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HMS Welfare - World Naval Ships Directory

HMS Welfare

Name : HMS Welfare
Laid Down : 8th February 1943
Launched : 15th July 1943
Completed : 4th April 1944
Type : Minesweeper
Class : Algerine
Builder : Toronto Shipbuilding Ltd.
Country : UK
Pennants : M356, J356
Fate : Scrapped November 1957, at Grays.

5th MSF

HMS Welfare Photos for Sale
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HMS Welfare

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Database Currently Holds : 6249 ships and 6262 crew!

Last edited : 16:35, January 17, 2011
By : jbryce1437

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Hannes Truatloft is shown here leading Fw190s of JG54 over the Russian Front.  Hannes Trautloft is one of the Luftwaffes great fighter leaders, scoring his first air victory in the Spanish Civil War in August 1936. Returning to Germany in 1937 he joined the national aerobatics team flying the Me109. Soon after the outbreak of World War II, Hannes took command of I./JG20 taking part in the Battle of Britain, before moving to the Balkans as Kommodore of JG54. Now leading the group on the Russian Front, JG54 took part in the heavy fighting, first in the Me109, then the Fw190. In the summer of 1943 Hannes Trautloft joined General Gallands staff. As a mutineer he was sacked by Goering, thus ending an illustrious combat career comprising 550 combat missions and 57 aerial victories.

Hannes Trautloft by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Spitfire of 19 Squadron shown over southern England in 1940.

Spitfire Country by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
Half Price! - 60.00
 One of the most versatile British aircraft of the second world war, the Mosquito was employed in many roles during the war, including as seen here, in photo reconnaissance.

Photo Reconnaissance Mosquito by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 American built, British inspired and once re-engined with the Merlin, the mighty Mustang became a supreme long-range escort fighter and close air support platform. Old Crow was the mount of Clarence E. Anderson based at Leiston, England, with the 357th FG, 363rd FS. Andersons personal victory score during WWII was 16.25 in air combat.
Winter of 45 by Philip West. (Y)
Half Price! - 70.00

Mosquitos of 105 Squadron, Marham.  No. 105 Squadron, stationed at Marham, Norfolk, became the first Royal Air Force unit to become operational flying the Mosquito B. Mk. IV bomber on 11th April 1942.  The painting shows 105 Squadron on the raid of 10th April 1945, to the Wahren railway marshalling yards at Leipzig, Germany.

Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - 20.00
 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Nicolas Trudgians painting Desert Victory recreates all the atmosphere of the North African desert war with a stunning portrayal of the Me109s of 3./JG-27. The wing is depicted being led by Staffelkapitan Gerhard Homuth as they escort Afrikakorps armor heading for the front line at Gazala, Libya, on February 21, 1942. Flying alongside Homuth, the great Luftwaffe Ace Joachim Marseille scored his 49th and 50th victories on this day, earning his Knights Cross. Below, the crew of an SdKfz 10 light half-track stop to investigate a crashed P-40 Kittyhawk belonging to No 112 Squadron RAF, brought down during an earlier contest.

Desert Victory by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - 130.00
 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
Half Price! - 65.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Nagato was launched on 9th November 1919. Shown here during world war two operations, the Nagato survived the war and was expended as a target at the Bikini A-Bomb tests on 29th July 1946.

Japanese Battleship Nagato by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The newly converted Command Helicopter Cruiser HMS Blake leaves Grand Harbour Malta at the end of the 1960s.  In the background, the old Submarine Depot ship HMS Forth lies at anchor at the very end of her long career.

HMS Blake by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 3050.00
Viewed across the damaged stern of the 80-gun San Nicholas, Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captains bowsprit to use it as a bridge.  The San Nicholas then fouled the Spanish three decker San Joseph (112), allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre.  A British frigate is moving into a supporting position in the middle distance.

HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 350.00
 HMS Tiger is shown under full steam.

Battle of the Dogger Bank 1915 by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00

HMS Duke of York passes Heaven gate, Scapa Flow, on her return from the battle of North Cape.  Following astern is HMS Belfast and HMS Jamaica.  HMS Meteor is already at anchor to the left of the painting.

