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Kenneth Henry James Davidson - Crew Details - World Naval Ships Directory

Kenneth Henry James Davidson


Name : Kenneth Henry James Davidson
Died : 9th June 1940
Service Number : P/KX99179
Info Source : Crew Losses

RN

Known Service Details :

Ship

Rank

Start of Service

End of Service

Known Date

Notes

HMS Acasta

Sto.1.

9th June 1940

Killed in Action




 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

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 To commemorate this much-loved and incomparable aircraft, Gerald Coulsons evocative painting depicts a Mosquito B Mk. XVI, a high altitude bomber version, on operations deep over occupied Europe. In this guise the Mosquito was by far the fastest piston-engine bomber of World War II, and also the only light bomber capable of delivering the devastating 4,000lb block-buster bomb.
Mission by Moonlight by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 95.00
 Having joined the RAF at the age of 19, James Francis Edwards was to end the war with a total of  20 confirmed kills and another 10 probables and was one of Canada's greatest aces.  He is depicted here in his Curtiss P.40, dispatching a Macchi MC.202 whilst defending Boston and Baltimore bombers on their way to attack the airfields of Daba on 19th October 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander James 'Stocky' Edwards by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 This is the moment when Joe Peterburs began his chase after German ace Walter Schuck's Messerschmitt Me262 on 10th April 1945, a combat that ended in victory for the American. But this was to be a day of mixed fortunes for Peterburs who was himself brought down some time later by ground fire whilst strafing an airfield.  He was captured, but escaped and fought with a Russian tank unit to the battle of Wittenberg on the Elbe.

Tribute to Joe Peterburs by Ivan Berryman.
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 The Winter of 1943-44 saw Hawker Typhoons operating from Tangmere, equipped with 500lb or 1000lb bombs against radar installations and V1 sites in northern France.  Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted getting airborne with others of his squadron for just such a mission early in 1944, before the squadron moved to Needs Oar Point in readiness for the D-Day landings.

Winter Warriors by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 The LFG Roland D.VI did not enjoy the success of its contemporaries, the Fokker D.VII and Pfalz D.XII, but was nonetheless a potent and capable fighter. Its unique Klinkerrumpf  fuselage construction made it both lightweight and robust although, despite its qualities, it was not built in large numbers. This particular example, a D.VIa, is shown chasing down a damaged Sopwith Camel  whilst being flown by Gefreiter Jakob Tischner of Jasta 35b. Tischner later wrote off this aircraft in a landing accident when he rolled into a parked Pfalz D.III, destroying both machines.

Gefreiter Jakob Tischner - Roland D.VIa by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland.
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 During an amazing spree of balloon-busting during 1918, Willy Coppens gained notoriety over the Western Front for his sheer daring and marksmanship, sending no fewer than 35 observation balloons plummeting to the ground, as well as two aircraft. Here, Coppens despatches a Drachen balloon flying his modified Hanriot HD.1 No23 which he had painted blue because he so disliked the ugly, bad camouflage in which it was delivered. Despite losing a leg whilst downing his final two balloons, Coppens survived the war and lived a full life until his death in December 1986.

Sous-Lieutenant Willy Coppens - Roasting A Sausage by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Planned as a successor to the Barracuda, the Fairey Spearfish was one of the largest and heaviest single-engined aircraft ever flown.  This example, RA363, first took to the air on 23rd September 1947 but a change in naval requirements brought the project to a premature halt before being superceded by the highly successful Gannet.

Fairey Spearfish by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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Americas first true aircraft carrier, the USS Langley (CV-1) is pictured making way at sea as a pair of Douglas DT-2s pass overhead.

USS Langley by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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Arctic Convoy.  Forcing their way through adverse conditions bordering on the limitations of human endurance, The Allied convoys faced appalling odds of survival in the endeavour to supply raw materials to Russias only ice free port of Murmansk.

