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Spitfire - Aircraft Details - Aviation Directory

Spitfire


Name : Spitfire
Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Pilots and Aircrew for : Spitfire
A list of all aircrew from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo
Adamek, Mieczyslaw
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   Died : 18 / 5 / 1944
Adamek, Mieczyslaw

Flying with the Polish Fighter Squadron 113 during the invasion of Poland, he claimed an He111 damaged on 1st September 1939, and a Ju87 on 6th September 1939. Escaping through France, he came to England and trained with the RAF, joining No.303 Sqn flying Spitfires in 1941. With this squadron he claimed 4 Me109s and an Fw190 by mid-April 1942. In November 1943 he transferred to No.317 Sqn flying Spitfires. On 18th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX ML275 od No.317 Sqn was apparently hit by flak near Fecamp before he baled out near Beachy Head. The rescue boat found him dead. Other sources claim his aircraft was shot down in error by British defences. He is buried in Northwood Cemetery.
Adams, Arthur Adams
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1995
Adams, Arthur Adams

. joined the RAF in 1936. He was commissioned on joining 611 Squadron, AuxAF in July 1938. He went to summer camp at Duxford on 4th August 1939 and was called to full-time service on the 26th. Adams probably destroyed a Ju87 over Dunkirk on 2nd June 1940 and possibly a Bf109. Flying from Tern Hill on 22nd July he made a forced-landing on the beach at Colwyn Bay, in Spitfire N3062 which had a coolant failure. The aircraft was pushed on to the promenade to escape the incoming tide. The 3rd August saw him promoted to Flying Officer. On 21st September Adams was sent up to investigate an unidentified aircraft over Liverpool and intercepted a Do215 of 2(F)/121 on a photo-reconnaissance mission. He pursued it for about fifteen minutes before shooting it down at Dolgellau, Merioneth, where it crash-landed at Trawsfynydd. One crew member, Uffz Pelzer, was killed and the other three (Ltn. Book, Fw. Jensen and Fw. Kühl) were captured, wounded. The aircraft (0023: VB+KK) was destroyed. Adams was then posted to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch on 29th September. In a morning engagement over Folkestone on 7th October While attacking a Dornier DO17 he had to bale out of his Spitfire I (N3276). He was not injured landing at Douglas Farm, Postling. He was posted from 41 Sqn in April 1941 and was in the RAF until 1945, when he was released as a Squadron Leader.
Adams, J A
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Adams, J A


Adams, John Simon Leslie
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Adams, John Simon Leslie

Commissioned Jan 1921; OC 41 Sqn, 4 March 1937-28 August 1939; retired as Wg Cdr, Oct 1946, died 29 Aug 1971 or 1972
Aeberhardt, Raymond Andre Charles
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1940
Aeberhardt, Raymond Andre Charles

Killed August 31st 1940. while landing Spitfire I (R6912) while landing at Fowlmere after being attacked by a BF109 which had damaged the flap mechanism, This was only his second Operation with 19 Squadron. He is buried at Whittlesford churchyard in Cambridgeshire.
Ainley, John
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Ainley, John


Aitken, J
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Aitken, J


Akroyd, H. J.
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   Died : 7 / 10 / 1940
Akroyd, H. J.

Spitfire I (N3039) was shot down and Crashed October 7th 1940. H J Akroyd. Died October 8th 1940
Aldred, C J
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Aldred, C J

On 16th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH935 of No.274 Sqn failed to return from a bomber escort mission to Alencon. He was taken prisoner.
Alexander, Richard
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Alexander, Richard


Alexandre, Robert Andre Guy
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   Died : 10 / 6 / 1944
Alexandre, Robert Andre Guy

Killed aged 28 on 10th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb AA720 MN-J of No.350 Sqn suffered engine failure and crashed into the sea off Beachy Head. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. He had been awarded the Chevalier of the Order of Leopold with Palm, Croix de Guerre (Belgium), Medaille des Evades. Son of Lambert and Gabrielle Alexandre, of Brussels, Belgium
Allen, Hubert Raymond
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   Died : 31 / 5 / 1987
Allen, Hubert Raymond

Pilot Officer Hubert R. Allen flew Spitfires with No 66 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. Pilot Officer Allen later promoted to Squadron Leader and put in command of No 66 Squadron. Later still Allen was promoted to Wing Commander. Wing Commander Allen was part of a mid-air collision on the 28th of November 1940 with Sergeant P.H.Willcocks in Spitfire II (P7491). This resulted in Willcocks being killed and Allen was left unhurt. His final score was 5 destroyed, 3 shared, 2 probables, and 3 damaged.Born on 19th March 1919, Allen entered the RAF on a short service commission. He began his flying training in early June 1939, Perth and completed his training at 15 FTS, Lossiemouth. Allen, “Dizzy”, joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on 13th April 1940. On 30August he took part in a “Convoy and Interception” patrol and shared in the destruction of a Do 215 . The combat took place off the Norwich coast at about 19:45 hrs., where it had involved an a/c (#0036: G2+JH) from 4/Aufkl.Gr.Ob.d.L. The Do215 crew, Oblt. Sonnleitner, Oberfw. Weise, and Obgefr. Hoffman, were killed and Fw. Neubauer missing On the 5th September he flew an “Interception” patrol and was shot down by a Bf109 at about 16:00 hrs. His Spitfire (N3043: LZ-X) was force-landed at Kenley minus an aileron. He was unhurt and the aircraft was repairable. On the 9th September he shared a Ju88 which was on a bombing mission to London docks. The Ju88 (#0274: 4D+AA) was from Stab KG30 and force-landed in Church Field, Newells Farm, Nuthurst south of Horsham at about 18:00 hrs. The crew, Oblt. Heil, Uffz. Beck, Uff. Paustian and Fw. Beck, were all captured and the aircraft was a write-off On the 15th September 66 Sqn was scrambled against heavy enemy formations both in the morning (11:45) and in the afternoon near Dartford in the afternoon (14:30) During these encounters he destroyed a He111 and damaged a Do17 over London On the 18th the Squadron was scrambled at about 10:00 hrs and engaged Bf109’s over North Kent near Manston where Allen claimed a Bf109E On the 11th October he took part in an “Interception Patrol” and claimed to have damaged a Bf109E However, his aircraft suffered damage when he was in turn attacked by Major Moelders of JG51[9]. He consequently crash-landed at Hawkinge at 11:40 hrs after his oil tank had exploded and suffered a slight concussion. Spitfire (X4255) was damaged but was repairable. In October he was appointed ‘B' Flight Commander. Awarded the DFC in July 1941and details were provided in the London Gazette, (22.7.4l) and highlighted that he “displayed great determination in combat”. He was promoted to Acting Squadron Leader in October and commanded 66 Squadron until December 1941. In total he claimed 5 destroyed with 3 shared, 2 probable with 1 shared and 3 damaged with 1 shared throughout the Second World War. He retired from the RAF as a Wing Commander on the 1st January 1965. Allen passed away on 31st May 1987.
Allen, John Lawrence
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   Died : 24 / 7 / 1940
Allen, John Lawrence

Pilot Officer Johnnie L. Allen flew with No 54 Squadron from throughout the war. Pilot Officer J.L. Allen was killed on the 24th of July 1940 near Margate. His Spitfire (R6812) or (P9549) was shot down on convoy patrol by Bf 109's of III Gruppe of JG 26 claimed by Adolf Galland. Pilot Officer J.L Allen stalled and crashed near Cliftonville.
Allen, Luke
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Allen, Luke

Volunteering for the RAF just as the Battle of Britain was reaching its climax, Luke joined 71 Eagle Squadron, flying his first combat operation in April 1941 on Hurricanes. Converting to Spitfires the squadron had a busy period of patrols, sweeps and escorts before transferring to the USAAF as the 334th Fighter Squadron. Luke flew over 60 combat missions in Europe.
Allen, Peter
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Allen, Peter

Completing his pilot training at No.1 OTU in Canada, he was assigned to 54 Sqn on Spitfires which had been relocated from Britain to Darwin, Northern Australia in 1943. The squadron carried out Air Defence patrols against Japanese aircraft and high-level reconnaissance flights.
Alligier, A
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Alligier, A

On 26th April 1944, while returning from a fighter sweep to Mons with No.329 Sqn, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK346 5A-T collided with Spitfire Mk.IX MK360 flown by Wing Commander Roy Marples DFC*. MK360 crashed near Horsham and Marples was killed. MK346 crash landed with damage and Alligier was injured. On 30th October 1944 during a reconnaissance mission to Walcheren, he was injured in the leg but managed to return Spitfire Mk.IX PL190 5A-S to base with minor damage.
Allton, L. C.
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   Died : 19 / 10 / 1940
Allton, L. C.

Killed October 19th 1940
Anderson, Murray
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Anderson, Murray

Commissioned in the Royal Tank Regiment from RMA Woolwich in 1939, Murray Anderson was seconded to the Royal Air Force in 1940. He flew Spitfires with No.1 Photo Reconnaissance Unit at RAF Benson until 1943. He then joined 161 (Special Duties) Squadron flying Lysanders, and was the most successful pick up pilot for the whole of that year even though in May 1944 he was posted to 65 Squadron 2nd Tactical Air Force, flying Mustangs. After a rest period he was posted to 52 Sqn at Dum Dum in May 1945.
Andrear, C. J. D.
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   Died : 15 / 8 / 1940
Andrear, C. J. D.

Flight Officer C.J.D. Andrear of No 64 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (R6990) on the 15th of August 1940.
Anthonsen, K B
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   Died : 11 / 6 / 1944
Anthonsen, K B

Killed on 11th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ834 of No.331 Sqn was shot down by ground fire near St Martin while he was attacking tanks. He baled out of the aircraft but his parachute was caught on the tailplane.
Appleford, Alexander N R L
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   Died : 17 / 4 / 2012
Appleford, Alexander N R L

Born in September 1921, Robin Appleford was one of the youngest pilots to take part in the Battle of Britain. He joined 66 Squadron at Duxford on 13th May 1940, flying Spitfires. He was shot down over the Thames Estuary during a dogfight on 4th September 1940, but baled out slightly wounded. After a spell as an instructor, in 1943 he flew another combat tour, this time with 274 Squadron, flying Hurricanes on coastal defence in North Africa. After a spell with the Aircraft Delivery Unit, he went to South Africa as a flying instructor. Sadly, we have learned that Alexander Appleford passed away on 17th April 2012.
Arkell, Peter
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   Died : 27 / 8 / 2010
Arkell, Peter

For his first tour Peter flew Mustangs and Spitfires with 26 Squadron on intruder and low lever photographic sorties over France, before joining 161 Squadron as Tempsford in 1944, flying Lysanders into occupied Europe. He then accompanied the Lysanders to Burma where he flew 35 successful but hazardous missions supplying Force 136 behind the Japanese lines. He was awarded the OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 1997 for his work as chairman of the Anglo-American community relations committee at RAF Fairford. Peter Arkell passed away on 27th August 2010.
Armitage, Dennis
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   Died : 5 / 3 / 2004
Armitage, Dennis

Having flown 13 wing operations with Douglas Bader, Armitages strongest memories are of a man who was afraid of nothing, who would take on any odds. In the mess this transferred to the pilots so that they eagerly awaited the next day's operations. An RAFVR pilot, Armitage was commissioned and joined 266 Squadron in December 1939. He was appointed Flight Commander in August 1940. On August 12 he claimed the destruction of a Ju 88. 266 Squadron was not a formal part of the Duxford Wing, but did provide an additional element to the wing on a regular basis. Armitage took command of 129 Squadron in June 194 1. Flying from Westhampnett on September 2 1, he was shot down on a sweep and made a POW, meeting up with Bader again in prison camp.
Arnfield, Stanley John
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   Died : 24 / 9 / 1954
Arnfield, Stanley John

Sergeant S.J. Arnfield Stanley John Arnfield was born on 3rd October 1913 and was initially educated in India before going to the Royal Masonic School at Bushey, Hertfordshire. He joined the RAF as an aircraft apprentice in January 1930, passing out as a Fitter of Aero Engines in December 1932. By 1933 he was based at Abingdon with the rank of Leading Aircraftman, he was then posted to Quetta in India in 1935 where he helped with the earthquake tragedy that struck Baluchistan at that time. (It is estimated that between 30-60,000 people died when a force of 7.7 Mw was recorded). During 1936-37 he was involved in assorted supply drops and minor bombing. In June 1938 he began flying Westland Wallace aircraft and carried out a variety of bombing exercises. He had his first flight in a Hurricane on 30th September 1938 and then transferred to 610 Squadron shortly afterwards, flying Spitfires. During 1939 he trained intensively on this aircraft. On the 26th January 1940 flying Spitfire L1006 force landed in the region of ten to twelve miles north of Driffield after he became lost and eventually ran low on fuel. The aircraft was repaired but may infact have landed with the wheels down and have suffered very little damage. Arnfield returned to his home airfield by train. On 31st May, patrolling over Dunkirk, he claimed a Me109 destroyed. This was followed On 12/06/40 a He111 of Wekusta 51 flown by Oblt Gerd Nissen, the Staffelkapitän, was shot down off Margate. Attacked at 0700 by two Spitfires from 610 Squadron flown by Flt Lt John Ellis (P9451/DW-M) and Sgt Stanley Arnfield (P9495 DW-K) the crippled reconnaissance machine then ditched a few miles offshore. Three of the crew managed to get out before the aircraft sank but two others – Uffz Franz Bolinski and Uffz Willi Stiegelmeier – were lost. However, one of the survivors – Reg. Rat. Dr Hermann Freudenberg, a weather specialist – drowned before help arrived in the form of the fishing boat Golden Spray. Arnfield flew continuously through June and July and was shot up by Me109’s in Spitfire R6621 over Dover on 12th August. The aircraft was written off after he brought it back. In another aircraft he claimed Me109’s destroyed on 15th and 16th August followed by a further two on the 18th. Sgt. Arnfield’s luck ran out six days later on the 24th when in combat over Hawkinge in Spitfire R6686. He was shot down by Hptm. Foezoe of 4/JG51 but managed to bale out, his aircraft crashing in flames at Hammil, near Eastry. He broke his ankle on landing and was admitted to Victoria Hospital at Deal. He was recovering for some time and this may explain the failure to award him a DFM, which normally would have been the due of someone with six confirmed victories. By December 1940 Arnfield had returned to flying duties, serving as an instructor with the Commonwealth Flying Training Scheme in Canada. He had been commissioned as a Pilot Officer on 26th July 1941 and promoted to Flying Officer exactly a year later. In September 1943 Arnfield, now a Flight Lieutenant, made the transition to bombers, training on Wellingtons and progressing to operations on Lancasters with 166 Squadron. His first sortie was Berlin on 16th December 1943, followed by many others including Stettin, Brunswick, Leipzig and Stuttgart. His last sortie was on 22nd April 1944 to Dusseldorf LAC Arnfield returned to the UK in the summer of 1937 and applied for piot training. He was accepted and commenced flight training at the Perth Flying Club, flying in Tiger Moths. By November 1937 Sgt. Arnfield had transferred to 7 FTS at Peterborough. Arnfield returned to training duties and continued in this role until the end of the war. He retired from the RAF on 12th February 1951 as a Flight Lieutenant in the Secretarial Branch, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. He died of a heart attack on 24th September 1954.
Arthur, Charles Ian Rose
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   Died : 13 / 10 / 1998
Arthur, Charles Ian Rose

Born 4 June 1918 in Fort Garry, Manitoba; educated at Kelvin High School, Winnipeg. joined 141 Squadron. From Fort Garry, Manitoba. 01 Jun 1943 as a F/Lt he took command of 232 Squadron in Tunisia until 25 Dec and then commanded 72 Squadron at Lagos, Italy. He destroyed a Me 109 on 07 May and was awarded the DFC 9/6/44. He took the squadron to Sisteron, France to cover the landings and returned to Italy on 02 Oct. He was promoted to acting W/Com and awarded a bar to his DFC. He left the RAF as a W/Com on 03 Nov, 1954 and returned to Canada Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the RAF, 29 October 1938. Reported to No.141 Squadron, 10 October 1939; posted to No.242 Squadron, 3 December 1940; posted to No.145 Squadron, 23 May 1941; posted to Central Flying School, Upavon, 18 October 1941. Instructor, No.5 (P) Advanced Flying Unit, Ternhill, December 1941; instructor, No.7 (P) Advanced Flying Unit, Peterborogh; to No.411 Squadron, November 1942; to No.122 Squadron, January 1943; to No.81 Squadron (North Africa), March 1943; to No.242 Squadron (Flight Commander), March 1943; to No.232 Squadron (to command), 1 June 1943; remained until December 1943; posted to Aleppo, December 1943; to No.72 Squadron (to command), April 1944; to No.5 Refresher Flying Unit, Perugia (as Wing Commander), November 1944; to No.239 Wing (Mustangs) as Wing Leader, July 1945. Returned to UK, 1946, reverting to Squadron Leader. No.19 Squadron (in command), April 1946 to August 1948. Retired from RAF, November 1954 and settled in Canada. Air Ministry Bulletin 14231/AL.829 refers. See Michel Lavigne, Canadian Wing Commanders. Known victories as follows: 25 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed, Le Touquet (Circus 23); 30 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with F/O St.Pierre, RAF), Le Touquet area, Circus; 29 June 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with another pilot), Comiso; 17 July 1943, one Bf.109 damaged, Sicily; 12 August 1943, one MC.202 damaged, northwest of Milazzo; 7 May 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed, Lake Bracciano area; 16 May 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with another pilot), Lake Bracciano area; 14 October 1944, one Me.410 destroyed (shared with five other pilots), Bergamo area.
Ash, William
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Ash, William

Volunteer American pilot Bill Ash joined the RCAF and flew Spitfires with 411 Squadron gaining 3 confirmed victories. Shot down in 1942 he became a POW and was sent to Stalag Luft III where he took part in "The Great Escape", and later was involved in more than a dozen escape attempts from POW camps in Poland, Germany and Lithuania. A constant trouble maker to his captors, Bill Ash became a real life "Cooler King" after many hours spent in solitary captivity.
Ashleigh, D D
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Ashleigh, D D

On 30th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH872 of No.401 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and crash landed near Mormal. He was unharmed.
Ashton, D. G.
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   Died : 12 / 8 / 1940
Ashton, D. G.

Pilot Officer D.G. Ashton was with No 266 Squadron from the beginning of the Battle of Britain. Pilot Officer Ashton was shot down in his Spitfire I (P9333) off Portsmouth on the 12th of August 1940, and reported missing in action, aged 20. Pilot Officer Ashton's body was found by a minesweeper later in September and it was buried at sea.
Assheton, W. R.
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Assheton, W. R.

Pilot Officer W.R.Assheton of No 222 Squadron was on patrol on 20th September 1940. Pilot Officer Assheton baled out of his Spitfire I (K9993) with burns after coming under attack from a Bf 109 over the Thames Estuary. Spitfire I (K9993) aircraft crashed near West Hanningfield, Essex.
Atkinson, John
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Atkinson, John

John Atkinson joined the RAF from Oxford University in 1938 and completed his pilot training in England. His first operational posting was in 1940 to 234 Squadron at St Eval, Cornwall, flying Spitfires, before moving on to 609 Squadron at Warwell, Dorchester. In 1942 he converted to Typhoons with 609 Squadron at Duxford, and from there to Biggin Hill and Manston, launching fighter operations over France. When his tour of operations ended in 1943 he was awarded the DFC and went on to become a Flying Instructor until the war was over. Released from the RAF in 1945, he went on to have a successful career in the civil service, and was knighted in 1979.
Atkinson, William James
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 1944
Atkinson, William James

Killed age 21 on 1st June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII MB887 of No.131 Sqn was shot down by flak near St Brieux. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Clifford and Elsie May Atkinson, of Cremorne, New South Wales, Australia.
Audet, Richard
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Audet, Richard


Autret, P J M
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Autret, P J M

Killed on 7th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM312 of No.345 Sqn was hit by flak and the fuel tank exploded. The aircraft crashed on Utah beach.
Ayers, D. H.
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   Died : 23 / 9 / 1940
Ayers, D. H.

Sergeant David H.Ayers left No 600 Squadron in August and joined No 74 Squadron. On the 23rd of September 1940 Ayers baled out of his Spitfire II (P7362) into the sea whilst on a routine patrol and was killed, aged 26. Sergeant David H. Ayers was later washed up on shore on the 4th of October 1940.
Ayerst, Peter V
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Ayerst, Peter V

Peter Ayerst joined the RAF in 1938, and was posted to 73 Squadron in August 1939, flying Hurricanes. He went to France with the squadron, scoring his first victory in April 1940. After a spell instructing, when he shared in the destruction of a He111 with two other instructors, he had postings with both 145 and 243 Squadrons. In July 1942 he went to 33 Squadron, before promotion to flight commander with 238 Squadron, both postings with further combat success. After a period in South Africa, he returned to the UK, joining 124 Squadron flying Spitfire MkVIIs in defence of the invasion ports, where he scored his final victory; then flew Spitfire MkIXs on bomber escorts to Germany. He later became a Spitfire test pilot at Castle Bromwich. Peter finished the war not only a brilliant fighter Ace, but also one of the most highly regarded wartime instructors in the RAF. His final victory tally stood at 5 destroyed, 1 probable, 3 damaged and 2 further destroyed on the ground.
Ayling, C. A. H.
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   Died : 11 / 10 / 1940
Ayling, C. A. H.

