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NAVAL ART AVIATION ART MILITARY ART SPORT ART
Portsmouth - World Naval Ships Directory

Portsmouth

Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK

Much has been heard by the Englishmen of the younger generation of that Navy which is their defence and their pride. Its ships, by pictures and descriptions, have become familiar as household things. Their sufficiency, both in number and quality, is the subject of frequent discussion. The movements of the fleet are constantly reported, and its manoeuvres and exercises are the theme of the daily press. Its officers and men are much in the public mind also. The opinions of prominent seamen are cited and there services described, and all stand very high, and deservedly high, in our national regard. But there are some matters concerning the Navy about which Englishmen are not well informed. They possess no adequate knowledge of the Naval bases, of those dockyards which are the life of the fleet, and in which ships are built, armed, fitted, and stored with everything necessary, from which, when commissioned, they are despatched to their duties at sea, and to which they return for repair, docking, refitting, coaling, and victualling, again and again, until the time comes when they go to sea no ore. All things necessary for their service to the state are found in the dockyards, and the resources, which these establishments furnish, are far more vital in these times of steel and steam than ever they were in the days of the hemp, canvas, and wood.



The Univorn Gate, Portsmouth.

The series of articles of which this is the first is intended to make good the deficiency. By an unrivalled series of illustrations, it will bring our great naval base vividly before the reader, and it will be my object to deal with the several Royal dockyards historically, and in regard to the highly important duties they fulfil. Already I have been able to describe the victualling yards, the current discussion of the victualling question having seemed to make it expedient to describe these before the dockyards themselves, though that subject, even now, is not exhausted. No better beginning of the present series could be made with Portsmouth, because it is not only our most important Naval arsenal, but also the greatest naval port in the world. A writer who described Portsmouth in 1729, considering the question of its possible capture by a superior force, remarked that if the Navy could not defend the place, England would then no longer be England, and we must all submit to the conqueror, so close did he think thee relationship of Portsmouth to the national welfare. Happily, what he said of it actual situation is now as true as it was in his day-that it may be accounted strong and sufficient for its purposes, which is for the security of the Navy in essential matters and the provision of the good harbour which is its necessity, making it a place, indeed, as he said, of the utmost importance. Like all our other dockyards Portsmouth has advanced by leaps and bounds, on order it might be fitted to meet the demands of the expanding fleet. It may not be generally known that under the Naval Works Act, since 1895, a sum of something like twenty-four millions sterling is being expended on very important operations, including the enclosing of the harbour of Portland, Dover, and Gibraltar, the deepening of harbours and extending of works at Gibraltar, Keyham, Simon’s Bay, and Hong Kong, and in building naval barracks and other works at Portsmouth, Chatham, and elsewhere. So great, however, had been the increase in the resources of Portsmouth already, that not so large an amount is absorbed there of the sums recently voted as at some places which had been neglected. The intimate relation of Portsmouth to the fleet, and thereby to the national welfare, had made it impossible that it could ever lack far behind.

Ships built by Portsmouth (ordered by launch date)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.

Ships built by Portsmouth(ordered by name)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.

Photos Submitted Through Our Directory



Portsmouth Docks No.7 and No.10 (1901)



Enlarging one of the Docks (1901)



The Residence of the Commander in Chief (1901)



Visitors Welcomed at Portsmouth (1901)



A Vickers Armour Plate for a Battleship (1901).



The Old Semaphore Tower at Portsmouth (1901)



The Shipbuilding Mould Loft (1901)



The Electric Fitting Shop (1901)



The Lawn of Admiralty House (1901)



Completing HMS Canopus at Portsmouth.



The Unicorn Gate at Portsmouth (1901)



The Steam Boat Basin at Portsmouth (1901)



The Portsmouth Coaling Station (1901)



Air Compressing and Hydraulic Machinery (1901)



Portsmouth Harbour and Dockyard from Gosport Hard, 15th January - 10th February 1906.
HMS Victory at her moorings, HMS Drake in the background.


Portsmouth Dockyard from the Railway (1901)



Portsmouth - the Round Tower
The old Round Tower at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour was begun by Edward III and finished by Henry VIII. At its base may be seen the chains which reached across the harbour, at this point only a quarter of a mile broad. In the days of torpedo-boats, Spithead was no longer a safe anchorage, and in times of war, the great ships would probably be collected in the harbour, so that some kind of boom would be needed across the entrance to afford protection, as was usual in the old days. In the photograph the flagship Majestic is seen entering the mouth of the harbour.


A Scene in the Boiler Shop (1901)



The Admiral Superintendent's House at Portsmouth (1901)



A Steel Shield for a 9.2-in gun (1901)



The Main Gate of Portsmouth Dockyard (1901)


* - Represents a ship built here which later changed to this name or role.