The Arctic Run by Anthony Saunders (GS)
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 The Dido class cruiser HMS Naiad is pictured together with the cruiser HMS Leander during the encounter with the French Guepard in 1941 whilst they were both engaged in operations against the Vichy-French forces in Syria.

HMS Naiad by Ivan Berryman.
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  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (P)
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 HMS Hood passes beneath the forth Bridge on her way to Rosyth during one of her many visits to the Firth in the 1930s.  the cruiser HMS Norfolk lies at anchor in the middle distance.

HMS Hood Passing Under the Forth Rail Bridge by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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One of the finest battleships of all time, Bismarck was built by the Blohm and Voss shipyard in Hamburg and launched in February 1939.  Her first duty was for commerce raiding in the north Atlantic.  Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, the destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 and a minesweeper.  The Bismarck, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunther Lutjens, left her last anchorage at Grimstadt Fjord in Norway.  Once Bismarcks departure was confirmed all available British forces were deployed to meet the threat.  On the 24th of May 1941 the Bismarck sailed into naval history - sinking the battlescruiser and pride of the British fleet - HMS Hood.  But Bismarck would have little time to celebrate, she was sunk by a scorned British fleet three days later.  Here Bismarck is depicted on the evening of the 21st May 1941 entering the open sea on her fateful final voyage.

Bismarck - The Final Voyage by Anthony Saunders (GS)
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Viewed across the damaged stern of the 80-gun San Nicholas, Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captains bowsprit to use it as a bridge. The San Nicholas then fouled the Spanish three decker San Joseph (112), allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre. A British frigate is moving into a supporting position in the middle distance.

HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent by Ivan Berryman
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 The Royal Navy aimed to block communications between France and its American colonies. On May 3rd 1747, a British fleet of 14 warships intercepted a French convoy off Cape Finnisterre. The French ships were protected by eight ships of the line, the British fleet under Admiral George Anson attacked the French. Many of the merchant ships escaped, but Admiral Anson pursued the French ships of the line commanded by Admiral La Jonquiere. A series of running fights ended with all French warships sunk or captured.
The First Battle of Finnisterre, 3rd May 1747 by Richard Paton (GL)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 Through the driving rain, Captain Mercer (G, troop Royal Horse Artillery), riding his charger Cossack leads his battery to the ridge of Mount Saint Jean on the eve of the Battle of Waterloo.

Officer, RHA, Belgium 1815 by Mark Churms.
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DHM543GL.  Halt of the 12th Lancers by Ernest Crofts.

Halt of the 12th Lancers by Ernest Crofts (GL)
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Last stand of the 24th South Wales Borderers at Isandhlwana during the Zulu War.  The battle of Isandhlwana, a Zulu victory over the British forces on 22nd January 1879 about 100km north of Durban.  Lord Chelmsford led a column of forces to seek out the Zulu army camped at Isandhlwana, while patrols searched the district.  After receiving a report, Chelmsford set forth at half strength, leaving six companies of the 24th Regiment, two guns, some Colonial Volunteers and a native contingent (in all about 1,800 troops) at the camp.  Later that morning an advanced post warned of an approaching Zulu army.  Shortly after this, thousands of Zulus were found hidden in a ravine by a mounted patrol but as the patrol set off to warn the camp, the Zulus followed.  At the orders of the Camp Commander, troops spread out around the perimeter of the camp, but the Zulu army broke through their defences.  The native contingent who fled during the attack were hunted down and killed.  The remaining troops of the 24th Regiment, 534 soldiers and 21 officers, were killed where they fought.  The Zulus left no one alive, taking no prisoners and leaving no wounded or missing.  About 300 Africans and 50 Europeans escaped the attack.  Consequently, the invasion of Zulu country was delayed while reinforcements arrived from Britain.

Battle of Isandhlwana, 22nd January 1879 by Brian Palmer. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 At Clonmacnoise, most celebrated of Irish monasteries. Scorning the cross, Pagans hack holy men to death, defile sanctuaries, rob golden objects that made churches the treasures of medieval Europe. Swift assault lets few reach haven in the round tower, its entry accessible only by ladder.

