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HMS Hardy - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Hardy

Name : HMS Hardy
Laid Down : 13th November 1911
Launched : 10th October 1912
Completed : 1st September 1913
Type : Destroyer
Class : Acasta
Builder : Thornycroft
Country : UK
Pennants : H67, H39, H88
Fate : Sold 9th May 1921.

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HMS Hardy, 1912.

Timeline Entries :


10th October 1913 - Launched
1914 - Joined the 4th Flotilla with the Grand Fleet
8th August 1914 - 4th Destroyer Flotilla. Grand Fleet.
16th December 1914 - Participated in the Scarborough Raid
1916 - 4th Destroyer Flotilla. Humber.
1916 - Tranferred to Portsmouth
1916 - At the Humber
31st May 1916 - Cdr. R.A.A. Plowden in Command
31st May 1916 - Took part in the Battle of Jutland
1917 - Transferred to Devonport
November 1918 - 4th Destroyer Flotilla, Devonport
May 1921 - Sold for breaking

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Database Currently Holds : 6249 ships and 6262 crew!

Last edited : 20:44, November 1, 2011
By : jbryce1437

First Added : 12:15, April 15, 2011
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 At 0154am, Pilot officer Les Knight in Avro Lancaster AJ-N transmitted the codeword Dinghy, the signal that the Eder Dam had been successfully breached. Although the target was undefended by flak, its location made it extremely difficult to hit. In fact, four of the five aircraft involved in the attack failed in their attempts and Knights was the last available aircraft carrying the last available bomb!
Target Y The Eder Dam Raid, The Ruhr Valley, 17th May 1942 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 As the Suez crisis worstened in 1956, 8 Sqn's De Havilland Venoms found themselves in demand to attack enemy installations and aircraft on the ground from their base at Khormaksar in Aden.  Two of the type are shown here, glinting in the sun above their base.

8 Sqn Venoms by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 Johnnie Johnson leads his Canadian Wing Spitfires over the Normandy beaches on D-Day, 1944.

Normandy Fighter Sweep by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Half Price! - 65.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 Victory No 26 for Josef Mai was a 64 Squadron SE5.A on 5th September 1918, here falling victim to the guns of the aces zebra-striped Fokker D.VII 4598/18 of Jasta 5. By the end of the war, his total had risen to 30 aircraft destroyed, Mai himself collecting a number of decorations, among them the Iron Cross 1st and 2nd class. Surviving the Great War, it is believed that he became a flying instructor for the Luftwaffe during World War II, finally being laid to rest in 1982, aged ninety four.

Leutnant Josef Mai by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The potential value of aircraft at sea had been proven as early as the Battle of Jutland in 1916 and many experiments were undertaken to provide all significant warships with their own aircraft for spotting and reconnaissance purposes. One solution widely adopted was the fitting of flying-off platforms to the main guns, as demonstrated here, as a Sopwith 1½ strutter is launched from HMS Warspite in 1919.

Sopwith 1 ½ Strutter by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
It was during the inter-war period that a reawakening interest in twin engined fighter design prompted several countries to investigate a number of revolutionary concepts, of these only the Lockheeds sleek and unconventional P.38 was to be put into large scale production, proving to be a versatile and dominant fighter possessed of extremely long range, good speed and manoeuverability and a formidable armament. When production ceased in 1945, 9,923 examples of the P38 Lightning had been delivered.

Fork Tailed Devil (Lightning) by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 40.00
 When pilots took off from the respective airfields in the 1914/18 war, they would rarely know what lay ahead. For Otto Kissenberth, the 12th October 1916 was to be a baptism of fire. Flying Fokker D.II 540/16, he scored his first three victories in quick succession, shooting down two Maurice Farmans and a Breguet V, as shown here. Unusual among fighter pilots of the time for the simple reason that he wore spectacles, Kissenberth went on to score an eventual 20 victories and survived the war, only to be killed whilst mountaineering in 1919.