Sergeant C.A.H. Ayling of No 43 Squadron, C.A.H.Ayling was killed in action while flying with No 421 flight, he was shot down in his Spitfire Mk II (P7303) on the 11th of October 1940, over Newchurch, Kent, aged 28.
Aylott, George Joseph
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   Died : 19 / 6 / 1944
Aylott, George Joseph

Killed on 19th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH362 of No.274 Sqn developed a glycol leak and crashed into the sea off Beachy Head. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of George Samuel and Martha Rose Aylott, of Canvey Island, Essex.
Ayre, George Desmonde
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   Died : 30 / 5 / 1940
Ayre, George Desmonde

29th January 1940 shared in the destruction of a HE111 of the |Tay Estuary (shared with F/Lt D. Persse Joynt and F/O A.R. Edge 27th February 1940 shared with P/O J.R. Buchanan. destruction ofHE111 off St Abbs Head 30th May 1940 Flying Officer G.D. Ayre was killed. He apparently ran out of petrol and must have spun in on his approach to force land in the grounds of an explosive works at Oakley near Harwich. Age: 25 Grave Reference Sec. H. Grave 165. Cemetery NORTHWOOD CEMETERY Additional Information: Son of George William Bulley Ayre and Jessie Rogerson Ayre, of St. John'S, Newfoundland.
Babbage, C. F.
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Babbage, C. F.

Sergeant C.F.Babbage of No 602 Squadron bailed out to the South of Selsey Bill on the 26th of August 1940. Sergeant Babbage Spitfire had been shot up by a Bf 109 of JG 53.
Bache, K
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   Died : 7 / 5 / 1944
Bache, K

Killed on 7th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK182 of No.331 Sqn crashed and exploded after being sjot down by flak near Moorseele airfield.
Bader, Douglas
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1982
Bader, Douglas

Group Captain Douglas R.S.Bader CBE, DSO and bar, DFC and bar, Legion d'Honneur, Croix de Guerre, whose dazzling success as a fighter pilot with artificial legs made him a national hero, Bader was a legend in his own lifetime for the courage and style with which he defied disablement. Bader had an academic ability which won him a scholarship to St Edward's School and a cadet ship at the elite RAF College, Cranwell. Douglas Bader joined No 23 Squadron at Kenley in July 1930 to fly Gamecocks. Asked to give an aerobatic demonstration in a Bulldog by pilots at a flying club, he declined; whereupon someone made a comment he could not ignore and took-off. Unfortunately the Bulldog's wingtip touched the ground during a low pass and it crashed. Bader lost both legs and was invalided out of the RAF. When war came his perseverance got him accepted back into the RAF for flying duties in Spitfire I's in No 19 Squadron at Duxford. In June 1940, Bader was given command of No 242 Squadron. A Canadian unit, the only one in the RAF at the time, No 242 had been badly mauled in France, and its morale was low. Bader quickly transformed No 242 into a tight, tough squadron by his courage, leadership and uncompromising attitude toward his pilots, ground crews and the RAF high command, with whom he soon had a major brush. After taking charge of No 242, Bader soon discovered that the unit did not have the spare parts or tools to keep its 18 Hurricane fighters operational. After trying to sort out the problem through official channels, Bader signaled 12th Group Headquarters: "242 Squadron operational as regards pilots but non-operational as regards equipment." And he refused to announce his squadron as operational until its lack of tools and spares was rectified. It took a direct meeting between Squadron Leader Bader and Fighter Command's commander Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, to correct the mess. Within 24 hours, No 242 Squadron had all the tools and spares it needed, and Bader signaled 12th Group: "242 Squadron now fully operational." Early in 1941 he commanded the first Tangmere Wing and his tactics then were carried on by Fighter Command for some years. On 11th of August he baled out of his Spitfire, leaving his 'tin' right leg in the Spitfire, and became a prisoner of war for 3½ years, ending it in Colditz Castle after two attempted escapes. He retired from the RAF in July 1946 and rejoined Shell Oil, later being knighted. During only 15 months operations his official score was 22½ enemy aircraft destroyed, although his personal tally was 30! His courage and determination in war and his work for the handicapped in peace inspired others until he passed away in 1983.
Badkin, R W
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Badkin, R W

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM355 of No.130 Sqn was shot down near Peronne.
Baillon, P.A.
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   Died : 28 / 11 / 1940
Baillon, P.A.

P/O P.A.Baillon of No 609 Squadron bailed out of his Spitfire I (P9503) safely on the 27th of October 1940 after combat over Andover. P.A.Baillon was killed in action on the 28th of November 1940 when he was shot down by a Bf 109 near the Isle of Wight. Pilot Officer Baillon is buried at Bayeux in France. At time of death he was 26.
Baker, A. C.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1978
Baker, A. C.

Passed away, 1978.
Baker, H C
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Baker, H C

Just one month before the Battle began, Henry "Butch" Baker had already seen fierce fighting over Dunkirk where he shot down one German aircraft and damaged another. After surviving a car accident, he joined 41 Squadron on September 15 – viewed by many as Battle of Britain Day – when 17 squadrons fought off a major attack. Flew Spitfires and helped destroy seven Messerschmitts in the Battle.
Baker, R
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Baker, R


Balasse, M A L B
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Balasse, M A L B

On 12th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII MB842 EB-Y of No.41 Sqn ran out fuel off Bolt Head and he baled out. He was rescued from the English Channel.
Ball, Alfred Freddy
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Ball, Alfred Freddy

Air Marshall Sir Alfred (Freddy) Ball, KCB DSO DFC attended RAF College, Cranwell in 1939 and joined 13 Squadron in France in March 1940 on Lysanders (Army Co-operation). He joined No 1 PRU Benson early in 1941 on Spitfires. He commanded 4 PRU (later 682 Sqdn) as Squadron Leader in October 1942 and flew out to North Africa for Operation Torch, the Allied landings, flying Spitfires. He was posted to the UK as CF1, 8PR, OTU Dyce, Aberdeen in September 1943 and took over 542 Sqdn Benson in March 1944 (PR Spitfire Mk XIs and Mk XIXs). In September he was promoted to Wing Commander and given command of No 540 Squadron flying Mosquito 16s and 32s. The Squadron moved to France early in 1945 to support the Allied armies. In December, Freddy was posted to Egypt to take command of No 680 PR Sqdn (later to become 13 Sqdn), flying Mosquitoes and Spitfires. He was posted to Staff AHQ East Africa in 1946 and retired from the RAF in April 1979.



Alfred Ball at a print signing session

Ballantyne, J H
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   Died : 8 / 3 / 1944
Ballantyne, J H

Killed on 8th March 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ876 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot down by flak near St Andre de l'Eure.
Balloch, F
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Balloch, F

Taken prisoner on 7th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK855 SK-E of No.165 Sqn was hit by flak south west of Carhaix and crash landed into trees.
Bamberger, Cyril Bam
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   Died : 3 / 2 / 2008
Bamberger, Cyril Bam

Born in Port Sunlight on May 4th 1919, Cyril Bamberger won an electrical engineering apprenticeship at Lever Brothers in 1934. He joined 610 Squadron AuxAF, in 1936 on the ground staff. Accepted for pilot training with the RAF VR in late 1938, he soloed in mid 1939. Bamberger was called up at the outbreak of war and on the 23rd October 1939 was posted to No 8 EFTS, Woodley and later went to 9 FTS, Hullavington to complete his training. He rejoined 610 (F) Squadron at Biggin Hill on July 27th but with no experience on Spitfires, he was sent to Hawarden for three weeks. Back with 610 (F) Squadron, Bamberger claimed a probable Bf109 on August 28th 1940. He was posted to 41 (F) Squadron at Hornchurch, Essex, September 17th and on October 5th he claimed a Bf109 destroyed. After volunteering for Malta, Bamberger left 41 (F) Squadron in mid-October 1940. He sailed from Glasgow on the Aircraft Carrier HMS Argus. Luckily for him, he did not fly off for Malta with the twelve Hurricanes ad two navigating Skuas which did. Only five of the fourteen aircraft reached their destination. Bamberger eventually reached Malta on November 28th on the destroyer HMS Hotspur, and on arrival he joined 261 Squadron. On January 18th 1941 he destroyed a Junkers JU87 Stuka and another the following day. 261 Squadron was dispended on May 21st 1941. Bamberger moved on the 12th to the newly formed 185 (F) Squadron at Hal Far. He was posted back to England on June 12th and was sent to Central Gunnery School at Sutton Bridge. Commissioned in February 1942, he was posted to Northern Ireland as a Gunnery Officer with the Americans who were converting to Spitfires. In March 1943 Bamberger volunteered for North Africa where he joined 93 Squadron at Hal Far, Malta in May. On July 13th operating over Sicily, he shot down a Junkers JU87 Stuka. In August Bamberger joined 243 Squadron in Sicily as a Flight Commander. He was awarded the DFC (28.09.43). On October 16th Bamberger damaged a Bf109, his first success after 243 crossed into Italy. On May 25th 1944 he claimed a Bf109 destroyed and on June 15th a Macci 202 damaged. Bamberger came off operations in July for medical reasons returning to the UK. He was sent on an instructors course and in early 1945 was posted to the Gunnery School at Catfoss. Awarded a bar to his DFC (14.11.44). Bamberger received it from the King at Buckingham Palace on July 3rd 1945. Released in 1946, Bamberger returned to Lever Brothers and rejoined 610 Squadron at Hooten Park, becoming its CO in 1950. When the Korean crisis came, he was recalled to the RAF. In February 1951 he was granted a permanent commission and in May 1952 moved to an Intelligence Unit, assessing strike capabilities of the Chinese and Koreans. Bamberger retired on January 29th 1959 as a Squadron Leader, and became managing director of a small packaging materials company – he started in 1954. On retirement he had an antique shop in Hampshire. Sadly, Cyril Bamberger passed away on 3rd February 2008.
Bamford, J
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Bamford, J

On 27th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK969 of No.421 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and crash landed near Varaville. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair and he was taken prisoner.
Barker, J. K.
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   Died : 4 / 9 / 1940
Barker, J. K.

Sergeant J.K.Barker of No 152 Squadron was killed on 4th of September 1940. His Spitfire I was shot down off Bognor Regis. He baled out but was not rescued and his body washed up on the French Coast. Sergeant Barker's body was buried at Etaples, France, he was 22 years old.
Barron, P H
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   Died : 11 / 7 / 1940
Barron, P H

while flying Spitfire I L1069 Shot down over Portland by ME109 of JG 27 at 18:10hrs, on the 11th of July 1940. F/Lt P.H.Barron baled out with wounds and burns but he died later. 11th July 1940
Barthropp, Paddy
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   Died : 16 / 4 / 2008
Barthropp, Paddy

At the outbreak of war Paddy flew obsolete Hinds, Hectors and Lysanders in combat, but converted to Spitfires and joined 602 Squadron at Tangmere. During the Battle of Britain he flew with some of the great aces - Douglas Bader, Sailor Malan, and Bob Stanford Tuck. In 1941 he was a Flight Commander with 610 Squadron. Continuing to fly Spitfires, now with 122 Squadron based at Hornchurch, he flew fighter sweeps and escort missions. On 17th May 1942 he was shot down over St Omer. He baled out but was captured, spending the next three years as a POW. One of the RAFs best known and best loved characters, though the bane of certain senior officers, Paddy Barthropps RAF service spanned the period from bi-planes to supersonic jets. Joining the RAF in 1938, his first squadron was 613 flying Hinds, Hectors and Lysanders. In 1940 he was released to fly Spitfires with 602 Squadron where he shared in the destruction of two aircraft. He was posted to 610 Squadron, and then to 91 Squadron, shooting down two Bf 109s during summer 1941 and receiving the DFC. In August 1941 he returned to 610 Squadron as a flight commander. He was shot down three times, the third time being taken prisoner ofwar. He had by then brought his total to 9. Scraps in the air were accompanied by scrapes on the ground, and appearances in Magistrates Courts for disorderly conduct. Addicted to fast cars and lively ladies - and the sworn enemy of stuffed shirts everywhere - he was the irrepressible life and soul of any party, and a persistant thorn in the side of overweening authority as the Germans were to discover. The war over, he was posted to the Empire Test Pilots School where he flew over a hundred different types of plane in ten months. Soon, he was out in the Sudan and in serious trouble again - under arrest after taking a hippo to an upper-crust party. As a boy, he had been taught to ride by champion jockey Steve Donaghue and now, posted to Hong Kong, he rode winners on the track at Happy Valley, and seriously thought of turning professional. Then it was back to the U.K. to take up an appointment as a Fighter Station Commander, and to lead the Coronation fly-past over Buckingham Palace. He left the RAF to set up his own luxury car-hire firm. He died on 16th April 2008.
Bartkowiak, Z
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Bartkowiak, Z

On 22nd May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb EN836 of No.303 Sqn developed a glycol leak and he baled out over Merville. He successfully evaded capture.
Barton, A. R. H.
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   Died : 4 / 4 / 1943
Barton, A. R. H.

Pilot Officer A.R.H. Barton was an experienced pilot with both the RAF and F.A.A. before the war. On the 20th September 1940 he was shot down again in a Hurricane I (R2686) by a Bf 109 over Kent. Barton was severely wounded and did not return to operations until February 1941. He was awarded the D.F.C. on the 10th of April 1942, credited with five kills during the Battle of Britain. He was awarded the Bar to the D.F.C. on the 7th of July 1942 for destroying a five enemy aircraft while in Malta. A.R.H.Barton was killed in a flying accident while an instructor on the 4th of April 1943, aged 29.
Barton, Robert Alexander 'Butch'
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   Died : 2 / 9 / 2010
Barton, Robert Alexander 'Butch'

Arrived with 41 sqd 11 October 1936 Departed 15 May 1940 Flight Lieutenant R.A.Barton a Canadian of No 249 Squadron was shot down in his Hurricane I (V6625) over Shell Haven, Essex by a Bf 109 on 5th of September 1940, Barton was wounded. DFC (1940), Bar to DFC (1941), OBE (1945) Retired as Wg Cdr, Feb 1959; died 2 Sep 2010
Bass, Reginald Frederick
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   Died : 29 / 6 / 1944
Bass, Reginald Frederick

Killed aged 21 on 29th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK797 of No.222 Sqn was shot down by Fw190s of JG26 south west of Lisieux. He is buried in Le Mesnil-Durand Communal Cemetery. Son of Frederick Thomas and Sarah Jane Bass, of Coldstream, Berwickshire.
Bauer, Jiri
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   Died : 28 / 6 / 1944
Bauer, Jiri

Killed aged 20 on 28th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH570 of No.310 Sqn was shot down by flak near Caen. He is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery.
Bavis, C H
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Bavis, C H

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb EP114 of No.402 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and was damaged in the subsequent crash landing on a Normandy beach head. He was uninjured and the aircraft later returned to service.
Baxter, Raymond
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   Died : 15 / 9 / 2006
Baxter, Raymond

Spitfire pilot, and the voice of British aviation broadcasting. Raymond Baxter was born on January 25, 1922 in Ilford, Essex. In 1940 at the age of 18, Baxter joined the Royal Air Force and became a Spitfire pilot with the celebrated 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron, rising to the rank of Flight Lieutenant and being mentioned in despatches for his part in Operation Big Ben, when six of 602s Spitfires, converted to carry small bombs, attacked the Bataafsche petrol company in Holland to try to wipe out the headquarters of the German V2 rocket forces, which were the plague of London at the time. Baxter was also twice mentioned in despatches. In 1945 Baxter joined Forces Broadcasting in Cairo. After the war he was deputy director of the British Forces Network in Hamburg and went on to the BBC. Raymond Baxter is probabaly best known for being in the Tomorrows World TV series which he was involved with since the beginning in 1965. Raymond Baxter stayed with Tomorrows World for 12 years. A regular participant in the Monte Carlo Rally — he competed in no fewer than 14 of them — he showed his professionalism in the 1954 event when the car in which he was travelling skidded into a ditch in central France. Although shaken by the incident and sustaining a cut over his eye, Baxter immediately recorded a description of what had happened. On three occasions he was a member of a winning rally team. He was also an accomplished Formula 1 commentator. Baxter would also commentate at many major historical moments, the funerals of Sir Winston Churchill and Lord Mountbatten of Burma, the 1953 Coronation and the the annual Festival of Remembrance. He also commentated at many aviation events and also is know for his commentary for Concorde's first flight. A favourite recreation was boating. He served on the management committee of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and was vice-president from 1987 to 1997. As honorary admiral of the Association of Dunkirk Little Ships he took a prominent part in events to mark the 60th anniversary of the Dunkirk evacuation in June 2000. Baxter was appointed OBE in 2003. Sadly Raymond Baxter died on September 15, 2006, aged 84.
Baxter, S.
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   Died : 14 / 9 / 1940
Baxter, S.

Sergeant S.Baxter of No 222 Squadron, crash landed his Spitfire I (X4275) after combat with a Bf 109 over Rochford on the 14th of September 1940. S.Baxter was killed.
Bayne, Alfred William Alexander
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Bayne, Alfred William Alexander

. Alfie Bayne joined the RAF in January 1936 and joined the Squadron 54 in April 1937. On 7 June 1940, he was assigned to Squadron 17 as Flight Commander. At the head of his squadron, he takes an active part in the Battle of Britain He was shot down in combat on 25th of August 1940. He safely baled out of his Hurricane I (V7407) safely near Portland He was awarded the DFC in November 1940 . In July 1941, he became commander of Squadron 132 when it forms but in February 1942 he was transferred to the Far East. Arrived in Ceylon after the Japanese had attacked, he took command of the Squadron 30 in May 1942, remaining with the unit until February 1943. He was then posted to Burma as commander of Squadron 136 , managing to shoot down two Japanese aircraft which 1 will be confirmed. His tour of duty ends in May 1943. He left the RAF in 1946 with the rank of Wing Commander and died May 28, 1963. Flight Lieutenant A.W.A. Bayne of No. 17 Squadron was . Bayne later flew Spitfires with No 54 Squadron in the Battle of Britain.
Beake, Percival H
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   Died : 25 / 6 / 2016
Beake, Percival H

Joining the RAFVR in April 1939, Percival Beake was mobilised at the outbreak of war. Posted to 64 Squadron on Spitfires in the summer of 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain, he flew with them until June 1941 when he was posted first to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill, and then 601 Squadron at Duxford. On February 2nd 1941 Percy made a forced landing in a field at Sheperdswell in Kent. He tried to make a wheels-down landing to save his aircraft but ended up head down in the mud. Percy’s aircraft was a write-off and he suffered concussion for which he was treated in the RAF Officers Hospital in Torquay. He did not get back to the Squadron until March 27th. On May 16th the Squadron was posted to Turnhouse near Edinburgh. On June 26th Percy complained to the CO about the lack of combat opportunity there and the following day he was posted to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill. On July 8, having taken part in a mission over France, he was shot down by an Me 109 just after leaving the French coast but he managed to bale out over the sea and was picked up 18 miles east of Dover by an RAF Rescue Launch. Towards the end of October the Squadron moved to Digby in Lincolnshire and by the end of the year Percy had completed 100 operation sorties and was declared ‘tour expired’. In January 1942 Percy was posted to 601 Squadron which at the time was equipped with Aircobras. These aircraft had serious maintenance problems and were never made operational. However, the Squadron was re-equipped with Spitfires in March and was posted to Malta. The CO said “Beaky you are tour expired” so I can’t take you to Malta – you will have to go to instructing at an OUT. So it was he arrived at 58 OUT in Grangemouth on April 1st 1942. After a spell instructing he returned for his second tour in December 1942, joining 193 Squadron as a Flight Commander. In May 1944 he took command of 164 Squadron at Thorney Island flying Typhoons, moving to France shortly after the Normandy Invasion. With two victories to his credit he was awarded the DFC in September 1944.

"Starting with 6th August 1944 my log book records that a successful attack was carried out on an enemy strong point in a quarry and that on the following morning I flew home on a very rare 48 hour leave. For a few days after my return we had only one specific target - an enemy dump which we effectively bombarded with rockets on 11th August - so we were deployed on armed reconnaissances. After landing from one of these on 13th August my Wing Commander, Walter Dring, called me to his caravan and said - Beaky, you have just done your last op. You are not to fly again and that is an order, until returning to the UK. I am arranging for your relief as soon as possible. - I was absolutely stunned and my lasting memory of that period is not of carnage but of acute embarrassment at having been grounded. I just hated sending the squadron up without myself leading and remember making frequent calls to the met office hoping to get forecasts of filthy weather that would make operational flying impossible. In the event, my relief, Squadron Leader Ian Waddy, was shot down by flak within two or three days of taking over command, so maybe Wally Dring had some sort of premonition that prompted my grounding."
Beardsley, Robert
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Beardsley, Robert

Pilot Officer Robert A.Beardsley flew with Spitfire's in No 610 Squadron and No 41 Squadron's during the Battle of Britain. He attacked a Do 17 and a Bf 109 on 30th September 1940 he became the prey. Six Bf 109's chased him and shot up his Spitfire with machine gun and cannon fire, Pilot Officer Beardsley managed to land at Hawkinge and jumped clear whilst the aircraft was still rolling to a halt well alight with the airfield tender giving chase.
Beaumont, W.
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   Died : 23 / 9 / 1940
Beaumont, W.