Norse Marauders Wreak Mayhem by Tom Lovell.
Half Price! - 40.00

 Coming into action in Iraq, February 1991.

M109 Howitzers of 127 (Dragon) Field Battery Royal Artillery by David Rowlands. (GS)
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The American Civil War saw not only the split between north and south but also even between family members.
Brother Against Brother by Chris Collingwood (GS)
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On the night of 27th May, a four man patrol from G Squadron boat troop were tasked to patrol to the summit of Mount Kent to see if it was clear. (Mount Kent was an important strategic height as it looked across to Mount Longdon, Two Sisters and Goat Ridge) A Battalion of 12th regiment Argentinean Infantry were expected to be engaged by the patrol but found the Argentineans had been airlifted the previous night to reinforce the garrison at Goose Green for the subsequent 2 Para attack. From the summit of Mount Kent, the unit could see hundreds of Argentinean soldiers with Artillery and helicopters. The relief and tension of this mission shows on their faces as they descend down to their hide position after their all night patrol. The patrol commander, a Sergeant Major and veteran of many conflicts including the Oman War, won a mention in dispatches in this conflict.

Is the Mountain Clear. G Squadron 22 SAS, Mount Kent, Falklands War 1982 by Graeme Lothian (P)
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As the evening draws to a close Napoleon is seen riding amongst his men after their victory at the Battle of Friedland.  Due to the French pressure the Russian Commander General Levin Bennigsen moved his army back to his main camp at Konigsberg in June 1807, while his army of 60,000 men crossed the River Alle at Friedland.  It was faced by a French force of 26,000 under the command of Marshal Jean Lannes. The Russian Commander attacked early on the 14th of June. The much smaller force fought of the Russian attacks for nine hours, giving time for the main French force of 80,000 to arrive. Marshall Neys Force came up from the south and attacked the Russian left flank which gave way all the way along the river until just outside Friedland where it was halted. A second corps under the command of General Laude Victor came to the support of Neys left flank. Victor also brought up 30 Artillery pieces which blasted the Russians at very short range. The Russians that were massed in the tiny village and unable to cross the River received huge numbers of casualties due to the artillery fire. General Bennigsens army was decimated with most of his troops killed, wounded or forced to cross the river.  The actual looses were 11,000 dead, 7,000 wounded and many thousands of troops drowned trying to cross the river. This compared to the French losses of 1372 killed 9,108 wounded.   The French army pursued the Russians with Marshal Soult occupying Konigsberg on June 16th.  A few days later Czar Alexander I arranged a truce and on the 25th of June on a barge like raft on the River Niemen along with the Prussian King Frederick Willaim III drew up the Treaty of Tilset. Prussia ceded to France all the territories West of the Elbe, becoming the Kingdom of Westphalia and from the area of Poland both Russia and Prussia recognised the new state, The Duchy of Warsaw.

Battle of Friedland by Horace Vernet (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 David Coulthard. McLaren Mercedes MP4/13
A Scottish Gentleman by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00
 In one of the most astounding and unlikely comebacks in Champion's League history, Liverpool came back from a half time deficit of 3 goals against AC Milan to take the final to extra time, and subsequently won the penalty shoot-out.  Here, Steven Gerrard sends his team on the road to recovery by heading in Liverpool's first goal early in the second half.

Liverpool Euro Final by Robert Highton. (B)
Half Price! - 50.00
 Jean Alesi drove the number 11 Sauber in the 1999 Formula One season.  With just seven finishes that year, his only points-scoring races were at San Marino and Japan, where he finished in 6th place.

Jean Alesi - Sauber by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

GIFP3446GL. The Drive.  Conway Links  by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
The Drive. Conway Links by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
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 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
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GIMK0601GS.  Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy.

Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 Neil Hodgson celebrates winning the World Superbike Championship at Assen, September 2003.
No.1 by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - 130.00

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