Oberleutnant Otto Kissenberth by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

On the 1st of August 1798, thirteen French ships of the line sat anchored in Aboukir Bay off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt, in support of Napoleon who was inland with his troops attempting to conquer the country.  As nighttime approached so did Lord Horatio Nelson and the British fleet.  Nelson had been hunting Napoleon at sea for months; at Aboukir Bay he had found the French fleet, trapped and unprepared for battle.  Nelsons audacious plan was to attack the French on their unprotected prot side, the plan had its risks; the whole of the British fleet could run aground in the shallows - but Nelson knew the waters too well.  The Battle of the Nile was one of the most decisive in the history of naval warfare.  By the end of the battle nearly all the French ships were sunk or captured.  The 124-gun flagship - and the pride of the French navy - LOrient, had exploded with such ferocity that it halted the battle for over ten minutes.  Napoleons ability to dominate the region had been crushed, whilst Nelson was to become a hero throughout the whole of Britain.

Battle of the Nile by Anthony Saunders (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Americas first true aircraft carrier, the USS Langley (CV-1) is pictured making way at sea as a pair of Douglas DT-2s pass overhead.

USS Langley by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 27.50
 Gneisenau returns to Kiel harbour after participating in Operation Nord Mark. With number one bowline secured crew crew prepares to bring the ship alongside.

K.M.S. Gneisenau - Stand by The Bowlines by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar is depicted here passing the iconic Round Tower at the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour before dropping anchor at Spithead in readiness for her next voyage.  With her is the sloop HMS Pickle, also a veteran of Trafalgar, who carried Admiral Collingwood's victory despatch to the Admiralty after the great battle had been won.

HMS Victory Departing Portsmouth by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 Developed from the F.18E/F Block II Super Hornet, the EA-18G Growler is the US Navy's latest airborne electronic attack aircraft (AEA), a land or carrier-based weapons platform into which many flexible design features have been incorporated, giving it a full-spectrum AEA capability as well as targeting and self-defense systems equal to those of the standard F.18.  Sometimes referred to as a 'Grizzly' to avoid confusion with its predecessor, the EA-6B Prowler, the EA-18G was first introduced into Navy service in 2008 with VAQ-129, one of whose aircraft is depicted here above the carrier USS Ronald Raegan (CVN.76).

EA-18G Growler by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
 HMS Hood readies to fire off a what proved to be the final salvo against the Bismarck before a shell from the German battleship penetrated the magazine of HMS Hood, tearing apart the British ship in an enormous explosion.

The Final Salvo - HMS Hood by Anthony Saunders. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 With the British Mediterranean Fleet riding at anchor in Grand  Harbour Malta, HMS  Majestic is shown preparing to leave harbour as local fisherman look on.

Majestic Malta by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 The battered Bismarck fires its final salvos, during the last stage of the battle, 27th May 1941.
Death of the Bismarck by Brian Wood.
Half Price! - 50.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

General Lasalle who was killed during the battle of Wagram and is shown leading the cavalry charge
Portrait of General de Lasalle by Edouard Detaille (GL)
Half Price! - 250.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
The Infantry Heavy Weapons School at Netheravon in Wiltshire circa 1940.
Vickers Machine-Gunners Training by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Prince Rupert beginning his career as a leader of the Royalist Cavalry drove the Parliamentarian Cavalry off the field. Prince Rupert was a nephew of King Charles I and commanded the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War.  Prince Rupert was born on 17th December1619 in Prague.   His mother was Elizabeth, the sister of Charles I.  Rupert became a soldier and fought in the Thirty Years War (1618 - 1648) and in 1642, he joined the army of Charles I in the English Civil War. He was soon appointed to lead the royalist cavalry and fought in the first major battle of the war at Edgehill in October 1642. His cavalry charge completely routed the parliamentarians but he got carried away and pursued them too far from the battlefield, losing the chance to inflict a decisive defeat. His reputation grew after a number of military.  In 1644  Prince Rupert led the spectacular relief of the siege of York  but  his army was defeated by a parliamentary army at Battle of Marston Moor, losing York and the north to Cromwell    In June 1645 he took part in the Battle of Naseby at which the royalists were defeated.  In September Rupert surrendered Bristol to parliament and in response the king abruptly withdrew his commission. Rupert left for exile in Holland.  After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Rupert held a series of British naval commands, fighting in the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch Wars.  On 19th November 1682 Prince Rupert died.
Prince Rupert at Edgehill by Stanley Berkeley (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

