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HMS Jaseur - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Jaseur

Name : HMS Jaseur
Laid Down : 14th September 1891
Launched : 24th September 1892
Completed : July 1893
Type : Gunboat
Class : Alarm
Builder : NC & A (Vickers)
Country : UK
Pennants :
Fate : Sold 1905.

Timeline Entries :

11th July 1893 - Cdr. Stanley T. Dean-Pitt
9th January 1896 - At Chatham, A Division, Reserve Fleet
16th July 1896 - Sailed Falmouth Roads
16th July 1896 - Arrived Portland
15th June 1897 - For seagoing service from Tender to HMS Vernon
15th June 1897 - Commissioned at Plymouth for the Mobilized Fleet
15th June 1897 - Jaseur Lt. A. Barry in Command
26th June 1897 - Fleet Review celebrating the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
26th June 1897 - Lt. Cdr. A. Parry in Command
5th June 1900 - Arrived Torbay for Manoeuvres
7th July 1900 - Participated in the Summer Fleet Manoeuvres
16th August 1902 - Coronation Review at Spithead
16th August 1902 - Lt. H. Strickland in Command

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Database Currently Holds : 6250 ships and 6263 crew!

Last edited : 20:39, January 2, 2011
By : jbryce1437

First Added : 11:41, December 3, 2010
By : kc




Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 No.501 (County of Gloucester) Sqn Hurricane Mk.I of Squadron Leader Harry -Hulk- Hogan, during the Battle of Britain.  This aircraft carried the codes SD-A.

Hurricane of No.501 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Swordfish of 825 Sqn led by Lt-Cdr Esmonde begin their heroic attack on the battlescruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen as they make their way up the English Channel from Brest during Operation Cerberus on 12th February 1942.  Although all the aircraft were lost and no significant damage was done to the German fleet, all the pilots were decorated for their bravery and Lt-Cdr Esmonde received the first Fleet Air Arm VC to be awarded, albeit posthumously.  The painting depicts the first wave of Swordfish attacking the Scharnhorst with Gneisenau taking avoiding action in the distance.  A German torpedo boat has turned to confront the attacking aircraft.

Against All Odds - Attack on the Scharnhorst by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 350.00
 In the summer of 1940, JG3, under the command of Hans von Hahn, scramble their Me109s from their French countryside base at Colombert, near Calais. With the deafening sound of their piston-engined aircraft, sporting the groups colourful Dragon emblem on their cowlings, they head for the battle front. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>

Dragons of Colombert by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)
Half Price! - 140.00
DHM623GL. 4th Regiment Army Air Corps, Helicopter Landing Site in Iraq, Operation Dessert Storm, 26th February 1991 by David Rowlands.

4th Regiment Army Air Corps, Helicopter Landing Site in Iraq, Operation Dessert Storm, 26th February 1991 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 Developed from the F.18E/F Block II Super Hornet, the EA-18G Growler is the US Navy's latest airborne electronic attack aircraft (AEA), a land or carrier-based weapons platform into which many flexible design features have been incorporated, giving it a full-spectrum AEA capability as well as targeting and self-defense systems equal to those of the standard F.18.  Sometimes referred to as a 'Grizzly' to avoid confusion with its predecessor, the EA-6B Prowler, the EA-18G was first introduced into Navy service in 2008 with VAQ-129, one of whose aircraft is depicted here above the carrier USS Ronald Raegan (CVN.76).

EA-18G Growler by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
A large umbrella of Spitfire Wings covered most of the sky over Dieppe during the Allied attack Operation Jubilee on 19th August 1942. Squadron leader Johnnie Johnson leads 610 (County of Chester) Squadron down from top cover support to lend a hand to Spitfires of 485 Squadron (New Zealand) and 411 Squadron (Canadian) which made up the 12 Group Wing, led by W/C Pat Jameson. The enemy being made up of a huge mixed force of Fw190 and Me109 fighters from JG2 and JG26. 12 Group Wing flew four times that disastrous day and in the end the Royal Air Force lost 106 aircraft compared to the Luftwaffe losses of 48.

The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Mustang P51 Nooky Booky IV flown by Captain Leonard Kit Carson of the 362nd Fighter Squadron, 357th Fighter Group, giving fighter escort top cover protection to the B17s of 381st Bomb Group, returning after a raid in Germany, January 1944. Kit Carson ended the war as top scorer of the 357th with 18.5 aerial victories in the last 6 months of the war.

