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Alec Victor Seamer - Crew Details - World Naval Ships Directory

Alec Victor Seamer


Name : Alec Victor Seamer
Died : 9th June 1940
Service Number : P/SD/X1273
Info Source : Crew Losses

RN

Known Service Details :

Ship

Rank

Start of Service

End of Service

Known Date

Notes

HMS Acasta

O.Sea.

9th June 1940

Killed in Action




 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

Hawker Hurricanes of 249 squadron (RAF) departing off HMS Ark Royal in June 1941 as par tof Force H. The Hurricanes were to become part of the Defence of Malta against the onslought and non stop bombing by the Axis Bombers and HMS Ark Royal would be sunk only a few months later when on the 13th November 1941 HMS Ark Royal was hit by a single torpedo from the German U-boat U81. The torpedo hit  on the starboard side near the starboard boiler room causing a 130ft by 30ft hole. Water poured in causing a 10% list immediately. The flooding spread quickly to the middle of the ship and then to the port boiler room, eectric power failed,  and after 14 hours while in tow to Gibraltar she capsized and sunk the following day.

Malta Relief by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 F/Lt (later Wing Commander) Baldwin was to become the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here downing a Bf.109 in Typhoon 1B, DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn over Beachy Head.

F/Lt J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Hypothetical engagement, Soviet airforce MIG19 shoots down a USAF RB47 Stratofortress during the 1960s.

Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00

 A C130 Hercules MK1 from RAF Lynham Transport Wing, delivers a low level Brigade drop of Airbourne forces over Salisbury Plain.

Dawn Descent by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 In one of the finest portrayals of the Avro Lancaster, Moonlight Run depicts the aircraft of Fl. Lt. Mickey Martin (ED909 AJ-P) at the moment of release of the Wallace Bomb during the Dams raid on the Ruhr in 1943. With only the gentlest of moonlight rippling over the dark water of the Mohne, this dramatic picture plays homage to the impossible low altitudes and high speeds that were necessary to complete successfully their heroic mission. A stark and refreshing treatment of a subject at the hearts of all aviation historians.

Moonlight Run (Dambusters) by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 En route to the dams of the Ruhr Valley, the first wave of three specially adapted Avro Lancasters roar across the Dutch wetlands on the night of 16 -17th May 1943 led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, their mission to breach the Mohne and Eder dams, thus robbing the German war machine of valuable hydro-electric power and disrupting the water supply to the entire area. Carrying their unique, Barnes Wallis designed 'Bouncing Bomb' and flying at just 30m above the ground to avoid radar detection, 617 Squadron's Lancasters forged their way into the enemy territories, following the canals of the Netherlands and flying through forest fire traps below treetop height to their targets. Gibson's aircraft ('G'-George) is nearest with 'M'-Mother of Fl/Lt Hopgood off his port wing and 'P'-Peter (Popsie) of Fl/Lt Martin in the distance.

Dambusters - The First Wave by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £650.00
  HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (P)
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USS Maddox engaging North Vietnamese torpedo boats with 5-in gunfire, August 2nd, 1964, in the Gulf of Tonkin.

USS Maddox by Randall Wilson.
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HMS Illustrious slips quietly away from the docks at Devonport, Plymouth with the Fiji class cruiser in the middle distance, 1941.

HMS Illustrious and HMS Kenya at Devonport by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
DHM120.  The Battle of Trafalgar by W Stuart.

The Battle of Trafalgar by William Stuart.
Half Price! - £25.00
B64.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 Depicting French Cuirassiers capturing a Russian Standard.
A Cavalry Skirmish by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
 The Kings Troop shown in full ceremonial uniform in Hyde Park preparing for a full gun salute.

Roller Coaster, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 1 dress. by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Two days into Operation Desert Storm (G+2), and the allied VII Corps had wheeled through southern Iraq towards the Kuwait border. In the centre of the advance were the men and tanks of the US 3rd Armored Division and 2nd Cavalry Regiment supported by the 1st Infantry Division. The greatest glory though, went to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, who after an initial encounter with 10 Iraqi T72 tanks all of which were destroyed near longitudinal line 60 (Easting 60), moved on until the bulk of the battle occurred at 73 Easting. Despite having to fight in almost zero visibility due to dust storms and nightfall, the regiments M2A2, M3A2 Bradleys, and M1A1 Abrams decimated the opposing elements of the Iraqi crack Tawakalna Republican Guard Division and 12th Armoured Division. Their success was followed up by the 1st Infantry Division who carried on the attack to take Objective Norfolk the following morning, and by the 3rd Armored Division to the north who engaged and destroyed other brigades of the Tawakalna and 12 Armoured Divisions.

The Battle of 73 Easting, Iraq, 26th February 1991 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
Flanked by his Companion heavy cavalry, Alexander, King of Macedon, led the charge which broke through the left wing of the Persian army, and forced Darius, the Great King, to flee the battlefield.  Persian success against his own left wing forced him to delay his pursuit of the routed troops, but by the end of the day the battle was won, and the heart of the Persian empire lay at his feet.

