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Fredrick Rowland Sutton - Crew Details - World Naval Ships Directory

Fredrick Rowland Sutton


Name : Fredrick Rowland Sutton
Died : 9th June 1940
Service Number : P/LX22393
Info Source : Crew Losses

RN

Known Service Details :

Ship

Rank

Start of Service

End of Service

Known Date

Notes

HMS Acasta

Stwd.

9th June 1940

Killed in Action




 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

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 One of the final versions of the ubiquitous De Havilland Vampire to be built was the T.11, a two-seat trainer, one example of which was XE998, shown here in the colours of No.8 Flying School at RAF Swinderby in the early 1960s.  This aircraft is now preserved and on display in the Solent Sky Museum, although currently in the livery of the Swiss Air Force.

De Havilland Vampire T.11 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Grid Caldwell, the top New Zealand Ace with 25 victories in his SE5A of 74 Squadron, is shown taking off from his home airfield during the Great War. Keith Logan (Grid Caldwell) was born 16th October 1895.  At the outbreak of World War One, Caldwell joined the territorial army.  He attempted to enlist with the New Zealand expeditionary force destined for Gallipoli but was refused.  In October 1915 he paid the sum of £100 to join the first class of the New Zealand Flying School.  In January 1916 Grid Caldwell arrived in England and was commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps in April that year.  In July 1916 he was posted to No.8 Squadron, flying BE2Cs and Ds on observation duty.  It was on 18th September 1916 his first aerial victory was scored, shooting down a Roland CII.  He transferred to 60 Squadron in November and flew Nieuport 17 fighters and was promoted to Captain in February 1917.  During this period he scored further victories, shooting down Albatros Scouts, and on 17th September was awarded the Military Cross.  In October 1917 he was posted back to England as an instructor.  In March 1918, promoted to Major, he was given command of 74 Squadron RAF flying SE5As.  The squadron under his command was credited with 140 aircraft destroyed and 85 out of control.  This tally was scored in the last eight months of the war with the loss of only 15 pilots killed or taken prisoner.  During his wartime flying, he had fought dogfights with German aces Werner Voss and Herman Becker, and he once survived a mid-air collision, bringing his badly damaged aircraft to ground level, jumping out before it crashed.  He was credited with 11 aircraft destroyed, 3 shared destroyed or captured and 10 out of control, and 1 further shared out of control.  During World War Two he was station commander at Woodbourne and later Wigram and posted to India in 1944.  After the war he was made commander of the British Empire.  He retired from the RNZAF in 1956, and sadly died of cancer in Auckland on 28th November 1980.

Grid Caldwell by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
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 From June 1940 on, Adolf Galland flew as a of III./JG 26, fighting in the Battle of britain with 109-Emils from bases in the Pas de Calais.  During the Battle of Britain, in a legendary front line General Officer briefing on Luftwaffe tactics, Hermann Goring asked what his pilots needed to win the battle.  Galland replied: <i>I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my squadron.</i>  Göring was speechless with rage.  It is important that this remark is not taken out of context, because Galland also stated (in his autobiography) that <i>of course fundamentally I preferred our Me109 to the Spitfire</i>.  This apparent contradiction was due to his view that because the Spitfire was more manoeuvreable he considered it more suitable to the role of defensive fighter than the Bf 109, though he actually thought that fighters should not be used in a defensive role anyway.  When Galland made the much quoted comment about the Spitfires to Göring he was <i>unbelievably vexed at the lack of understanding and stubbornness with which the command gave us orders we could not execute</i> and so made the comment as a retort to Göring.

Me109 - Adolf Galland by Jason Askew. (P)
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 Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target.  Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command.  The first four Squadrons - Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) - were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 HM Stephen - one of the Battle of Britains top scoring fighter pilots, brings down two Me109s in quick succession over the White Cliffs of Dover, early on August 11, 1940. Flying a Spitfire with 74 Squadron, HM shot down five German aircraft on this day, and damaged a further three. The note in his log book starts First flap of the day at 0600 hrs. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
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 The highest scoring Sopwith Camel ace of World War 1, Donald MacLaren was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1893. Joining the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 as a trainee pilot, it was only the following March that he claimed his first victory, a Hannover C-Type whilst posted to 46 Squadron. His kill rate was quite formidable for, in this the final year of the war, he was to claim no fewer than 54 confirmed victories. Indeed, in the period from 15th September to 2nd October, he claimed eight Fokker D.VIIs - a remarkable feat against Germanys most potent fighter. He is pictured here attacking a D.VII in Camel F2137 U of 46 Sqn. MacLaren survived the war and died in 1989.

