Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985



Alec Victor Seamer - Crew Details - World Naval Ships Directory

Alec Victor Seamer

Name : Alec Victor Seamer
Died : 9th June 1940
Service Number : P/SD/X1273
Info Source : Crew Losses


Known Service Details :



Start of Service

End of Service

Known Date


HMS Acasta


9th June 1940

Killed in Action




Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

French Spad VIIs of the famous Groupe de Combat 12 Les Cigognes (The Storks) during a relative lull on the front.  Shown here are some of the famous names of Escadrille N3, Capitaine Georges Guynemer (No.2) , Capitaine Alfred Auger (No.6) , Sous Lt. Georges Raymond (No.9) and Adjutant Rene Guilliaumot (No.13)

Mustering of Storks, Bonnemaison, France, 4th July 1917 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Winter of 1943-44 saw Hawker Typhoons operating from Tangmere, equipped with 500lb or 1000lb bombs against radar installations and V1 sites in northern France.  Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted getting airborne with others of his squadron for just such a mission early in 1944, before the squadron moved to Needs Oar Point in readiness for the D-Day landings.

Winter Warriors by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
The Fw190A-4 was introduced in July 1942, and was equipped with the same engine and basic armament as the A-3. A total of 976 A-4s were built between June 1942 and March 1943.  Some of the  most successful fighter aces of the Luftwaffe flew the Fw190.  Otto Kittel scored 267 vicotries, Erich Rudorffer claimed 222 kills, and Walter Nowotny 258 victories. The majority of their kills were scored while flying the Fw190.

Fw190A-4, Winter 1944 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 70.00
 Gazelle of Army Air Corps 661 Squadron on a reconnaissance mission for British 7th Armoured Division during Operation Desert Storm.

Desert Gazelle by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 750.00

 The greatest ace of WW1, Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron is depicted here flying Fokker Dr.1, serial No 425/17, in its final guise following the introduction of the Balkenkreuze. This was the only Triplane flown by the Rittmeister that was painted all red and was also the aircraft in which he lost his life on 21st April 1918, the celebrated ace having scored a confirmed 80 victories against allied aircraft over France.

The Rittmeister by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 40.00
 On the afternoon of 5th September 1940, Spitfires of 41 Sqn intercepted a large formation of Heinkel 111 bombers and their escorts over the Thames estuary, en route for London.  Flying N3162 as Red 2, Flight Lieutenant Eric Lock attacked the bombers head on as they began to turn north.  In a fraught combat, Lock was to destroy two He.111s and a Bf.109 on that single mission, setting him on course to become the highest scoring ace in the RAF during the Battle of Britain with sixteen confirmed victories and one shared.  His final total at the end of the war was twenty six kills confirmed and eight probables.

Total Commitment by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - 42.00



Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 With her pennant number GO4 painted out to accommodate a western approaches camouflage the destroyer HMS Onslaught punches her way through a heavy swell during escort duties in the north Atlantic

HMS Onslaught by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
 Under lowering arctic skies HMS Belfast (Admiral Burnets Flagship) leads HMS Sheffield and HMS Norfolk in the race to protect convoy JW55B from Scharnhorst.

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 In support of the American landings at Utah and Omaha beaches, the USS Texas slugs it out with German heavy gun emplacements during the D-Day landings.

Gunline Omaha - USS Texas by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - 1900.00
DHM1306GS.  Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.

Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 Battleship Tirpitz weighs anchor and ups steam to move out of Alta Fjord 1944.

Time to Move by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
HMS Ocean is the sixth ship to bear this famous name and is ably equipped with 12 Sea King HC Mk4s, 4 Landing Craft, 2 Griffon Hovercraft, plus enough equipment necessary to provide support for a Commando battlaion of over 800 Royal Marines.  She is depicted here in company with HMS Chatham, flying off Royal Marines from 42 Commando during operations off Sierra Leone.

HMS Ocean by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
The USS Colorado holds the all time record of 37 consecutive days of firing at an enemy and the record of 24 direct enemy air attacks in 62 days both while at Okinawa.

USS Colorado Okinawa by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - 60.00
The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935.  HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00



Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

21st July 1842: When bad feeling arose over trade relations between the Honourable East India Company and China, an expedition was mounted to re-establish trading facilities in certain Chinese ports. A force of infantry was accompanied by units of the Royal Artillery and Madras Artillery. An amphibious attack was made up-river towards Canton in 1840, and after first taking the forts which defended it, the city itself was eventually captured. After taking Amoy, the British force moved back to establish itself in Canton. Then, the entire British force sailed to capture Shanghai.  Proceeding up the river Yangtse Kiang, the fleet anchored abreast of the city of Chin-kiang-foo, at the foot of whose walls lay the grand canal. On 21st July 1842 all the troops were disembarked and took up their positions. Colonel Montgomerie, who commanded the artillery brigade, placed his guns in a strong position on a low hill commanding the Western gateway and walls. The infantry escaladed the North angle of the walls and after a sharp struggle the city was captured. Hostilities ended when the force reached Nanking.  For operations in the stifling heat and the swampy banks of Eastern rivers, the smaller and handier artillery equipments were preferred. As well as the smaller howitzers, five 6-pounder guns were also used. Field guns of the Madras Artillery had a distinctive flat, circular brass nave plate.  The Madras Artillery regulations describe the Undress uniforms and horse furniture of the officers. They and their men are wearing forage caps. Gunners and drivers with field batteries were armed with short swords. In marching order the Madras Artillery men were ordered to wear Undress jackets, woollen trousers and carry haversacks (containing provisions). As a gun is loaded, one of the detachment goes to fetch another cartridge from the limber in the rear. An officer of the 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment, suffering (like many) from heat stroke, is aided by a soldier and a sepoy of the Madras Native Infantry.