Pilot Officer W.Beaumont of No 152 Squadron baled out of his Sptitfire I (R6831) after being hit by a Junkers Ju 88 off Portland on the 27th of August 1940. Beaumont was unhurt. W.Beaumont was lost over the Channel on the 23rd of September 1940 in a Spitfire I (R7016), cause remains unknown.
Beech, W L
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   Died : 16 / 1 / 1941
Beech, W L

16th January 1941 while flying Spitfire N3191 when the wings broke off in a dive and the aircraft crashed near Truro, Cornwall. pilot P/O W L Beech was killed
Beeson, Duane
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Beeson, Duane


Bell, John Swift
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   Died : 30 / 8 / 1940
Bell, John Swift

At the age of 18 he joined 503 (Special Reserve) Squadron at Waddington early in 1935 and was commissioned in April. It was decided to disband 503 on 1st November 1938 and absorb the personnel into 616 Squadron, Auxiliary Air Force, then being formed at Doncaster as a bomber unit. The new squadron was transferred to Fighter Command on 15th December 1938. Bell moved to 616 and was called to full-time service on 24th August 1939 On 21st February 1940 while in Spitfire K9988 collided with another aircraft at 14.15hrs at Leconfield airfield while the Spitfire was being scrammbled. The other aircraft is believed to have been Magister N3859 and was struck whilst the pilot of this Spitfire was trying to avoiding hitting a Battle. The collision caused damage to both aircraft, deemed enough to write both off at a later date. . Over Dunkirk on 1st June 1940 he destroyed a Me109 but was then himself shot down into the sea. He was picked up by the minesweeper HMS Halcyon and landed at Dover. In mid-June Bell intercepted and damaged a He115, which jettisoned its bombs and fled. On 1st July he shared in damaging a He111 over Yorkshire. On 30th August Bell was shot down in a head-on attack on Me109's over West Mailing. His Spitfire, X4248, crashed and burned out and Bell was killed. (ther eis a report that He crashed whilst approaching West Malling ) He was 23 and is buried in St Peter's Cemetery, Eastgate, Lincoln.
Bell-Walker, H. J.
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Bell-Walker, H. J.

Sergeant H.J.Bell-Walker of No 72 Squadron. On the 18th of September 1940 he was badly wounded when his Spitfire I (R6704) was attacked by Bf 109's over Gravesend, Kent. On the 12th of August 1941 he was shot down in his Spitfire V by a Bf 109, wounded and captured while flying with No 602 Squadron as No 2 to Squadron Leader A.Deere.
Bennett, Geoffrey Charles
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   Died : 0 / 4 / 1941
Bennett, Geoffrey Charles

31st May 1940 Baled out over Dunkirk Bailed out after being damaged by an Me109. Rescued. Geoffrey Charles Bennett went missing in April 1941 still with 609.
Bennions, Ben
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   Died : 30 / 1 / 2004
Bennions, Ben

Pilot Officer George Harman Bennions of No 41 Squadron. On the 1st of October 1940 after combat with a Bf 109 over Henfield, Sussex. He baled out of his Spitfire I (X4559) badly wounded. Bennions was a veteran with a score of 11 destroyed and 5 probables.
Benson, N. J. V.
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   Died : 28 / 8 / 1940
Benson, N. J. V.

Pilot Officer N.J.V.Benson of No 603 Squadron killed when he was shot downon the 28th of August 1940. His Spitfire I (N3105) crashed near Tenterden.
Berry, Ronald
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   Died : 13 / 8 / 2000
Berry, Ronald

Pilot Officer Ronald Berry joined the R.A.F.V.R. in 1937. He joined No 603 Squadron as a Sergeant Pilot and was commissioned in June 1940. He flew spitfires during the Battle of Britain and attained a score of 7 confirmed 4 shared and 6 probables. 6 of the confirmed being Bf 109's.
Beurling, George
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Beurling, George


Biggs, Jack
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Biggs, Jack

Serving with 17 Sqn on Hurricanes he then transferred to Spitfires flying on the Burma front from March 1944 until the end of September 1945 as air cover for the planned invasion on Malaya which, as a result of the Nuclear attacks on the Japanese Empire, never happened.
Bisdee, John
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   Died : 21 / 10 / 2000
Bisdee, John

John Derek Bisdee was born on November 20th 1915 at Weston-Super-Mare, and educated at Marlborough. He joined the RAF Voluntary Reserve, and began the war as a sergeant pilot. His combat career started while with 609 (West Riding) squadron RAAF, flying Spitfires when the squadron was moved from Edinburgh to Drem in December 1939. They participated in the air cover of the evacuation of the BEF form Dunkirk. John Bisdee destroyed six aircraft between July 1940 and July 1941, including an Me110 during an eventful day n August 1940 when they attacked a strong Luftwaffe force of 45 JU88's escorted by many Me109s and Me110s. In July 1941 he became instructor at No 61 Operational training unit. While here he had a small speaking roll in the classic wartime film The First of the Few. John Bisdee became commander of 601 (County of London) auxiliary Spitfire squadron and embarked (along with 603 (Edinburgh) Squadron) for Malta on board the US carrier Wasp. While off Algiers 47 Spitfires took of for Malta. and almost immedniatly upon arriving took part in combat. John Bisdee shot down JU88. He himself had to bail out. with a damaged parachute dangling by one leg, he had to disentangle himself as he fell, managing just in time and landing in the sea, paddling his way 6 miles in his dinghy to Malta. in June 1942 the squadron went to Egypt. In August John Bisdee became flight training officer at the Middle East Headquarters, Cairo, moving in 1943 as Wing Commander for day fighters in Tunisia. In July 1943, after the capture of the island of Lampedusa, halfway between Malta and Sicily, Bisdee was appointed its governor - the first governor in liberated Europe, as he liked to claim. Returning to North Africa, Bisdee trained Free French pilots at Bone. Later, after a brief spell in Corsica, he commanded No 322 Wing at Bone. In 322 Wing wre three Spitfire squadrons, a Beaufighter Squadron a Wellington Squadon used in anti shipping role and an Air Sea Rescue unit. Group Captain John Bisdee left the Royal Air Force in 1945 with his offcial score of 8 but it is likely there were a few others. Sadly John Bidee died at the age of 84 on the 21st October 2000. Group Captain John Bisdee was awarded the DFC in 1941 and appointed OBE in 1943.
Bishop, Arthur
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Bishop, Arthur

Arthur Bishop is the son of Billy Bishop VC, perhaps the most famous of all the First World War Canadian Aces. Arthur joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941. Arriving in England he joined 401 Squadron RCAF flying Spitfires as part of 83 Group in the then recently formed 2nd TAF. After D-Day the Squadron was based in France, where he continued intensive flying. After the war he became a distinguished Canadian author, whose books include The Splendid Hundred - the story of Canadians who flew in the Battle of Britain.
Bisley, John
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Bisley, John

Fl Lt John Bisley DFC Royal Australian Air Force, fighter pilot joined the RAAF in 1940 and was posted to England where he joined 122 Sqn RAF. On 29 March 1942 he flew a Spitfire off HMS Eagle and landed at Malta as part of operation Picket II. On 5 April 1942 Plt Off John Bisley was flying one of three Mk VB Spitfires of 126 Sqn RAF who intercepted 100 German aircraft attacking Malta. He was then attacked by 12 Me109s from JG-53 who took it in turns to attack two at a time to try and shoot him down and he was hit by 55 cannon shells. Fl Lt John Bisley DFC said I would flick the aircraft over, standing it on its wingtip just 5 or 10 feet above the water and pulll into a tight turn go part way then flick back the other way. He then made a wheels up landing at Ta Kali and watched from a slit trench as two of the 109s then strafed what was left of his Spitfire. This was the intense aerial air battles over Valetta in April 1942. Between the summer of 1940 and the end of 1942, Malta became one of the most bombed places on earth. The RAFs desperate fight to retain control of the diminutive Mediterranean island, and the defiant courage of the people of Malta, is one of the epic stories of World War Two. Bisley was awareded the DFC on the 7th July 1942. From April to early July, Bisley shot down a Junkers Ju88, a Ju87, two Me109s a Macchi MC202 and a half share in a Savoia-Marchetti SM.84. He returned back the England and then to Australia in August 1942 joinming 452 Sqn in Darwin flying Spitfire MKVs. On 20 June 1943, Flight Lieutenant John Henry Eric Bisley (402720) shot down a Nakajima KI-49 (Helen) (Squadron Leader R. S. MacDonald, and Flight Lieutenant D. Evans also each shot down a Japanese Helen or Sally.) John Bisley became a test and ferry pilot from 1944 and then a instructor at the Central Flying School. He left the Ryal Australian Air Force in August 1945 and after the war established an import export business.
Bjoernstad, Bjoern
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Bjoernstad, Bjoern

Survived a collision on take off from North Weald with Spitfire EN130 on 4th January 1944 when he baled out to safety. He was flying Spitfire Mk.IX BS148 FN-B of No.332 Sqn.
Bjornstad, H E
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Bjornstad, H E

On 8th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX NH172 of No.332 Sqn was hit by flak and abandoned near Montebourg. He baled out and evaded capture.
Blackstone, M E
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Blackstone, M E

On 19th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK801 SK-A was damaged by flak south of Sizun, but he managed to return safely.
Blair, Ian
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   Died : 5 / 10 / 2016
Blair, Ian

Ian Blair joined 113 Squadron in 1938 as a AC1/Armourer AG. on Hawker Hind and later Blenheim Mk 1s. He took part in the heavy fighting of the first Lybian campaign. He was forced to take control and fly the Blenheim airceaft after his pilot was killed following an attack by an Italian Fiat CR 42. Remarkably he managed not only to evade the enemy aircraft, but fly to fly the Blenheim 350 miles back to his base where he made a succesful textbook landing. This extraordinary action earned him the award of an immediate DFM. The experience led him to train as a pilot at No 4 SFTS RAF Habbaniya, where the No 6 War Course were heavily engaged in operations to raize the siege of the base from the Iraqi Army. He was finally awarded his wings in May 1941. On return to the UK he served with 501 Squadron on combat duties on Spitfire Mk V's until injured as a result of enemy action. On return to flying duties he was posted to 602 Squadron flying MkV's and MkIX's until June 1944. In February 1944, he claimed a high altitude victory by destroying a Me.109 F at an altitude of 35,000 feet, flying a Spitfire Mk.VII H.F.
Blake, Arthur
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   Died : 29 / 10 / 1940
Blake, Arthur

Sub Lieutenant Arthur Blake of No 19 Squadron was killed on the 29th of October 1940 after an encounter with a Messerschmitt Me 109, his Spitfire II (P7423) crashed near Chelmsford, Essex.
Blakeslee, Donald
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   Died : 3 / 9 / 2008
Blakeslee, Donald

Joining the RAF in 1940 Don Blakeslee flew Spitfires with 401 Squadron. When the Eagle Squadron were formed he transferred as an experienced flight commander with several victories to his credit. An aggressive and fearless fighter pilot, Blakeslee was promoted to lead 133 Squadron, and was described as the best fighter leader the war produced. Already an Ace, he transferred to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group. By the war end he had over four years of continuous combat flying, and 14.5 air victories to his credit. Colonel Don Blakeslee sadly passed away on 3rd September 2008.
Blatchford, Howard Peter
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   Died : 3 / 5 / 1943
Blatchford, Howard Peter

Joined 41 Sqd 10 January 1937 Departed 20th April 1940 n April 1940 he was posted to No. 212 Squadron RAF, flying photo-reconnaissance operations. In June he joined the Photographic Development Unit as a flight commander, later transferring to No. 17 Squadron RAF in September, flying Hurricanes. He soon joined No. 257 Squadron RAF, under the command of Sqn Ldr Robert Stanford Tuck Flight Officer H.Peter Blatchford was a Canadian, he served with No 17 Squadron & No 257 Squadron's during the Battle of Britain flying Hurricane's. He became Commanding Officer of No. 257 Squadron RAF in July 1941. Blatchford was then promoted to Wing Commander in September that year, becoming Wing leader of the Digby Wing. He finished his tour of duty in April 1942, returning to operations in February 1943 and Wing Commander of the Coltishall Wing. Leading the wing to escort bomber attacking a power station in Amsterdam, Blatchford was shot down and killed in action on 3 May 1943 by Obfw. Hans Ehlers of II Gruppe, Jagdgeschwader 1. His body was never found. Blatchford had by this time claimed 5 aircraft shot down, 3 shared aircraft shot down, 3 'probables', 4 damaged and 1 shared damaged
Bodie, C. A. W.
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   Died : 24 / 2 / 1942
Bodie, C. A. W.

Pilot Officer C.A. (Bogle)Bodie of No 66 Squadron was in combat and had to force-land his Spitfire I ( X4321) by Barnhurst Lane, Hawkinge the 7th of September 1940. Pilot Officer Bodie was later killed in flying accident February 24th 1942
Boitel-Gill, D. P. A.
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   Died : 18 / 9 / 1941
Boitel-Gill, D. P. A.

Flight Lieutenant Derek B.P.A.Boitel-Gill of No 152 Squadron landed his Spitfire I (K9954) on the 15th of August 1940 at Cherbourg following with a Bf 109 combat over Portland. The Spitfire I was a write off but pilot Boitel-Gill was uninjured.
Bonjean, L. T.
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   Died : 8 / 6 / 1944
Bonjean, L. T.

Killed on 8th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL927 of No.345 Sqn crashed into the English Channel after suffering engine problems.
Booth-Jones, Peter
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Booth-Jones, Peter

Joined the RAAF in January 1941. After initial training in Australia, gained his wings and graduated as a Pilot Officer in Canada. Peter was posted to 58 OTU in the UK and converted to Spitfires, then posted to 118 Sqn at Ibsley until March 1942. He then returned to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in Juner 1942. Flying Kittyhawks Peter took part in the Battle of Milne Bay and on 27th August, he and Flt Lt Bruce Watson attacked 3 Val Dive Bombers over the Bay. They were credited with sharing 1 destroyed, 1 probable and 1 damaged. On 27th November he flew S A29-133 on a scramble from Cairns and again on 1st December. He was posted as an instructor to 2 OTU Mildura until September 1944. Sqn Ldr Jones was posted as CO to 76 Sqn based at Noemfoor, then Morotai, Sanga Sanga and Labuan until the end of the war.
Borrossis,
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   Died : 29 / 2 / 1944
Borrossis,

Killed on 29th February 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ853 of No.340 Sqn flew into the sea and exploded 80 miles west of Ushant.
Borudy,
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Borudy,

On 20th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK204 of No.340 Sqn suffered engine failure and force landed in France. He was ok, but the aircraft was written off.
Bouskill, R R
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Bouskill, R R

On 14th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX NH413 of No.401 Sqn RCAF was damaged beyond repair after crash landing. He had been landing on the airfield, but attempted to take off once more in order to avoid a motorcycle, stalling the aircraft and causing it to crash land. He was uninjured.
Boyle, J. G.
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   Died : 28 / 9 / 1940
Boyle, J. G.

Flight Officer J.G.Boyle from No 41 Squadron was killed in action when he was shot down in his Spitfire Ia (X4426) on the 28th of September 1940 over Charing, Kent.
Brace, Arthur H.
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Brace, Arthur H.

Flying Officer Arthur H Brace joined the RAF in 1941. After pre-elementary training he went to Canada for flying training, in Neepawa and Moosejaw, gaining his wings in Oct 1942. Arthur then went on to General Reconnaissance School on Prince Edward Island. On return to the UK he completed an Operational Training course at Dyce, Scotland, and was posted to Benson in Sept 1943, where, whilst awaiting posting to a PR squadron, he joined No 309 FT & ADU which was concerned with supplying the latest marks of PR Spitfires to our overseas Squadrons; during this time Arthur ferried aircraft to Italy and India. He joined No 542 PR Squadron in August 1944 and remained with it until August 1945. He then spent a short time with Meteological Squadron no 519 before being posted to No 16 Squadron, BAFO, stationed at Celle, Germany where injuries incurred in a road accident in March 1946 put paid to any further flying. he left the RAF in August 1946.
Bradshaw, John
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Bradshaw, John

Volunteering to fly with the RAF, John Bradshaw flew Spitfires with 41 Squadron. An experienced pilot, he transferred to the USAAF in 1943 and was immediately posted to the 56th Fighter Group, flying with the 63rd Fighter Squadron. He flew a total of 126 combat missions, flew on D-Dat, belly-landed twice in Holland, and downed 1.5 enemy aircraft.
Braley, Richard
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Braley, Richard

Richard Braley joined the Royal Air Force as a volunteer in March, 1942. He flew Spitfires with 64 Squadron before being personally recruited by by General McColpin to join 133 Squadron - the third "Eagle" squadron to be formed by the RAF. On September 12, 1942, the Eagle Squadrons were transferred to the USAAF and activated as the 4th Figher Group. Richard Braley was one of the squadron P-51 strafing experts - attacking and destroying numerous trains, a bridge and an electrical plant. He flew over 210 combat missions, first in Spitfires, then in P-47s and P-51s - including 3 missions as Flight Commander of 336 Squadron on D-Day.
Brearley, Peter G
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Brearley, Peter G

Flt. Lt. Peter G Brearley DFC joined the RAF in 1941 from Cambridge University Air Sqn. He obtained his Wings in 1942, and then completed a navigation course at 3 School of General Reconnaissance and after OTU in Novembe 1942 Peter G Brearley was posted to 140 Squadron, Army Co-op Command, later Fighter Command, then Tactical Air Force. At first equipped with P.R Spitfires then P.R Mosquitoes. A Photographic Reconnaissance unit dedicated to the Army Intelligence, making a revising maps for the coming invasion, beach gradients for troop landings and photo targets relevant to that operation. Also coverage of flying bomb sites to enable No. 2 Group (Boston & Mitchell medium bombers), stationed on the same airfield to carry out bombing raids to minimise the V1 threat. V2s were launched from mobile lorries so we attacked when seen by fighter-bombers. At first Peter flew Spitfires and later Mosquitoes with F/O Leslie W Preston GM as navigator Flt. Lt Peter G Brearley was awarded the D.F.C in August 1944, presented by H.M. George VI at Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh: - Citation - This Officer has shown great keenness and ability and can always be relied upon to complete his allocated task. He has made a great number of high level photographic sorties, often through most adverse weather, but his results have always been of the highest order. His Squadron started at Mount Farm, near Benson, Oxon, then moved to Hartford Bridge, Hants, re-named Blackbushe, and finally to Northolt after which he left in May 1944. Flt. Lt. Peter G Brearley DFC finished his RAF service as a flying instructor on Mosquitoes when he was sent as a flying instructor to 132 O.T.U, RAF East Fortune, East Lothian. They were the vanguard in converting the Beaufighter squadrons operating from RAF Banff on the Mosquito. As Beaufighters were phased out the O.T.U used Mosquitos entirely. The unit moved to RAF Brawdy for three months in 1945 during which time VE-Day came. Flt. Lt. Peter G Brearley DFC unit then moved back to RAF East Fortune awaiting demob. He had a short spell March to April 1946 at RAF Tain with Coastal Command Instructors School until it closed, after which he was sent back to East Fortune. Flt. Lt. Peter G Brearley DFC was demobbed in August 1946.
Breeze, R. A.
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   Died : 28 / 1 / 1945
Breeze, R. A.

