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Portsmouth - World Naval Ships Directory

Portsmouth

Builder : Portsmouth
Country : UK

Much has been heard by the Englishmen of the younger generation of that Navy which is their defence and their pride. Its ships, by pictures and descriptions, have become familiar as household things. Their sufficiency, both in number and quality, is the subject of frequent discussion. The movements of the fleet are constantly reported, and its manoeuvres and exercises are the theme of the daily press. Its officers and men are much in the public mind also. The opinions of prominent seamen are cited and there services described, and all stand very high, and deservedly high, in our national regard. But there are some matters concerning the Navy about which Englishmen are not well informed. They possess no adequate knowledge of the Naval bases, of those dockyards which are the life of the fleet, and in which ships are built, armed, fitted, and stored with everything necessary, from which, when commissioned, they are despatched to their duties at sea, and to which they return for repair, docking, refitting, coaling, and victualling, again and again, until the time comes when they go to sea no ore. All things necessary for their service to the state are found in the dockyards, and the resources, which these establishments furnish, are far more vital in these times of steel and steam than ever they were in the days of the hemp, canvas, and wood.



The Univorn Gate, Portsmouth.

The series of articles of which this is the first is intended to make good the deficiency. By an unrivalled series of illustrations, it will bring our great naval base vividly before the reader, and it will be my object to deal with the several Royal dockyards historically, and in regard to the highly important duties they fulfil. Already I have been able to describe the victualling yards, the current discussion of the victualling question having seemed to make it expedient to describe these before the dockyards themselves, though that subject, even now, is not exhausted. No better beginning of the present series could be made with Portsmouth, because it is not only our most important Naval arsenal, but also the greatest naval port in the world. A writer who described Portsmouth in 1729, considering the question of its possible capture by a superior force, remarked that if the Navy could not defend the place, England would then no longer be England, and we must all submit to the conqueror, so close did he think thee relationship of Portsmouth to the national welfare. Happily, what he said of it actual situation is now as true as it was in his day-that it may be accounted strong and sufficient for its purposes, which is for the security of the Navy in essential matters and the provision of the good harbour which is its necessity, making it a place, indeed, as he said, of the utmost importance. Like all our other dockyards Portsmouth has advanced by leaps and bounds, on order it might be fitted to meet the demands of the expanding fleet. It may not be generally known that under the Naval Works Act, since 1895, a sum of something like twenty-four millions sterling is being expended on very important operations, including the enclosing of the harbour of Portland, Dover, and Gibraltar, the deepening of harbours and extending of works at Gibraltar, Keyham, Simon’s Bay, and Hong Kong, and in building naval barracks and other works at Portsmouth, Chatham, and elsewhere. So great, however, had been the increase in the resources of Portsmouth already, that not so large an amount is absorbed there of the sums recently voted as at some places which had been neglected. The intimate relation of Portsmouth to the fleet, and thereby to the national welfare, had made it impossible that it could ever lack far behind.

Ships built by Portsmouth (ordered by launch date)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.

Ships built by Portsmouth(ordered by name)... :