Return to Ship Search Page


Last edited : 12:38, August 14, 2012
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Westland Wessex of No.72 Squadron based at RAF Aldergrove, flying over the Copeland Islands in Belfast Lough.

Wessex Over the Copelands by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 The German High Command entered World War II with the notion that the war would be quickly won, and certainly without the need to fight at night.  The RAF changed all that when Bomber Command, having suffered appalling losses in daylight, turned to attacking under the cloak of darkness.  By mid-1940 the Luftwaffe was forced to hurriedly form its first night fighter wing utilising the Messerschmitt Bf110.  Without specialised equipment, initially Luftwaffe pilots relied on visual acquisition, detecting enemy aircraft with the aid of searchlights.  To combat intensifying RAF night attacks, new electronic methods of navigation and detection were developed, and by the end on 1942 the German night fighter force had almost 400 aircraft contesting the night skies.  Almost 1300 British aircraft were destroyed in that year alone.The Bf110G-4 of 47-night victory pilot Oberleutnant Martin Drewes at dusk in March 1944, heading out to intercept in-bound British four-engined bombers over north west Germany. Equipped with the latest FuG220 and 218 radars, the experienced crew will lie in wait, carefully choose their prey, stalk and close for the kill. The deadly game of hide and seek is about to begin.

Night Hunters of the Reich by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £120.00
 With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the tranquillity of a snow covered English coastal village is briefly disturbed as the Mosquito crews head into the night.

Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £105.00
 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety.

Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 On the night of 12th September 1944, Lancaster NF958 (LS-M) of No.15 Sqn was lost in the skies above Mannheim when it was attacked by the Messerschmitt Bf.110G-2 of Ofw Ludwig Schmidt of II/NGJ 6, the bomber receiving hits to the bomb bay which ignited the incendiaries still in their racks.  Five of the crew bailed out and were taken prisoner of war once captured.  The pilot, F/O Norman Overend RNZAF, did not escape the aircraft.  Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton was seen to leave the stricken Lancaster but was not seen again.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>Lancaster LS-M</i> :</b><br><br>F/O Norman Overend RNZAF<br>Sgt Barry J Howarth <i>(survived)</i><br>Sgt George B Thomson <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt John D Jones <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Robert P E Kendall <i>(survived)</i><br>Flt Sgt Harry A Beverton<br>Sgt I Spagatner <i>(survived)</i>.

Incident over Mannheim by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00
 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command.

The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
 Maurice <i>Peter</i> Brown damages a Dornier Do.17 in his 41 Squadron Spitfire on 30th September 1940.

Dorniers Demise by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £260.00
 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £85.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

The Battle of Trafalgar was fought on a calm, almost windless day, on 21st October 1805.  Nelsons revolutionary battle plan was to cut apart the larger Franco-Spanish fleet of Vice-Admiral Villeneuve by sailing in two single column divisions directly at right angles into the combined fleet and thus rendering almost half of the leading ships useless until the could turn and join the fight, which in such calm conditions could take hours.  The battle raged for five hours in which time not one British ship was lost, however, Nelson would tragically lose his life at the very moment of his triumph, a triumph which rendered the British Navy unchallenged in supremacy for over a century.  Here HMS Mars passes between the French ship Belleisle on her starboard and the French ship Fougeux on her port, firing a murderous hail of gunfire at both ships.  Also shown in the painting on the left hand side is the Spanish ship Monarco and the French ship Pluton.

The Battle of Trafalgar - Mars Breaks the Line by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00
Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £40.00
 The lead ship of the Royal Navy's Vanguard Class SSBNs, HMS Vanguard (S28) was commissioned on 14th August 1993 and is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane.

HMS Vanguard in the Gareloch by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Royal Fleet Auxiliary Olna prepares to receive HMS Active (F171) during the Falklands campaign of 1982.  HMS Coventry (D118) is in the background
RFA Olna by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £625.00

Having taken terrible punishment from the guns of the allied French and Spanish fleet as she broke through the line, HMS Victory found herself engaged by the French Redoutable, a bitter battle that saw the two ships locked together, pouring shot into one another with terrifying ferocity and which left the British Admiral, Lord Horatio Nelson fatally wounded. In the background, HMS Neptune is emerging through the gunsmoke and is about to pass the wreck of the French flagship Bucentaure which Victory so spectacularly routed as she passed through the allied line. HMS Temeraire, which followed Victory through, and which was also to become embroiled on the Redoutables fight, is obscured by the smoke beyond the British flagship.

The Battle of Trafalgar, 1.00pm by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £325.00
 The destroyer HMS Kelly passes close to the battleship HMS Royal Sovereign as she escorts a convoy in the Mediterranean near Malta.

