Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON NAVAL ART!

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
HMS Violent - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Violent

Name : HMS Violent
Laid Down : November 1916
Launched : 1st September 1917
Completed : November 1917
Type : Destroyer
Class : V or Vanoc
Builder : Swan Hunter
Country : UK
Pennants : F31, D57, FA1, F95
Fate : Scrapped 8th March 1937.

Return to Ship Search Page


Database Currently Holds : 6249 ships and 6262 crew!

Last edited : 17:49, September 12, 2011
By : jbryce1437

First Added : 16:23, February 1, 2011
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 The distinctive black-fuselaged Albatross D.V of Jasta 12s commander taxis out for take off behind the similar machine of Leutnant d R Friedrich Hochstetter at Roucourt, late in 1917. Whilst all of Jasta 12s aircraft possessed black tails, many of them bore their pilots personalised insignia painted large on the fuselage sides. In the case of Hochstetter, it was a stacked shot emblem, whilst others sported castles, diagonal crosses or various geometric shapes. The origin of Schobingers light blue design is unknown, but may have been applied purely for recognition purposes. His final tally was eight victories, while Hochstetter scored just one.

Leutnant d R Viktor Schobinger by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
This aircraft entered service with the RFC in February 1915. Nicknamed the gunbus, it was the first British aircraft to be designed as a fighting machine from the start. The plane was armed with a single .303 inch Lewis machine gun, fired by the observer. It was only a short period of time before it was outclassed by German aircraft carrying synchronised forward firing machine guns.

Vickers Gunbus FB5 by Tim Fisher (AP)
Half Price! - 25.00
 The Royal Air Force is currently the largest operator of the Boeing Chinook after the United States, this ubiquitous helicopter now equipping  No.s 7, 18 and 27 Sqn based at RAF Odiham.  Deployed in Afghanistan, the flight and ground crew operate jointly as the Expeditionary Chinook Engineering Squadron (ExCES), No.1310 Flight.  Here, a Chinook is depicted ferrying an underslung re-supply load out of Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

A Vital Role by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 - the climax of the Battle of Britain.  Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot.  For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East.  Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.

Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - 90.00

 Dauntless Dive Bombers Dive on the Battleship Musashi in the Sibuyan Sea, October 1944.

Pressing Home the Kill by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Posted to 64 Squadron on 1st July 1940, </a>the tragically short relationship of Sub Lt F Dawson Paul with the Spitfire was crammed with victories.  He immediately shared a Dornier Do17 off Beachy Head and, just four days later claimed a Messerschmitt Bf.109.  Further kills were confirmed over the next two weeks, among them five Bf.110s and another Do.17. His final victory was a Bf.109 on 25th, but on this day he fell to the guns of the German ace Adolf Galland.  Dawson Paul was rescued from the English Channel by a German E-boat, but died of his wounds five days later as a prisoner of war.

The Longest July by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Three Focke-Wulf  Fw190Gs of II Gruppe, Schlachtgeschwader 2 Immelmann on patrol in 1943.

Fw190s by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - 95.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

HMS Renown viewed from a passing Sunderland Flying Boat.

HMS Renown by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
One of the finest battleships of all time, Bismarck was built by the Blohm and Voss shipyard in Hamburg and launched in February 1939.  Her first duty was for commerce raiding in the north Atlantic.  Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, the destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 and a minesweeper.  The Bismarck, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunther Lutjens, left her last anchorage at Grimstadt Fjord in Norway.  Once Bismarcks departure was confirmed all available British forces were deployed to meet the threat.  On the 24th of May 1941 the Bismarck sailed into naval history - sinking the battlescruiser and pride of the British fleet - HMS Hood.  But Bismarck would have little time to celebrate, she was sunk by a scorned British fleet three days later.  Here Bismarck is depicted on the evening of the 21st May 1941 entering the open sea on her fateful final voyage.

Bismarck - The Final Voyage by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - 3600.00
 Japanese Torpedo destroyers, rush in to finish off the Russian battleships near the end of the Battle of Tsushima.