NameLaunchedFate
HMS Actaeon *November 1906Renamed November 1906 (ex - Dido). Sold 17th July 1922.
HMS Actaeon31st January 1831Became survey vessel in 1856, then hulk in 1870. Sold February 1889.
HMS Agincourt3rd August 1914Ex Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Amphion26th July 1934To Australia as HMAS PERTH June 1939.
HMS Andromeda24th May 1967To India (Krishna) 22nd August 1995.
Archangelsk *30th May 1944Ex Royal Sovereign launched 29th April 1915, renamed May 30th 1944. Returned 4th February 1949.
HMS Argus15th December 1849Scrapped October 1881.
HMS Arrogant5th April 1848Sold March 1867.
HMS Aurora20th August 1936Sold to China (Chung King) 19th May 1948.
HMS Bacchante30th July 1859Scrapped 1869.
HMS Bacchante19th October 1876Sold 1897.
HMS Barfleur *2nd June 1819Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819 (ex Brittania 1762, ex Princess Royal 1812, ex St George 1812). Scrapped February 1825.
HMS Barham11th September 1889Scrapped 19th February 1914.
HMS Barrosa16th April 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Beagle28th February 1889Scrapped 11th July 1905.
HMS Bellerophon27th July 1907Sold for scrap 8th November 1921
HMS Bittern18th April 1840Sold 20th February 1860.
HMS Blazer7th December 1870Sold 19th August 1919.
HMS Boadicea16th October 1875Sold 6th January 1905.
HMS Boyne3rd July 1810Renamed Excellent 1st December 1834.
HMS Britannia10th December 1904Torpedoed and sunk 9th November 1918 by UB 50 off Cape Trafalgar.
HMS Britannia19th October 1762Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812, renamed St George 18th January 1812, renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819.
C470 *December 1904Renamed (ex Shah) December 1904. Sold 19th September 1919.
HMS Caesar2nd September 1896Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Calliope *October 1931Renamed Calliope October 1931 (ex Helicon). Scrapped 4th October 1951. Launched as Calliope 24th July 1884.
HMS Calliope24th July 1884Renamed Helicon June 1915. Renamed Calliope October 1931. Sold 4th October 1951.
HMS Camperdown24th November 1885Sold for scrap 11th July 1911.
HMS Canada26th August 1881Sold 10th May 1897.
HMS Canopus13th October 1897Scrapped 18th February 1920.
HMS Centaur6th October 1845Scrapped September 1864.
HMS Centurion6th January 1732Scrapped December 1769.
HMS Centurion3rd August 1892Scrapped 12th July 1910.
Chung King *19th May 1948Sunk by air attack March 1949
HMS Colossus21st March 1882Scrapped 6th October 1908.
HMS Comet8th December 1870Sold 12 May 1908
HMS Comet30th September 1931To Canada (Restigouche) 15th June 1938.
HMS Cordelia25th October 1881Sold 5th July 1904.
HMS Cracker27th November 1867Scrapped at Portsmouth 1889.
HMS Crescent30th March 1892Scrapped 22nd September 1912.
HMS Crusader30th September 1931To Canada (Ottawa) 15th June 1938.
HMS Danae21st May 1867Lent to War Department as a hulk in 1886. Sold for scrap 1906.
HMS Daring2nd April 1844Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Dauntless5th January 1847Sold 1st May 1885.
HMS Defiance III *17th February 1931Renamed 17 February 1931 (ex - Vulcan). Scrapped in Belgium, December 1955.
HMS Devastation12th July 1871Sold 12th May 1908.
HMS Dido23rd October 1869Hulked 1886, renamed Actaeon November 1906. Sold for breaking 1922.
HMS Dorsetshire29th January 1929Sunk 5th April 1942
HMS Drake25th March 1834Renamed MV.1 19th October 1855.
HMS Dreadnought10th February 1906Sold for scrap 9th May 1921
HMS Duncan7th July 1932Scrapped February 1949.
HMS Eclipse19th July 1894Scrapped August 1921.
HMS Excellent *1st December 1834Renamed (ex - Boyne) 1st December 1834. Renamed Queen Charlotte 22nd November 1859.
HMS Exmouth7th February 1934Sunk 21st January 1940.
HMS Firebrand6th September 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Formidable17th November 1898Sunk 1st January 1915.
HMS Fox15th June 1893Sold 14th July 1920.
HMS Frolic23rd August 1842Sold 7th October 1864.
HMS Furious26th August 1850Sold 1884.
HMS Gannet *1916Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS Gladiator18th December 1896Sold for scrap 5th August 1909
HMS Glasgow28th March 1861Sold and scrapped December 1884.
HMS Hastings22nd June 1819Sold September 1895.
HMS Helicon *June 1915Renamed Helicon June 1915 (ex Calliope). Renamed Calliope October 1931.
HMS Hermes26th June 1835Scrapped 1864.
Hsuang Ho *1951Launched as HMS Aurora 1936, sold and renamed Chung King 19th May 1948. Renamed Pei Ching 1951.
HMS Imperieuse *June 1909Launched as Imperieuse in 1883 and converted to Depot Ship 1905. Renamed (ex - Sapphire II) June 1909. Sold 24th September 1913.
HMS Imperieuse18th December 1883Renamed Sapphire II February 1905.
HMS Indus16th March 1839Sold 11th November 1898.
HMS Inflexible27th April 1876Sold 15th September 1903.
HMS Iron Duke12th October 1912Sold for scrap February 1946. Broken up at Glasgow 20th November 1948.
HMS J16th November 1915To Australia (J1) 1919.