 After the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons had charged the French artillery, they themselves were charged by the 3rd French Chasseur Chevals and the deadly 4th Regiment of Lancers.  The scene depicted shows the French cavalry engaging the Scots Greys.

Charge of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) at Waterloo by Brian Palmer. (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00
 Shura is an Arabic word meaning 'consultation'.  It is mentioned three times in the Quran as a praiseworthy activity.  ISAF forces sit down to discuss local events and to exchange views over a pot of sweet tea.  Sitting cross-legged, the ISAF are allowed to wear their boots and the locals fully understand that Europeans cannot sit cross-legged for even a short time.

Shura by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Polish 7TP (Twin Turret) light tank of Captain F. Michalowskis training company breaks out from the street barricade to counter attack German reconnaissance elements.

Warsaw, September 1939 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The 13th Light Dragoons cross a small river as part of Wellingtons armies advance on Vittoria in June 1813 during the Peninsula Campaign.

Advance on Vittoria by Chris Collingwood (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

GIJH2740GS. A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GS)

A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
Unique in the history of Formula One motor racing are the Schumacher brothers. After seeing the success of his elder brother, whilst climbing through the ranks to stardom in F1, Ralf Schumacher had his sights set firmly upon beating his illustrious brother. At last in a competitive car, we see Ralfs Williams BMW leading Michaels Ferrari through the Veedol chicane at Nurburgring during the 2003 European Grand Prix. This event which Ralf went on to win turned the tables on the 2001 race which also saw the two fighting wheel to wheel at times but in that case Ralf could not quite match the Ferrari of his brother Michael. The race threw the championship for both constructors and drivers wide open and set the stage for one of the most exciting conclusions of a championship season for years.
Sibling Rivalry II by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - 35.00
GIJL0358GS. A Huntsman with Harriers by John Emms.
A Huntsman with Harriers by John Emms. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00

 The painting portrays the Manchester United midfielder and England Captain David Beckham celebrating after scoring from a trademark free kick.

Seven by Robert Highton.
Half Price! - 70.00
 In a career that has seen a dramatic rise in the world rankings, Tim Henman has already become the first British born player to be ranked in the top ten, an Olympic silver medalist and Wimbledon semi-finalist. Tim is poised to break through and win one of the Grand Slams that every professional craves and gain success for Britain in the Davis Cup World Group in 1999. Tims finest year to date, was capped by his becoming the first Briton to reach the semi-finals of the ATP World Championship in Hanover.
Tim Henman by Simon Smith
Half Price! - 70.00
Racing at this pretty and ancient venue dates back as far as the mid 14th century, making it the oldest racecourse in Britain.  Bounded by the River Dee and a Roman city wall, the <i>Roodee</i> is the tightest and smallest course of all.  The oldest record of a race here is that for a prize of a silver bell woth 111 shillings on Shrove Tuesday in 1540, continuing until 1609.  The completely flat track is only a shade longer than a mile and can cause problems for larger horses that often find it difficult to get into their stride.  In longer races, the competitors pass the standds no less than three times covering nearly two miles and three furlongs.  The most famous of the <i>long</i> races is The Chester Cup, first run in 1824, being the highlight of a three day meet in May.

Chester by Paul Hart.
Half Price! - 55.00
 Alain Prost in his number 2 Williams dices with Jean Alesi in his number 27 Ferrari at the British Grand Prix in 1993.  Prost went on to win this race after Damon Hill suffered engine failure, while Alesi finished in 9th place, a lap behind Prost.

Alain Prost and Jean Alesi, British Grand Prix, Silverstone, 1993 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

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