Killed January 28th 1945
Brigden, Donald Andrew
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   Died : 1 / 1 / 1945
Brigden, Donald Andrew

Killed on 1st January 1945 after his Spitfire MK420 of No.442 Sqn RCAF was damaged in combat with fighters and damaged beyond repair after a forced landing near Heesch. He is buried in Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery.
Brochu, V A G
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Brochu, V A G

On 5th June 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK465 of No.441 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and he baled out off Selsey. He was rescued off the French coast 42 hours later.
Brooks, James
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Brooks, James

Jim Brooks joined the 31st Fighter Group in Italy in early 1944, flying the P51 against Me109s, Fw190s, and the Italian Macchi Mc202. He scored his first victory on a mission to Ploesti. Later, leading the 307th Fighter Squadron on a Russian shuttle mission, they engaged a large formation of Ju87 Stukas, shooting down 27 enemy aircraft, Jim Brooks accounting for three of them. He ended his tour with 280 combat hours, and 13 confirmed victories.
Brothers, Peter
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   Died : 18 / 12 / 2008
Brothers, Peter

Learnt to fly at the age of 16 and joined the RAF two years later in 1936. He first saw action in 1940 when as a Flight Commander in 32 Squadron, based at Biggin Hill, he flew his Hurricane against the fighters and bombers of the Luftwaffe. He recalls this as an intensely busy period, during which he shot down an Me109 - his first enemy aircraft; by the end of August that same year his tally of enemy aircraft shot down increased to eight. Awarded the DFC, he was transferred to 257 Squadron where he joined Bob-Stanford Tuck as a Flight Commander. Promoted in 1941 to Squadron Leader, Pete Brothers then took command of 457 Squadron RAAF, equipped with Spitfires. A year later when 457 Squadron returned to Australia, Pete took command of 602 Squadron. In the early autumn of 1942 he went on to become Wing Leader of the Tangmere Wing, succeeding his old friend, Douglas Bader. By the end of the war Pete Brothers had amassed 875 operational hours over a 44-month period. He was credited with having personally shot down 16 enemy aircraft and damaged many more. He later went on to command 57 Squadron during the Malaya campaign. Upon return to the UK Pete Brothers joined the V-Force, flying Valiant-4 jet bombers. He retired in 1973. Sadly, Pete Brothers died 18th December 2008.
Brown, Bernard Walter
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   Died : 23 / 1 / 2017
Brown, Bernard Walter

Flight Lieutenant Bernard Walter Brown was accepted for a short service commission in 1938, and after being accepted arrived in England in September, training at 5 E&RFTS, Hanworth and in late January 1939 he was posted to 5FTS, Sealand. He then went to No 1 School of Army Co-Operation at Old Sarum for a course on Lysanders in August 1939, and soon after joined 613 Squadron. Bernard Walker Brown was flying one of six Hectors detailed to dive-bomb gun emplacements near Calais. On the way to the target, he test-fired his forward gun but a fault caused the muzzle attachment to fly off, penetrate the fuselage and hole the main fuel tank. He jettisoned his bombs and turned back and make a forced-landing. In August 1940 he volunteered for Fighter Command, converting to Spitfires. He joined 610 Squadron at Biggin Hill. In late September he went to 72 Squadron, but on the 23rd was shot down by a Bf 109. He bailed out of the aircraft, badly wounded. Returning to active duty in November 1940, he was posted to 8FTS, Montrose for an instructor's course, after which he went to Rhodesia, subsequently instructing at Cumalo. In 1943, he trained with Transport Command, becoming a ferry pilot. He flew between the United Kingdom and the Middle East. He transferred to the RNZAF in January 1944 and by the end of the year was flying Halifaxes. He was released in 1945 to fly Dakotas with BOAC and later joined BEA, flying with the airline until his retirement in 1972.
Brown, Maurice P
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   Died : 20 / 1 / 2011
Brown, Maurice P

Maurice Peter Brown (known as Peter) was born in London on 17th June 1919. On leaving school he qualified for entry in the civil service with an appointment in the Air Ministry. But in April 1938 he left to join the Royal Air Force with a short service commission. In September 1939 he was posted to 611 West Lancashire Squadron with Spitfires in 12 Group, initially at Duxford and then Digby. His initiation into battle was over Dunkirk. He was at readiness throughout the Battle of Britain, including with the controversial Ducford Big Wing on 15th September, when the Luftwaffe's morale was broken, and then in late September with 41 Squadron at Hornchurch where the fiercest fighting with highest casualties had taken place. It was a quantum leap. In June 1941, after serving as a flight commander in the squadron, Peter was posted as an instructor to 61 Operational Training Unit at Heston and other OTUs and then at AFUs as a Squadron Leader Flying. He left the RAF with the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the Air Force Cross. In his flying career, Maurice Peter Brown flew Spitfire Mk.I, Mk.II and Mk.V. We have learned the sad news that Maurice Peter Brown passed away on 20th January 2011.

Cranston Fine Arts would like to extend our many thanks to Squadron Leader Maurice Peter Brown for spending a day (17/2/2010) with us signing a number of our art prints.

Maurice Peter Brown signing an original pencil drawing of 41 Sqn Spitfires.

Maurice Peter Brown signing High Patrol by Ivan Berryman.

Maurice Peter Brown, 4th from left of this picture.

M P Brown in his flying gear.

Peter Brown, wearing his medals.

Spitfire EB-J of Maurice Peter Brown, 41 Squadron.

M P Brown in his Spitfire EB-J of No.41 Sqn.

Peter Brown at a print signing session in February 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts would like to extend our many thanks to Maurice Peter Brown for spending a day (17/2/2010) with us signing a number of our art prints.

Brown, Norman
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Brown, Norman

Served on Spitfires with 611 and 41 Squadrons. On 1st November 1940 Norman was part of a flight of Spitfires that overshot Hornchurch due to poor visibility and soon found themselves in the London Balloon Barrage area. These balloons were tethered with metal cables and upon striking one; Browns aircraft was seriously damaged, forcing him to land in the built-up area of Dagenham. He left the squadron in February 1941 and left the RAF that April, working in the timber industry for the rest of the war.
Brown, Samuel
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Brown, Samuel


Bryan, A J
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Bryan, A J

On 21st May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ645 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak near Achiens and he baled out, evading capture successfully.
Brzeski, Stanislaw
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   Died : 3 / 12 / 1972
Brzeski, Stanislaw

Stanislaw Brzeski came from Poland to join the RAF, and was with No.307 Sqn by 9th September 1940. He transferred to No.303 Sqn on 14th October 1940, then to No.245 Sqn on 8th November 1940. His final transfer of the year saw him join No.249 Sqn in December 1940. He scored his first victory with this squadron, claiming an Me109 on 10th February 1941. The bulk of his victories would be scored with No.317 Sqn, however, which he joined on 25th February 1941. Here he claimed victories over an Me109, a Ju88, an He111 and an Fw190, as well as half claims on an Me109 and a Ju88. In addition, he claimed an Fw190 probable and another damaged. He transferred to No.302 Sqn on 23rd April 1943, where he claimed a further two Fw190s and a half claim of an Fw190, plus another probable. This would be the last of his victories, as he moved to No.303 Sqn once again on 28th December 1943. On 21st May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb EP461 of No.303 Sqn failed to return from a mission to the Pas de Calais. He was taken prisoner until the end of the war. He passed away on 3rd December 1972.
Budil, B
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Budil, B

On 19th April 1944 his No.312 Sqn Spitfirre Mk.IX MK248 was shot down by Fw190s of JG26 and he baled out near Mechelen, and was taken prisoner. A claim of a Spitfire matching the time and location was made by Major Karl Borris of JG26.
Burnett, R
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Burnett, R


Burton, Howard Frizelle
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   Died : 13 / 6 / 1943
Burton, Howard Frizelle

Missing 13th June 1943.
Butler, J
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Butler, J


Byrne, John
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Byrne, John

With the RAF since 1938, Byrne flew Hurricanes, Spitfires, P-47s, Tempests and Typhoons during WWII. Upon joining 197 Sqn in March 1944 he flew Typhoons during one the squadrons most hectic periods in the run up to D-Day and throughout the subsequent Allied invasion, mostly on low-level bombing missions. In total Byrne completed over 150 combat operations and finally left the RAF in 1946.
Cabas, V
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Cabas, V


Caister, J. R.
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Caister, J. R.

Pilot Officer J.R.Caister of No 603 Squadron was taken prisoner on the 6th of September 1940 after he was shot down by fighters from JG 54 near to Calais. Caister force landed his Spitfire I (X4260) in France.
Caldwell, Clive
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   Died : 5 / 8 / 1994
Caldwell, Clive

Citation for the Distinguished Flying Cross, gazetted 26th December 1941. :This officer has performed splendid work in the Middle East operations. He has at all times shown dogged determination and high devotion to duty which have proved an inspiration to his fellow pilots. On one occasion, during a patrol, he was attacked by 2 Messerschmitt 109s. His aircraft was badly damaged, while he himself received wounds on his face, arms and legs. Nevertheless, he courageously returned to the attack and shot down one of the hostile aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Caldwell has destroyed at least 4 enemy aircraft.

Citation for the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross, gazetted 26th December 1941. :This officer continues to take his toll of enemy aircraft. One day in December, 1941, Flight Lieutenant Caldwell led his flight against a number of Junkers 87s and, during the combat, he personally shot down 5 of the enemys aircraft bringing his total victories to 12.

Cale, Francis Walter
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   Died : 15 / 8 / 1940
Cale, Francis Walter

Pilot Officer F.W.Cale was an Australian and sailed for England on February 2nd 1939. With his elementary flying successfully completed, Cale was granted his commission in May 1939. flew Spitfires whilst serving with No 266 Squadron. Cale was shot down on the 15th of August 1940 in his Spitfire I (N3168) near Maidstone, Kent.Cale baled out and his parachute opened correctly. However all that was located on the ground later is a parachute with burnt straps. Cale's body was later recovered from the River Medway on the 16th of August 1940. He was aged 25. He is buried in Westminster City Cemetery, Ealing.
Cambell, John
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Cambell, John

John Cambell flew Spitfires with 234 Squadron, before joining 121 Eagle Squadron. After the transfer of the Eagles to the USAAF, John chose to remain with the RAF and was posted to 258 Squadron for the final defence of Singapore, and then to 605 Squadron defending Java. With four victories in the Far East to his credit, in March 1942 the squadron was over-run by the Japanese, and John became a POW in a harsh prison camp in Java for the next 3 and a half years.
Campbell, A. R. McL.
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Campbell, A. R. McL.

Pilot Officer A.R. McL Campbell of No 54 Squadron was wounded on the 24th of August 1940. His Spitfire I (X4019) was also damaged by a Bf 109 during this combat, over Manston.
Campbell, J R
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Campbell, J R

On 22nd May 1944, he returned unharmed after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK919 of No.1 Sqn was damaged.
Carbury, Brian
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   Died : 7 / 1962
Carbury, Brian


Cardell, P. M.
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1940
Cardell, P. M.

Pilot Officer P.M.Cardell of No 616 Squadron made a forced landing at Ilford, Essex on the 1st of September 1940. He escaped injury but his Spitfire I (L1020) was a write off due do the damage. On the 27th of September 1940 Cardell was killed when his parachute failed to deploy after he baled out of his Spitfire I (N3244) after combat over the Channel.
Care, Raymond
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Care, Raymond


Carey, J
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Carey, J


Carmichael, Hoagy
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 1997
Carmichael, Hoagy

Commander Peter (Hoagy )Carmichael was born on the 11th of August 1923. In 1942 Peter Carmichael joined the Royal Navy and began pilot training in the US and South Africa, and went on to fly the Spitfire and F4U Corsairs during the final days of the Second World War. After the war, Carmichael flew the Blackburn Firebrand. In June 1948 Carmichael converted to fly the Hawker Sea Fury. In 1952 Hoagy Carmichael, was deployed to Korea with 802 Squadron. The squadron was on board HMS Theseus and travelled to Malta. This was followed by a two month break for an intensive work-up at RNAS Hal Far on Malta, before the squadron sailed to Korea aboard HMS Ocean in April, with a four day stop over in Hong Kong where addtional aircraft arrived. On 9th August 1952 Carmichael, flying his regular Sea Fury (WJ232), was leading a four aircraft formation to attack railway facilities in North Korea between Manchon and Pyongyang. While flying over Chinnampo they came under attack from MiG 15s diving down on them. Hoagy Carmichael later stated: Eight MiGs came at us out of the sun. I did not see them at first, and my No. 4, 'Smoo' Ellis, gave a break when he noticed tracer streaming past his fuselage. We all turned towards the MiGs and commenced a 'scissors'. It soon became apparent that four MiGs were after each section of two Furies, but by continuing our break turns, we presented impossible targets. They made no attempt to bracket us. One MiG came at me head on. I saw his heavy tracer shells. I fired a burst, then he flashed past me. I believe Carl got some hits on him too. This aircraft then broke away, and went head on to my Nos 3 and 4, Lieutenant Pete Davies and 'Smoo' Ellis. They were seen to get good hits on one who broke away with smoke coming from him. Hoagy Carmichael in his Sea Fury became one of the few prop-driven aircraft to down a jet fighter and was the only British Pilot in a British aircraft to do so. For this action he was awarded the DSC. Commander Peter (Hoagy )Carmichael was CO of 806 Naval Air Squadron at Lossiemouth, the last Royal Navy unit flying Sea Hawks. Carmichael later went on to serve as Commanding Officer of T.S. Prince of Wales, Holyhead Sea Cadets until his retired in 1984. Sadly, Hoagy Carmichael died on the 25th of July 1997
Carpenter, George
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Carpenter, George


Carpenter, J O
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Carpenter, J O

On 21st May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH972 of No.132 Sqn was hit by flak and force landed in a field near Caudebec. He successfully evaded capture.
Carpenter, J. M. V.
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Carpenter, J. M. V.

Pilot Officer J.M.V.Carpenter flew Spitfire's with No 222 Squadron. On the 4th of September 1940 his Spitfire I (P9378) was shot down by British A.A. fire. The Spitfire crashed at Boughton, Kent.
Carpenter, John Chips
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   Died : 11 / 2 / 2005
Carpenter, John Chips

Flt. Lt. John Chips Carpenter DFC was born on 9 April 1921. He began elementary flying instruction at Redhill and later on Harvards at Turnhill with the RAF in February 1939 and on completion of his training he joined 263 Squadron at Filton in November. On 21 April 1940 the squadron embarked on HMS ‘Glorious’ for Norway, flying off three days later to land on a frozen lake. By the 26th all the Gladiators were either destroyed or unserviceable, so 263 Squadron re-embarked for the UK. In May another attempt was made. From the 21st until it re-embarked on HMS ‘Glorious’ on 6 June the squadron gave a good account of itself, covering the evacuation of the Army and flying offensive patrols. The carrier was sunk by enemy action soon after sailing and nearly all 263’s pilots were lost. Carpenter had not flown on to the carrier and returned to the UK by another ship. He joined 222 Squadron on Spitfires at Hornchurch in late June 1940 in time for the evacuation of Dunkirk. On 31 August he claimed a probable Bf109, on 1 September he destroyed another Bf109, on the 3rd a Bf110 and on the 4th a further Bf109. Soon afterwards he was shot down and wounded and returned to the squadron in October. Carpenter stayed with 222 Sqn. until April 1941, when he was posted to 46 Squadron, just as it prepared to go to the Middle East. The squadron embarked on HMS ‘Argus’, before transferring to the ‘Ark Royal’, from which they flew off to Hal Far, Malta on 6 June. 46 Squadron was kept in Malta and re-numbered 126 Squadron. On 30 June Carpenter shot down a Mc200, on 4 September he claimed another, on 8 November a Mc202, on the 12th another Mc202 and on 27 December he shot a Ju88 down into the sea. Carpenter, who had been a Flight Commander since early October, was awarded the DFC (2.1.42) and posted to 92 Squadron in the Western Desert. In May 1942 he covered the invasion of Sicily and Italy and was given command of 72 Squadron at Anzio. After a rest Carpenter was given command of 72 Squadron at Lago, Italy in January 1944. On 11 April he was posted away, received a Bar to the DFC (7.7.44) and returned to the UK. He went to Hawker’s as a production test pilot. Carpenter was granted a Permanent Commission in September 1945 and he retired on 31 December 1959, as a Flight Lieutenant, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader. Post war he served as CO in Kai Tek, Hong Kong. He died 11th February 2005.
Carter, L. R.
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   Died : 6 / 7 / 1941
Carter, L. R.

Sergeant L.R.Carter of No 41 Squadron collided with Flight Officer D.H.O'Niel in another Spitfire I (X4052) whilst climbing to engage some Bf 109's on the 11th of October 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (X4554).
Case, H. R.
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   Died : 12 / 10 / 1940
Case, H. R.

Pilot Officer H.R.Case of No 72 Squadron was killed after he crashed near Folkestone in his Spitfire I (P9338) on the 12th of October 1940. The cause of the crash was unknown.
Casson, Lionel Harwood Buck
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   Died : 8 / 10 / 2003
Casson, Lionel Harwood Buck

Pilot Officer Lionel H.'Buck' Casson D.F.C. / A.F.C. of No 616 Squadron was in combat with a Do 215 over Kenley on the 1st of September 1940 at 14:20hrs. His Spitfire I (R6778) was a write off due do the damage but he escaped injury. Casson was one of the original three trainee pilots to join the newly formed 616 (South Yorkshire) Auxiliary Air Force Squadron at Doncaster in early 1939. Training at weekends and during the annual summer camps, he qualified as a pilot in early 1940 before being sent to France as a reinforcement to 501 Squadron. But, before he could join them, the train on which he was travelling was bombed outside Amiens and he lost all his belongings. Casson managed to escape by boat back to England from Cherbourg. After a brief spell flying Hurricanes with 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill, he rejoined 616 at Leconfield, Yorkshire, just as the Battle of Britain gathered momentum. At lunchtime on August 15, the fighter squadrons based in north-east England were scrambled to face the Luftwaffe's most concentrated attack against industrial targets in Scotland and the north of England. Casson flew one of the 12 Spitfires which met the enemy as they crossed the Yorkshire coast. Within minutes, 616 Squadron had accounted for six of the unescorted bombers, with similar results achieved by other northern-based squadrons. A few days later, 616 flew south to Kenley where the squadron was involved in some of the fiercest fighting of the battle as part of Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park's No 11 Group. Casson and his colleagues were scrambled three or four times each day and losses mounted; in a five-day period 10 squadron pilots were killed or wounded. On August 30 Casson was credited with a probable and a damaged Heinkel 111. Two days later he claimed an Me 109 fighter, followed by the destruction of a Dornier 17 bomber. After suffering severe losses, the squadron was withdrawn to Kirton in Lindsay on September 4 with just seven of the original 21 pilots fit to fly. With barely 300 hours flying time, Casson was now a veteran; he remained with 616 to train the new crop of young pilots, and to fly patrols over coastal convoys and during the Luftwaffe's night blitz in December. A steel buyer's son, Lionel Harwood Casson, always known as "Buck", was born at Sheffield on January 6 1915 and educated at Birkdale School and the King's School, Ely, before embarking on a career in the steel industry. Although working in a reserved occupation, he elected to remain with the Royal Auxiliary Air Force on the outbreak of war when he completed his pilot training. Once 616 became fully operational again in early 1941, it was transferred and came under the command of the new Wing Leader, the legless pilot Douglas Bader, at Tangmere. The squadron boasted a glittering array of outstanding pilots, including "Johnnie" Johnson and "Cocky" Dundas. With his steadying and mature influence, allied to the experience gained during the hectic summer days of 1940, Casson became a section leader. On May 5, he shared in the destruction of a Junkers 88, but was hit by return fire, and was forced to bale out over Chichester harbour. Throughout the summer of 1941, the Wing was heavily engaged over northern France escorting bombers and flying offensive sweeps when it made regular contact with Adolph Galland's fighters. Casson destroyed a Me 109 on June 22, claimed a "damaged" two days later and in July claimed two Me 109s as probables. The squadron suffered heavy losses, and Casson soon found himself appointed to command B Flight. On August 9, the "Bader" Wing took off for another sweep over France. During a hectic fight in which German fighters surprised them from above, Bader was shot down, and the Wing was forced to scatter. Casson had accounted for an Me 109 when he went to the aid of a lone Spitfire, but before he could join up he was engaged by a German fighter. Cannon shells damaged his aircraft's engine, forcing him to crash near St Omer, where he was captured. Shortly after his arrival at Stalag Luft III at Sagan, it was announced that Casson had been awarded the DFC. During his years in captivity, Casson's outstanding talents as a draughtsman were put to good use by the camp's escape committee. He maintained a detailed and beautifully illustrated diary of events throughout his imprisonment, which he was able to salvage despite the horrors and privation he and his colleagues suffered on the "Long March", during the severe winter of 1945 when the PoWs were driven eastwards ahead of the advancing Soviet Army. On returning home, Casson rejoined the steel industry in Sheffield. In June 1946 he was one of the first to volunteer for service when 616 Squadron was reformed at RAF Finningley. The squadron was initially equipped with Mosquito night fighters but it soon reverted to the day fighter role, flying Meteor F 4s before re-equipping with the F 8 version. In January 1951, Casson was promoted to Squadron Leader and appointed to command 616 Squadron. His outstanding period in command culminated in the award of the Esher trophy, awarded annually to the most efficient Auxiliary Air Force squadron. Casson retired in 1954, when he was awarded the AFC for his service in command of 616. He was also the holder of the Air Efficiency Award with Bar.
Cattermoul, Frank Harold
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   Died : 9 / 7 / 1944
Cattermoul, Frank Harold

Died on 9th July 1944 after sustaining injuries on 1st June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK798 of No.1 Sqn was hit by flak near Quimper and crash landed.
Caulton, J. J.
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Caulton, J. J.

On 29th April 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ639 FF-G of No.132 Sqn was shot down and crash landed near Deelen airfield. Flak may have been the cause, but the victory has been claimed by Major Hans-Joachim Jabs of NJG1 who was landing at the airfield. Caulton was taken prisoner.
Chalder, H. H.
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   Died : 10 / 11 / 1940
Chalder, H. H.

