

Bob.

Rob Hoole
09-05-2012, 12:49
Bob - I assume the MASTUs were moved to Vernon in 1961 when, as I remarked in Post #90 (http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showpost.php?p=10026821&postcount=90), the school at Osprey closed down and all A/S (Anti-Submarine) training was consolidated at Vernon.
ASUAT = Anti-Submarine Universal Attack Teacher
MASTU = Mobile Anti-Submarine Training Unit

Scratcher
26-05-2012, 08:06
Rob.. If it narrows the date down a bit for you I arrived from Ganges and joined Vernon in January 1960,the place was wall to wall with MASTU's.There was so many Junior Seamen we were billeted across at Stokes Bay in what was known as Vernon 2.

Peter.