Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket


FREE worldwide shipping for orders over £150

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS ON NAVAL ART!

VIEW ALL OF OUR CURRENT SPECIAL OFFERS HERE!
Portsmouth - World Naval Ships Directory

Portsmouth

Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK

Much has been heard by the Englishmen of the younger generation of that Navy which is their defence and their pride. Its ships, by pictures and descriptions, have become familiar as household things. Their sufficiency, both in number and quality, is the subject of frequent discussion. The movements of the fleet are constantly reported, and its manoeuvres and exercises are the theme of the daily press. Its officers and men are much in the public mind also. The opinions of prominent seamen are cited and there services described, and all stand very high, and deservedly high, in our national regard. But there are some matters concerning the Navy about which Englishmen are not well informed. They possess no adequate knowledge of the Naval bases, of those dockyards which are the life of the fleet, and in which ships are built, armed, fitted, and stored with everything necessary, from which, when commissioned, they are despatched to their duties at sea, and to which they return for repair, docking, refitting, coaling, and victualling, again and again, until the time comes when they go to sea no ore. All things necessary for their service to the state are found in the dockyards, and the resources, which these establishments furnish, are far more vital in these times of steel and steam than ever they were in the days of the hemp, canvas, and wood.



The Univorn Gate, Portsmouth.

The series of articles of which this is the first is intended to make good the deficiency. By an unrivalled series of illustrations, it will bring our great naval base vividly before the reader, and it will be my object to deal with the several Royal dockyards historically, and in regard to the highly important duties they fulfil. Already I have been able to describe the victualling yards, the current discussion of the victualling question having seemed to make it expedient to describe these before the dockyards themselves, though that subject, even now, is not exhausted. No better beginning of the present series could be made with Portsmouth, because it is not only our most important Naval arsenal, but also the greatest naval port in the world. A writer who described Portsmouth in 1729, considering the question of its possible capture by a superior force, remarked that if the Navy could not defend the place, England would then no longer be England, and we must all submit to the conqueror, so close did he think thee relationship of Portsmouth to the national welfare. Happily, what he said of it actual situation is now as true as it was in his day-that it may be accounted strong and sufficient for its purposes, which is for the security of the Navy in essential matters and the provision of the good harbour which is its necessity, making it a place, indeed, as he said, of the utmost importance. Like all our other dockyards Portsmouth has advanced by leaps and bounds, on order it might be fitted to meet the demands of the expanding fleet. It may not be generally known that under the Naval Works Act, since 1895, a sum of something like twenty-four millions sterling is being expended on very important operations, including the enclosing of the harbour of Portland, Dover, and Gibraltar, the deepening of harbours and extending of works at Gibraltar, Keyham, Simonís Bay, and Hong Kong, and in building naval barracks and other works at Portsmouth, Chatham, and elsewhere. So great, however, had been the increase in the resources of Portsmouth already, that not so large an amount is absorbed there of the sums recently voted as at some places which had been neglected. The intimate relation of Portsmouth to the fleet, and thereby to the national welfare, had made it impossible that it could ever lack far behind.

Ships built by Portsmouth (ordered by launch date)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.

Ships built by Portsmouth(ordered by name)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.

Photos Submitted Through Our Directory



Completing HMS Canopus at Portsmouth.



Portsmouth Docks No.7 and No.10 (1901)



The Portsmouth Coaling Station (1901)



The Shipbuilding Mould Loft (1901)



The Unicorn Gate at Portsmouth (1901)



The Admiral Superintendent's House at Portsmouth (1901)



A Vickers Armour Plate for a Battleship (1901).



The Main Gate of Portsmouth Dockyard (1901)



The Electric Fitting Shop (1901)



The Residence of the Commander in Chief (1901)



Visitors Welcomed at Portsmouth (1901)



A Scene in the Boiler Shop (1901)



The Steam Boat Basin at Portsmouth (1901)



A Steel Shield for a 9.2-in gun (1901)



Portsmouth - the Round Tower
The old Round Tower at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour was begun by Edward III and finished by Henry VIII. At its base may be seen the chains which reached across the harbour, at this point only a quarter of a mile broad. In the days of torpedo-boats, Spithead was no longer a safe anchorage, and in times of war, the great ships would probably be collected in the harbour, so that some kind of boom would be needed across the entrance to afford protection, as was usual in the old days. In the photograph the flagship Majestic is seen entering the mouth of the harbour.


Portsmouth Harbour and Dockyard from Gosport Hard, 15th January - 10th February 1906.
HMS Victory at her moorings, HMS Drake in the background.