Pilot Officer H.H.Chalder flew with No 266 Squadron before he later moved to No 41 Squadron. On the 28th of September he baled out after he was shot down, seriously wounded, before his Spitfire I (X4409) exploded in mid-air. H.H.Chalder was admitted to hospital but later died of his wounds on the 10th of November, aged 25.
Chalice, Leonard Harry
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   Died : 4 / 7 / 1944
Chalice, Leonard Harry

Killed aged 20 on 4th July 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH709 LO-R of No.602 Sqn was shot down by fighters over Normandy. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Harry and Elsie Chalice, of Orpington, Kent.
Chandler, H. H.
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Chandler, H. H.

Sergeant H.H.Chandler was a non-flying member of No 610 Squadron before the war. He qualified as a Sergeant-Pilot for the war and rejoined No 610 Squadron in April 1940. He was awarded the D.F.M. on the 22nd of October 1940, with six enemy aircraft destroyed at that time, and also the A.F.C. on the 2nd of April 1943.
Charlesworth, A M
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Charlesworth, A M

Joined the RAF straight from school just before his 18th birthday in the summer of 1940 with the sole purpose of becoming a fighter pilot. After training, at age just 18, he was posted to RAF Ibsley, Hampshire, to 118 Sqdn, flying Spitfire 2Bs. Here he took part in his first scramble. After a month he was posted where the action was thickest, to a 11 Group Station, RAF Kenley, where he joined 602 Sqdn. His Squadron Commander was Al Deere, by this time a highly decorated ace; Al was 23 then and had already been shot down nine times. 602 Squadron was equipped with the more advanced Spitfire VBs which had two 20mm cannons, firing at 1200 rounds a minute, plus four very useful Browning 50mm machine guns firing at an even higher rate per minute. Al Deere was eventually posted to another squadron and Paddy Finucane took over - "possibly the finest fighter pilot 1 came across", Max. Charlesworth continues, "I remember him trying to get his 21st victory before his birthday and I often flew No. 2 to him. These were twitchy and tiring days when three sweeps a over occupied France day were the norm, to be met each time by several hundred Me 109s and Focke Wolf 190s, at our maximum range, where hectic dog fights ensued. We were normally outnumbered and a day could last from an early morning call at 3.30am to the last landing at 10.30pm in the semi-dark of the long summer of 1941. The average age of the approximately 30 pilots on the squadron was always about 19." During this period they were scrambled to search for and attack the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau (although they did not know it at the time) which, with escorting vessels had slipped up the Channel from Brest. The weather was awful and Max flew straight across the German battle cruiser Hipper thinking it was a Royal Navy cruiser. The Hipper opened up at Max with guns blazing but he was fortunate to escape with just a hole in one wing. In April 1942 Max was posted to a secret unit called MSFU (Merchant Service Fighter Unit) where he flew Hurricanes from catapults on merchant ships attached to convoys of anything up to fifty merchant men a time. The ships were mainly bringing supplies from America and taking them to Murmansk and Archangel, the hard-pressed Soviets and Gibraltar. Max recalls this as a highly physical and uncomfortable task, apart from also being very scary. The ships were constantly attacked by U Boat packs and aircraft. When they were in range of the latter, if they launched the Hurricane they knew they would ultimately have to bail out and hope to be picked up by either a friendly escort vessel or a sunken ships lifeboat. "The North Atlantic route to Canada, north of Iceland and down the Greenland coast at an average sped of six knots in appalling seas was not our idea of a holiday cruise", Max vividly recalls. Having survived this posting Max was then moved to 124 Sq. at West Malting, Near Maidstone, Kent. The squadron was equipped with the much more powerful Spitfire IXs. Their task here was mainly escorting USAF and RAF bombing raids into Europe. With longrange tanks fitted they were able to reach Hamburg and Ludwigshafen; later on they were able to refuel from liberated bases in France. These ops. required them to fly as Top Cover at over 30,000 feet for up to three hours, where it was so cold the pilots returned to base hardly able to climb out of their cockpits. On February 9th 1945 Max was the Senior Flight Commander on 124 Squadron during their move to Cottishall. Here they adapted the Spitfire Ks to dive-bombing. The Spitfires carried either a 500lb. bomb under the fuselage and two 250lbs. under each wing or, a 90-gallon fuel tank under the fuselage and a 250lb. bomb under each wing. Their mission was to destroy V2 sites in Holland - mainly situated in small parks near the centre of the Hague. These V2 sites were launching rockets on London in ever increasing numbers. As well as attacking the V2 sites they were to destroy railway lines used by the Germans to transport V2s into the area. These were dangerous times as the V2s sites were heavily defended by 88mm guns down to 20mm. "The flak was horrendous and we lost many" recalls Max. As Senior Flight Commander, Max often led the squadron, though identifying targets from 12,000 feet was difficult. After the war Max was one of the first pilots to convert to the Meteor twin-engined jet, later to move on to Vampires and Canberras. His flying career was completed in June 1961 when he was posted to Warsaw, Poland as the Assistant Air Attache. He finally retired from the RAF in 1966.
Charnock, H. W.
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   Died : 24 / 5 / 1974
Charnock, H. W.

Sergeant H.W.Charnock flew with No 19 Squadron and No 64 Squadron. On the 6th of September 1940 he crashed his Spitfire I (K9903) near Ternhill, Shropshire. He was unhurt but the aircraft was written off.
Cheeseman, S. H.
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   Died : 22 / 2 / 1944
Cheeseman, S. H.

Killed on 22nd February 1944 after he lost control of his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL311 of No.501 Sqn which crashed 10 miles south west of Walcheren. He baled out but was killed.
Cheminade, J
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   Died : 26 / 4 / 1944
Cheminade, J

Killed on 26th April 1944 when his No.329 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX MK373 crashed into the sea off St Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight. He had been on a patrol providing cover for rescue boats and made a mayday call.
Chick, Lewis
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Chick, Lewis


Childress, Hubert M
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Childress, Hubert M

Hubert Childress was posted to England, joining the 27th Photo Recon Squadron, 7th Photographic Group flying the F5 - a specially adapted photo-recon version of the P38 with cameras and no guns. Hubert flew his first combat mission on New Year's Eve 1943, and was heavily involved in many reconnaissance missions prior to D-Day. He also flew the Spitfire MkIXs on several operations. He flew 58 combat missions and later commanded the 7th Photographic Group (R)
Chipping, D. J.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1985
Chipping, D. J.

Sergeant D.J.Chipping of No 222 Squadron on the 5th of September 1940 was shot down by A.A. fire over Dover while he was in combat. He was killed.
Christie, G. P.
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   Died : 6 / 7 / 1942
Christie, G. P.

Flight Lieutenant G.P.Christie was a Canadian who flew with No 242 Squadron and No 66 Squadron. He was wounded after his Spitfire I (K9944) crashed at Gillingham, Kent on the 5th of September 1940.
Christie, J. M.
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   Died : 26 / 9 / 1940
Christie, J. M.

Sergeant J.M.Christie of No 152 Squadron killed on the 26th of September 1940. His Spitfire I (K9882) was attacked and shot down near Swanage.
Chudek, Aleksander
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Chudek, Aleksander

Killed on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb AB271 of No.303 Sqn went missing , presumed shot down by flak from the Carentan area.
Churches, E. W. G.
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   Died : 19 / 4 / 1941
Churches, E. W. G.

Pilot Officer E.W.G.Churches joined No 74 Squadron on the 21st of August 1940 and flew Spitfire's.
Clark, Frank Joel
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   Died : 13 / 6 / 1944
Clark, Frank Joel

Killed aged 23 on 13th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH415 of No.421 Sqn RCAF collided with another Spitfire (MK235) of the same squadron and crashed into the English Channel. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. Son of Frank Allen Clark and of Florence May Clark (nee Herbert); husband of June Clark (nee Hart), of Brampton, Ontario. The pilot of the other Spitfire, Robert Wilton Murray, was also killed.
Clark, James
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Clark, James


Clark, T K
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   Died : 30 / 3 / 1944
Clark, T K

Killed on 30th March 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ307 of No.132 Sqn was probably hit by flak near Rouen and went missing.
Cleaveland, Arthur
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Cleaveland, Arthur


Cleaver, Richard Bath
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   Died : 19 / 6 / 1944
Cleaver, Richard Bath

Killed aged 25 on 19th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL520 of No.611 Sqn crashed into the sea during a beach patrol over Normandy. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of William Bath Cleaver and Gladys Emma Cleaver, of Pontypool, Monmouthshire.
Cleeton, Barrington Farr
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   Died : 25 / 6 / 1944
Cleeton, Barrington Farr

Killed aged 21 on 25th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V BL753 of No.63 Sqn was shot down by flak off Cherbourg. He is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Alfred J. and Lois Cleeton, of Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada.
Cleland, J M
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Cleland, J M

On 12th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.VII MNB768 YQ-X of No.616 Sqn was damaged in combat with Me109s and also by flak before being abandoned over the English Channel. He baled out and was later rescued.
Clenard, A B
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Clenard, A B

On 17th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK570 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Fw190s over Caen. He baled out and evaded capture.
Clift, Douglas G
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   Died : 31 / 12 / 2008
Clift, Douglas G

Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift was born in 1919 and joined the RAF in January 1939. Douglas Clift arrived at 11 Group Pool, St Athan on 24 October 1939 and after converting to Hurricanes, he joined 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill on November 17. On 15 August 1940 Clift claimed a Bf 110 destroyed and on 30 August he shared in the destruction of a He 111. In July 1941 he was posted to the Central Flying School at Upavon for an instructor's course. Clift later volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit (MSFU) and served with it until October 1942. He remained on flying duties for the rest of the war, finishing up in South-East Asia with the Royal Indian Air Force (RIAF). After the war Clift served with 34 Squadron flying photo-reconnaissance Spitfires until its disbandment in August 1947. later he became a radar specialist, sadly Squadron Leader Douglas G Clift passed away on the 31st December 2008 aged 89.
Clinch, A H
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Clinch, A H

Taken prisoner on 29th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH601 of No.33 Sqn was hit by flak over Bois Coquerel and he baled out.
Closterman, Pierre
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   Died : 22 / 3 / 2006
Closterman, Pierre

One of the RAFs best known fighter pilots, with more than 20 victories, Clostermann was a Free French officer and later the author of a classic book about World War Two flying, The Big Show. Clostermann came to Britain via the United States and was first in action with 341 (Alsace) Squadron on Spitfires in 1943. By D-Day he was with 602 Squadron, also on Spitfires, and flew a patrol over the beaches late in the afternoon of June 6th. On June 14th he became the first French pilot to land in liberated France. Rested in July 1944, Clostermann returned to action in January 1945 and from 4th March was flying Tempests with 274 Squadron. His first Tempest score was a Bf 109 on his second day during a "cannon test". In the middle of March 1945 he was posted as a Flight commander to No 56 Squadron. With this unit he destroyed a Bf109 in the air. On 8th April he was transferred to No 3 Squadron as "A" Flight commander where he on 20th April scored two Fw190D-9s. Clostermann's final score in Tempest is at least 12 destroyed, 6 shared and 2 probables. He was awarded the DSO and DFC and Bar in addition to French, Belgian and American decorations. Post war he achieved world-wide fame with The Big Show, and other books, and enjoyed a substantial career in politics and th aviation industry. Pierre Clostermann passed away on 22nd March 2006.


Final Total : 33 destroyed

19 Fw190
7 Me109
2 Dornier 24
1 Fieseler 156
1 Ju252
1 Ju88
1 Ju290
1 Heinkel 111

On the ground he destroyed :

7 Ju88
6 Do18
4 He177
2 Arado 323
1 Ju252
1 Blom-Voss
,br>Add to it some 72 locomotives , 5 tanks , 1 submarine and 2 destroyers.

Clouston, John Greville
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   Died : 21 / 6 / 1944
Clouston, John Greville

Died aged 25 on 21st June 1944 of wound sustained on 6th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK589 SK-G of No.165 Sqn was abandoned over the sea after combat with Ju88s and possible flak damage. He is buried in Nantes Communal Cemetery. Son of Allan Wilson Clouston and Violet Clouston, of Wellington City, New Zealand.
Cobden, D. G.
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   Died : 11 / 8 / 1940
Cobden, D. G.

Pilot Officer D.G.Cobden of No 74 Squadron was a New Zealander who joined the R.A.F. in 1937 or 38. On the 11th of August 1940 he was shot down and killed in a Spitfire I (R6757) during combat with East of Harwich. D.G.Cobden is buried at Oostende Communal Cemetery he was 26 years old.
Cockram, Ken
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Cockram, Ken

After training in Rhodesia and a spell with 73 OTU in Egypt, Ken Cockram flew Hurricanes and Spitfires in late 1944 and early 1945 with 26 AA Cooperation Unit based in Egypt. He also flew Curtiss Kittyhawks with 112 Squadron on anti-shipping and fighter patrols, once crashing his aircraft on take-off during a dust storm. He completed a total of 198 operations.
Coen, Oscar
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 2004
Coen, Oscar

Oscar Coen was born at Hannaford, N.D., on May 11, 1917, to Archie and Mary Coen. He grew up in Pound, Wis., and received his bachelor of science degree at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Enlisting in 1940 into the RCAF, Oscar Coen transferred to the RAF in 1941, joining 71 Squadron RAF. In a daring raid over France he destroyed a complete ammunition train with a pass so low that exploding debris hit his Spitfire. Managing to bail out safely he was smuggled to Spain by the French Resistance, and eventually back to England. With several victories and a DFC to his credit he transferred to the USAAF in 1942 as a Squadron Commander, completing the war as an Ace with 5 victories and flying over 250 combat missions. Oscar Hoffman Coen, 87, of Baker City, died June 23, 2004, at the Idaho State Veterans Home in Boise.
Cohen, Cyril Branston
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   Died : 3 / 6 / 1944
Cohen, Cyril Branston

Killed on 3rd June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK840 of No.401 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and he baled out over the English Channel. The aircraft was too low when he baled out. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
Coleman, E. J.
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   Died : 7 / 2 / 1941
Coleman, E. J.

Pilot Officer E.Jack Coleman served flew Spitfire's with No 54 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. Pilot Officer Coleman was killed in action on the 7th of February 1941.
Colgan, B T
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Colgan, B T

Taken prisoner on 28th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XIV RB175 of No.610 Sqn was hit by flak from a train and crash landed near Lamballe.
Collett, G. R.
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   Died : 2 / 8 / 1940
Collett, G. R.

Sgt G.R.Collett joined No 54 Squadron on the 15th of July 1940. G.R.Collett was killed in action on the 22nd of August 1940 after he was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6708) near Deal in Kent. Sgt G.R.Collett is buried at Bergin op Zoom, The Netherlands, aged 24.
Colley, Stan
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Colley, Stan

Joining the RAF in 1941, Stan undertook his flight training in Canada in Tiger moths. He returned to the UK in 1944 training Glider pilots prior to D-Day. He learnt to fly Spitfires with 73 OTU prior to working in Egypt towards the end of the War.
Collingbridge, L.W.
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Collingbridge, L.W.

Pilot Officer Leon W.Collingbridge of No 66 Squadron. His Spitfire I (N3042) crash landed on the beach at Oxfordness on the 29th of July 1940, Collingbridge was injured.
Collins, A. R.
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Collins, A. R.

Squadron Leader A.R.Collins of No 72 Spitfire Squadron was wounded on the 2nd of September 1940 following combat in a Spitfire I over the Thames Estuary.
Collins, Kenneth McRoberts
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   Died : 22 / 6 / 1944
Collins, Kenneth McRoberts

Killed aged 24 on 22nd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V AD180 of No.402 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Allied anti-aircraft fire near Foret de Cerisy. He is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Arthur J. and Agnes McRoberts-Collins, of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Collinsworth, J
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Collinsworth, J

RAF fighter ace with 6 victories. Born in Dublin, Texas, he is one of the few Americans to become an ace flying the Supermarine Spitfire. March 1942 saw him in England flying in the 31st. F.G., 307th Squadron. This was the first Yank fighter unit in the country since WWI. On August 19, 1942, he received his baptism of fire above the ill-fated commando raid on the coast of France. Later, Collinsworth helped spearhead Operation Torch landings in Oran, Algeria, still flying Spitfires. He covered the landings at southern Sicily, flying from Maltas sister island Gozo. In 125 combat sorties, he shot down 6 Axis aircraft, 1 probable and 1 damaged. He finished his military career as a Colonel. His Spitfire is seen low left in Defiance at Dieppe. Awards include D.F.C. with 1 O.L.C., Air Medal with 17 O.L.C.s, the Purple Heart and Army Commendation Medal.
Collis, John Arundel
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   Died : 29 / 4 / 1944
Collis, John Arundel

Killed on 29th April 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.XIV RB187 of No.91 Sqn failed to return from an evening patrol over the Thames Estuary. It is believed the aircraft crashed into the sea. His name is on the Runnymede memorial.
Collorado-Mansfeld, Count F F
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   Died : 14 / 1 / 1944
Collorado-Mansfeld, Count F F

Killed on 14th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH978 of No.132 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed on the beach at Berck-sur-mer.
Colston, Bryan
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Colston, Bryan

Bryan Colston was born in Buckinghamshire on 27 May 1921 and was educated at St Pauls School. He joined the RAFVR in 1940, training on Tiger Moths, Oxfords and Lysanders, becoming a fighter reconnaissance pilot with 225 Squadron in 1941. He served with 225 Sqn until July 1943 and became a Flight Commander in 1942. He flew Lysanders, Tomahawks, Hurricanes, Mustangs and Spitfires serving throughout the Tunisian campaign and flying over a hundred operational sorties. He contracted typhoid fever at the end of the campaign and was invalided back to the UK, where, after periods of instructing at 61 OTU and some staff appointments, he commanded 695 Squadron flying Spitfire XVIs.
Connor, F. H. P.
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   Died : 1 / 5 / 1982
Connor, F. H. P.

Flight Officer F.H.P.Conner of No 234 Squadron was shot down and baled safely out of his Spitfire I (X4016) on the 16th of August 1940 near Southampton following combat.
Cook, H.
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Cook, H.

Sergeant H.Cook of No 66 Squadron crash landed his Spitfire I (X4543) at R.A.F. Hornchurch due to battle damage on the 13th of October 1940. He was uninjured.
Cooke, C. A.
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Cooke, C. A.

Pilot Officer C.A.Cooke of No 66 Squadron was slightly wounded when he baled out of his Spitfire I (R6689) Hehad been attacked by a Bf 109 over Ashford, Kent on the 4th of September 1940.
Copeland, P.
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   Died : 26 / 6 / 1942
Copeland, P.

Sgt P.Copeland of No 616 Squadron was shot down by a Bf 109 near Wye on the 26th of August 1940 in his Spitfire I (K9827). He baled out with burns.
Copley, John James Hawke
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   Died : 14 / 9 / 1939
Copley, John James Hawke

On Thursday, 14th September 1939 Copley was attempting to take off at 18.25hrs, there was a slight wind blowing from the north at the time and the aircraft was taking off into this wind. The aircraft failed to climb above twelve feet after becoming airborne, it struck the tower of the Watch Office on the Northern boundary of the airfield and crashed just behind it. AC1 George Marshall (328832) was at his post in the Watch Office at the time of the crash and saw the aircraft approach, he was left to duck for cover as it struck the top of the building. The wreckage caught fire immediately and although the pilot could not be rescued because of the fire it was later thought that he had been killed instantly as a result of the impact. It was thought that he had lost control while taking off. This was 41 Squadron's first fatal accident of the War. Pilot - P/O John James Hawke Copley RAF (41258), aged 18, of Newton, Cambridgeshire. Buried Newton Churchyard, Cambridgeshire.
Corbett, G. H.
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   Died : 8 / 10 / 1940
Corbett, G. H.