Donald MacLaren by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Linienschiffsleutnant Gottfried Freiherr von Banfield was one of the top scoring aces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire with 9 confirmed and 11 unconfirmed victories to his credit and was awarded the Empires highest order, the Knights Cross of the Order of Maria Theresa for his achievements.  In February 1916 he was put in command of the naval air station at Trieste, a post that he held until the end of the war.  He is shown here with his observer, Seekadett Heribert Strobl Edler von Ravensberg, having just claimed his first victory, an Italian observation balloon near the mouth of the Isonzo River on 27th June 1915, flying his Lohner Type T, L.47.

Gottfried von Banfield by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Hurricanes of 43 Squadron scramble from an airfield in southern England during the height of the Battle of Britain, 1940. The R.A.F.s first 300mph fighter, the Hurricane proved itself a formidable aerial gun platform, its pilots accounting for four-fifth of all the air victories achieved by the R.A.F. during the Battle of Britain.

Squadron Scramble by Nicolas Trudgian.
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NAVAL PRINTS

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In February 1944, USS Baltimore and Saratoga make up part of the formidable Task Force 58, forcing their way through the central pacific to attack the Japanese bases in the Marshal Islands in support of Operation Flintlock.

USS Baltimore and Saratoga in the Pacific by Anthony Saunders. (P)
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Fairey Swordfish I, L9726 4M of 818 Sqn, HMS Ark Royal pulls a tight, climbing turn through a hail of anti-aircraft fire as its torpedo strikes home, jamming the steering gear of the mighty Bismarck and setting in motion the beginning of her dramatic end.

Bismarck by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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  Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground.  In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes.  All pennant numbers were painted out and a vertical black identification stripe applied to all the Type 42s to distinguish them from their Argentine counterparts.

Falklands Task Force by Ivan Berryman (P)
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The Pedestal Convoy, to provide desperately needed supplies to the beleaguered Mediterranean island of Malta in August 1942, was perhaps one of the most famous and strategically important convoys of World War II.  It had a powerful escort, including three aircraft carriers, one of which was HMS Indomitable.  Closely escorted by the cruiser HMS Sirius, she came under heavy attack from both German and Italian bombers on the 12th of August 1942 and was eventually forced to turn back after bomb damage put her flight deck out of action.

The Pedestal Convoy - HMS Indomitable by Anthony Saunders. (GS)
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 Completed in May 1941, HMS Victorious had been in commission just nine days when her pilots encountered and attacked the Bismarck. She is seen here in August 1942 with HMS Eagle astern of her.

HMS Victorious by Ivan Berryman.
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HMS Ocean is the sixth ship to bear this famous name and is ably equipped with 12 Sea King HC Mk4s, 4 Landing Craft, 2 Griffon Hovercraft, plus enough equipment necessary to provide support for a Commando battlaion of over 800 Royal Marines.  She is depicted here in company with HMS Chatham, flying off Royal Marines from 42 Commando during operations off Sierra Leone.

HMS Ocean by Ivan Berryman (GL)
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 HMS Hood readies to fire off a what proved to be the final salvo against the Bismarck before a shell from the German battleship penetrated the magazine of HMS Hood, tearing apart the British ship in an enormous explosion.

The Final Salvo - HMS Hood by Anthony Saunders. (P)
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 Wearing her unusual black and white disruptive colour scheme, HMS Repulse is pictured as part of Force Z in company with HMS Prince of Wales and the destroyer Vampire. These two mighty battleships were to be lost within hours of each other, the victims of intense Japanese air strikes. Vampire and the destroyer Electra were on hand to pick up survivors from both ships.

HMS Repulse by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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The battle took place on the 17th November 1796, Arcole is a small village in Italy on the Alpine river. Bonaparte, holding the tri colour, urges on his Grenadiers and carries the Bridge of Arcole, thus bringing victory over the Austrians. This episode has passed into French Army Legend but we understand the truth to be. A French Officer cried if you fall we are lost, you shall not go further. This is not your place and Bonaparte almost drowned when the officer pushed him into the water.
Le Bataille Du Pont D Arcole by Horace Vernet (GS)
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 Captain R. Blair Paddy Mayne, and men of L detachment SAS, stop to discuss their location en route to Sidi Haneish airfield. The raid was a major victory, especially for the newly acquired jeeps, which played an important part in the destruction of some 40 enemy aircraft for the loss of one man.