Return the Victor, HMS Duke of York entering Scapa Flow by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Built at Toulon in 1803, Bucentaure was the flagship of Admiral Villeneuve at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 and the first to be almost completely disabled by a massive broadside from HMS Victory as Nelson broke through the enemy line.  Bucentaure was taken as a prize by the British fleet, but was lost in the great storm that followed the battle.

Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Seen here from the deck of an escorting destroyer.
HMS Prince of Wales by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 30.00
 Under lowering arctic skies HMS Belfast (Admiral Burnets Flagship) leads HMS Sheffield and HMS Norfolk in the race to protect convoy JW55B from Scharnhorst.

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 M19 self-propelled antiaircraft guns guns of the 82nd Battalion give cover to the M46 Patton tanks and men of the US Armys 2nd Division during their hazardous retreat south from the Yalu River, following the surprise Chinese winter offensive.

Retreat from the Yalu by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00
The King's Regiment and the Atholl Brigade at the Battle of Culloden.  16 April 1746: At the Battle of Culloden the King's Regiment was on the extreme left flank of the Royal army. However, it was positioned en potence, at right angles to the line. The regiment was on rising ground, protected to some degree by the crumbling Leanach dyke, made of turf. The soldiers were in a position to open a deadly fire on the Highland right, should it make an attack. The Highlanders of the Atholl Brigade made a spirited charge, sword in hand, towards their right, and the King's Regiment opened a deadly flanking fire on the crowded mass of men. Wind and smoke blew towards the Highlanders. With bayonets fixed, and drawn up in three ranks, they were unable to miss at such close quarters. The officers carried spontoons, and sergeants, halberds. 
The Highlanders were mainly armed with old-fashioned muskets and powder horns, targes and broadswords.  King George I granted the regiment its title of The King's in 1716. It ranked in order of precedence as the 8th Regiment of Foot, and in 1746 was known as Wolfe's Regiment (named after its Colonel, Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe).

The Battle of Culloden, 16th April 1746 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Probably the best known painting of the gallant charge of the Royal North Dragoons, The Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo. According to an eyewitness Alexander Armour at the start of the charge of the greys had to pass through the ranks of the Highland Brigade and armour recalled The highlanders were then ordered to wheel back, when they did so we rushed through them at the same time they heard us calling Now my boys Scotland Forever.

Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00

 In 1296 an English convoy escorting a shipment of looted gold was passing through the Irvine valley to the port of Ayr.  It was led by an English Knight by the name of Fenwick, who in 1291 had killed the father of William Wallace, Sir Malcolm.  Wallace, who was fighting a guerilla war on the English invaders, planned an attack at Loudon Hill where the road on which Fenwicks convoy was travelling had to pass through a steep gorge.  Wallace had about fifty men and Fenwick close to one hundred and eighty.  The Scots blocked the road with debris and attacked on foot.  The English charged, but the Scots held firm.  Fenwick armed with a spear, turned his horse in the direction of Wallace, who in turn felled Fenwicks horse with his claymore.  The unhorsed Englishman was no match on the ground where he, along with one hundred of his convoy, met their deaths.
The Battle of Loudon Hill 1296 by Mike Shaw.
Half Price! - 70.00
 As allied forces pressed inland towards Caen, the 21st panzer Division launched a counterattack along a narrow three mile corridor between the Canadians on Juno beach and the British on Sword. the charge led by fifty tanks of 22nd panzer regiment and supporting Panzer grenadiers was engaged on its eastern flank by heavy British anti tank fire and the bulk of the force was pinned down or destroyed. ultimately only six PZ IVs and a company of infantry mannered to reach the coast at lion sur mer. their stay however was short lived and within a few hours the arrival of the transports and gliders of the British 6th Airborne directly overhead forced the entire division to pull back for fear of being trapped.