Pilot Officer George Henry Corbett a Canadian of No 66 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (N3049) and was wounded over East Grinstead on the 9th of September 1940 after being shot down by a Bf 109. G.H.Corbett was shot down and killed on the 8th of October 1940 in his Spitfire I (R6779).
Corbin, William James
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   Died : 8 / 12 / 2012
Corbin, William James

Already a member of the RAFVR, William Corbin was called up for active duty in September 1939. Following training and conversion to Spitfires, in September 1940 he was posted as a Sergeant Pilot to join 66 Squadron at Coltishall. With the exception of a few weeks spent with 610 Squadron he remained with 66 Squadron until September 1941. Commissioned in June 1942, he returned to combat flying in September, joining 72 Squadron with whom he went to North Africa. Here he shared in a probable Me109 and damaged another, and in August 1943 was awarded the DFC. Corbin arrived on No 66 Squadron as it moved south to Surrey in late August 1940, as the Battle was reaching its climax. Because he had so little experience, he was dispatched by his CO to the north of England for a few weeks’ extra training before returning to No 66, which had moved to Gravesend. During the final month of the Battle, Corbin was in action over his native Kent. As the Battle of Britain was drawing to a close, Corbin’s CO, Squadron Leader Athol Forbes, decided that 10 of his pilots should record their impressions of the great air battle while memories were fresh. He chose a cross-section of officers and sergeants from different backgrounds and with different experiences – Corbin was one of them. In between flying on operations, the 10 scribbled down their thoughts. Corbin contributed the third chapter of their classic book Ten Fighter Boys, which was published by Collins in 1942 – and by which time five had perished. The book was reissued in 2008. In 2007 Corbin decided to complete his story, publishing his own book, Last of the Ten Fighter Boys. In the New Year of 1941, Fighter Command went on the offensive, carrying out sweeps over northern France. Corbin’s Spitfire was hit by anti-aircraft fire and damaged over Calais, but he managed to return safely to base. During a strafing attack against an airfield on the Brest Peninsula, Corbin and his leader damaged a number of aircraft on the ground. In June 1941 he attacked a Heinkel bomber which was returning from an attack on Liverpool and probably destroyed it; a month later he shot down a Messerschmitt Bf 109 while escorting a force of Blenheim bombers over the Dutch coast. After a year of almost continuous operations, he was rested and became an instructor at a fighter training unit. William James Corbin was born at Maidstone on August 5 1917 and educated in the town at St Michael’s School. He trained as a teacher, and in April 1939 joined the RAFVR . He was called up on the outbreak of war . ADVERTISING After his spell as an instructor, Corbin was commissioned and joined a Spitfire squadron sent to North Africa in support of Operation Torch, the Allied landings in Algeria and Morocco in November 1942. He saw a great deal of action with No 72 Squadron as the Allied armies moved eastwards towards Tunis, shooting down a Bf 109 (with another probable) and damaging at least three more fighters. He was also engaged on many sweeps shooting up motor transports and aircraft on the ground. During these operations, the Spitfires faced intense enemy ground fire, and Corbin recorded in his diary that he felt “a little shaky at times”. As the Allies closed on Tunis, he attacked a motor torpedo boat – which exploded from the concentrated fire from his cannons; he also damaged two others. A few days later the war in North Africa was over and, after 450 hours’ operational flying, Corbin was rested and returned to Britain to be a gunnery instructor. He was awarded a DFC. At the end of the war, Corbin left the RAF and returned to Maidstone, where he took up a teaching post. He joined the RAF Reserve and enjoyed flying Tiger Moths and Chipmunks at weekends until the Force was disbanded in 1955. He received the Air Efficiency Award. After 10 years teaching at Collier Road School, Corbin joined the staff of Maidstone Technical School, retiring as a senior master in 1980
Corfe, D. F.
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   Died : 25 / 4 / 1942
Corfe, D. F.

Sergeant D.F.Corfe flew with No 610 Squadron, No 73 Squadron and No 66 Squadron. He shot down a Bf 109 on the 14th of August 1940. On the 22nd of August his Spitfire (R6695 'P') was written off when he crashed at Hawkinge after combat. Corfe moved to No 66 Squadron where he was shot down again and injured on the 18th of September 1940 while on patrol, his Spitfire (R6603) was written off in the crash following combat over Canterbury. The aircraft crashed at Petham, Kent. D.F.Corfe was killed in action on the 25th of April 1942.
Cosby, I. H.
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Cosby, I. H.

Flight Lieutenant Ivor Henry Cosby was with No 72 Squadron and No 610 Squadron flying Spitfire's during the Battle of Britain.
Costain, Hank
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Costain, Hank

Hank Costain was born in Horton on the Gower Coast and was educated at Christ College Brecon. He joined the RAFVR for pilot training in September 1940. He trained in the USA in Arizona at Thunderbird Field and Falcon Field, returning to the UK in 1941 to complete operational training at 53 OTU on Spitfire Mk1s. He flew with No 154 Squadron (Motor Industries Squadron) Spitfire Vbs in the Hornchurch Wing. The Squadron was withdrawn from 11 Group to prepare for the invasion of North Africa, operation Torch. He flew with the Squadron throughout the North African campaign and moved with the Squadron to Malta to prepare for the invasion of Sicily, operation Husky. After moving to Lentini East in Sicily his tour was completed and he was posted back to The Canal Zone 73 OTU Abu Sueir as an instructor. Having completed his instructors tour the Far East were calling for experienced Spitfire pilots and he found himself en route to No 615 Squadron (County of Surrey) R.Aux.A.F. in Burma. He baled out of a Spitfire MkVIII while operating with 615 Squadron and spent several months in hospital in Calcutta before being invalided home. Fit again he became an instructor at 61 OTU Keevil on Spitfires and Mustangs. The next tour was with 245 Squadron at Horsham St Faith flying Meteor 3s. This tour was cut short, as there was a call for the two Spitfire Squadrons in Japan to be reinforced. At the end of 1946 he found himself on No 11 Squadron at Miho in Japan as part of the BCAIR element of BCOF (British Commonwealth Occupation Force). Returning from Japan in 1948 he spent a period ferrying with No 20 Maintenance Unit followed be an appointment as Unit Test Pilot at No9 MU. He completed the CFS Course in 1952 and became Training Officer of No602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron R.Aux.A.F. Promoted to Squadron Leader in 1953, a tour as Chief Ground Instructor and OC Gunnery Squadron at 226 OCU was completed. When 226 OCU was disbanded he took command of No608 (NR) Squadron R.Aux.A.F. at Thornaby on Tees, flying Vampires. He completed his RAF career in Guided Weapons. A tour of Woomera evaluating the Bloodhound Mk2 SAM missile. Then CO of No 33 (SAM) Squadron at Butterworth in Malaysia followed by appointment as CO of No 25 (SAM) Squadron at North Coates and RAF Germany.
Coverley, W. H.
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   Died : 7 / 9 / 1940
Coverley, W. H.

Flight Officer W.H.Coverley of No 602 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (P9381) on the 25th of August 1940 after combat over Dorchester. W.H.Coverley baled out of his Spitfire after he was shot down over Biggin Hill on the 7th of September 1940 but later died of his wounds.
Cowan, Raife J.
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Cowan, Raife J.

Joined the RAAF in May 1940 and attended EFTS in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Early in 1941, Raife sailed to the UK and converted to Spitfires at 57 OTU Hawarden. In April 1942 he joined 452 Sqn RAAF being formed at Kirton in Lindsay, Lincolnshire. On 16th June 1941 he was hospitalised after a night flying prang until re-joining the squadron at Kenley during September. Raife flew operations with 452 Sqn until the squadron was posted to Australia for the defence of Darwin. On 24th June he joined 75 Sqn which was re-forming at Kingaroy after their epic forty four day Battle at Port Moresby. Cowan flew to New Guinea in July and participated in the Battle of Milne Bay during August and September, then withdrew to Australia with the squadron. In February 1943 Raife was posted to 2 OTU Mildura as an instructor on Spitfires, Kittyhawks and Wirraways. On 3rd August 1945 Raife Cowan was posted as CO to 78 Sqn at Tarakan until the end of the war.
Coward, James Baird
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 2012
Coward, James Baird

James Baird Coward was born on May 18 1915 at Teddington and educated at St John’s School, Leatherhead. After a few years as an apprentice bookkeeper, he joined the RAF in October 1936 and trained as a pilot. When Coward joined No.19 Squadron at Duxford a year later, it was equipped with the Gauntlet biplane fighter. A fine artist, he executed a set of caricatures of his fellow pilots and was then asked to paint the squadron badge on the fins of the silver fabric covered aircraft. After weeks of painstaking work, he had just completed the final aircraft when the Munich crisis erupted and all RAF aircraft had camouflage paint applied to their skins. Shortly afterwards No.19 became the first RAF squadron to be equipped with the Spitfire. The squadron was heavily engaged in providing support during the evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk, and on June 2 1940 Coward was credited with the probable destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf 109. Coward, who had seen action over Dunkirk, was one of the more senior pilots on No.19 Squadron flying from Duxford. Early on the morning of August 31 1940 the squadron was scrambled to intercept an incoming raid, and Coward was leading his section at 22,000ft when they identified a formation of Dornier bombers escorted by a force of 60 fighters. Coward dived on the bombers but his cannons jammed as he opened fire. As he pulled away, he felt a dull thud on his left leg and looked down to see his foot almost severed. The controls of his Spitfire Mk.I X4231 were damaged and he was forced to bail out. He decided to free-fall to a lower height but could not stand the pain as his foot twisted in the slipstream. He was also losing a great deal of blood, so he pulled the ripcord. Fearing that he would bleed to death in the long descent, he took off his helmet and used the long radio lead to tie a tourniquet to arrest the bleeding. The Spitfire I (X4231) crashed at Little Shelford, Essex. His leg was amputated, and after five months recovering from his wounds, Coward joined Winston Churchill’s personal staff. Each weekend was spent at Chequers or the Prime Minister’s private home at Chartwell, where Coward coordinated the roof-spotting organisation. In January 1942 Coward returned to flying and became an instructor at a fighter training unit. He later commanded the Aircraft Delivery Unit at Croydon. He remained in the post-war RAF, serving as the air attaché in Oslo and at the RAF College Cranwell before taking command of an advanced flying training school equipped with the twin-engined Meteor fighter. He carried out many test flights investigating the spinning characteristics of the jet, and at the end of his appointment was awarded an AFC. In 1957 Coward assumed command of RAF Boulmer in Northumberland, one of the RAF’s main radar early warning and fighter control units. Three years later he left for Australia to join the British Defence Liaison Staff. For four years he was the Air Officer Commanding Air Cadets and Commandant of the Air Training Corps before being appointed, in 1966, defence attaché in Pretoria. On leaving South Africa in 1969, Coward retired from the RAF and moved with his wife, Cynthia, to Australia. He passed away on 25th July 2012.
Cox, David
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   Died : 20 / 1 / 2004
Cox, David

Ending the war with seven confirmed victories and as Wing Leader of 909 Spitfire Wing in Burma, Cox remembers an acerbic encounter with Bader as a young Sergeant Pilot. Bader made it very clear that the battle damage to his Spitfire was not excused by his having shot down the Bf 109 that caused it! Above all, however, he remembers Baders calmness on the radio when leading the Wing - it calmed evervone else. Cox, from Cambridge, an RAFVR pilot, originally failed the RAF medical, working for some months in Billingsgate market to build up his strength. He joined 19 Squadron at Duxford in 1940. He scored several victories during the Battle of Britain, but was shot down on September 27 1940 and wounded. Cox took part in many fighter sweeps with 19 Squadron in 1941 and was commissioned in July. After a spell instructing, Cox joined 72 Squadron in May 1942, accompanying it to North Affica where lie increased his score to a total of seven confirmed victories. On April 5 1945 he was posted to Burma. David Cox died 20th January 2004.
Cox, K. H.
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   Died : 28 / 8 / 1940
Cox, K. H.

Pilot Officer K.H.Cox joined No 610 Squadron on the 27th of July 1940. Cox was killed when he was shot down in his Spitfire I (P9511) on the 28th of August 1940 over Dover, aged 24.
Crimmins, John Allan Cameron
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   Died : 10 / 5 / 1944
Crimmins, John Allan Cameron

Killed on 10th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK853 was shot down by Fw190s near Reims. He is buried in Marissel French National Cemetery.
Croquet, J L J
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Croquet, J L J

On 11th February 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb AB175 GE-U of Mo.349 Sqn crashed near Epinay, but he managed to evade capture.
Cross, C D
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Cross, C D

On 27th April 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ140 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak during a low level attack on a rail bridge at Granville. He baled out off Selsey and although injured, was rescued by a corvette.
Crowe, Steve
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Crowe, Steve

Steve Crowe flew Hurricanes with 257 Squadron RAF. and undertook his first combat operation in November 1941. Along with other Americans he was then posted to join 133 Eagle Squadron, flying Spitfires, transferring to the USAAF in September 1942 as the 336th Fighter Squadron. He flew over 70 combat missions in both the European and Mediterranean theatres of operations.
Cruickshanks, I. J. A.
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   Died : 8 / 6 / 1945
Cruickshanks, I. J. A.

Killed June 8th 1945
Cumming, Robert Alexander
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   Died : 11 / 6 / 1944
Cumming, Robert Alexander

Killed aged 22 on 11th June 1944, when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ219 of No.229 Sqn crashed on the Isle of Wight in fog. He is buried in Parkhurst Military Cemetery. Son of Gerald G. Cumming and Dora E. Cumming of East London, Cape Province, South Africa.
Cummings, Wesley Elmore
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   Died : 27 / 4 / 1944
Cummings, Wesley Elmore

Killed aged 21 on 27th April 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ982 of No.401 Sqn RCAF flew into the ground during an attack on a rail bridge at Granville. He is buried in Lessay Communal Cemetery in France. Son of George Howard Cummings and Kate Louise Cummings, of North Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Cundy, W R
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Cundy, W R

Ron Cundy commenced flying with 135 Sqn before being posted to the Middle East with 260 Sqn flying Hurricanes and later Kittyhawks. Returning back to Australia he flew Spitfires in defence of Darwin with 452 Sqn RAAF. In North Africa he survived an encounter with Marseille, and ended the war with 5 confirmed victories.
Cunningham, John
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   Died : 21 / 7 / 2002
Cunningham, John

John Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 with 604 Squadron. At the outbreak of World War Two he was based at North Weald flying Blenheims on day escort and night fighter operations. In September 1940 he converted onto Beaufighters equipped with radar, the first aircraft that made night fighting really possible. In November he had the Squadron's first successful night combat. He took command of 604 Squadron in August 1941. After a period at HQ81 Group, he was posted on his second tour to command 85 Squadron equipped with Mosquitoes. In March 1944 with 19 night and 1 day victory he was posted to HQ11 Group to look after night operations. The most famous Allied night fighter Ace of WWII - 20 victories. He died 21st July 2002. Born in 1917, Group Captain John Cunningham was the top-scoring night fighter ace of the Royal Air Force. Cunningham joined the RAF in 1935 as a Pilot Officer. He learned to fly in the Avro 504N and was awarded his wings in 1936. While assigned to the Middlesex Squadron Auxiliary based at Hendon, Cunningham received instruction in the Hawker Hart prior to moving on the Hawker Demon. The Demon was a two-seat day and night fighter. Cunningharn's squadron was mobilized in 1938 following the Czechoslovak crisis. His No. 604 unit was moved to North Weald. Later in 1938 his unit returned to Hendon and was reequipped with the more modern Blenheim 1 fighter. In August of 1939 the unit was again mobilized and returned to North Weald. The Squadron was primarily utilized to provide daylight air cover for convoys. Lacking radar the Blenheim was relatively useless as a night fighter. In September of 1940 the unit was moved to Middle Wallop and the first Bristol Beaufighters arrived. The Beatifighter had a modestly effective, although often unreliable radar. It was an excellent aircraft with reliable air-cooled engines and four 20mm cannons. Cunningham attained the units first night victory in the Beaufighter, and his tally rose steadily. He was promoted to Wing Commander of 604 Squadron in August of 1941. Cunningham completed his first combat tour of duty in mid-1942 with a total of 15 victories. He was then posted to H.Q. 81 Group, which was an operational training group under the Fighter Command. In January of 1943 Cunningham was transferred to command of No. 85 Squadron which was equipped with the Mosquito. With the higher speed of the Mosquito, Cunningham was successful at downing Fw-190s, something impossible in the slower Beaufighter. Cunningham completed his second tour in 1944 with a total of nineteen victories at night and one by day. He was promoted to Group Captain at that time, and was assigned to H.Q. 11 Group. Cunningham's radar operator Sqd. Ldr. Jimmy Rawnsley participated in most of Cunningham's victories. The 604 Squadron was disbanded in 1945, but in 1946 Cunningham was given the honor of reforming the Squadron at Hendon - flying the Spitfire. Cunningham left the RAF in 1946 and joined the De Havilland Aircraft Co. at Hatfield as its Chief Test Pilot. Cunningham had a long and distinguished career in the British aviation industry, retiring from British Aerospace in 1980.
Cunningham, Peter
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 2007
Cunningham, Peter

Battle of Britain Spitfire Pilot. Passed away 2007. Like so many pilots, Peter began his flying career in the USA on Stearmans, staying as an instructor after qualifying. The death of a close friend in action prompted him to request posting to an active fighter squadron and after a short conversion spell on Hurricanes in England, Peter found himself flying Spitfire Mk.IXs over Italy in 1943. One incident he recalled was the occasion when he was obliged to put his Spitfire, which had been damaged by ground fire, into the sea off the coast of Anzio and the resulting difficulty he had in extricating himself from the rapidly sinking fighter! Following his tour of operations Peter was sent to the Middle?East as a test pilot and it was here that he met Vera, the WAAF who would become his wife. With flying now truly engrained in his blood, Peter went on after the war to become one of the worlds most respected civil airline pilots, flying the classic aircraft of the day and witnessing amazing sights as his adventure?filled career took him across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle?East.
Cunningham, Wallace
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   Died : 4 / 10 / 2011
Cunningham, Wallace

Wallace Cunningham, known as Jock during his time in the RAF, was born in Glasgow on December 4th 1916. He studied Engineering part-time at the Royal Technical College (later to become the University of Strathclyde) and joined the RAFVR in 1938, learning to fly at Prestwick. When war was declared he was commissioned. He did his flying training at 11 FTS, Shawbury. After converting to Spitfires at 5 OTU, Aston Down, he was posted to 19 Squadron in July 1940. Flew Spitfire Mk.I P8439. On 16th August 1940 he destroyed a Bf110. On September 7th the Duxford Wing of three squadrons flew its first offensive patrol under the leadership of Douglas Bader. The controversial Big Wing took off in the late afternoon to head towards London. A large force of enemy bombers, with their fighter escort, was intercepted and Cunningham shot down a Heinkel 111 bomber over Ramsgate and damaged a second. His next success came two days later when the Big Wing scrambled in the afternoon. After attacking a bomber force, Cunningham found a stray Messerschmitt Bf109, which he shot down. September 15th saw the most intensive fighting and the turning point of the Battle, with all fighter squadrons in the south of England scrambled. Cunningham shared in the destruction of a Bf110 and destroyed a second fighter over the Thames Estuary. Before the battle was over at the end of October, he shared in the destruction of two more enemy aircraft. In October he was awarded the DFC for great personal gallantry and splendid skill in action. After the Battle of Britain, Flight Lieutenant Cunningham remained with No.19 Sqn as a flight commander. In July 1941 he damaged a Bf109 but on August 28th, while escorting a force of Blenheim bombers, he was shot down by flak near Rotterdam and taken prisoner. Flight Lieutenant Cunningham was initially sent to Oflag XC at Lubeck before joining a large RAF contingent at Oflag VIB at Warburg. He was soon involved in escape activities. The tunnelling fraternity he joined was almost ready to break out when its efforts were discovered. Within weeks he was on the digging team of another tunnel and was one of 35 PoWs selected for the escape. But when the tunnel broke the surface on April 18 1942 it was well short of the intended spot. Only five prisoners were able to escape before the tunnel was discovered next morning. Later in the year Cunningham was transferred to Stalag Luft III. At the end of January 1945, the camp was evacuated and the PoWs were forced to march westwards in atrocious winter weather. In late April, British forces liberated the prisoners and Cunningham was flown back to England. He was released from the RAF in 1946. Sadly Wallace Cunningham passed away on October 4th 2011.
Curchin, Johnny
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   Died : 4 / 6 / 1941
Curchin, Johnny

Flt-Lt Frank Howell in R6691, Fg-Off Paul Edge in R6636 and Plt-Off Johnny Curchin R6634 shot down a Heinkel 111 (later only credited with a 'Probable'). P/O John "Johnnie" Curchin flew 130 sorties with No 609 Squadron RAF between July and October 1940, earning himself a DFC on 1 November. The citation credited the 22-year-old pilot with at least 7 victories and shares in more. He crash-landed Spitfire Mk I PR-F at RAF Middle Wallop on 25 October due to failing to lower the undercarriage. The aircraft had been flown by P/O Sydney J Hill 4 days earlier, Curchin's close friend, who shared a Ju 88, the unit's 100th victory. Missing June 4th 1941 after combat with ME109 over Manche
Curry, John
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   Died : 18 / 3 / 2008
Curry, John


Curtis, Lettice
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Curtis, Lettice

Joined the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in July 1940 having been taken on to ferry Tiger Moths. Although we were later allowed to ferry other training types such as Oxfords and Masters, it was not until the autumn of 1941 that women were allowed to fly operational aircraft types. I flew my first Hurricane in August 1941 and my first Spitfire a couple of weeks later. After a brief course on a Blenheim I was cleared to fly without any further training, twin-engine bombers up to the Wellington. In November 1943 I was sent on a Halifax course, which due to unserviceability and bad weather closed, restarting in February 1943 at Pocklington where I was cleared for ferrying Halifaxes. After that without further training, I ferried Lancasters and over 100 Stirlings. In November 1945 I ferried 14 Liberators.
Curtis, Robert
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Curtis, Robert

Bob Curtis arrived in North Africa in 1943, moving to Sicily soon after, flying Spitfires with the 52nd Fighter Group. He scored his first air victory over an Me109 flying his Spitfire, amd later survived a bail out when his fighter was badly damaged after a building he straffed exploded beneath him Moving across to the 15th Air Force, the 52nd Fighter Group re-equipped with the P-51 and Bob Curtis became a Squadron Commander. He added 13 more to his score flying the P-51, ending his war with 14 victories.
Cutts, J. W.
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   Died : 4 / 9 / 1940
Cutts, J. W.

