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Portsmouth - World Naval Ships Directory

Portsmouth

Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK

Much has been heard by the Englishmen of the younger generation of that Navy which is their defence and their pride. Its ships, by pictures and descriptions, have become familiar as household things. Their sufficiency, both in number and quality, is the subject of frequent discussion. The movements of the fleet are constantly reported, and its manoeuvres and exercises are the theme of the daily press. Its officers and men are much in the public mind also. The opinions of prominent seamen are cited and there services described, and all stand very high, and deservedly high, in our national regard. But there are some matters concerning the Navy about which Englishmen are not well informed. They possess no adequate knowledge of the Naval bases, of those dockyards which are the life of the fleet, and in which ships are built, armed, fitted, and stored with everything necessary, from which, when commissioned, they are despatched to their duties at sea, and to which they return for repair, docking, refitting, coaling, and victualling, again and again, until the time comes when they go to sea no ore. All things necessary for their service to the state are found in the dockyards, and the resources, which these establishments furnish, are far more vital in these times of steel and steam than ever they were in the days of the hemp, canvas, and wood.



The Univorn Gate, Portsmouth.

The series of articles of which this is the first is intended to make good the deficiency. By an unrivalled series of illustrations, it will bring our great naval base vividly before the reader, and it will be my object to deal with the several Royal dockyards historically, and in regard to the highly important duties they fulfil. Already I have been able to describe the victualling yards, the current discussion of the victualling question having seemed to make it expedient to describe these before the dockyards themselves, though that subject, even now, is not exhausted. No better beginning of the present series could be made with Portsmouth, because it is not only our most important Naval arsenal, but also the greatest naval port in the world. A writer who described Portsmouth in 1729, considering the question of its possible capture by a superior force, remarked that if the Navy could not defend the place, England would then no longer be England, and we must all submit to the conqueror, so close did he think thee relationship of Portsmouth to the national welfare. Happily, what he said of it actual situation is now as true as it was in his day-that it may be accounted strong and sufficient for its purposes, which is for the security of the Navy in essential matters and the provision of the good harbour which is its necessity, making it a place, indeed, as he said, of the utmost importance. Like all our other dockyards Portsmouth has advanced by leaps and bounds, on order it might be fitted to meet the demands of the expanding fleet. It may not be generally known that under the Naval Works Act, since 1895, a sum of something like twenty-four millions sterling is being expended on very important operations, including the enclosing of the harbour of Portland, Dover, and Gibraltar, the deepening of harbours and extending of works at Gibraltar, Keyham, Simonís Bay, and Hong Kong, and in building naval barracks and other works at Portsmouth, Chatham, and elsewhere. So great, however, had been the increase in the resources of Portsmouth already, that not so large an amount is absorbed there of the sums recently voted as at some places which had been neglected. The intimate relation of Portsmouth to the fleet, and thereby to the national welfare, had made it impossible that it could ever lack far behind.

Ships built by Portsmouth (ordered by launch date)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.

Ships built by Portsmouth(ordered by name)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.

Photos Submitted Through Our Directory



The Shipbuilding Mould Loft (1901)



The Unicorn Gate at Portsmouth (1901)



Portsmouth - the Round Tower
The old Round Tower at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour was begun by Edward III and finished by Henry VIII. At its base may be seen the chains which reached across the harbour, at this point only a quarter of a mile broad. In the days of torpedo-boats, Spithead was no longer a safe anchorage, and in times of war, the great ships would probably be collected in the harbour, so that some kind of boom would be needed across the entrance to afford protection, as was usual in the old days. In the photograph the flagship Majestic is seen entering the mouth of the harbour.


A Scene in the Boiler Shop (1901)



A Vickers Armour Plate for a Battleship (1901).



Completing HMS Canopus at Portsmouth.



The Portsmouth Coaling Station (1901)



The Old Semaphore Tower at Portsmouth (1901)



Portsmouth Harbour and Dockyard from Gosport Hard, 15th January - 10th February 1906.
HMS Victory at her moorings, HMS Drake in the background.