Enlarging one of the Docks (1901)



The Lawn of Admiralty House (1901)



Portsmouth Dockyard from the Railway (1901)



The Old Semaphore Tower at Portsmouth (1901)



Air Compressing and Hydraulic Machinery (1901)


* - Represents a ship built here which later changed to this name or role.

Return to Ship Search Page


Last edited : 12:38, August 14, 2012
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
  Dauntless Dive Bombers Dive on the Battleship Musashi in the Sibuyan Sea, October 1944.

Pressing Home the Kill by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Designed by Hugo Junkers, the J.1 was the worlds first all-metal aircraft to go into mass production and proved very successful in its intended role as an observation and ground attack aircraft. The sheer strength of its structure and mass of load-bearing struts eliminated the need for bracing wires and the outer portions of the wings were not linked by interplane struts, affording the observer / gunner a clear field. The crew and engine were protected from ground fire with 5mm armour plate, all of which added to the considerable weight of the J.1, which suffered with relatively poor performance as a consequence. It was powered by a 200hp Benz BZ.IV inline engine and well over 200 of this innovative machine were put into service during 1918.

Junkers J.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s, of the 281a Suadriglia based in Libya in 1940, begin their journey home after another successful mission against Allied shipping in the Mediterranean.  Nearest aircraft is 281-5, that of Capitano Carlo Emanuele Buscaglia.

Hunters Homeward Bound by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

Lancasters of No.15 Squadron are shown releasing their bombs during the attack against German armour that had amassed in and near the French village of Villers Bocage on 30th June 1944. ED395 (LS-M), piloted by Fl Off W Hall, is in the background with LM473 (LS-P) in the foreground, flown by Fl Sgt N Overend. The village was almost completely obliterated during the bombing raid and the operation was deemed a tactical success.

The Attack on Villers Bocage by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £60.00
 A sight never to be repeated. Concorde G-BOAE gracefully drifts above London with Buckingham Palace immediately below, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the River Thames and the London Eye in the middle distance. On 24th October 2003, the world said goodbye to this elegant airliner, bringing to a close almost thirty years of commercial supersonic travel.

Concorde over London by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Bf109 G2 of Major Gunther Rall pursues and downs an unidentified Soviet aircraft over the Caucasus, Russia, early Autumn 1943. Rall went on to become the third highest scoring ace of all time, with 275 victories in only 621 missions.

No Escape by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1600.00
  R5689 (VN-N) - a Lancaster B.1 of 50 Squadron based at Swinderby. This aircraft crash-landed in Lincolnshire while returning from a mission on 19th September 1942, after both port engines failed as the aircraft was preparing to land.  The aircraft never flew again.  The crew on the final mission were : <br>Sgt E J Morley RAAF,<br>P/O G W M Harrison,<br>Sgt H Male,<br>Sgt S C Garrett,<br>Sgt J W Dalby,<br>Sgt J Fraser<br>and<br>Sgt J R Gibbons RCAF, the sole member of the crew killed in the crash.

Avro Lancaster B.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 The mighty Bismarck returns fire to the fast-approaching HMS Hood a the start of a battle that would see both adversaries tragically sunk.

Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Under lowering arctic skies HMS Belfast (Admiral Burnets Flagship) leads HMS Sheffield and HMS Norfolk in the race to protect convoy JW55B from Scharnhorst.

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Portrait of Admiral Nelson shown in the uniform worn at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Portrait of Admiral Nelson by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 Between 24th may and 4th June 1940 an extraordinary armada of craft, large and small, naval and civilian, embarked on one of the greatest rescue missions in history. the evacuation of 330,000 British and French troops from the beaches of Dunkirk in northern France. the destroyer HMS Wakeful dominates the foreground here as troops pour onto the beaches and harbour moles in search of salvation. Both Wakeful and distant HMS Grafton were lost during the evacuation.

Dunkirk by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
The Japanese ship Takao at Flank speed, riding shotgun for the carrier

Flank Speed by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Two Stringbags (Fairey Swordfish) pass across the bow of HMS Courageous as she staggers from torpedo strikes launched from a German U-Boat in the Irish Sea. On 17th September 1939 HMS Courageous was struck by two torpedoes from the German submarine U-29 about 190 nautical miles south-west of Dursey Head, Ireland.  HMS Courageous sank in less than 16 minutes with the loss of 519 lives, including her commander Captain W T Makeig-Jones.  Her total complement was 1,260 officers and ratings and two squadrons of Fairey Swordfish aircraft (48 planes).  The sinking of the HMS Courageous was the first U-boat offensive against the Royal Navy, and more importantly, Schuhart's victory prompted the Admiralty to withdraw all three remaining carriers from the Western Approaches.

