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NAVAL ART AVIATION ART MILITARY ART SPORT ART
Portsmouth - World Naval Ships Directory

Portsmouth

Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK

Much has been heard by the Englishmen of the younger generation of that Navy which is their defence and their pride. Its ships, by pictures and descriptions, have become familiar as household things. Their sufficiency, both in number and quality, is the subject of frequent discussion. The movements of the fleet are constantly reported, and its manoeuvres and exercises are the theme of the daily press. Its officers and men are much in the public mind also. The opinions of prominent seamen are cited and there services described, and all stand very high, and deservedly high, in our national regard. But there are some matters concerning the Navy about which Englishmen are not well informed. They possess no adequate knowledge of the Naval bases, of those dockyards which are the life of the fleet, and in which ships are built, armed, fitted, and stored with everything necessary, from which, when commissioned, they are despatched to their duties at sea, and to which they return for repair, docking, refitting, coaling, and victualling, again and again, until the time comes when they go to sea no ore. All things necessary for their service to the state are found in the dockyards, and the resources, which these establishments furnish, are far more vital in these times of steel and steam than ever they were in the days of the hemp, canvas, and wood.



The Univorn Gate, Portsmouth.

The series of articles of which this is the first is intended to make good the deficiency. By an unrivalled series of illustrations, it will bring our great naval base vividly before the reader, and it will be my object to deal with the several Royal dockyards historically, and in regard to the highly important duties they fulfil. Already I have been able to describe the victualling yards, the current discussion of the victualling question having seemed to make it expedient to describe these before the dockyards themselves, though that subject, even now, is not exhausted. No better beginning of the present series could be made with Portsmouth, because it is not only our most important Naval arsenal, but also the greatest naval port in the world. A writer who described Portsmouth in 1729, considering the question of its possible capture by a superior force, remarked that if the Navy could not defend the place, England would then no longer be England, and we must all submit to the conqueror, so close did he think thee relationship of Portsmouth to the national welfare. Happily, what he said of it actual situation is now as true as it was in his day-that it may be accounted strong and sufficient for its purposes, which is for the security of the Navy in essential matters and the provision of the good harbour which is its necessity, making it a place, indeed, as he said, of the utmost importance. Like all our other dockyards Portsmouth has advanced by leaps and bounds, on order it might be fitted to meet the demands of the expanding fleet. It may not be generally known that under the Naval Works Act, since 1895, a sum of something like twenty-four millions sterling is being expended on very important operations, including the enclosing of the harbour of Portland, Dover, and Gibraltar, the deepening of harbours and extending of works at Gibraltar, Keyham, Simon’s Bay, and Hong Kong, and in building naval barracks and other works at Portsmouth, Chatham, and elsewhere. So great, however, had been the increase in the resources of Portsmouth already, that not so large an amount is absorbed there of the sums recently voted as at some places which had been neglected. The intimate relation of Portsmouth to the fleet, and thereby to the national welfare, had made it impossible that it could ever lack far behind.

Ships built by Portsmouth (ordered by launch date)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.

Ships built by Portsmouth(ordered by name)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.

Photos Submitted Through Our Directory



A Vickers Armour Plate for a Battleship (1901).



The Lawn of Admiralty House (1901)



The Old Semaphore Tower at Portsmouth (1901)



A Steel Shield for a 9.2-in gun (1901)



Portsmouth Dockyard from the Railway (1901)



Enlarging one of the Docks (1901)



A Scene in the Boiler Shop (1901)



Completing HMS Canopus at Portsmouth.



The Admiral Superintendent's House at Portsmouth (1901)



Portsmouth - the Round Tower
The old Round Tower at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour was begun by Edward III and finished by Henry VIII. At its base may be seen the chains which reached across the harbour, at this point only a quarter of a mile broad. In the days of torpedo-boats, Spithead was no longer a safe anchorage, and in times of war, the great ships would probably be collected in the harbour, so that some kind of boom would be needed across the entrance to afford protection, as was usual in the old days. In the photograph the flagship Majestic is seen entering the mouth of the harbour.


The Main Gate of Portsmouth Dockyard (1901)



The Residence of the Commander in Chief (1901)



Portsmouth Harbour and Dockyard from Gosport Hard, 15th January - 10th February 1906.
HMS Victory at her moorings, HMS Drake in the background.


The Portsmouth Coaling Station (1901)



The Unicorn Gate at Portsmouth (1901)



The Shipbuilding Mould Loft (1901)



Visitors Welcomed at Portsmouth (1901)



Portsmouth Docks No.7 and No.10 (1901)



The Steam Boat Basin at Portsmouth (1901)



Air Compressing and Hydraulic Machinery (1901)



The Electric Fitting Shop (1901)


* - Represents a ship built here which later changed to this name or role.