The Residence of the Commander in Chief (1901)



The Lawn of Admiralty House (1901)



The Admiral Superintendent's House at Portsmouth (1901)



Air Compressing and Hydraulic Machinery (1901)



The Electric Fitting Shop (1901)



A Steel Shield for a 9.2-in gun (1901)



Visitors Welcomed at Portsmouth (1901)



Enlarging one of the Docks (1901)



Portsmouth Docks No.7 and No.10 (1901)



The Steam Boat Basin at Portsmouth (1901)



The Main Gate of Portsmouth Dockyard (1901)



Portsmouth Dockyard from the Railway (1901)


* - Represents a ship built here which later changed to this name or role.

Return to Ship Search Page


Last edited : 12:38, August 14, 2012
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of <a href=http://www.military-art.com/mall/profiles.php?SigID=1236>Group Captain Byron Duckenfield</a>.

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III.

Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Squadron Leader J R Baldwin passes above a section of Mulberry Harbour near Arromanches, late in June 1944, his personalised Hawker Typhoon bearing the codes JBII.

JBII - Hawker Typhoon of Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

  B-17G 42-37755 NV-A 325th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group from Poddington crash landing in Switzerland on 25th February 1944 after sustaining damage over enemy territory after a raid on Augsburg and Stuttgart.

Safe Pastures by Mark Postlethwaite.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Nine O Nine awaits her next mission over occupied Europe. Part of the 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron, this B-17 went on to complete a record mission tally of 140 without an abort or loss of a single crew member. She started operations in February 1944. By April 1945 Nine O Nine had flown an extraordinary 1,129 hours. This aircraft and crew represented just one of many who fought in war-torn skies for the freedom we now enjoy.

Nine O Nine by Philip West. (Y)
Half Price! - £67.50
 During the years of the German occupation of Holland in World War II, more than 20,000 Dutch civilians perished through starvation and lack of basic provisions. Operation Manna was set in motion on Sunday, 29th April 1945 when Lancasters of the Royal Air Force began the first of 2,835 sorties, dropping 6,672 tons of food, to relieve the crisis in the Netherlands.  These humanitarian missions continued until 8th May, saving many thousands of civilians from certain death by starvation and malnutrition.  Here, Lancaster 4K765, LS-Z of 15 Sqn piloted by Flying Officer Jack Darlow, releases its precious cargo over a sports field north of The Hague.  Also in the crew was Alistair Lamb the Rear Gunner.

Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Willi Reschkes Fw190A8 of III./JG301 during October 1944.
Willi Reschkes Fw190A8 of III./JG301 during October 1944 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £250.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 A splendid little war was how John Hay, ambassador to Britain, described the Spanish-American war of 1898. Though the war was small in scope it was large in consequences; it promoted the regeneration of the American Navy and the emergence of the United States as a major world power. Fought primarily at sea, the war created an American naval legend in its opening encounter between the pacific squadrons of Spain and the United States at Manila Bay on the 1st of May 1898. At sunrise Admiral Dewey, leading the American fleet in his flagship the USS Olympia, had caught the Spanish fleet, under Admiral Patricio Montojo, by surprise - still anchored off Sangley Point at Manila Bay in the Philippine Islands. Defeat for the Spanish was total and heralded the end of a once extensive Spanish empire in the Americas. Montojos flagship, Reina Cristina, is seen here under fire from the Olympia.

The Battle of Manila Bay by Anthony Saunders (YB)
Half Price! - £62.50
VAR346B.  H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Completed in May 1941, HMS Victorious had been in commission just nine days when her pilots encountered and attacked the Bismarck. She is seen here in August 1942 with HMS Eagle astern of her.

HMS Victorious by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
  Fairey Swordfish I, L9726 4M of 818 Sqn, HMS Ark Royal pulls a tight, climbing turn through a hail of anti-aircraft fire as its torpedo strikes home, jamming the steering gear of the mighty Bismarck and setting in motion the beginning of her dramatic end.

Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00

 The E-class light cruiser HMS Emerald is shown off the Newfoundland coast in company with a Flower class corvette.  Between October 1939 and August 1940, HMS Emerald carried 58 million pounds in gold from Britain to Canada.

