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HMS Vestal - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Vestal

Name : HMS Vestal
Laid Down : 11th January 1943
Launched : 19th June 1943
Completed : 24th August 1944
Type : Minesweeper
Class : Algerine
Builder : Harland and Wolff
Country : UK
Pennants : J215
Fate : 26 July 1945 - July Sunk by Japanese Kamikaze plane off Phuket, Siam

6th MSF 7th MSF

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Database Currently Holds : 6248 ships and 6261 crew!


First Added : 20:20, January 19, 2011
By : Clive S Cottam

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Ju 52s deploy German Paratroopers during the assault on Crete (operation Mercure) 1942.

Falling Angels by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - 35.00
 The second half of 1940 saw repeated attacks by the Regia Aeronautica on Allied airstrips in East Africa, but its aging bomber force proved no match for the Hurricanes and Gladiators that offered a spirited defence.  The airstrip at Wajir in Kenya was attacked several times by the Italians, but largely survived, the worst damage being the destruction of a fuel dump on 13th June.  Here, a Gloster Gladiator of No.1 SAAF Squadron despatches a Caproni Ca.133, just south of Wajir.

Raid on Wajir by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 The formation of six New Zealand squadrons within the RAF in the early part of WW2 acknowledged the contribution and commitment of the Commonwealth to the campaign against the Nazi invasion of Europe.  Among these was 489 Sqn, based at Dallachy in Scotland, whose Beaufighter Mk Xs flew missions against Axis shipping in the North Sea as well as other missions along the Scandinavian coast.  Here, two 489 Sqn Beaufighters run up their engines prior to a sortie in the Winter of 1943/44.

Kiwis at Dallachy - Tribute to No.489 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 The night of the 16th May 1943 saw 19 modified Lancasters of the specially formed 617 squadron set out to breach the Ennepe, Eder, Mohne and Sorpe dams in Westphalia, Germany. The mission was led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson.

The Dambusters by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00

 One of the most experienced and respected test pilots in history, Eric 'Winkle' Brown carried out the first landing and take off by a jet aircraft on an aircraft carrier on 3rd December 1945.  This was accomplished in the second prototype De Havilland Vampire LZ551/G which had been extensively modified for the sole purpose of carrier operations.  Not only was an arrester hook added, but the aircraft featured larger flaps and was fitted with the more powerful Goblin 2 engine.  The first take off by a jet from an aircraft carrier is depicted here as Lt Cdr Brown lifts away from the deck of HMS Ocean on that momentous day.

Tribute to Lt Cdr Eric 'Winkle' Brown by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 1300.00
  USS Independence launches multiple aircraft, RA5C Vigilante from the waist cat, and a Crusader from the bow while deployed in the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.

USS Independence by Randall Wilson. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work.

Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 40.00
 Arriving in France in 1917 with little or no air gunnery training behind him, Captain Arthur Harry Cobby went on to become the Australian Flying Corps highest scoring ace with 29 victories to his credit, five of them observation balloons. He is shown here in Sopwith Camel E1416 of 4 Sqn AFC (formerly 71 Sqn AFC) having downed one of his final victims, a Fokker D.VII on 4th September 1918. Cobby survived the Great War and served in the RAAF during the inter war period and World War Two, eventually leaving the service as Air Commodore CBE. He died in 1955.

Captain Arthur Henry Cobby by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Cutty Sark and Thermopylae racing each other home in 1872.  Cutty Sark is nearest with her sails backlit against the low sun and her great rival Thermopylae in the distance.

Cutty Sark and Thermopylae by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
The Atlantic ocean was the lifeline between Britain and America, as well as millions of tons of raw materials, GIs were also transported over in all manor of hastily converted liners.  Protecting the troops from marauding u-boats and German surface ships was of paramount importance to the allied fleets.  Although USS New York spent a good deal of the war in the Atlantic, she also participated in the Torch landings off North Africa and took part in the Pacific campaign, seeing action at both Iwo Jima and Okinowa.

Escort for the Troops - USS New York by Anthony Saunders
Half Price! - 50.00
Arctic Convoy.  Forcing their way through adverse conditions bordering on the limitations of human endurance, The Allied convoys faced appalling odds of survival in the endeavour to supply raw materials to Russias only ice free port of Murmansk.

The Arctic Run by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Half Price! - 3300.00
21st October 1805. As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet towards the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass the Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column.  Harvey was discouraged with a customry rebuke from Nelson and duly fell into line behind the flagship.  The enemy can be seen spread along the horizon whilst, to the right in the distance, the leading ships of Admiral Collingwoods fleet can be seen spearheading a separate assault to the south.  In the light airs preceding the battle, much sail was needed to drive the British ships towards the enemy line. HMS Victory, nearest, has royals and stunsails set and is making good way, her furniture boats strung behind in readiness for battle.  On her poop deck, officers prepare to run up a signal.