Flight Officer J.W.Cutts was part of No 222 Squadron was killed when his Spitfire I (X4278) was shot down over Maidstone on the 4th of September 1940.
Czarnecki, S
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Czarnecki, S

Injured on 21st May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX ML116 of No.308 Sqn was hit by flak.
Daines, Roy
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Daines, Roy

Roy Daines joined the RAF as soon as he was able, and after completing his hurried training as a pilot, was posted to join 247 Squadron in the autumn of 1940. Here he flew Gladiators and Hurricanes on coastal patrols, 247 being the only squadron to fly Gladiators during the Battle of Britain, before converting to nightfighting Hurricanes. Later, in 1943, he flew Typhoons with 247 before being posted to join 65 Squadron flying Spitfires and Mustangs.

Roy Daines signing the print Victory Above Dover

Roy Daines signing the original pencil drawing A Dunkirk Encounter


Daley, W
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Daley, W


Dalzell, J
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Dalzell, J

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX ML200 of No.74 Sqn ran out of fuel and crash landed in a Normandy beach head. He was unhurt, but the aircraft was written off.
Darling, E. V.
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   Died : 2 / 6 / 1942
Darling, E. V.

Sergeant E.V.Darling of No 41 Squadron was wounded after he baled out of his Spitfire I (X4409) over West Malling on the 27th of September 1940.
Davenport, R M
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Davenport, R M

Served with No.401 Sqn RCAF flying Spitfire and was shot down by flak on 9th January 1944. He managed to evade capture and was again shot down by flak on 18th August 1944, once again evading capture.
Davidson, J F
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Davidson, J F

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ928 was hit by flak and he baled out.
Davidson, Robert Dunlop
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   Died : 28 / 6 / 1944
Davidson, Robert Dunlop

Killed aged 21 on 28th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ428 of No.401 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Fw190s south of Caen. He is buried in Couterne Churchyard. Son of William and Jessie McLeod Davidson, of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Davies, A. E.
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   Died : 30 / 10 / 1940
Davies, A. E.

Pilot Officer A.E.Davies of No 222 Squadron was killed in action after he was shot down over Sussex on the 30th of October 1940.
Davies, Alan
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Davies, Alan

Joining the RAF in 1943, Alan Davies did his pilot training in America. Returning to the UK he flew Spitfire MkXIVs with an OTU, before joining 225 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron flying Spitfire Mk IXs. At the end of the war, he remained with the squadron, first at Klagenfurt in Austria, then Udine in Italy, and served briefly with 253 Squadron.
Davies, G. G. A.
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Davies, G. G. A.

Pilot Officer G.G.A.Davies of No 222 Squadron was wounded on the 31st of August 1940. He was shot down over Tenterdern in his Spitfire I (P9337) and suffered burns on the face and neck.
Davis, J.
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Davis, J.

Sergeant J.Davis joined No 54 Squadron on the 9th of August 1940. On the 31st of August 1940, was one of three pilots attempting to take off during a bombing raid. His Spitfire was thrown over the boundary fence by a bomb blast just as it took off, and it crashed into the River Ingrebourne. Two hours later Davis turned up at the main gate, unhurt and carrying his parachute. He had been thrown clear but, being unable to find a gap in the boundary fence, Davis had walked halfway around the aerodrome to get back in. J.Davis was later awarded A.F.C. on the 3rd of April 1945.
Davis, P. O.
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   Died : 10 / 8 / 1943
Davis, P. O.

Sergeant P.O.Davis of No 222 Squadron crash landed his Spitfire I (R6773) on the 26th of October 1940 after his Merlin engine had caught on fire. He was unhurt.
Dawson, Joseph
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 1940
Dawson, Joseph

Commissioned pilot Officer 8th July 1938 Flying Officer Joseph Dawson, RAF (AAF) 90331, 609 Sqdn., age 24, 01/06/1940, missing Shot down by a Me110. Plot 4. Row K. Grave 8. Cemetery: FOUQUIERES CHURCHYARD EXTENSION Son of John Parker Colling and Annie Colling, of Darlington, Co. Durham.
Dawson-Paul, Francis
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   Died : 30 / 7 / 1940
Dawson-Paul, Francis

Born in London in February 1916, he Francis Dawson-Paul (sometimes recorded in official records unhyphenated a Dawson Paul) joined the Fleet Air Arm in September 1939. After training with 758 Squadron, he was loaned to the RAF and flew Spitfires with 64 Squadron. He only joined the squadron on 1st July 1940. By the 25th of that month he had been shot down over the Channel and taken prisoner by a German E-boat. He died of his wounds just 5 days later. Within those short 25 days he had scored 7.5 confirmed victories, as well as one probable. He was shot down in Spitfire L1035. He had claimed two Me109s, four Me110s and one Do17, with one Do17 shared. His probable victory was over an Me110.
Daymond, Gregory
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Daymond, Gregory


De Grunne, R. G. C. de H.
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   Died : 25 / 5 / 1942
De Grunne, R. G. C. de H.

Pilot Officer Rodolphe.G.C.deH de Grunne, a Belgian of No 32 Squadron. On the 18th of August he baled out of his Hurricane I (V6535) badly burned after combat near Biggin Hill. On the 21st of May 1941 he was flying with No 609 Squadron and was killed when his Spitfire II (P7436) broke up during combat over the Channel.
Deansley, E. C.
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Deansley, E. C.

Flight Lieutenant E.Chritopher Deansley of No 152 Squadron was was shot down 3 miles off Portland in a Spitfire I (K9901). After being rescued by a ship he spent some time in hospital. On the 26th of September 1940 he was shot down and wounded again off Swanage, he baled out of his stricken Spitfire I (K9982) after combat. Deanesly was located by a Lysander and then picked up by the S.S. Empire Henchman.
Deere, Alan
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   Died : 21 / 9 / 1995
Deere, Alan

Top scoring New Zealand Ace with 22 victories, Deere was born in Auckland on December 12th 1917. Alan Deere would become one of the RAF's finest pilots. Joining the RAF in 1937, in September 1938 Al Deere was posted to No.54 Sqn at the time flying Gloster Gladiators, then in early 1940 the Squadron converted to Spitfires. His first brush with death happened when his oxygen failed while at altitude and ke blacked out, coming to only in time to pull his aircraft out of a dive and certain death. At the beginning of May 1940 Deere took part in the intensive air war over Dunkirk and on 23rd May 1940 Deere took part in a daring rescue operation. He and Pilot Officer Allen escorted their flight commander, James Leathart, to France where he was to land a Miles Master trainer and pick up the CO of 74 Squadron who had made a forced landing on the airfield at Calais-Marck. While the pick up was made, Alan Deere was at low level with Pilot Officer Allen at 8000 feet. As Flight Commander James Leathart prepared for take off in the Master, Pilot Offcier Allen spotted a flight o Bf109's coming their way.

Deere scored his first victory, as a strafing Bf109 pulled out of its dive, presenting a perfect target. Deere fired a short burst and the aircraft stalled and then crashed into the sea. Deere, climbing to help Allen, crossed the path of two 109’s, one of which turned towards him. Deere also turned, firing at the second one, which rolled over and dived away. Pursuing the first one, he caught up at treetop height and pursued him, firing off his remaining ammunition before the German headed for home. During the whole event Deere and Allen accoutned for three Bf109's shot down and three damaged. All three aircraft returned to their base at RAF Hornchurch.

During four days - 23rd to 29th May - Deere shot down three Bf109’s and three Bf110’s but his luck ran out and he was shot down over Dunkirk while attacking a Dornier Do17 and luckily managed a forced landing in Belgium where he optained a bicycle and cycled to Dunkirk where he managed to get on a destroyer and returned to Hornchurch within 30 hours of taking off. In June he was decorated with the DFC by the King at a special ceremony at Hornchurch. Alan Deere destroyed seven more enemy fighters and one bomber during the Battle of Britian and was awarded a Bar to the DFC. In January 1941 became an Operations Room Controller. He returned to operations on 7th May 1941, joining 602 Squadron in Scotland as a Flight Commander.

On August 1st 1941 Alan Deere took command of 602 Squadron and on that day destroyed a Bf109. When his second operational tour ended in January 1942 Deere went to the USA to lecture on fighter tactics. In May 1942, he took command of 403 Squadron, commanding the squadron until August before being posted to staff duties. During a temporary attachment to 611 Squadron in February 1943 Deere destroyed an Fw190. Some days later he was appointed Wing Leader at Biggin Hill. He flew 121 sorties during his six months leadership and by this time his tally was twenty-two confirmed victories, ten probables and eighteen damaged.

He was also awarded the DSO and a bar to his DFC. Alan Deere was also awarded the Croix de Guerre and the DFC (USA) and in May 1945 He was awarded an OBE. In December 1977 Air Commodore Deere retired form the Royal Air Force. Iin 1959 Air Commodore Alan Deere wrote of his experiences in his book, ’Nine Lives’. Sadly, he passed away on 21st September 1995.
DeJaeger, G C
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DeJaeger, G C

On 30th April 1944, suffered minor injuries when his Spitfire Mk.V AA853 of No.350 Sqn was in a mid-air collision with Spitfire Mk.V AR498 also of No.350 Sqn, and ditched into the sea off Tangmere. The pilot of AR498, Flying Officer Didier John Maurice Scuvie was killed after the Spitfire crashed into the sea off Tangmere.
Delange, P G
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   Died : 25 / 2 / 1944
Delange, P G

Killed on 25th February 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL344 SD-R of No.501 Sqn suffered engine failure during an Air Sea Rescue mission 30 miles south of Beachy Head. He baled out but did not survive.
Deleuze, R C
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Deleuze, R C

On 23rd May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM593 SD-Q of No.501 Sqn returned safley after being hit and damaged by flak in the Bateux area.
Dell, Jimmy
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   Died : 25 / 3 / 2008
Dell, Jimmy

Jimmy Dell joined the RAF in 1942 and after the war flew F-86Es and the first radar equipped F-86D with the USAF. He was the first RAF Lightning Project Test Pilot and later became Chief Test Pilot at English Electric/BAC test flying Lightning, TSR 2 and Jaguar. One of a unique breed of aviators who have achieved great career success as a fast jet test pilot within both military and commercial environments. Probably best known for his work on the English Electric Lightning, Jimmy Dell has used his skill, courage and intimate knowledge of aerodynamics to reach the very top of a highly demanding profession. Joining the RAF in 1942, Jimmy Dell did his initial pilot training in Southern Rhodesia. By 1944 he had already become a Flying Instructor for advanced trainers. After the war Jimmy performed various training and test flying roles on aircraft such as Spitfires, Meteors, Venoms and Hunters. He also led test flight teams to the USA and France to work on aircraft such as the F-100, F-104, F-105, F-106, Mystere 4 and Mirage 3. In 1960 he joined English Electric on the Lightning development programme and was Chief Test Pilot from 1961 to 1970. Jimmy also worked on the TSR2 programme and flew 12 of the aircraft’s 24 test flights, before its untimely cancellation in 1965. He worked on the French / UK Jaguar programme, and finally became Director, Flight Operations with responsibility for all Tornado test flight activities across the three participating countries. Jimmy Dell retired in 1989. Amongst his awards was the OBE for services to test flying. Sadly, Jimmy Dell died on 25th March 2008.
Demas, C
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   Died : 21 / 5 / 1944
Demas, C

Killed on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK140 of No.340 Sqn failed to return after being hit by flak while attacking Bernay Station.
Denchfield, David
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   Died : 5 / 12 / 2012
Denchfield, David

Called up in 1939 he converted to Spitfires and joined 610 Squadron at Acklington in the Battle of Britain. On a Blenheim escort to St Omer in February 1941 his aircraft was hit and, having baled out at 5,000 feet, he was captured by the Germans. He spent time in several POW camps, including Stalg Luft III, and at the end of the war in May 1945 flew back to the UK in a Lancaster of 617 Squadron.
Derever, Nigel
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Derever, Nigel

Joining the RAF on a short service commission in May 1939, he was sent to 98 Sqn upon completion of his training. At the height of the Battle of Britain in September 1940 he then joined 610 Sqn on Spitfires before later being shot down over France in 1942 and spending time as a PoW in several camps including Stalag Luft III.
Dewey, R. B.
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   Died : 27 / 10 / 1940
Dewey, R. B.

Pilot Officer R.B.Dewey of No 603 Squadron was killed after his Spitfire II (P7365) was shot down near Maidstone, Kent on the 27th of October 1940.
Dewhurst, K. S.
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Dewhurst, K. S.

Flight Officer K.S.Dewhurst flew with No 234 Squadron. On the 16th of August 1940 he baled out of his Spitfire I (R6967) safely near Southampton after combat.
Dillard, William
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Dillard, William

Flew P-51 Mustangs with 308th Fighter Squadron, 31st Fighter Group, claiming an Me262 on 22nd March 1945.
Doe, Bob
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   Died : 21 / 2 / 2010
Doe, Bob

In 1939 he joined the R.A.F. and upon completion of his training was posted to 234 squadron. During the Battle of Britain he achieved great success. He was one of the very few pilots to successfully fly both Hurricanes and Spitfires and was one of the top scorers of the Battle with 14 and two shared victories. He was awarded the DFC in October and a BAR in November. He joined 66 squadron as a Flight Commander then moving to 130 squadron in August 1943 saw him in 613 squadron flying Mustangs. October 1943 he was posted out to the Far-East, forming 10 squadron, Indian Air Force, which he led on the Burma front. Awarded the DSO in 1945. He stayed on in the R.A.F. after the war, retirement in 1966 was followed by opening a Garage business which proved successful.
Dolezal, Frantisek
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   Died : 4 / 10 / 1945
Dolezal, Frantisek

Born on September 14th, 1909 in Ceska Trebova, Dolezal studied mechanical engineering at Czech Technical University in Prague. Graduating in 1932, he began his military career and after completing his compulsory military service, decided to stay in the army. He completed his education in the air corps with top honors in 1936 and was commissioned as an air force lieutenant. Completing his training in 1937, he qualified as a pilot and lookout. He joined 36th air squadron of the second air regiment in Olomouc, equipped with AVIA B-534. At the beginning of the Nazi occupation of the Czechoslovakia in 1938, Dolezal was promoted to squadron first officer. Dolezal fled to Poland and later to France, joining L'Arme de l'Air. Most Czech fighter pilots in France served under Dolezal flew Morane Saulner MS-406. During the French campaign he shot down 4 German fighter planes, 3 of them confirmed kills and 1 probable, and was honored with the Croix dr Guerre. On the fall of France on June 16th, 1940, Dolezal with other pilots flew to Africa and then further to Liverpool, where he spent time in quarantine at the Cholmondeley camp. After this he was automatically admitted to the Royal Air Force as Pilot Officer (P/O). He was transferred to Duxford, where the No.310 Czechoslovakian Squadron was created. Due to large number of pilots, he was finally moved to the No.19 Squadron. Flying Spitfires with No.19 Sqn, Dolezal shot down 4 Luftwaffe aircraft and damaged one. During combat with a Messerschmitt Me109 his knee was injured. Returning to the No.310 Sqn, he was immediately appointed as the wing commander and simultaneously promoted to Flight Lieutenant and was later promoted to Squadron Leader. With No.310 Sqn, Dolezal shot down 2 aircraft and damaged 2 others. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on 1st September 1942. He later became a co-comander of Churstaton, where the 312 and 313 Squadrons were based. He began his second operational tour as Wing Commander. He took command of the second Czechoslovakian Wing when the commander Karel Mrazek left. During this time, he achieved his last victory. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 17th June 1944. After finishing his second operational tour, he finally left operating service and was appointed Czech liaison officer. Later, he worked as a Czechoslovakian air force inspector in London. In 1944 he moved to the U.S., where he studied at U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth. After completing his studies, he went back to London where he continued to work as a Czechoslovakian air force inspector. At the beginning of 1945 Dolezal was promoted to major and on March 3rd, 1945 left the RAF and started to work at Ministry of Defence in London. He was one of the first RAF pilots to returned to Czechoslovakia after the war. During a service flight from Prague to Zlin on 4th October 1945 he lost his life tragically in an accident in a Sibel Si 204 training aircraft when the plane crashed near Bucovice na Morave.
Dolton, A K
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Dolton, A K

Taken prisoner on 21st January 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.VII MB913 YQ-G of No.616 Sqn was shot down by an Fw190 of JG26 over France. He had been on a mission to Cambrai when he was unable to change fuel tanks and so headed back to France.
Donahue, Archie
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   Died : 30 / 7 / 2007
Donahue, Archie

Archie Donahue was born in Casper, Wyoming in 1917. He attended schools in Wyoming until 1934 when his family moved to Texas. He had his first airplane ride at the age of eight and the flying bug bit him. Archic completed three years of engineering studies at the University of Texas before joining the Navy as an Aviation Cadet. During his training Archie was stationed at Kansas City, Jacksonville, and finally Corpus Christi. He requested a transfer to the Marine Corps, and upon his graduation he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in February of 1942. After a short posting to Norfolk, Archie was assigned to VMF-112, which was nicknamed the "Wolfpack." The squadron was sent to Guadacanal in September where they commenced combat missions flying the Grumman F4F Wildcat. Archie would soon transition to the state-of-the-art F4U-1 Corsair. Between September 1942 and June of 1943 Archie was credited with nine aerial victories. One of these was achieved in the Wildcat with the balance attained while piloting the Corsair. On May 13, 1943 Archic would down five A6M3 Zeros during a single mission. In June of 1943 VMF-112 returned to the States, and the squadron was disbanded. Serving as a flight officer at El Toro Air Station in California, Archie was given the assignment of carrier qualifying VMF-451. In February of 1945 VMF-451 began combat operations flying from the deck of the USS Bunker Hill. For the next three months Donahue and his squdroninates flew numerous missions in support of the landings at lwo Jima and Okinawa, as well as strikes at the Japanese mainland, and in the process earning the nickname "Angels of Okinawa." On April 12, 1945 Donahue was once again credited with five victories during a fierce aerial battle over Okinawa. On May 11 th Archie's flight of 16 Corsairs had just returned to the carrier, and as the pilots completed their debriefing the Bunker Hill was hit by two Kamikaze aircraft, setting off a huge fire and killing 346. The Bunker Hill had to be withdrawn from action. Donahue returned to the States where he was made Commander of a squadron at El Toro. He was later transferred to Quantico, a large Marine base near Washington, DC. Archie flew a total of 215 combat missions during WWII including 56 from the deck of the Bunker Hill. He was credited with a total of 14 confirmed aerial victories. He had more than 4000 flying hours in military aircraft and 110 successful carrier landings. Although he never crashed an airplane, Archie was reported killed during aerial gunnery training when a student made a beautiful run and cut the tail off Archie's plane about five feet behind his head. Archie is a recipient of the Navy Cross, three Distinguished Flying Crosses, and five Air Medals. Archie has also been an active participant in the Confederate Air Force, and in 1990 he piloted an SBD with an unusual pilot, Saburo Sakai, the high scoring Japanese ace who was shot down in WWII by the rear gunner of a SBD. Following his retirement from military service in 1958 Archie began a long and successful career in real estate development. Archie lives in Texas with his wife Mary. They have five children and many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Sadly, he passed away on 30th July 2007.
Donnett, Avi Baron M
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Donnett, Avi Baron M

One of Belgiums most distinguished fighter pilots, Mike Donnet led 350 (Belgian) Squadron Spitfires over the D-Day beaches just before dawn, as the invasion was going in. He returned to the beachhead during the day and then finally at sunset. In all he flew 30 sorties over the beaches during the Normandy campaign. Originally a member of the Belgian Air Force, Donnet was captured by the Germans in May 1940 but subsequently made a daring escape to England by air in July 1941. Flying with 69 Squadron he scored three victories before taking command of 350 Squadron. After Normandy Donnet was in action against the V1s and the retreating German ground forces, as well as providing air cover for the Arnhem operation. In October 1944 he took command of the Hawkinge Wing of Spitfires. He rose to high command in the postwar Belgian Air Force.
Dowbiggin, T. W.
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Dowbiggin, T. W.

Taken prisoner on 7th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH483 of No.401 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and crash landed near Laon during a sweep to Lille. His aircraft was later destroyed by a strafing run by Squadron Leader L M Cameron.
Downing, R
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   Died : 6 / 4 / 1944
Downing, R

Killed on 6th April 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK778 of No.165 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed into the sea 20 miles north west of Porspoder. Unteroffizier Willi Lang of 4./JG2 cliamed this victory.
Draper, B. V.
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   Died : 28 / 2 / 1945
Draper, B. V.

Pilot Officer B.V.Draper of No 74 Squadron force landed his Spitfire II (P7355) on 20th of October 1940 following combat. He escaped injury.
Draper, G. G. F.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1997
Draper, G. G. F.

Pilot Officer G.G.F.Draper flew with No 610 Squadron and No 41 Squadron. He was injured after a combat over Ashford, Kent on the 30th of October 1940. His Spitfire II (P7282) was a written off. Draper later became a prisoner of war on the 7th of August 1941 when his Spitfire Vb (W3635) was shot down near Lille, France on a fighter sweep and he baled out safely.
Drobinski, B. H.
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Drobinski, B. H.