HMS Emerald by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 With HMS Warspite keeping a watchful eye off her port bow, the Illustrious class carrier HMS Formidable prepares to recover a Fairey Albacore TB MK1 of No. 826 sqn. following a vital sortie against Italian shipping at the start of the Battle of Cape Matapan in march 1941. Led by Lt Cdr W G H Saunt DSC, Formidables Albacores launched torpedo attacks on the battleship Vittorio Veneto, seriously damaging her, despite coming under intense anti aircraft fire and a splash barrage of 15-inch shells.

HMS Formidable by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
B219.  Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 In the early morning murk of 24th May 1941, the forward 15in guns of HMS Hood fire the first shots against the mighty German battleship Bismarck. Both Bismarck and her escort, the Prinz Eugen, immediately responded, the latter causing a fierce fire on Hoods upper deck, while plunging shot from Bismarck penetrated deep into the British ships hull, causing an explosion that ripped the Hood apart, sinking her in an instant. Tragically, just three survivors were rescued from the water.

HMS Hood Opens Fire Upon the Bismarck by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £230.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

The Germans launched their attack on the Kursk salient on 5th July 1943, and for both sides this was maximum effort. The Soviets, however, informed by intelligence of the impending German attack, had ample time to prepare huge defensive works with hundreds of planned anti tank belts.  They deployed 10 Tank Corps, 5 Tank Armies, 1 mechanised Corps and 14 Field Armies equipped with 4000 anti tank guns and 6000 tanks.  The Soviet Air Forces were equally impressive - 2600 aircraft.  The Germans, outnumbered in every department, were forced to scrape together whatever serviceable tanks they could from their badly under strength Panzer formations.  Most of the tanks deployed were old Panzer IIIs or IVs, with only 147 Tigers available for action.  The northern German attack made very little headway, but, in the south, the Germans had grouped all of the SS Panzer forces into the II SS Panzer Corps and these units, despite the enormous Soviet forces ranged against them, began to smash their way through the Soviet defences.  The Luftwaffe too had brought together 1200 aircraft and these made an immediate impact on the fighting - on the first day alone German fighters broke up massive formations of Soviet aircraft, over 400 victories being claimed.

Kursk - Clash of Steel by Nicolas Trudgian.
Half Price! - £140.00
The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.

The Charge of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville.
Half Price! - £40.00
 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
 The men of the US 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment ambushed the German 1st Battalion, 6th Fallschrimjager Regiment making their way to Carentan, the Battle of Hells Corner ensued.

Hells Corner, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Depicting troopers of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) on the morning of 18th June 1815. before the Battle of waterloo, and their great charge into history.

The Dawn of Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
Midday, 21st October 1805, and Admiral Collingwoods flagship, the 100-gun HMS Royal Sovereign, breaks the allied line and delivers a shattering broadside on the Spanish flagship Santa Anna. Making great speed, Collingwoods ship had breached the Franco-Spanish line some distance ahead of the rest of his van and the Royal Sovereign suffered heavily as she quickly drew the attentions of three French and three Spanish ships. To her starboard, the French Indomitable can be seen firing into the British flagship while, astern of the Santa Anna, Belleisle and Fougueux are engaging ahead of Mars, Monarca and Pluton.

The Battle of Trafalgar - The First Engagement by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £345.00
DHM396.  The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
The younger Charles, after escaping the Worcester rout, is hiding in a pollard oak, with the Roundheads hunting for him.
The Boscobol Oak, By Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £40.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (AP)
Half Price! - £150.00
Whilst flat-racing enthusiasts may argue which horse was the best Derby Winner, artist Peter Deighan was deciding for himself, he made a short list of six.  His canvas entitled Derby Winners depicts these six. They include the great Shergar, who ran the fastest Derby in history and won by a record ten lengths.  Also included are Golden Fleece, Reference Point, Teenoso, The Minstrel and the fantastic Nashwan.  Any of these could be classified as the greatest.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £120.00
 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00

SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
Half Price! - £60.00
SFA19.  Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Celebrating Englands 1980 Five Nations Grand Slam. After the 70s had been dominated by the Welsh, England battled through an exceptionally tough campaign to win their first Grand Slam in 23 years.

1980 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00
SP4.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £35.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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