Mustang Escort by Graeme Lothian (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Whilst patrolling over advancing Allied troops east of Metemma, three Gloster Gladiators of K Flight, 1 SAAF Sqn, were attacked by Fiat CR.42s from 412a Squadriglia, led by Capitano Antonio Raffi.  All three Gladiators were lost in the action, plus a further two that arrived too late to assist.

Tribute to Capitano Antonio Raffi by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00



Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

By June 1944 the US Fleet had made a huge leap across the Pacific to the Marianas, a small group of Japanese held islands of which Saipan would prove the most difficult to overcome. The landing were supported by the US 5th Fleet, which included USS North Carolina together with an increasingly powerful armada of battle hardened warships.

USS North Carolina, Saipan Bound by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Half Price! - 3400.00
 Wearing her unusual black and white disruptive colour scheme, HMS Repulse is pictured as part of Force Z in company with HMS Prince of Wales and the destroyer Vampire. These two mighty battleships were to be lost within hours of each other, the victims of intense Japanese air strikes. Vampire and the destroyer Electra were on hand to pick up survivors from both ships.

HMS Repulse by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
A class submarine, HMS Anchorite, swings away from the depot ship Adamant during work up exercises in the Firth of Clyde. In the mid fifties the depot ship was moored in Rothesay Bay providing a base for the 3rd Submarine Squadron. Leaving the moorings ahead of Anchorite is the frigate HMS Termagant which will day part in the days exercise.

Group Up- Half Ahead Starboard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - 30.00
Nelsons annihilation of the French Fleet at Aboukir Bay was complete, but for the escape of Admiral Villeneuve who would again confront his nemesis just seven years later at Trafalgar.  Doubled by the British ships and ravaged by their relentless gunnery, the French faced utter defeat as the battle raged into the night. At the centre of the French line lay the massive three decker L Orient.  The British Alexander positioned herself astern of L Orient and began to fire mercilessly into her fragile stern galleries.  Within a short time, a terrible fire started that raged through her hull, eventually reaching her powder magazine, causing a massive explosion that literally blew L Orient to pieces.  In this scene, shortly before the explosion, Alexander can be seen astern of the burning L Orient, minus her maintop, and trying to move away in the intense heat.  To her port, the British Majestic is also starting to slip away while, in the foreground, the French Franklin is ablaze and threatened with being caught in the imminent blast.  At the extreme right of the picture, crews are racing to remove sails from the British Orion to lessen the risk of fire in the event of L Orients spectacular demise.

The Battle of the Nile, 1798 - The Burning of L Orient by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 350.00

The P&O Cruise Liner SS Uganda is shown anchored off the Greek Island of Santorini.  Although part of the P&O fleet, SS Uganda kept the livery of the British India Steam Navigation Company Ltd  (B.I.) which was taken over by P&O in 1971.

SS Uganda at Santorini by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet toward the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column.

HMS Victory by Randall Wilson. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
 Pirate ship in the shallows of a reef, and under fire from a fort.
Pirate Ship by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
Launched on the 29th of January 1944, USS Missouri was the last and one of the finest battleships of any fleet.  With a top speed of 33 knots, she earnt the name Fast Battleship, as the Iowa class to which she belonged were known.  Bristling with an assortment of anti-aircraft, Missouri was as much a floating anti-aircraft battery as a battleship.  With these qualities Missouri was well equiped to counter the desperate aerial attacks faced when she joined the Pacific Fleet.  Here Missouri is seen repelling a kamikaze attack on the 11th of April 1945, with the destroyers Melvin (left) and McCord.  Although one of the kamikazes did get through the curtain of shell fire, little damage was sustained.

Boiling Point - USS Missouri by Anthony Saunders. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00



Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall. Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line. The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th. Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire. Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.