Dash to the Sea, November 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 In 1275 BC there were two superpowers in the ancient near east, in the south the Egyptians and in the north the Hittites from Anatolia in modern day central Turkey.  A clash between these two powers was inevitable.  The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II marched an army north into Syria to confront the Hittites and their allies under King Muwatallis.  Reaching Kadesh Rameses camped under the walls of the city with his leading division, Amun, and awaited the arrival of the rest of his army.  Poor intelligence had led Rameses to believe the Hittites were far to the north, in fact they were only 2 - 3 miles away.  Muwatallis delivered a surprise attack against Rameses camp but the Egyptians managed to hold on until re-enforcements arrived.  Despite retreating from the field after a day long battle it was Rameses who claimed a victory.  The two armies never clashed again and eventually a peace treaty was signed between the Egyptians and the Hittites.

The Battle of Kadesh - circa 127 BC by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00
Roveredo is a small town 30 miles south of Trent in the Adige valley, this was the scene of an engagement between the advance formations of the army of Italy (10,200 strong) commanded by Massena and the larger part of Davidovitchs Austrian force (14,000 strong) general Wurmser had entrusted Davidovitch to defend the area around Trent, while the main Austrian army headed east and South in an attempt to relieve besieged Mantua. The 14,000 Austrians deployed between the road Junction of Roveredo and the village of Marco. The French captured the main position by sending one brigade to outflank Marco. During the battle the French forces took 6,000 Prisoners and 20 artillery pieces for the loss of a few hundred men.

Battle of Roveredo by William Clarkson Stanfield (B)
Half Price! - 25.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

Johnny Herbert is shown in the Benetton B195.  Herbert took a deserved victory at his home British Grand Prix at Silverstone, beating the Ferrari of Frenchman Jean Alesi into second place by more than 16 seconds, and ahead of fellow briton David Coulthard in the third placed Williams.  He also claimed victory at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.  Along with Michael Schumachers nine victories, Herbert  helped Benetton win their first constructors championship in the 1995 season.  The Formula One Benetton B195 was designed by Rory Byrne and Ross Brawn for use in the 1995 Formula One season by Benetton.  The B195 was almost identical to the B194 but for a change of engine supplier from Ford to Renault V10 engine, the same type the rival Williams team was using.  With his first two Formula One wins under his belt in 1995, Johnny Herbert won just one more race, winning at the Nurburgring at the European Grand Prix in 1999, racing for Stewart Ford.  He retired from Formula One in 2000.

Johnny Herbert/ Benetton B.195 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 45.00
FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - 40.00
Michael Schumacher in his Ferrari F-300 at the home circuit of Ferrari - Monza in Italy.

Michael Schumacher - Ferrari F-300 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Rothmans Williams Renault FW18.  World Champion 1996.
Damon Hill by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00

GIMK0601GS.  Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy.

Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
Racing at this pretty and ancient venue dates back as far as the mid 14th century, making it the oldest racecourse in Britain.  Bounded by the River Dee and a Roman city wall, the <i>Roodee</i> is the tightest and smallest course of all.  The oldest record of a race here is that for a prize of a silver bell woth 111 shillings on Shrove Tuesday in 1540, continuing until 1609.  The completely flat track is only a shade longer than a mile and can cause problems for larger horses that often find it difficult to get into their stride.  In longer races, the competitors pass the standds no less than three times covering nearly two miles and three furlongs.  The most famous of the <i>long</i> races is The Chester Cup, first run in 1824, being the highlight of a three day meet in May.

Chester by Paul Hart.
Half Price! - 55.00
B40. Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196

Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 45.00
 Ayrton Senna in his #27 car on his way to winning the 1990 Monaco Grand Prix, leading the Tyrell of Jean Alesi and the McLaren of Gerhard Berger out of Mirabeau and into the Station Hairpin.  The historic number 27, made famous by Gilles Villeneuve at Ferrari, had been adopted by McLaren for the start of the 1990 season after Ferrari took the numbers 1 and 2 for their cars.  Senna won the 1990 word championship in this car, but never drove the 27 car again after switching to number 1 for the next season.

Senna at Monaco by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

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