Alexander at Arbela, Plain of Gaugamela, Iraq, 331BC by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00

 Often called the Last Patrol, the painting depicts a scene from the Boer war, showing a party of Lancers bringing a riderless horse back from patrol. Art prints reproduced by kind permission of the 9th / 12th Lancers.

The Empty Saddle by J P Beadle. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) is shown as an Army Scout during a skirmish with Indians on the Frontier. 

Buffalo Bill by Brian Palmer.
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Charles Edward Stuart on Board a French Warship bound for France, takes his last look at Scotland disappearing from view and reflects over the events of the previous year and what might have been.
The End of the Jacobite Dream by Brian Wood (P)
Half Price! - £3800.00
King Harold defeats the Viking invaders at Stamford Bridge before his long march south to face William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings.

Battle of Stamford Bridge by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £50.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

Saturday, 1 September, 2001.  Germany had only ever lost one World Cup qualifier at home in their history - but suddenly they were torn apart by an England team playing great attacking football  in Munich.  Coming from behind, Michael Owen blasted a stunning hat-trick, with Steven Gerrard  scoring England's 2nd and Heskey scoring the 5th goal, making the final score 5 - 1 to England.  This superb painting by Darren Baker shows Heskey celebrating his goal with a jubilant Owen and Beckham also celebrating.  <br><br>Germany: Kahn, Worns, Linke, Nowotny, Boehme, Hamann, Rehmer, Ballack, Deisler, Jancker, Neuville. <br><br>England: Seaman, G Neville, Ferdinand, Campbell, A Cole, Barmby, Scholes, Gerrard, Beckham, Heskey, Owen.
England v Germany 5 - 1 by Darren Baker
Half Price! - £75.00
 England 1 Germany 0, Euro 2000.  On the 17th of June 2000 England once again faced their old nemesis Germany in a Group A qualifying match at Euro 2000.  England entered the game knowing that they had not defeated Germany in a competitive match since the famous World Cup victory in 1966.  Germany made four changes to the side that had drawn with Romania including the introduction of midfielder Sebastian Deisler, whilst England had been forced to replace Tony Adams and Steve McManaman with Martin Keown and Dennis Wise due to injury.  As expected the game started at a frenetic pace and Jancker made things difficult for England's central defenders early on with his height and strength.  England appeared to be lacking cohesion and allowed Germany to take control of the game.  Deisler brought the German crowd to their feet with a clever run down the right hand side and minutes later Hamaan had their first strike on goal which was hit directly at David Seaman.  England were looking for a flash of inspiration and it was very nearly delivered as Michael Owen managed to meet Phil Neville's cross with his head but only managed to direct the ball on to the post.  Paul Scholes in typical fashion drove a ferocious volley, which was tipped just over the bar, and suddenly it appeared that England were beginning to find some weaknesses in certain areas of the German side.  At the interval little separated the two sides however, England started the second half with a steely determination.  After just seven minutes David Beckham earned his side a free kick in a very dangerous position on the England right.  With good movement from the forwards in the German area Beckham swung a speculative cross into the six yard box.  Owen, beaten by the pace, failed to connect but man of the match Alan Shearer anticipated the kind bounce and without hesitation headed the ball back across Kahn and into the right hand side of the German goal.  The England captain had broken the deadlock and instilled in his side the belief that they could finally defeat their oldest rivals.  Germany threw everything they had at England but Keegan's team were equal to the task in every area of the pitch.  As the final whistle blew a huge roar erupted from the England supporters as Alan Shearer's goal had ended over thirty years of frustration and sealed his place in the history books as one of England's greatest ever strikers.

Perfect Finish by Peter Cornwell.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
MC0042P. Tomahawk by Mark Churms.

Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00

 Following the success of several French imports to Highbury, Arsene Wenger again turned to his home country in search of another midfield maestro.  Robert Pires was duly signed from Marseille in July 2000 in a £6 million deal.  Robert Pires has adjusted quickly to the English game.  Pires and his love affair with English football comes from the intensity of the game teamed with the passion from the Highbury fans.  On describing the fans' reaction when he scores, he said, <i>It's an unbelievablesensation to be standing on the pitch when the whole crowd erupts.</i>  For a man who played in a European championship final, and who won the World Cup, these words must sound sweet to the Highbury faithful.  Robert Pires received the recognition his talent deserved on winning the Football Writer's Player of the Year Award in the 2001/02 season.

Robert Pires by Gary Brandham.
Half Price! - £50.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
Matt Le Tissier is quite simply a legend of Southampton Football Club. Since making his debut in 1986, Matt played 462 games for the Saints scoring 209 goals (including 49 penalties out of 50!)

Matt le Tissier by Gary Brandham. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
 Celebrating Englands 1980 Five Nations Grand Slam. After the 70s had been dominated by the Welsh, England battled through an exceptionally tough campaign to win their first Grand Slam in 23 years.

1980 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

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