Battle of Tsushima by Anthony Saunders (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Sunset over Aboukir Bay on 1st August 1798 as ships of the Royal Navy, led by Nelson, conduct their ruthless destruction of the anchored French fleet. Ships shown from left to right. HMS Orion, Spartiate, Aquilon, Peuple Souvrain, HMS Defence, HMS Minotaur and HMS Swiftsure.

Battle of the Nile by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - 60.00

 The French battleship Richelieu with the Royal Navy cruiser HMS Cumberland, shown during Operation Crimson after bombarding Sabang during July 1944. Grumman Avengers from the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Vengeance shown overhead

Richelieu and HMS Cumberland 1945 by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The Royal Navy aimed to block communications between France and its American colonies. On May 3rd 1747, a British fleet of 14 warships intercepted a French convoy off Cape Finnisterre. The French ships were protected by eight ships of the line, the British fleet under Admiral George Anson attacked the French. Many of the merchant ships escaped, but Admiral Anson pursued the French ships of the line commanded by Admiral La Jonquiere. A series of running fights ended with all French warships sunk or captured.
The First Battle of Finnisterre, 3rd May 1747 by Richard Paton (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The third of the Royal Navy's Vanguard class submarines, HMS Vigilant (S30) entered service on 2nd November 1996.  She is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane and carries the UK's nuclear deterrent Trident ballistic missile.  Manned by a crew of 14 officers and 121 men, her main power is supplied by one Rolls Royce PWR2 nuclear reactor driving two GEC turbines.

HMS Vigilant by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 725.00
Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - 500.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

DHM504.  The Cameron Highlanders at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.

The Cameron Highlanders at Waterloo by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 60.00
English soldiers search a blacksmiths hunting for highlanders who fled from after the battle of Culloden.
After Culloden, Rebel Hunting by J.S. Lucas.
Half Price! - 45.00
 Recovering a vehicle in Helmand.  A support dumper truck has edged over to the side of the track which has given way under the weight.  Two REME soldiers are pulling out the tow-rope (which is made of metal cables) and will attach this to the stranded vehicle.  every vehicle will have a top-gunner, heavily armed with an array of weapons - usually the GPMG.  When the convoy is stationary for any period of time they are at their most vulnerable to attack, so speed is of the essence to get the convoy on its way again.

REME Recovery by Graeme Lothian. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Challenger II tanks of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, and Warrior APCs of the Irish Guards, 7th Armoured Brigade, the Desert Rats supported overhead by US Marine Corps Cobras during their epic dawn attack to finally take and secure Basra.

The Road to Basra, Southern Iraq, 7th April 2003 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Muncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 In AD 9, three Roman legions - 20,000 men plus camp followers - commanded by Governor Varus crossed the Rhine into what they believed to be friendly territory on their way to putting down a local uprising. A young chieftain of the Cherusci tribe, Arminius, had guaranteed them safe passage through his lands.  However, Arminius who held a grudge against the Romans, deliberately deceived Varus and in a four-day running battle in the forest overwhelmed and slaughtered the Romans almost to a man. Varus, along with his surviving senior officers, took their own lives to avoid capture.

The Battle of Teutoburg Forest, AD 9 by Brian Palmer. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
When Portuguese traders took advantage of the constant violence in Japan to sell the Japanese their first firearms, one of the quickest to take advantage of this new technology was the powerful daimyo Oda Nobunaga. In 1575 the impetuous Takeda Katsuyori lay siege to Nagashino castle, a possession of an ally of Nobunagas, Tokugawa Ieyasu. An army was despatched to relieve the siege by Nobunaga and Ieyasu, two of the most influential figures in Japanese history, and the two sides faced each other across the plain of Shidarahara. The Takeda samurai were brave, loyal and renowned for their cavalry charges, but Nobunaga, counting on Katsuyoris impetuosity, had 3,000 musketeers waiting behind prepared defences for their assault. The outcome of this clash of tactics and technologies was to change the face of Japanese warfare forever.