HMS Courageous by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
The assault ship HMS Fearless is shown dispatching her assault craft in San Carlos Water during the Falklands conflict of 1982. HMS Argonaut lies at anchor to her starboard with HMS Antrim in the extreme distance.

HMS Fearless by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

Royal Engineers Clearing one of the Convoy Routes (Route TRIANGLE) in the mountains of Central Bosnia, for a convoy of Royal Logistics Corps (RLC) vehicles.  David Rowlands travelled this muddy route in early 1993, bouncing and rocking in a Land Rover on my way to Gornji Vakuf with members of 8 Squadron RLC.  I made sketches at various points, including Camp Redoubt and the lake near Prozor.  Two days earlier on 5th April 1993, at Omis Camp, he watched a small ceremonial parade when members of the Royal Corps of Transport re-badged as part of the newly-formed Royal Logistic Corps.

Royal Engineer Regiment by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 British infantry supported by Warrior armoured vehicles advance into Iraq, February 1991.

The Storm and the Sabre by Simon Smith. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £90.00
DHM607.  French Line Infantry by Jim Lancia.
French Line Infantry by Jim Lancia.
Half Price! - £20.00

 After an unsuccessful attempt to invade Britain the previous year, Caesar returned in force. Included among his large ranks was one Indian elephant, a beast unknown to his enemy, and as it transpired a dramatic psychological weapon which succeeded in breaching the Britons defensive position on the River Thames.

Julius Caesar Crossing the Thames, Summer 54BC by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
The Battle of Marathon 490 BC during the Persian Greek Wars. King Darious I of Persia sent his son in law Mardonius to invade Greece in 492 BC.  The Persian Forces conquered Thrace and Macedonia before their fleet was devastated by a storm. Mardonia was forced to return to Asia.  A second Persian invasion force crossed the Aegean sea. After conquering Eretria, the Persian Army under Datis (15,000 strong) landed near Marathon.  (Marathon is 24 miles northeast of Athens.) General Miltiades, general in the Greek army gathered a force of 10,000 Athenians and 1,000 Plataean citizen Soldiers.

Battle of Marathon by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The 13th Light Dragoons cross a small river as part of Wellingtons armies advance on Vittoria in June 1813 during the Peninsula Campaign.

Advance on Vittoria by Chris Collingwood (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM940GS.  Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford.
Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 England 31 - New Zealand 28. Played at Twickenham, November 9th 2002. England : Robinson, Simpson Daniel, Greenwood, Tindall, Cohen, Wilkinson, Dawson, Woodman, Vickery, Thompson, Grewcock, Johnson, Moody, Hill, Dallaglio. (Subs) Back, Healey, B. Johnson, Kay, Leonard, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Moody, Try - Wilkinson, Try - Cohen, Drop Goal - Wilkinson, 2 Conversions - Wilkinson, 3 Penalties - Wilkinson. <br><br>New Zeland: Blair, Howlett, Lowen, Umaga, Lomu, Spencer, Devine, McDonnell, Meeuws, Hore, Williams, Robinson, Randell, Holah, Broomhall, (Subs) Hayman, Lee, Mealamu, Mehrtens, Mika, Robinsom, So oialo. Scores: 2 Tries - Lomu, Try - Howlett, Try - Lee, 2 Conversions - Blair, 2 Conversions - Mehrtens.

England versus New Zealand - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
Marcus Gronholm wins the 2002 Rally New Zealand in the Peugeot 206 and gains the World Rally Championship Title, October 2002.
Finnish First by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
GIMK0601GS.  Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy.

Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
Cranston Fine Arts purchased the remaining prints of this numbered edition from the publisher and specially arranged for all of our prints to be signed by the artist Robert Highton.  The prints were numbered but not signed on their release several years ago, now making ours the only prints available signed.
Michael Owen - The German Hat Trick by Robert Highton.
Half Price! - £25.00

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
GITW5601GS. A Race at the End by Thomas Blinks.

A race at the End by Thomas Blinks (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Valentino Rossi on his way to a seventh Moto GP World Championship in the 2009 season on his Yamaha, scoring thirteen podium finishes, including six race wins, leaving him 45 points clear of his nearest rival.

Valentino Rossi by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £525.00


Lennox Lewis by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £50.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

Join our forum - currently 32661 members!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page