Prelude to Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00

 Yamato powers her way, ahead of Yahagi during Operation Ten Ichi Go.

Otoko-Tachi-No Yamato by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - 370.00
 The elegant but ill-fated jewel in the White Star crown Titanic was a technical marvel of engineering in its day. At 882 ft long, her perfect proportions and magnificent profile were the envy of other shipping companies. her tragic loss on her maiden voyage was a crushing blow to the White Star Line that left the whole world in shock.

RMS Titanic by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 60.00
 Having broken the line of the French and Spanish ships, HMS Victory is about to lock horns with Redoubtable.

Nelsons Day, Battle of Trafalgar by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 370.00
In the early morning murk of 24th May 1941, the forward 15in guns of HMS Hood fire the first shots against the mighty German battleship Bismarck.  Both Bismarck and her escort, the Prinz Eugen, immediately responded, the latter causing a fierce fire on Hoods upper deck, while plunging shot from Bismarck penetrated deep into the British ships hull, causing an explosion that ripped the Hood apart, sinking her in an instant.  Tragically, just three survivors were rescued from the water.

HMS Hood Opens Fire Upon the Bismarck by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

DHM509.  Chasseur a Cheval by Brian Palmer.

Chasseur a Cheval by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 25.00
 German infantry take cover in a shell hole during the blitzkrieg through Southern Russia towards Stalingrad.

Cross of Iron, Russia, Summer 1942 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Battle of Waterloo 1815

Royal Horse Guards by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - 600.00
DHM621GL. Headquarters 4th Armoured Brigade on Objective Copper South, Iraq 27th February 1991 by David Rowlands.

Headquarters 4th Armoured Brigade on Objective Copper South, Iraq 27th February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 Below the vast bulk of the Zoo Bunker one of three giant Flak towers designed to defend Berlin from air attack, some remnants of the citys defenders gather in an attempt to break out of the doomed capital. Amongst which are troops from the 9th Fallschirmjager and Munchberg Panzer Divisions, including a rare nightfighting equipped Panther G of Oberleutnant Rasims Company, 1/29th Panzer Regiment.

Panther at the Zoo, Tiergarten, berlin, 2nd May 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 100.00
DHM1432.  Flora MacDonalds Farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie by George William Joy.
Flora MacDonalds Farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie by George William Joy.
Half Price! - 50.00
 2 Rifles on patrol back to PB2, Nahr E Saraj, Operation Herrick 15.

2 Rifles, Afghanistan by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
1st Foot Guards and The Coldstream Guards are shown manning the walls of Hougoumont Farm against the heavy French forces at the height of the the Battle of Waterloo.  Also shown are some captured French soldiers.  During the Battle of Waterloo the 1st Foot Guards and the Coldstream Guards losses were as follows: 1st Foot Guards - 125 Killed, 352 Wounded, and the Coldstream Guards - 97 killed and 446 wounded and four missing.

Defence of Hougoumont Farm by Robert Hillingford (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 20.00
GIFP1214GS. The Hunt by George Derville Rowlandson (GS)
The Hunt by George Derville Rowlandson (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 The 1991 Grand Prix season started with great public expectations supporting, encouraging and urging on Britains one and only Nigel Mansell to win the Formula One World Championship. In the race at Silverstone a fired up Mansell was dominant in front of the ecstatic home crowd winning the race with such style and aplomb. His arch rival Ayrton Senna was completely outclassed and to add insult to injury he ran out of fuel on the last lap, finishing fourth behind our hero.  In an unprecedented gesture, Nigel stopped on his victory lap and picked up Senna to get him safely back to the pits through the thronging crowd, so creating one of the most memorable moments in the history of Formula One.  Disappointments were to follow throughout the season and it would not be until 1992 that Nigel would eventually lift the coveted crown.

Mansells Taxi Service by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - 110.00

 Racing off the Needles Rocks, Isle of Wight, 1923.
Norada & Mariquita by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Nigel Mansell leads the pack in his red No.5 Williams on the first lap of the 1992 British Grand Prix, closely followed by the McLarens of Ayrton Senna and Gerhard Berger, with the No.19 Benneton of Michael Schumacher in fourth place.  Mansell went on to win this race, with his team-mate Ricardo Patrese taking second.  Senna retired 7 laps from the end, while Schumacher finished 4th ahead of Berger in 5th.

The First Lap - Nigel Mansell and Ayrton Senna, British Grand Prix, Silverstone, 1992 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Produced on high quality German etching art stock.

McLaren at Monaco, Hakkinen and Coulthard 1998 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 70.00
GITW5601GS. A Race at the End by Thomas Blinks.

A race at the End by Thomas Blinks (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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