HMS Kelly passes HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
 With HMS Warspite keeping a watchful eye off her port bow, the Illustrious class carrier HMS Formidable prepares to recover a Fairey Albacore TB MK1 of No. 826 sqn. following a vital sortie against Italian shipping at the start of the Battle of Cape Matapan in march 1941. Led by Lt Cdr W G H Saunt DSC, Formidables Albacores launched torpedo attacks on the battleship Vittorio Veneto, seriously damaging her, despite coming under intense anti aircraft fire and a splash barrage of 15-inch shells.

HMS Formidable by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
RFA Fort Austin makes a leisurely rendezvous at sunset with the Polaris submarine HMS Renown on patrol somewhere in mid ocean. Soon a rubber inflatable will be launched from the Fort, and mail and fresh fruit and vegetables will be transferred before darkness sets in and makes the operation more hazardous.

The Rendezvous by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him.

Marshal Ney at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Below the vast bulk of the Zoo Bunker one of three giant Flak towers designed to defend Berlin from air attack, some remnants of the citys defenders gather in an attempt to break out of the doomed capital. Amongst which are troops from the 9th Fallschirmjäger and Münchberg Panzer Divisions, including a rare nightfighting equipped Panther G of Oberleutnant Rasims Company, 1/29th Panzer Regiment.

Panther at the Zoo, Tiergarten, berlin, 2nd May 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00
DHM324.  Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Les Ordannces by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - £30.00
 AH-1 Whiskey Cobras of the US marine Corps in Action, Kuwait, February 1991.

Cobra Attack by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

Napoleon with his general staff salutes a regiment of Cuirassiers who charge by during the Battle of Friedland.
Friedland, 1807 by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - £48.00
  Objective Steel, 26th February 1991.  Just before the start of the ground offensive, the artist was invited by 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers to join them in the desert, and jumped at the opportunity.  After various adventures with other units in trying to reach their location in the flat, featureless terrain, I was attached to the crew of a Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle of C Company, Callsign Zero Charlie, commanded by Captain Bob Keating.  The Battlegroup made a wide sweep around the enemy and attacked them unexpectedly from the west.  The area codenamed Objective STEEL consisted of dugouts, trenches and artillery pieces.  In this painting, soldiers are dismounting from Warriors with fixed bayonets to capture Iraqi artillery, which was uselessly pointing to the South.  The green pennant flying from an antenna denotes C Company.  The black desert rat painted on the rear stowage bin was the badge of 4th Armoured Brigade.  The battlegroup halted around the final Iraqi gun positions on STEEL at 1445 hours, and about 800 prisoners in all were taken.  I was able to take some photographs of the enemy's 155 mm guns here.  The ground was littered with MLRS bomblets.  At 1502 hours, nine British soldiers were killed and 12 seriously injured as a result of a tragic mistake by US Air Force pilots, who engaged and destroyed two of the Warriors of C Company.  David Rowlands was asked to depict these two vehicles, call signs Two Two and Two Three, in this painting.

Assault on Iraqi Artillery Positions, 3rd Fusiliers Battle Group by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940.  Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Eyes of the Army by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

From behind 10th green looking back towards lighthouse, Ailsa Craig and monument.

Turnberry - Ailsa Course by Mark Chadwick
Half Price! - £20.00
 Eddie Irvine and Johnny Herbert.  Jaguar Cosworth R1s

Return of the Cat by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £25.00
SFA19.  Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Eddie Irvine.  Jaguar-Cosworth 2002
Green Giant by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00

 The Minstrel, 1977, Shergar, 1981, Golden Fleece, 1982, .Teenoso, 1983, Reference Point, 1987, Nashwan, 1989.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £100.00
 2003 World Superbike Champion, Neil Hodgson with James Toseland in his slipstream.  British World Superbike - June 2003. 
Battle of Britain by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £130.00
David Coulthard made his Grand Prix debut at the Spanish Grand Prix in 1994.  Only an electrical problem with his Williams Renault stopped Coulthard finishing 3rd in his first ever Grand Prix.  This performance was enough to confirm his potential and earn a drive for the 1995 season.  Winning at Estoril, on the podium at Interlagos, Magny-Cours, Silverstone, Hockenheim, Hungaroring and T I Aida, placed him third in the championship in his first full Grand Prix season.  Coulthard moved to McLaren for the 1996 season proving on many occasions that he could match the pace of team leader Mika Hakkinen, who has a reputation as one of the fastest.  For 1997, Coulthard took over the mantle of Britains No.1 driver and was well qualified to do so.  Winning at Melbourne and Monza, second at A1 Ring and Jerez.  Fourth in the championship prior to Schumachers exclusion.  Coulthard drives with a balance of flair and aggression which earned him considerable respect.  After nearly fifteen years as a top flight driver, Coulthard has now retired from driving, leaving a remarkable legacy behind him.  Twice winner of the British Grand Prix in 1999 and 2000, he has represented Scotland and Great Britain at the highest level of motorsport for well over a decade.

Tribute to David Coulthard by Stuart McIntyre
Half Price! - £23.00


Heroes of Goodison Park by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £165.00

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