Return to Ship Search Page


Last edited : 12:38, August 14, 2012
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob is shown claiming his 5th victory – a Blenheim – 60km west of Rotterdam on 26th June 1940.  Bob went on to serve with JG.54, JG.51, JG.3, EJG2.2 and JV.44, scoring a total of 60 confirmed victories in the course of his Luftwaffe service.  The Blenheim claimed as his 5th victory is likely to have been R3776 of No.110 Squadron, which was the only Blenheim recorded to have been lost participating in Operation Soest on that day - while another returned to base damaged and crash landed.  The three crew of the Blenheim were all missing in action - P/O Cyril Ray Worboys, Sgt Gerald Patterson Gainsford and Sgt Kenneth Cooper.

Ltn. Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG21 Becomes an Ace by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
 The end of an era.  British Airways Concorde G-BOAG moments before touching down at Heathrow for the very last time.

Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Sopwith Camel with 65 Squadron, on routine patrol, meet head-on with the unmistakable Albatross fighters of the German air force.

The Sky Warriors by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00

 Two Bristol Brigand B1s of 8 Squadron RAF based at Khormaksar are depicted off the Aden Peninsular in 1950.  Nearest aircraft is VS814 (L), flown by Sgt Pilot Vic Campden.

8 Sqn Bristol Brigands by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £750.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Sqn Ldr Billy Drake is shown in Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk1a ET790 claiming a Ju87 Stuka  on the 31st of October 1942.  Sqn Ldr Drake commanded  112 Squadron flying Kittyhawks at Gambut on 24th May 1942.  He claimed a probable Bf109 on 6th June, another probable on  2nd July, destroyed a Bf109 on the 8th, damaged a Ju88 on the ground on the 19th, destroyed a Bf109 on the 24th, two Ju87s on  the 1st September and another Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake shared a Ju87 and probably destroyed another on 1st October 1942, got a probable Bf109 on the 22nd, destroyed another on the 26th, an Me202 on the 27th, a Ju87 on the 31st, a Bf109 destroyed and another damaged on 5th November, a Bf109 destroyed on the ground on the 11th, an He111 destroyed and a Bf109 damaged on the 15th, a Bf110 destroyed and another damaged on the 19th, an Me202 and a Bf109 destroyed on 11th December and he finally shared a Bf109 on the 13th.  Drake was awarded a Bar to the DFC (28.7.42) and the DSO (4.12.42).

Tribute to Squadron Leader Billy Drake by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 New Zealand's highest scoring ace, with 25 victories to his credit, proved himself to be an extraordinary and resourceful leader.  Whilst on a routine patrol in September 1918, Keith Logan 'Grid' Caldwell's 74 Sqn SE5a was involved in a mid-air collision with another SE5a, the impact breaking one of Caldwell's struts and destroying the aerodynamics of his aircraft, which promptly dropped 1,000 ft and went into a flat spin.  Incredibly, Caldwell climbed from the cockpit of his stricken machine and held the broken strut together with his left hand whilst keeping his right hand on the joystick, somehow steering his wayward fighter out of danger and over friendly territory.  With no hope of a safe landing, the Kiwi jumped clear of the SE5a just a second or so before it impacted with the ground. Astounded British soldiers in a nearby trench saw Caldwell stand, dust himself off and walk casually toward them.  He returned to his unit and continued flying until the end of the war.

The Tenacious Grid Caldwell by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £800.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Blackbeard the Terrible, otherwise known as Edward Teach, Thatch or Drummond. Circa 1718.

Damnation Seize My Soul by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £350.00
With the British Mediterranean Fleet riding at anchor in Grand  Harbour Malta, HMS  Majestic is shown preparing to leave harbour as local fisherman look on. 

Majestic Malta by Randall Wilson (AP)
Half Price! - £75.00
B151AP.  HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
B63AP.  HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

The English fleet pursued the Armada up the English Channel and, as darkness fell, Vice Admiral Drake broke off and captured the Spanish galleon Rosario, Admiral Pedro de Valdes and the crew.  The Rosario was known to be carrying substantial funds to pay the Spanish Army in the Low Countries.  Drakes ship had been leading the English pursuit of the Armada by means of a lantern.  By extinguishing this for the capture, Drake put the fleet into disarray overnight.  On the night of 29th July 1588, Vice Admiral Drake organised fire-ships, causing most of the Spanish captains to break formation and sail out of Calais . The next day, Drake was present at the Battle of Gravelines.  English losses were comparatively few, and none of their ships were sunk.