HMAS J1 *1919From UK (Ex - J1) 1919. Sold for scrap 26th February 1924.
HMS J26th November 1915Transferred to Australia 25 March 1919
HMS J69th September 1915Sunk in error by Q Ship HMS Cymric on 15 October 1918
HMS K114th November 1916Sunk to avoid capture after collision with K4 on 17th November 1917.
HMS K214th October 1916Sold 13th July 1926.
HMS K516th December 1916Sunk 20th January 1921.
HMS Kent6th March 1901Sold for scrap June 1920
HMS King George V9th October 1911Sold for scrap December 1926.
INS Krishna *22nd August 1995From UK (Andromeda) 22nd August 1995.
Kuang Chou *1955Renamed ex Pei Ching, 1955. Scrapped 1960.
HMS Leopard23rd May 1955Paid off for last time 12 December 1975. Broken up 1977.
HMS London21st September 1899Sold for scrap 4th June 1920.
HMS London14th September 1927Scrapped 1950
HMS Majestic31st January 1895Sunk 27th May 1915.
HMS Marlborough31st July 1855Renamed Vernon II March 1904.
HMS Melpomene20th September 1888Sold 11th August 1905.
HMS MV.1 *19th October 1855Renamed (ex Drake) 19th October 1855. Renamed Sheppey 7th July 1856.
HMS Neptune27th September 1832Sold 18975.
HMS Neptune30th September 1909Sold 1st September 1922
HMS Neptune31st January 1933Sunk 19th December 1941
HMS Netley2nd July 1866Sold for scrap September 1885.
HMS New Zealand4th February 1904Renamed Zealandia 1 December 1911. Sold for scrap 8th November 1921.
HMS Nightingale30th September 1931Sold for scrap 5th July 1957.
HMS Nubian6th September 1960Sunk as target 27th May 1987.
HMS Nymphe1st May 1888Shore training ship at Sheerness from August 1914. Renamed Wildfire December 1906.
HMS Orion20th August 1910Scrapped 19th December 1922.
HMS Orwell27th December 1866Sold to the Customs Board on 20th December 1890.
HMCS Ottawa *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Crusader) 15th June 1938. Sunk 14th September 1942.
HMS Pallas30th July 1890Scrapped 1906
HMS Pallas13th April 1816Sold to be broken up 11th January 1862.
HMS Pandora17th January 1900Sold 7th October 1913.
Pei Ching *1951Renamed from Hsuang Ho, 1951. Renamed Kuang Chou, 1955.
HMS Pembroke *July 1917Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMAS Perth *June 1939From UK (ex - Amphion) June 1939. Sunk 1st March 1942.
HMS Plumper5th April 1848Scrapped 2nd June 1865
HMS Prince Albert23rd May 1864Sold in December 1899 for £7,025
HMS Prince George22nd August 1895Renamed Victorious II 1918. Sold for scrap 21st September 1921.
HMS Princess Charlotte14th September 1825Sold 1875.
HMS Princess Royal *6th January 1812Renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812 (ex Britannia launched 1762). Renamed St George 18th January 1812.
HMS Queen15th May 1839Scrapped 1871.
HMS Queen Charlotte *22nd November 1859Renamed (ex - Excellent) 22nd November 1859. Scrapped 25th June 1861.
HMS Queen Elizabeth16th October 1913Scrapped 7th July 1948.
HMCS Restigouche *15th June 1938From UK (ex - Comet) 15th June 1938. Sold for scrap 1946.
HMS Rhyl23rd April 1959Sunk as target August 1985.
HMS Royal Alfred15th October 1864Sold for scrap December 1884.
HMS Royal Arthur26th February 1891Ex Centaur, renamed before launching. Sold for scrap August 1921.
HMS Royal Sovereign25th April 1857SOLD FOR B/U 1885
HMS Royal Sovereign29th April 1915Loaned to Russia 30th May 1944. Renamed Archangelsk. Returned 9th February 1949. Sold for scrap 5th April 1949.
HMS Royal Sovereign26th February 1891Sold for scrap 7th October 1913.
HMS Sapphire II *February 1905Renamed (ex - Imperieuse) February 1905. Renamed Imperieuse June 1909 sold 1913.
HMS Scourge8th November 1844Scrapped 1865.
HMS ShahSeptember 1873Renamed C470 December 1904.
HMS Shannon24th November 1855Sold 15th December 1899.
HMS Sheppey *7th July 1856Renamed (ex - MV.1) 7th July 1856. Scrapped 1867.
HMS Sirius22nd September 1964Sunk as target, 1998.
HMS Sirius18th September 1940Scrapped 1956
HMS Sirius24th April 1868Sold 1885.
HMS St George *18th January 1812Launched as Brittania 1762, renamed Princess Royal 6th January 1812. Renamed St George 18th January 1812. (ex Princess Royal). Renamed Barfleur 2nd June 1819, broken up 1925.
HMS St Vincent10th September 1908Sold 1st December 1921
HMS Suffolk16th February 1926Scrapped June 1948
HMS Suffolk15th January 1903Sold for scrap 1st July 1920
Tchoung King *1949Sunk 19th March 1950. Salvaged 1951, renamed Hsuang Ho.
HMS Tireless19th March 1943Sold for scrap 20th September 1968.
HMS Token19th March 1943Sold for scrap 18th February 1970.
HMS Trafalgar20th September 1887Sold 9th May 1911.
HMS Vernon II *March 1904Renamed (ex - Marlborough) March 1904. Sold October 1924.
HMS Victorious II *1918Renamed (ex - Prince George) 1918. Sold for scrap 29th January 1921.
HMS Vulcan13th June 1889Renamed Defiance III, 1931.
HMS Wildfire *December 1906Launched as Nymphe 1st May 1888, renamed Wildfire (Base Ship) December 1906, renamed Gannet 1916. Renamed Pembroke July 1917. Sold for breaking 10th February 1920.
HMS X41943Scraspped 1945.