Battle of Nagashino by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 In 1974 the greatest rugby union side ever to leave the British Isles took on the mighty Springboks in a gruelling 22 match series, including four test matches. By the end, each member of that historic team had entered British Rugby folklore. Several of the victorious side from the 1971 tour of New Zealand united once again and accomplished a remarkable unbeaten record of 21 consecutive victories and a draw in the final test, however, many commentators feel that a perfect record was denied due to poor refereeing. Individual performances, which caught the headlines, included the magnificent half-back pairing of Phil Bennett and Gareth Edwards. JJ Williams completed two brilliant tries during the third test and finished with an impressive 112 tour tries in total. Roger Uttleys appearance in no less than 16 of the 22 games was a formidable achievement and JPR Williams, possibly the greatest ever full back, would have won the final test with a magnificent run to set up Fergus Slatterys try only for it to be dubiously disallowed. Scotlands Ian McGeechan demonstrated superb agility and pace in the centre whilst fellow country man, Andy Irvine, produced countless moments of sublime skill in the final two tests and will always be remembered as one of the most gifted players ever to don a Lions shirt. The Lions tremendous forward line led by inspirational Captain Willie John McBride was in many respects the driving force behind the success of the 1974 tour. McBrides courage and leadership singled him out above all others, as this was to be his fifth and final Lions tour. McBrides Lions career spanned a remarkable 12 years and 17 tests, a record, which may never be surpassed. The other forwards including Cotton, McLauchlan, Gordon Brown, Windsor, Slattery and Mervyn Davies combined effectively to set up a strong platform for victory and proved to be stalwarts in both attack and defence. Everyone returned from the 1974 tour a hero and it would be fair to say that this unparalleled squad is still a benchmark to which each and every successive Lions team since 1974 have strived to emulate.

Pride of Lions 74 by Keith Fearon. (B)
Half Price! - 210.00
GIFP1191GS. Refreshments At The Inn by Warren Williams (GS)
Refreshments At The Inn by Warren Williams (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
B452.  Sandown Park by Paul Hart.

Sandown Park by Paul Hart.
Half Price! - 55.00
 The 2002 Grand Prix season started with much excitement as for the first few races the major teams sparred for supremacy. Just when it looked as if there would be a three-way fight between Ferrari, Williams and McLaren, along came Michael Schumacher in the 2002 Ferrari and showed the supremacy of the driver and machine package. However, against all odds and demonstrating supreme confidence and skill on a track where top speed was not all important, David Coulthard made one of the best drives of his career. Pulling out all the stops lie grabbed second spot on the grid. For once on race day he was not to be easily pushed aside and from the sprint to the first corner, he managed to grab first place and though pressed throughout the race, gave no quarter. In a supreme demonstration reminiscent of Senna and Mansell years ago, he made his car so wide that no-one could pass, and went on to take a memorable and well-deserved victory. Our picture shows him at Lowes Hairpin with the Williarris and Ferraris waiting to pounce at the slightest mistake - which did not happen.

Davids Day by Robert Tomlin
Half Price! - 30.00

 Peter Deighan has superbly captured Jimmy White, John Parrot, Stephen Hendry, James Wattana, John Higgins, Ken Doherty, Ronnie OSullivan and of course the centrepiece, a magnificent study of former World Champion Steve Davis as he Ponders his next shot.  A must for all snooker rooms, clubs and players of this wonderful game.

Kings of the Baize II by Peter Deighan
Half Price! - 180.00
 A cricketing genius, Sir Garfield Sobers excelled at all aspects of the game.  One of his most memorable moments being the six consecutive sixes hit off one over.

Sir Garfield Sobers by Gary Keane.
Half Price! - 60.00
 Neil Hodgson celebrates winning the World Superbike Championship at Assen, September 2003.
No.1 by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - 130.00
Nelson Picquet guides his Williams around the Adelaide street circuit at the Australian Grand Prix.

Nelson Picquet by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

Join our forum - currently 33309 members!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page