The Defense of Rorkes Drift by Alphonse De Neuville. (C)
Half Price! - 48.00

Trumpeter of the French Cuirassiers Going to Battle by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00
Charles Edward Stuart arrives on the west coast of Scotland to raise his standard at Glenfinnan and the start of the 45 Rebellion.
I Am Come Home by Alan Herriot (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
In 1805 Colonel Congreve invented the rocket which was placed in the hands of the Rocket Brigade of the Royal Artillery and landing parties of the Royal Navy. Rockets were cheap and simple weapons, light enough to be carried in large numbers , and could be fired in large salvoes from portable rests. The employment of the rocket was sporadic and extremely limited. This was due to its unreliability -- rockets had an unpleasant habit of curving in the air and returning to burst at the feet of those using them -- and its inaccuracy compared with gunfire. In the Peninsular War the erratic behaviour of the projectiles fired by a rocket battery made a most unfavourable impression on Lord Wellington. However, the psychological effect on the enemy was quite powerful, and horses could never stand rocket fire.  The 2nd Rocket Troop left England for Germany in August 1813 and played a distinguished part in the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October. It was the only unit of the British Army present, and was attached to the bodyguard of the Prince of Sweden. Rockets had to be fired at close range to achieve any real success. The rocketeers, given a guard of Swedish dragoons, advanced to attack five Saxon battalions of the French army in the village of Paunsdorf. They opened a destructive fire, which was returned by musketry, and a hot combat ensued. Against the perfect targets presented by the enemy manoeuvring in the mass formations of the period the Troop's 28 rocket tubes did excellent service. When the enemy fell into confusion and began to retreat, Captain R. Bogue, the commander of the Rocket Troop, charged at the head of the squadron of cavalry, and over 2000 enemy surrendered. He was killed at the moment of victory.  At Leipzig the 9-pounder rockets were placed on the ground, pointed at the enemy and fired. A small iron trough for this purpose was carried (in a leather cover) on top of the saddle roll of every third man. Swords were attached to the saddles in action, and the troopers had a double-barrelled pistol in a holster on the left hip. The horse furniture included large leather holsters to carry rockets.

The Rocket Brigade at the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 Already ravaged by incoming shot from the combined French and Spanish fleets as she approached the enemy line, HMS Victory found herself under intense attack from the French 3rd Rate 74-gun Redoutable.  The two ships became entangled, grappling irons went across and the most terrible artillery battle commenced.  Admiral Lord Nelson was fatally wounded by a shot from the Redoutables mizzen top before it was brought crashing down.  Now the British three-decker, the 98-gun Temeraire appeared outboard of the Redoutable and began pouring further shot into her, the little French ship dwarfed by two mighty British vessels.  But still she fought on, refusing to strike her colours.  Of all the ships at Trafalgar, Redoutable sustained the highest casualties with 478 killed and 81 wounded.  Depicted from left to right are HMS Temeraire, Redoutable and HMS Victory.

The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
The French General Kellerman (Duc de Valmy) resisted the invading armies under the Duke of Brunswick at Valmy, between Reims and Verdun, on 20th September, 1792, a turning-point in the French revolutionary wars.
Battle of Valmy by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Panzer IIs and IIIs of the African Korps, 15th Panzer Division drive towards Arcoma during the epic battles for the Gazala line.

Battle for Gazala by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00
 Officer and sergeant of the 17th Light Dragoons in charge of Indian Irregular Cavalry.

Forward the Guns by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00



Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

B46. Damon Hill/ Williams FW.16 by Ivan Berryman
Damon Hill/ Williams FW.16 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 45.00
 The Minstrel, 1977, Shergar, 1981, Golden Fleece, 1982, .Teenoso, 1983, Reference Point, 1987, Nashwan, 1989.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - 100.00
 A celebration of Nigel Mansells success in winning the Formula 1 World Championship and the Indy Car Championship in successive years. A celebration of the magnificent talents of Nigel Mansell. He made his debut in Formula 1 in 1981 and his superb driving technique made an instant impact. He recorded victory after victory coming agonisingly close to being world champion many times before gaining his well deserved Formula 1 title in 1992. The following year he recorded an unprecedented double, gaining the Indy Car championship in 1993. A feat that reserves his name quite rightly in the record books.
Mansell by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - 45.00
Ian Rush's goalscoring feats with Liverpool may never be matched by any player at any club.  His astonishing strike rate made him the club's talisman through one of the most successful periods in the club's history and it is one of footbal's greatest ironies that like so many of the worlds greatest players, Ian's talents were never allowed to blossom on the world stage despite his valiant efforts for his beloved Wales.

Ian Rush by Gary Brandham.
Half Price! - 50.00

 Valentino Rossi.  Honda RC211V
Master on Two Wheels by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 28.00
SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - 70.00
GIFP3446GL. The Drive.  Conway Links  by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
The Drive. Conway Links by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00

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