Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus above first)
NAVAL ART AVIATION ART MILITARY ART SPORT ART
HMS Excellent - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Excellent

Name : HMS Excellent
Laid Down :
Launched : 1st December 1834
Completed :
Type : Training Ship
Class :
Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK
Pennants :
Fate : Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
Was previously : HMS Boyne
Later became : HMS Queen Charlotte

Gunnery training ship.

Return to Ship Search Page


Database Currently Holds : 6236 ships and 6261 crew!


First Added : 17:13, November 1, 2011
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £45.00
 Hawker Hurricane IIc of top Czech ace Flt. Lt. K.M. Kuttlewascher, No.1 Fighter Squadron on a night intruder sortie from RAF Tangmere. On this mission he destroyed three Heinkel IIIs over their own airfield, St. Andre, in occupied France.

Night Reaper, 4th May 1942 by David Pentland. (D)
Half Price! - £75.00
 Designed the brothers Henri and Maurice Farman, the F.40 embodied many of the features of contemporary designs comprising a crew nacelle with pusher propeller and a tail supported by narrow booms and struts. Forty French squadrons were equipped with the type which first entered service in 1915 but, just one year later, they were being withdrawn as rapid developments in fighter design rendered them obsolete. One such example is shown here having surprised a single-seat Taube observation aircraft, which is spotting above some abandoned trenches near a crashed Albatros C.III. The F.40s prominent position for the gunner / observer was one of its qualities and, it is said, inspired the German AGO company when designing their C.1.

Farman F.40 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1950.00

 Opened in 1932, Ryde airport became the principal airport for the Isle of Wight, with routes being operated to destinations as far away as Croydon, Bristol and Shoreham, as well as a regular commuter service that took in Southampton, Bournemouth and Portsmouth.  This painting depicts a typical day early in 1936 when aircraft of both Portsmouth, Southsea and Isle of Wight Aviation Ltd  and Railway Air Services were using the airport, in this case, Airspeed Courier G-ADAY and De Havilland Dragon Rapide G-ACPR City of Birmingham respectively.  The airport closed officially in 1939, but may have been used sporadically after the war.  The site of the airport is now occupied by Tesco and McDonalds.

Ryde Airport, 1936 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £80.00
In this lovely picture from Graham Bosworth, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) is seen flying past the very famous Boston Stump in Lincolnshire (properly known as St Botolph*#39;s Church).  Called the Boston 'Stump' because the tower was completed over a period of 100 years, appearing as a stump on the horizon (alternative theory is that the tower should have had a spire on top of it and the 'stump' is therefore the base.  St Botolph's is one of the largest parish churches in England.  Founded in 1390, St Botolph's is aiming to raise £3,000,000 by 2009 in time for its 700th birthday and for much-needed restoration.  The BBMF is much beloved by many people of all ages and the sounds of the engines from these World War II aircraft still draws the crowds.  Based at Conningsby in Lincolnshire the formation displays throughout Europe.

Salute to the Stump by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
In 1944 Berlin was probably the most defended city in the world.  The Luftwaffe had kept what reserves it had for planes to defend Berlin.  On March 6th, 1944, The USAAF were involved in the massive air raid on Berlin, 69 B17s were lost – but the Luftwaffe lost 160 planes.  Whereas the US 8th Air Force could recover from these aircraft losses, the German Luftwaffe could not.  By the end of the war, the 8th Air Force and the Royal Air Force had destroyed 70% of Berlin.

Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

The King George V class battleship HMS Anson is pictured in Sydney Harbour where she joined the Pacific Fleet in July 1945, viewed across the flight deck of HMS Vengeance, where ten of her Vought F4.U Corsairs are ranged in front of a single folded Fairey Barracuda
HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 Type 21 frigate HMS Ambuscade (F172) is shown passing the swing bridge as she enters Taranto Harbour.

HMS Ambuscade by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
B146AP.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

 Blackbeard the Terrible, otherwise known as Edward Teach, Thatch or Drummond. Circa 1718.

Damnation Seize My Soul by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead accompanied by the Uruguayan gunboat Rio Negro for light repairs. (Damage can be seen on the hull and behind the Conning tower ) . This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee enters Montevideo by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 HMS Dido was launched on 18th July 1939, she took part in the evacuation of troops and defense of Crete, where she was damaged on B gun, killing 46 men. HMS Dido took part in the second Battle of Sirte during 1942, she sank three supply ships off North Africa. She also took part in the Anzio landings and the invasion of Southern France in August 1944.

HMS Dido by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen slips quietly through the waters of Kiel Harbour as one of her own Arado Ar.196s flies overhead. In the background, Bismarck, wearing her Baltic camouflage, is alongside taking on supplies.

Prinz Eugen by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)

Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £4000.00
 At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery. Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift. From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank. Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill. Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.

Charge of the Union Brigade by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) is shown as an Army Scout during a skirmish with Indians on the Frontier. 

Buffalo Bill by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April 2007.  Troops of 1st Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment engage Taliban insurgents from a compound roof at dusk during Operation Herrick 6.  In addition to small arms a one shot AT4 anti tank launcher is used against more difficult targets.

On the Roof by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

Stonewall Jackson with the Stonewall Brigade during the Valley Campaign of 1862.

Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - £8000.00
In August 1808 the 2nd battalion of the 95th Rifles were part of the expedition commanded by Sir Arthur Wellesley to Portugal and covered the landings at Mondego Bay.  On 15th August during a skirmish at Obidos, they had the distinction of firing the first shots of the Peninsular War against the French.  The Rifles were trained to think quickly and by themselves in dangerous situations, they were also taught to work and fight together in pairs while firing harassing and well aimed shots at the enemy.  The Baker rifle which the 95th used was an accurate weapon for its day, with reported kills being taken up to 270 metres away.  During the Peninsular War, Rifleman Thomas Plunkett of the 1st Battalion, 95th Rifles, shot the French General Auguste-Marie-Francois Colbert at a range that may have been even greater.  Rifleman Thomas Plunkett then shot a second French officer who rode to the general's aid.

Tribute to the 95th Rifles by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 A lone Jacobite piper plays a last farewell to fallen comrades.

The Lone Piper by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Charge of the 1st Battalion Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (AP)
Half Price! - £50.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Michael Schumacher celebrates another win for Ferrari.
Dream Team by Franklin.
Half Price! - £25.00
22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
Half Price! - £50.00
Passing the stand in the Galway Plate.

With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £70.00

Neil Hodgson puts in 100% to achieve Pole Position, his 1st Double Win, the 1st Win for the Ducati 999 and the race and lap record at Valencia, March 2003.
One Hundred Percent by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £130.00
 A great tribute to one of the all time greats in golf who will be sadly missed.

Seve Ballesteros by Peter Deighan. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
Saturday, 1 September, 2001.  Germany had only ever lost one World Cup qualifier at home in their history - but suddenly they were torn apart by an England team playing great attacking football  in Munich.  Coming from behind, Michael Owen blasted a stunning hat-trick, with Steven Gerrard  scoring England's 2nd and Heskey scoring the 5th goal, making the final score 5 - 1 to England.  This superb painting by Darren Baker shows Heskey celebrating his goal with a jubilant Owen and Beckham also celebrating.  <br><br>Germany: Kahn, Worns, Linke, Nowotny, Boehme, Hamann, Rehmer, Ballack, Deisler, Jancker, Neuville. <br><br>England: Seaman, G Neville, Ferdinand, Campbell, A Cole, Barmby, Scholes, Gerrard, Beckham, Heskey, Owen.
England v Germany 5 - 1 by Darren Baker
Half Price! - £75.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

Join our forum - currently 28091 members!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page