Paddys Troopers, The Sidi Haneish Road, 17th July 1942 by David Pentland. (GL)
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French skirmishers engaging Prussians during an attack in Metz during August 1870.
Surprise attack in the Suburbs of Metz by Alphonse de Neuville.
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On a dark winter evening, the Permanent Vehicle Check Point (PVCP) north of Rosslea, close to the border with Monaghan, was manned by 8 soldiers commanded by Corporal Robert Duncan.  In response to a threat to the border locations an additional 4-man team commanded by Corporal Ian Harvey was on external patrol.  From the direction of the border a specially armour-plated lorry, with about twelve terrorists intent on destroying the base stopped, and as Private Houston checked the back of it, automatic gunfire opened up from Armalite and AK47 rifles.  Grenades were thrown into the base, and a flame-thrower was aimed at the command sangar.  Two RPG7 Rockets were fired at the observation sangar.  Heavy suppressive fire continued as the lorry reversed and smashed its way into the compound.  Two soldiers were killed.  The truck drove out of the devastated PVCP, and a red transit van drove in, laden with explosives.  Fortunately only the booster charge exploded.  As the patrol came up rapidly, firing at the terrorists, the truck drove off at speed, its two machine-guns mounted on the rear firing, its driver intent on escape.  It was found abandoned at the border with a 210 kg bomb on board.  The scale and type of this attack had never been seen before in Northern Ireland.  Every soldier involved acted with exemplary courage and the determination to defeat the enemy.  The conduct of Corporals Duncan and Harvey was in the highest traditions of conspicuous gallantry.  Each received the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  The events of the Derryard Action are a landmark in the modern fighting history of the King's Own Scottish Borderers.  I was phoned soon after the action.  I flew to Belfast and was driven to the location.  In order to paint the action it was important to see the PVCP in its scarred condition, before it was repaired.  The lonely, isolated building put me in mind of the beleaguered little forts which dotted this part of Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth I.  The soldiers took up the positions they had fought in, while I sketched them in their Tam-o'-shanters.  Corporal Ian Harvey is in the foreground with Pte Maxwell.  Cpl Robert Duncan kneels in the road.
1st Battalion Kings Owns Scottish Borderers. The Derryard Action, Co Fermanagh, December 13th 1989 by David Rowlands. (GS)
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The 17th Lancers in Flanders 1916.

Death and Glory in Flanders Fields by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
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Bohemian Revolt 1618-1623 includes the following battles, Pilsen, Sablat, White Mountain, Wiesloch, Wimpfen, Höchst, Fleurus I, Stadtlohn.   Danish Revolt 1626-1628: Dessau Bridge, Lutter am Barenberge, Stralsund I, Wolgast.   Swedish Revolt 1631-1634: Frankfurt on the Oder, Magdeburg, Weben, Breitenfeld I, Rain, Furth, Lutzen I, Nördlingen I. Swedish-French 1636-1648: Wittstock, Rheinfelden, Breisach, Breitenfeld II, Rocroi, Tuttlingen, Freiburg, Jankau, Mergentheim, ördlingen II, Zusmarshausen, Prague II, Lens.
Wallenstein, A Scene From the Thirty Years War by Ernest Crofts (GL)
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 Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879.  After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him, as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM.  He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

Wounded by Mark Churms.
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 Churchill MkIV tank of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade (comprised of 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards, 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards and 3rd Battalion Scots Guards), pass infantry of the 2nd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders during the Battle for Caumont.

Operation Bluecoat, Normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
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SPORT PRINTS

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 Gerhard Berger in the number 28 McLaren throws up sparks in the 1990 season.  Although he failed to win a race this season, he consistently scored points, including a second place to Alain Prost at Brazil and a second place to Ricardo Patrese in San Marino.

Gerhard Berger, 1990 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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Johnny Herbert is shown in the Benetton B195.  Herbert took a deserved victory at his home British Grand Prix at Silverstone, beating the Ferrari of Frenchman Jean Alesi into second place by more than 16 seconds, and ahead of fellow briton David Coulthard in the third placed Williams.  He also claimed victory at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.  Along with Michael Schumachers nine victories, Herbert  helped Benetton win their first constructors championship in the 1995 season.  The Formula One Benetton B195 was designed by Rory Byrne and Ross Brawn for use in the 1995 Formula One season by Benetton.  The B195 was almost identical to the B194 but for a change of engine supplier from Ford to Renault V10 engine, the same type the rival Williams team was using.  With his first two Formula One wins under his belt in 1995, Johnny Herbert won just one more race, winning at the Nurburgring at the European Grand Prix in 1999, racing for Stewart Ford.  He retired from Formula One in 2000.

Johnny Herbert/ Benetton B.195 by Ivan Berryman
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GIJL0358GS. A Huntsman with Harriers by John Emms.
A Huntsman with Harriers by John Emms. (GS)
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GIJH2740GS. A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GS)

A Good Day with the Hunt by John Frederick Herring (GS)
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In the final moments of extra time of the game, the England number 10, Jonny Wilkinson slotted a perfect drop goal which clinched victory over Australia, winning 20 points to 17.

Rugby World Cup Final 2003 by David Pentland. (GL)
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GITW1473GS.  The Fence The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken.
The Fence The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS)
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Portrait of Ayrton Senna by Robert Tomlin. (P)
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GITW5601GS. A Race at the End by Thomas Blinks.

A race at the End by Thomas Blinks (GS)
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Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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