Grenvilles Revenge by Brian Wood.
Half Price! - £95.00
 Key ships of the British task Force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean Sea during the build-up to the coalition liberation of Iraq in march 2003. Ships pictured left to right, include ATS Argus (A135), a Type 42 destroyer in the extreme distance, the flagship HMS ark Royal (RO7), RFA Orangeleaf (A110), LSL Sir Percival (L3036), the Commando and helicopter carrier HMS ocean (L12) and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool (D92) 

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
 The destroyer HMS Kelly passes close to the old carrier HMS Eagle as she escorts a convoy in the Mediterranean early in 1941.

HMS Kelly by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
A class submarine, HMS Anchorite, swings away from the depot ship Adamant during work up exercises in the Firth of Clyde. In the mid fifties the depot ship was moored in Rothesay Bay providing a base for the 3rd Submarine Squadron. Leaving the moorings ahead of Anchorite is the frigate HMS Termagant which will day part in the days exercise.

Group Up- Half Ahead Starboard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

DHM249.  Depicting General La Salle before his last charge before being killed at the Battle of Wagram.

La Salle at the Battle of Wagram by Mark Churms
Half Price! - £70.00
 During the morning of June 7th the 82nd Airborne were attacked by a mixed German battle group. Supported by 4th Division armour the Paratroopers and Glider troops repelled the attack which lasted most of the day.

Fighting for a Foothold, 82nd Airborne at St Mere Eglise, 1944 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £
 After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away. As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.

The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
Soon after it was raised, the regiment achieved fame by charging and destroying five German Battalions of the French Army, capturing their colours and artillery.

The Charge of the 15th Light Dragoons at Emsdorf by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

Between 18th and 23rd February, 1991, immediately preceding the ground assault, Iraqi defensive positions were bombarded by British and American artillery.  The Artillery Raids took place just inside the Saudi border all along the front line, from the east coast to west of the Wadi al Batin.  The 1st Armoured Division's contribution to the raids was the largest concentration of British artillery since the Second World War.  Further behind the M109 and M110 guns and the locating batteries were the armoured vehicle-mounted rocket launchers of the Multi-Launch Rocket System (MLRS).  39 Heavy Regiment, the only British regiment equipped with MLRS, fired five 'fireplans', one of them at night.  MLRS can ripple-fire 12 rockets in less than one minute.  The Artillery Raids were a major factor in the success of Operation Desert Sword because they contributed to the deception plan by concealing the main point of effort.  The ammunition itself was terrifyingly destructive.  Furthermore, Iraqi morale, already damaged by the air assaults, was crushed by the artillery bombardment.  At the right of the scene a DROPS vehicle of the Royal Corps of Transport is delivering Rocket Pod Containers, and gunners are preparing to re-arm the MLRS.
The Artillery Raids, 18th / 23rd February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Stonewall Jackson with the Stonewall Brigade during the Valley Campaign of 1862.

Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - £8000.00
 Hauptsturm fuhrer Fritz Klingenberg, and the men of 2nd SS Divisions Motorcycle Reconnaissance battalion stop at the swollen banks of the River Danube. The following day he and six men, a broken down radio, and totally unsupported were to capture the Yugoslavian capital of Belgrade.

The Magician, Balkans, 11th April 1941 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Goch-Gennep, Germany, 9th February 1945.  The Sturmgeschutz III of Leutnant Heinz Deutsch, Stug-Brigade XII, and paratroops of 7th Fallschirmjager Division counterattacking the Allied advance into the Reichswald forest in the final months of the war.  The small Stug brigade numbering at its peak only 30 assault guns was responsible for the destruction of 250 allied tanks, Deutsch's gun claiming 44 of that total.

Defenders of the Reichswald by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

SFA15.  Bollocks by Chris Howells.

Bollocks by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Jacques Villeneuve.

The Maple Leaf Maestro by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - £20.00
SP4.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £35.00
22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
Half Price! - £50.00

 A quartet of Ferrari 801s are warmed up at Rouen-les-Essarts.  French Grand Prix 1957.

Thoroughbreds in the Paddock by Ray Goldsbrough.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Three Steps To Heaven pays tribute to one of the greatest strikers to play for Liverpool and in particular, the historic Cup treble in 2001. It contains details of the FA Cup triumph over Arsenal, Worthington Cup win over Birmingham City and the unforgettable 5-4 defeat of Spanish side Alaves to complete the cup treble and bring back the UEFA Cup to Merseyside.

Three Steps to Heaven by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - £72.00
 Peter Deighan has superbly captured Jimmy White, John Parrot, Stephen Hendry, James Wattana, John Higgins, Ken Doherty, Ronnie OSullivan and of course the centrepiece, a magnificent study of former World Champion Steve Davis as he Ponders his next shot.  A must for all snooker rooms, clubs and players of this wonderful game.

Kings of the Baize II by Peter Deighan
Half Price! - £80.00
 Eddie Irvine.  Jaguar-Cosworth 2002
Green Giant by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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