Photos Submitted Through Our Directory



Portsmouth Dockyard from the Railway (1901)



A Vickers Armour Plate for a Battleship (1901).



Portsmouth - the Round Tower
The old Round Tower at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour was begun by Edward III and finished by Henry VIII. At its base may be seen the chains which reached across the harbour, at this point only a quarter of a mile broad. In the days of torpedo-boats, Spithead was no longer a safe anchorage, and in times of war, the great ships would probably be collected in the harbour, so that some kind of boom would be needed across the entrance to afford protection, as was usual in the old days. In the photograph the flagship Majestic is seen entering the mouth of the harbour.


A Scene in the Boiler Shop (1901)



The Lawn of Admiralty House (1901)



Portsmouth Docks No.7 and No.10 (1901)



The Portsmouth Coaling Station (1901)



Enlarging one of the Docks (1901)



The Main Gate of Portsmouth Dockyard (1901)



The Residence of the Commander in Chief (1901)



The Unicorn Gate at Portsmouth (1901)



Portsmouth Harbour and Dockyard from Gosport Hard, 15th January - 10th February 1906.
HMS Victory at her moorings, HMS Drake in the background.


A Steel Shield for a 9.2-in gun (1901)



Completing HMS Canopus at Portsmouth.



The Electric Fitting Shop (1901)



The Admiral Superintendent's House at Portsmouth (1901)



Visitors Welcomed at Portsmouth (1901)



The Steam Boat Basin at Portsmouth (1901)



The Shipbuilding Mould Loft (1901)



The Old Semaphore Tower at Portsmouth (1901)



Air Compressing and Hydraulic Machinery (1901)


* - Represents a ship built here which later changed to this name or role.

Return to Ship Search Page


Last edited : 12:38, August 14, 2012
By : kc

 

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group from Upottery, East Devon, try to hold steady amid a barrage of flak and anti aircraft fire as troops of 101st jump into the unknown above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944.  These aircraft are of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron.

Hell Below Us by Ivan Berryman.
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 Junkers JU87 R-1 Stukas find a gap in the cloudbase en route to their target during the Norwegian Campaign of 1941.

Dawn Raiders by Ivan Berryman.
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 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (2) by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £900.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - £105.00

 Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived.

Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00


Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 So versatile was the Mosquito that is performed in every role allotted to the R.A.F. and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Made almost entirely of wood, and powered by two hefty Merlin engines, it was the fastest piston engined aircraft of the war. Seen in its intruder configuration, Mosquitos of 418 Squadron, R.C.A.F. led by Charlie Krause, make a devastating high speed low-level attack on railroad marshalling yards in northern France during the winter of 1944.

Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00
 From the day they began their aerial campaign against Nazi Germany to the cessation of hostilities in 1945, the USAAF bomber crews plied their hazardous trade in broad daylight. This tactic may have enabled better sighting of targets, and possibly less danger of mid-air collisions, but the grievous penalty of flying daylight missions over enemy territory was the ever presence of enemy fighters. Though heavily armed, the heavy bombers of the American Eighth Air Force were no match against the fast, highly manoeuvrable Me109s, Fw190s and, late in the war, Me 262 jet fighters which the Luftwaffe sent up to intercept them. Without fighter escort they were sitting ducks, and inevitably paid a heavy price. Among others, one fighter group earned particular respect, gratitude, and praise from bomber crews for their escort tactics. The 356th FG stuck rigidly to the principle of tight bomber escort duty, their presence in tight formation with the bombers often being sufficient to deter enemy attack. Repeatedly passing up the opportunity to increase individual scores, the leadership determined it more important to bring the bombers home than claim another enemy fighter victory. As the air war progressed this philosophy brought about an unbreakable bond between heavy bomber crews and escort fighter pilots, and among those held in the highest esteem were the pilots of the 356th. Top scoring ace Donald J Strait, flying his P-51 D Mustang Jersey Jerk, together with pilots of the 356th Fighter Group, are seen in action against Luftwaffe Fw 190s while escorting B-17 bombers returning from a raid on German installations during the late winter of 1944. One minute all is orderly as the mighty bombers thunder their way homeward, the next minute enemy fighters are upon them and all hell breaks loose. <br><br><b>Published 2003.<br><br>Signed by three of the top pilots from the 356th Fighter group.</b>

