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Kenneth Henry James Davidson - Crew Details - World Naval Ships Directory

Kenneth Henry James Davidson


Name : Kenneth Henry James Davidson
Died : 9th June 1940
Service Number : P/KX99179
Info Source : Crew Losses

RN

Known Service Details :

Ship

Rank

Start of Service

End of Service

Known Date

Notes

HMS Acasta

Sto.1.

9th June 1940

Killed in Action




 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, and the most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force.  It is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area.  The aircraft is also able to perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions when required.  The inherent flexibility and performance characteristics of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.  The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area.  Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved 
capabilities of potential adversaries.  This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo.  As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide.  The C-17 was designed and built with this new world order in mind.

The Globemasters by Dru Blair.
Half Price! - £60.00
 Avro Lancaster AJ-P of Flt. Lt. Martin  617 Squadron releases the bomb that successfully breaches the Mohne dam. In the foreground the electrical substation is burning from a previous attack by Flt.Lt. Hopgood.

GONER 58A - Mohne Dam, Germany, 17th May 1943 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1500.00
 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00

 Shown in the colours of Jasta Boelke and carrying Baumers personal red / white /  black flash on the fuselage, Fokker DR.1 204/17 was the aircraft in which he scored many of his 43 victories. Although the Sopwith Triplane had been withdrawn from service, German pilots frequently found their DR.1s being mistakenly attacked by their own flak batteries and, sometimes, by other pilots. For this reason, in march 1918, Baumers aircraft bore additional crosses on the centre of the tailplane and on the lower wings to aid identification. For some reason, his rudder displayed what appeared to be an incomplete border to the national marking. Nicknamed Der Eiserne Adler – The Iron Eagle – Paul Baumer survived the war, but died in a flying accident near Copenhagen whilst testing the Rohrbach Rofix fighter.  He is shown in action having just downed an RE.8 while, above him, Leutnant Otto Lofflers DR.1 190/17 banks into the sun to begin another attack.

Leutnant Paul Baumer by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 AH-1 Whiskey Cobras of the US marine Corps in Action, Kuwait, February 1991.

Cobra Attack by David Rowlands. (Y)
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 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to – and after – D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island.

Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman.
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 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman.
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NAVAL PRINTS

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 HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. The submarine HMS Thunderbolt moves away from the depot ship Montcalm.  Another submarine, HMS Swordfish is alongside for resupply.

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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B69AP. HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 HMS Broadsword and the aircraft carrier Hermes battle their way through the storm on their way to the Battle for the Falklands.

Storm Force to the Falklands by Anthony Saunders (P)
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 HMS Vanguard in company with HMS Indefatigable.

HMS Vanguard by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman.
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 The King George V class battleship HMS Anson is pictured in Sydney Harbour where she joined the Pacific Fleet in July 1945, viewed across the flight deck of HMS Vengeance, where ten of her Vought F4.U Corsairs are ranged in front of a single folded Fairey Barracuda. 

HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire (The End of the Bismarck) by Ivan Berryman.
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 Depicting Legio II Augusta, 1st Century AD, (showing a Legionary, Centurian and a Conucen Trumpeter)

SPQR (For the People of Rome) by Chris Collingwood (GL)
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Confederate cavalry with the battle flag of the Confederacy gallop into battle.  The battle flag was also known as the Southern Cross.

Southern Steel by Simon Smith.
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Napoleon defeated the Prussians on the 14th October 1806, a prelude to the Occupation of Berlin.
Soir D Jena by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
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 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

Anzio Annie, Italy, 29th January 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
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The Battle of Trafalgar was fought on a calm, almost windless day, on 21st October 1805.  Nelsons revolutionary battle plan was to cut apart the larger Franco-Spanish fleet of Vice-Admiral Villeneuve by sailing in two single column divisions directly at right angles into the combined fleet and thus rendering almost half of the leading ships useless until the could turn and join the fight, which in such calm conditions could take hours.  The battle raged for five hours in which time not one British ship was lost, however, Nelson would tragically lose his life at the very moment of his triumph, a triumph which rendered the British Navy unchallenged in supremacy for over a century.  Here HMS Mars passes between the French ship Belleisle on her starboard and the French ship Fougeux on her port, firing a murderous hail of gunfire at both ships.  Also shown in the painting on the left hand side is the Spanish ship Monarco and the French ship Pluton.

The Battle of Trafalgar - Mars Breaks the Line by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

The Battle of Kulm by Carl Rochling. (Y)
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 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (GS)
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DHM598P.  Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia.

Ensign of the 17th regiment of Foot, American War of Independence 1779. by Jim Lancia (P)
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SPORT PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

SC34. Throwing the Discus by Eduard Joseph Danton.

Throwing the Discus by Eduard Joseph Danton.
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 In 1992 Matthew graduated in Geography from St. Catherine's College, Oxford, where he was President of the Oxford Rowing Club.  He took part in the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race in 1990 and 1991, when Oxford beat Cambridge by substantial distances.  Also in 1992, at the age of only 21, Matthew had his first taste of Olympic success, when in a coxless pair with partner Sir Steve Redgrave, he won the gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics.  Prior to that Olympic win he and Redgrave had enjoyed an unbeaten international season, and it was already obvious that Matthew was developing to become one of the world's greatest oarsmen.  At the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 the Pinsent / Redgrave duo won another gold medal and throughout the nineties their outstanding combination also brought them seven world championship golds.  Their unbroken run of success continued through to the millennium Olympic games in Sydney when Pinsent, again with Redgrave (now in a coxless four with James Cracknell and Tim Foster) again triumphed earning Pinsent his third Olympic gold medal.  The race in which he did it was voted Britain's greatest sporting moment and the crew secured themselves a very special place in the heart of the nation.  After Sydney, Matthew formed a seemingly invincible coxless pair partnership with James Cracknell MBE.  Undefeated throughout 2001, they went on to complete a unique feat in the history of rowing, by winning the coxless pair at the world championships in Lucerne, a mere two hours after winning the coxed pairs.  In the 2002 world championships in Seville they defended their coxless pairs title, beating an experienced Australian crew who had beaten them in Lucerne earlier in the year and breaking the world record by 4 seconds in the process.  On Saturday 21st August 2004 at the Athens Olympic games, Matthew Pinsent CBE entered Olympic history.  In one of the classic sporting moments of all time, he led the Great Britain coxless four to victory over the Canadian world champions by only eight hundredths of a second.  Matthew was awarded the MBE in the 1993 New Year's Honours List and the CBE in the New Year's Honours List 2003.  In the 2005 New Year's Honours List he was awarded a knighthood.

Sir Matthew Pinsent CBE by James Owen.
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Marcus Gronholm wins the 2002 Rally New Zealand in the Peugeot 206 and gains the World Rally Championship Title, October 2002.
Finnish First by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
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B45. David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
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Lester Piggott by Gary Keane. (Y)
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 England Captain martin Johnson lifts the World Rugby Cup, as winners of the 2003 World Rugby Cup in Australia.

Martin Johnson by Chris Howells.
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 Neil Hodgson celebrates winning the World Superbike Championship at Assen, September 2003.
No.1 by Dave Foord. (Y)
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