The Madras Foot Artillery at the Assault on Chin-Kiang-Foo, 21st July 1842 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
Showing the charge of the Scots Greys and the Inniskillings at Balaclava.
Charge of the Heavy Brigade by Orlando Norie.
Half Price! - 20.00
 Talisman is a suite of vehicles operated by the Royal Engineers that clears routes of IED's and mines.  Each Talisman consists of 2x Mastiffs, a Buffalo mine protected vehicle, a JCB high mobility engineer excavator, a T-HAWK micro air vehicle and TALON tracked remote control vehicle.

Talisman by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
DHM499.  2nd Maryland Regiment at the Guildford Courthouse 1781 by Brian Palmer.

2nd Maryland Regiment at the Guildford Courthouse 1781 by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 35.00

Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
DHM128GS.  Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben.

Retour De L Ile D Elbe by Charles August Guillaume Steuben (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 Oberssturmbannfuhrer Jochim Peiper, commander of the armoured spearhead of 1st SS Panzer Division, in conference with some of the officers of other units under his command. Aside form men and tanks of his own division, these included King tigers of the 501st heavy tank battalion and paratroops of 1st battalion, 9th Fallschrimjager regiment.

Kampfgruppe Peiper by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
First Fusiliers Battlegroup leading 7th Armoured Brigade into Iraq.  21st march 2003  Operation Telic.  The motto of The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers means <i>Wherever the fates call</i>.  On 21st March 2003, just after midnight, Warriors of the Milan Anti-tank Platoon of the First Fusiliers, commanded by Captain Nader Anabtawi, drove through the gap made in the wire and halted at the foot of the berm marking the border between Kuwait and Iraq.  Soldiers dismounted from the Warriors and climbed to the top of the berm, where each pair of men set up their Milan firing post.  There were twelve Milan firing posts in all.  A platoon of Y Company, armed with machine guns and SA80 rifles was interspersed among them.  All the while, shells fired by the Royal Artillery were exploding in the air ahead of them.  As the Fusiliers fired at the enemy across the rugged farmland in front, a Combat Engineer Tractor of 39 Armoured Engineer Squadron dug a gap in the berm. Then, an AVLB was driven through and launched its No.10 bridge across the anti-tank ditch.  By now it was first light.  A Phoenix unmanned aerial vehicle was flying at the same height as the air bursts.  The enemy fire was suppressed, and Challenger 2 tanks of The Queen's Royal Lancers poured through the breach, then across the bridge and into Iraq.

Quo Fata Vocant by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00



Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

GIJL2651GS.  The Race by Alfred de Dreux (1810-1860)
The Race by Alfred de Dreux (1810-1860) (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 Adelaide, Australia, the final race of the 1993 Formula 1 season.  Ayrton Senna was tragically killed at Imola, Italy, in May the following year.

Senna's Final Victory by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 250.00
This signed art print was produced at the end of 2000 after the Olympics of that year, and has been sold out from the publisher for many years.  We have the last few publishers proofs of this edition available.  This superb art print celebrates the ultimate achievement for any athlete, the winning of an Olympic gold medal.  In the modern era athletes from Great Britain have won 178 gold medals and Gary Keane's montage celebrates some of the highlights from those achievements.  It captures the determination and effort required to win, as well as the euphoria when the realisation that a life long dream has finally become a reality.  This print is not only a tribute to those featured but also to all other competitors and medal winners who have strived to bring glory and honour to Great Britain.  As the Olympic Games enter a new century and a new chapter in history, it is hoped that this reminder of past glories will also help to inspire those competing for gold in the future.  This limited edition print is signed by six gold medal winners : <br>LYNN DAVIES - 1964 TOKYO Men's Long Jump.<br>MARY PETERS - 1972 MUNICH Pentathlon.<br>DALEY THOMPSON - 1980 MOSCOW Decathlon & 1984 LOS ANGELES Decathlon.<br>TESSA SANDERSON - 1984 LOS ANGELES Javelin.<br>SALLY GUNNELL - 1992 BARCELONA 400 metre Hurdles.<br>STEVEN REDGRAVE - 1984 LOS ANGELES Rowing Coxed Fours, 1988 SEOUL Rowing Coxless Pairs, 1992 BARCELONA Rowing Coxless Pairs, 1996 ATLANTA Rowing Coxless Pairs (and since signing this print, also 2000 SYDNEY Rowing Coxless Fours).

British Olympic Legends by Gary Keane
Half Price! - 110.00
GIJH0810GS.  The Death, by Henry Alken.
The Death, by Henry Alken. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

Portrait of Michael Schumacher by Robert Tomlin. (P)
Half Price! - 280.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - 70.00
FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - 40.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.


Join our forum - currently 33634 members!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page