Ace of Diamonds by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Half Price! - £105.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Type 42 HMS Southampton (D90), Type 22 Beaver (F93), Type 42 Manchester (D95) and Type 21 Amazon (F169) formate during a World cruise on which they visited 17 countries in 9 months.

Around the World by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 The E-class light cruiser HMS Emerald is shown off the Newfoundland coast in company with a Flower class corvette.  Between October 1939 and August 1940, HMS Emerald carried £58 million in gold from Britain to Canada.

HMS Emerald by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
The King George V class battleship HMS Anson is pictured in Sydney Harbour where she joined the Pacific Fleet in July 1945, viewed across the flight deck of HMS Vengeance, where ten of her Vought F4.U Corsairs are ranged in front of a single folded Fairey Barracuda
HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
B139P. HMS Royal Oak by Ivan Berryman. The R-class battleship Royal Oak lies at anchor in Scapa Flow between the wars ahead of her sisters Royal Sovereign and Revenge.  HMS Repulse is passing the line on the left of the picture
HMS Royal Oak by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Launched in March 1984 and commissioned into the Royal Navy in October the following year, HMS Tireless (S88) was the third of seven Trafalgar Class SSN submarines and is depicted in the Arctic waters near the polar ice cap in 1991.

HMS Tireless by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 Cheux, Normandy, 25th June 1944.  Royal Armoured Corps Recce troops of the 15th (Scottish) Infantry Division set up a temporary observation post to locate 12th SS Panzer Division positions, prior to Operation Epsom.  The 15th Division comprised of 9th Cameronians, 2nd Glasgow Highlanders, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, 8th Royal Scots, 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers, 6th King's Own Scottish Borderers, 10th Highland Light Infantry, 2nd Gordon Highlanders and the 2nd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Enemy in Sight by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Royalist cavalry at the Battle of Naseby. Cavalier trumpeters are shown advancing with King Charles 1sts cavalry during the Battle of Naseby.

After the Battle of Naseby by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April, 2011. Men of <i>The Highlanders</i> 4th Royal Regiment of Scotland, patrol through a flowering poppy field near Lashkar Gah.

Poppy Fields by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £85.00
 In an attempt to expand into Europe, Ottoman Turks under the command of Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa laid siege to Vienna for two months.  A coalition of Polish, German and Austrians led by John III Sobieski, the King of Poland, arrived before Vienna to raise the siege.  Sobieski led a charge of 20,000 cavalry, including the fearsome Winged Hussars into the Ottoman camp and completely routed their army. The battle was over in three hours, the Turks fled the field leaving behind tents, weapons, battle standards and provisions.  The threat to Europe had been reversed, and this battle signaled the beginning of the end for the Ottoman Empire.

Polish Winged Lancers - Battle of Vienna, September 12th 1683 by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £40.00
 M19 self-propelled antiaircraft guns guns of the 82nd Battalion give cover to the M46 Patton tanks and men of the US Armys 2nd Division during their hazardous retreat south from the Yalu River, following the surprise Chinese winter offensive.

Retreat from the Yalu by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Although outnumbered ten to one, General Arthur Wellesley defeated the well trained Mahratta army in one of the fiercest battles in India. It was the first of many victories by the future Duke of Wellington, and the bloodiest for the number, he recalled, that I ever saw.

The 74th Highlanders at the Battle of Assaye, 23rd September 1803 by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Jim Clark in his Lotus-Ford 38 winning in the record breaking 1965 Indianapolis 500 Mile Classic.

Jim Clark by Ray Goldsbrough.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Damon Hill, World Champion

King of the Track by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - £20.00
 Carl Fogarty testing the new Foggy Petronas FP1 at Brands Hatch, 2003.
Back on Track by Dave Foord. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00



Jason Leonard by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
 Twickenham, March 16th 1996.  England return to the running game to clinch victory in style over Ireland and retain the Five Nations Championship.

In Full Flight by Keith Fearon.
Half Price! - £80.00
SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
Half Price! - £60.00


Jenson Button - Canada 2011 by Stephen Doig. (P)
Half Price! - £240.00

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