Pilot Officer Boleslaw H.Drobinski from Poland served with No 65 Squadron flying Spitfire I's during the Battle of Britain. He later became a Squadron Leader.
Drope, William John
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Drope, William John

Killed aged 21 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ554 of No.421 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak off Normandy. He baled out but his parachute failed to open. He is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Harry E. and Jean B. Drope, of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Drummond, J. F.
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   Died : 10 / 10 / 1940
Drummond, J. F.

Pilot Officer J.F.Drummond flew with No 92 Squadron and No.46 Squadron. He was killed on the 10th of October 1940 when his Spitfire I (R6616) collided with the Spitfire I (X4038) over Tangmere. Drummond's aircraft crashed at Portlant, Sussex.
Drummond - Hay, P
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   Died : 9 / 7 / 1940
Drummond - Hay, P

31st May 1940 over Dunkirk Fg Off Drummond Hay in spitfire L1095 met a Dornier flying alone on one engine. He put a burst into the other engine and put that out of action. Crew baled out and Dornier 8TH July 1940 over portland share din a victory of a JU87 and two unconfirmed JU87s 9th July 1940 while flying Spitfire I R667 "Q" was killed during combat with a ME109 near PORTLAND there is a brief combat film footage of Drummond Hay witht he Yorkshire film archive title – Combat Film No 43 F/O Drummond Hay 609 Sqd 31-540
Duchesne, G F G
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   Died : 30 / 1 / 1944
Duchesne, G F G

Killed on 30th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH428 of No.350 Sqn failed to return from a Ranger mission to St Omer.
Duckenfield, Byron
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   Died : 19 / 11 / 2010
Duckenfield, Byron

Byron Duckenfield started at Flying Training School on 25th November 1935 in a Blackburn B2 at Brough. As a Sergeant, he joined No.32 Sqn at Biggin Hill on 8th August 1936 and flew Gauntlets and Hurricanes. He joined 74 Squadron at Hornchurch on 11th April 1940, flying Spitfires, and on 5th May was posted to 501 Squadron flying Hurricanes at Tangmere. On the 11th of May at Betheniville, he survived a crash in a passenger transport Bombay aircraft in an aircraft in which he was a passenger, While comin ginto land the aircraft at 200 feet the aircraft stalled and the aircrfat fell backwards just levelly out as it histhe ground. 5 of th epassengers were killed when the centre section collapsed and crushed them. Duckenfield was fortunate as he had moved position during the flight. as the two passengers sitting each side of where he was sitting had died in the crash. (it was found later that the Bombay had beeb loaded with to much weight in the aft sectiion. ) recovering in hospital in Roehampton. On 23rd July 1940, he rejoined No.501 Sqn at Middle Wallop, then moved to to Gravesend two days later, scoring his first victory, a Ju87, on the 29th of July 1940. During August and September he scored three more victories. After a spell as a test pilot from 14th September 1940, he was posted to command 66 Squadron on 20th December 1941, flying Spitfires. On 26th February 1942 he took command of 615 Squadron flying Hurricanes from Fairwood Common, taking the squadron to the Far East. In late December 1942 he was shot down in Burma and captured by the Japanese. He remained a POW until release in May 1945. After a refresher course at the Flying Training School in November 1949, he took command of No.19 Squadron flying Hornets and Meteors from Chruch Fenton. After a series of staff positions, he retired from the RAF as a Group Captain on 28th May 1969. Duckenfield would write later his details :

Burma

At first light, 12 Hurricanes IIC aircraft of 615 Squadron, myself in the lead, took off from Chittagong for central Burma to attack the Japanese air base at Magwe, 300 miles away on the banks of the River Irrawaddy. Arriving at Yenangyaung, we turned downstream at minimum height for Magwe, 30 miles to the South and jettisoned drop tanks. Just before sighting the enemy base, the squadron climbed to 1200 feet and positioned to attack from up sun. On the ramp at the base, in front of the hangers, were 10 or 12 Nakajima KI - 43 Oscars in a rough line up (not dispersed) perhaps readying for take. These aircraft and the hangars behind them were attacked in a single pass, before withdrawing westward at low level and maximum speed. A few minutes later perhaps 20 miles away form Magwe, I was following the line of a cheung (small creek), height about 250 feet, speed aboput 280 mph, when the aircraft gave a violent shudder, accompanied by a very lound, unusual noise. The cause was instantly apparent: the airscrew has disappeared completely, leaving only the spinning hub. My immediate reaction was to throttle back fully and switch off to stop the violently overspeeding engine. Further action was obvious: I was committed to staying with the aircraft because, with a high initial speed, not enough height to eject could be gained without the help of an airscrew. So I jettisoned the canopy and acknowledged gratefully the fact that I was following a creek; the banks of either side were hillocky ground, hostile to a forced landing aircraft. Flying the course of the creek, I soon found the aircraft to be near the stall (luckily, a lower than normal figure without an airscrew) extended the flaps and touched down wheels-up with minimum impact ( I have done worse landings on a smooth runway!) My luck was holding, if one can talk of luck in such a situation. December is the height of the dry season in that area and the creek had little water, it was shallow and narrow at the point where I came down: shallow enough to support the fusalage and narrow enough to support wing tips. So I released the harness, pushed the IFF Destruct switch, climed out and walked the wing ashore, dryshod. The question may occur -Why did not others in the squadron see their leader go down? - the answer is simple, the usual tatctic of withdrawal from an enemy target was to fly single at high speed and low level on parallel courses until a safe distance from target was attained. Then, the formation would climb to re-assemble. Having left the aircraft, I now faced a formidable escape problem? I was 300 miles from friendly territory: my desired route would be westward but 80% of that 300 miles was covered by steep north-south ridges impenetrably clothed in virgin jungle; these were natural impediments, there was also the enemy to consider. Having thought over my predicament, I decided the best I could do - having heard reports of mean herted plainspeope - was to get as far into the hills as possible and then find a (hopefully sympathetic) village. I suppose I may have covered about 15 miles by nightfall when I came upon this small hill village and walked into the village square. Nobody seemed surprised to see me (I suspect I had been followed for some time) I wa given a quiet welcome, seated at a table in the open and given food. Then exhaustion took over, I fell asleep in the chair and woke later to find myself tied up in it. Next day I was handed over to a Japanese sergeant and escort who took me back to Magwe and, soon after that, 2.5 years captivity in Rangoon jail.

Sadly we have learned that Byron Duckenfield passed away on 19th November 2010.


Byron Duckenfield during a signing session in March 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts extend our many thanks to Byron Duckenfield for signing a number of our art prints over a number of sessions.

Byron Duckenfield at a signing session in 2010.

Byron Duckenfield's Hurricane P3059 (SD-N) of 501 Squadron.




Byron Duckenfield signing the print Quartet by Gerald Coulson at a signing session in February 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts extend our many thanks to Byron Duckenfield for spending the day (21/2/2010) signing a number of our art prints.

Duke, Neville
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   Died : 7 / 4 / 2007
Duke, Neville

Neville Duke flew Spitfires as wingman to Sailor Malan in 92 Squadron. In November 1941 he was posted to 112 Squadron in the Middle East. After a second tour in the Desert, he flew a third tour, with 145 Squadron in Italy. He was the top scoring Allied Ace in the Mediterranean with 28 victories. After the war, in 1953, he captured the World Air Speed record. He died 7th April 2007.
Duncan, John David McAlpine
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   Died : 16 / 6 / 1944
Duncan, John David McAlpine

Killed aged 22 on 16th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V BM128 of No.64 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed into a farmhouse. He is buried in the Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Andrew Cargill Duncan and Margaret McAlpine Duncan, of Balado, Kinross-shire.
Duncan-Smith, W
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Duncan-Smith, W

Spent WWII flying Spitfires in the Battle of Britian and over Europe accounting for 19 enemy aircraft destroyed, 7 probables and 15 damaged. Duncan-Smith was born in Madras, India, on 28th May 1914, the son of an officer in the Indian civil service. He was educated in Scotland, where he joined his schools OTC. Returning to India in 1933, he became a coffee and tea planter, but in 1936 returned to the UK to join the RAF.

Wartime service - Serving at 7 OTU at the outbreak of war, he was posted to No.611 Squadron RAF later that year. He was awarded a DFC in June 1941, and went to 603 Squadron in August 1941 as a Flight Commander. Taken ill late in the year, he spent some time in hospital, before joining 64 Squadron in March 1942. In August he became Wing Commander- Flying at RAF North Weald after a rest from operations. He was then sent to the Mediterranean as Wing leader, 244 Wing. In September 1943 after engine failure he bailed out into the sea, being rescued after 5 hours adrift. As a Group Captain, he then took charge of 324 Wing , finally leaving in March 1945. Duncan Smith or Smithy,/i> was credited with 17 confirmed kills, two shared kills, six probables, two shared probables and eight damaged in aerial combat. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and Bar and the Distinguished Flying Cross and two Bars in recognition of his bravery. He also was a notable recipient of the 5 Years Safe Driving Award. He was the author of Spitfire into Battle, published in 1981, a highly entertaining account of aerial combat in the Spitfire aircraft. Group Captain Duncan Smith flew and fought in front-line operations continuously from the Battle of Britain through the struggle for Malta, the invasion of Italy and the liberation of France.
Dundas, Hugh
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   Died : 10 / 7 / 1995
Dundas, Hugh

Hugh Dundas, a pre-war member of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, was called up early in the war, serving with 616 Squadron. After a promising start as a fighter pilot, Dundas was shot down and injured during the Battle of Britain, but quickly returned to his squadron which in early 1941 was at Tangmere and came under the command of Wing Commander Douglas Bader. Dundas became one of the leading members of that Wing and frequently flew with Bader, gradually building his reputation as a fighter pilot and tactician. After receiving the DFC, Dundas became Flight Commander in 610 Squadron. December 1941 brought another promotion as commanding officer of 56 Squadron, the first in the RAF to be converted to Typhoons. Posted to the Mediterranean in 1943, he led 244 Spitfire Wing from Malta and later Italy. In 1944, Dundas was awarded the DSO and became one of the youngest Group Captains in the RAF. For some years after the war, Dundas served once more with the RAuxAF during which time he became CO of 601 Squadron. Cocky Dundas flew Spitfires with 616 Sqn during some of the heaviest air fighting of the Battle of Britain. With several victories to his name he was shot down on August 22nd and wounded. Later this distinguished pilot flew in Douglas Baders famous Tangmere Wing, and subsequently commanded successively Typhoon and Spitfire Wings.

Sir Hugh Dundas (22 Jul 1920 - 10 Jul 1995) Served with 616 sqd 1939 - 1941, 56 sqd 1941 to 1942, 324 wing north Africa, Sicily and the first wing to move to Italy 1943 - 1944, 240 wing 1944 - 1945 in Italy.

Dundas, John
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   Died : 28 / 11 / 1941
Dundas, John

Flight Lieutenant John Charles Dundas joined No 609 Squadron before the war. He was awarded the D.F.C. He was shot down and killed on the 28th of November 1941.
Dunn, William
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Dunn, William


Dyke, L. A.
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1940
Dyke, L. A.

Sergeant L.A.Dyke of No 64 Squadron was reported as 'Missing' on the 27th of September 1940.
East, Clyde
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   Died : 30 / 7 / 2014
East, Clyde

By the summer of 1941, at 19 years of age, Clyde was hitchhiking up to Canada to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). His goal was to become a military pilot and help fight the war against Hitler. He achieved that goal and became an accomplished fighter and reconnaissance pilot, first with the RCAF, then with the US Army Air Corps beginning in January, 1944. Staged in England and flying Spitfire and Mustang recon/fighter planes, he flew in and led numerous missions across the English Channel. Significantly, Clyde is merited with shooting down the first plane on D-Day, giving ground support to Patton's troops as they marched across France, and participating in the Battle of the Bulge. By war's end in 1945, Captain East had flown approx. 250 missions, and amassed 400 flight hours and 13 aerial victories. He was awarded the Silver Star, two Distinguished Flying Crosses and the Air Medal with 36 Oak Leaf Clusters. His career as a military pilot continued on in the Korean War (1950-1953) where he earned the rank of Major and was awarded three more Flying Crosses and six additional Air Medals. With this achievement Clyde held the record for the highest number of repeat combat medals, an honor which stood unchallenged in the Guinness World Records for 13 years. Clyde's accomplishments in the USAF continued through the 1950's and 60's, first as Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron Commander at Shaw AFB (1951-1954), then with a three-year stint as Training Advisor for the Italian Air Force (1954-1957). Returning to the States with his family, which now included wife Margaret and 6 children, Clyde attended USAF War College at Maxwell AFB, Montgomery, AL then on to TacRecon Squadron Commander at Shaw AFB, Sumter, SC where he flew the McDonnell RF-101 Voodoo. He was subsequently promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1959, then served overseas another 3 years as a Squadron Commander at Laon AFB near Laon, France. Lt/Col East spent his last three years of active military service back at Shaw AFB as a Squadron Commander and Voodoo pilot. Notably, during the fall of 1962, he served as Detachment Commander in the Cuban Missile Crisis. Clyde flew numerous visual and photographic missions over Cuba and was later awarded the fourth cluster to his Distinguished Flying Cross. In 1964 he commanded a Voodoo unit deployed to South Vietnam in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident. East was one of the most decorated fighter pilots during World War II. He was awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Air Medal with 36 Oak Leaf Clusters. In 1955, The Guinness Book of World Records listed him as having the highest number of repeat awards of combat medals. After a 25-year period of exemplary service spanning three major wars across the globe, Lt/Col Clyde East retired from Air Force life in February, 1965. Clyde's commitment to his country continued an additional 28 years as a military analyst for RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA.
Edge, Paul
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Edge, Paul

On 12th July 40, Red Section, consisting of Flt-Lt Frank Howell in R6691, Fg-Off Paul Edge in R6636 and Plt-Off Johnny Curchin R6634 shot down a Heinkel 111 (later only credited with a 'Probable'). 18th July 1940 Paul Edge spitfire was shot down was also shot down,
Edner, Selden
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Edner, Selden


Edridge, H. P. M.
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   Died : 30 / 10 / 1940
Edridge, H. P. M.

Pilot Officer H.P.M.Edridge of No 222 Squadron was wounded with slight burns on the 30th of August 1940 when he baled out of his Spitfire I (K9826) over Barham, Kent after combat with a Bf 109. H.P.M.Eldridge was killed in action on the 30th of October 1940 when he crash landed his Spitfire I (K9939) after combat with a Bf 109 over Ewhurst.
Edsall, E. F.
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   Died : 12 / 4 / 1942
Edsall, E. F.

Pilot Officer Eric F.Edsall joined No 54 Squadron on the 1st of August 1940. He was awarded the D.F.C. on the 16th of January 1942, he was killed in a Japanese attack on Ceylon on the 12th of April 1942, aged 24.
Edwards, Bill
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   Died : 7 / 8 / 2009
Edwards, Bill

Bill Edwards applied to the USAAF but was turned down because of two missing molars. He volunteered for the RAF in 1940, and was readily accepted and was shipped to Tulsa's Spartan School for RAF training. Upon graduation, he was sent to an OTU in England flying Hurricanes and Spitfires. He was assigned to the 133 Squadron, last of the famed 'Eagle Squadrons.' He flew convoy escort duty out of Northern Ireland and delivered all types of British aircraft to and from operational units. By September 1942, Lt. Edwards joined the USAAF along with most other Eagle Squadron pilots who wore the wings of both the RAF and USAAF. Assigned to the 8th Air Force Fighter Command, Bill's job was to ensure that newly arriving fighter units received first hand information on British navigating systems, aircraft, maps etc. As a Major, Bill commanded the first P-51 / P-38 OTU in England providing intensive flying in all combat and weather conditions. In June, 1944, Major Edwards was assigned with his Eagle Squadron friends to the Fourth Fighter Group flying P-51Ds escorting bombers on deep missions into Germany. During one escort mission to Munich, which bill was leading, Bill's Mustang was hit by German '88 flack' and downed near the French and German border. Bill spent the remainder of the war as a POW at Stalag Luft I, Barth, Germany until liberated in June 1945. Bill Edwards flew a total of 37 combat operations with 133 Squadron, the third Eagle Squadron to be formed. He retired from the USAF in 1968. Sadly Colonel Bill Edwards died on the 7th of August 2009.
Edwards, H. D.
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   Died : 11 / 9 / 1940
Edwards, H. D.

Pilot Officer Henry Davies Edwards a Canadian flew Spitfire's with No 92 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. He was killed on the 11th of September 1940. His Spitfire I (P9464) had been in combat with some Bf 109's. The Spitfire crashed near Smeeth in Kent.
Edwards, James
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Edwards, James

Stocky Edwards became a P40 Ace with 260 Sqn. 94 Sqn RAF, Flight Commander 260 Sqn RAF, 417 Sqn RCAF, Flight Commander 92 Sqn RAF, Squadron Commander 274 Sqn RAF, Wing Leader 127 Wing RCAF. His victory total was 15 with 3 shared.
Elcome, D. W.
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   Died : 26 / 10 / 1940
Elcome, D. W.

Sergeant Douglas William Elcome of No 602 Squadron was reported missing after he failed to return from a routine patrol in his Spitfire I (R6839) on the 26th of October 1940. His body was never recovered. Earlier that summer Douglas was flying a Spitfire I which crash-landed. He was knocked unconscious and hospitalised for a short while. He insisted on going back to flying and was accepted. However, on returning from patrol on the 26th of October 1940 he appeared to black out or go unconscious and his plane crashed into the sea off Selsey Bill. It was conjectured that this might have occurred because of his earlier crash.
Eley, F. W.
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   Died : 31 / 7 / 1940
Eley, F. W.

Sergeant F.W.Eley of No 74 Squadron was shot down and killed on the 31st of July 1940. He was flying in his Spitfire I (P9398) when he was attacked over Folkestone and crashed.
Elliott, R. D.
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Elliott, R. D.

Pilot Officer R.D.Elliott of No 72 Squadron baled out safely over Kent on the 4th of September 1940. His Spitfire was shot down over Hartfield, Sussex. R.D.Elliot was wounded on the 6th of September 1940 following combat over the Thames Estuary.
Ellis, W. T.
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Ellis, W. T.

Sergeant W.T.Ellis of No 92 Squadron crash landed his Spitfire I (X4552) on the 10th of October 1940. He escaped injury.
Elsdon, Thomas Arthur Francis
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   Died : 9 / 9 / 2003
Elsdon, Thomas Arthur Francis

Flight Officer Thomas Arthur Francis Elsdon of No 72 Squadron was wounded on the 7th of September 1940 following combat. He crash landed his Spitfire I (X4254) near Biggin Hill. Born January 22, 1917 in Broughty Ferry Dundee, "Jimmi" Elsdon at the Academy of the RAF in 1936 and received his promotion to the rank of officer in December 1937. Posted to 72 Squadron, was was witht he squadron when war broke out and participated in the first battles of the phoney war. During the Battle of Britain, his Spitfire was shot down by a Me 110 on 7 September. Injuring his knee and foot, As a reward of 8 wins that totals at this time (including 6 obtained after August 31), he received the DFC in early October. he returned flying in mid-July 1941 and was assigned to Squadron 257. On the 24th of July, he was again wounded slightly. On August 25th, he was promoted to commander of Squadron 136 that has just been set up to go to the middle east. While on route to its new destination, the Japanese attacked on Pearl Harbour . The Squadron was ordered to Burma where he arrived in January 1942. The squadrons Hurricane were the first in combat in this sector. After the retreat from Burma to India, he was promoted Wing Commander Wing 165 in Dum Dum, September 8, 1942 before taking command of Wing 293 in October and 169 in February 1943 and then to 185. Finally, in October 1943 he returned to Wing 165 and led the offensive at the front of Arakan in late November. In July 1944, he was assigned to District General Far East in Calcutta before returning to Britain in September 1944. He then served in the Transport Command in April 1945 and became commander of the base Boreham. He received the OBE in January 1945 and continued serving in the RAF becoming Wing Commander in 1949 before retiring as a (acting) Group Captain in October 1959
Else, P.
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Else, P.

Sergeant P.Else of No 610 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (P9496) and was wounded on the 26th of August 1940. His Spitfire crashed at Paddlesworth.
Empey, James
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Empey, James

James W. Empey first flew into combat flying Spitfires and P-51s over North Africa during World War II and scored all five of his aerial victories in just 30 days, from May 29 to June 28, 1944. Empey was off to war again flying low over the Vietnam jungle barely missing the jagged treetops serving as a Forward Air Controller as he banked his Cessna O-1 Bird Dog in search for signs of Viet Cong activity, often spotting the enemy by the muzzle flashes of ground fire aimed at his plane. Empey directed over 154 airstrikes firing white phosphorus rockets to mark the enemy forces for an airstrike by North American F-100 Super Sabres. He finished his tour with over 700 combat flying hours and returned to Systems Command, participating in the launching of communication satellites. Among his decorations are the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross with two Oak Leaf clusters, and the Air Medal with 27 Oak Leaf clusters.
England, Mac
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England, Mac

‘Mac’ England joined the RAF in 1938 and after qualifying, posted as a pilot into Lancaster’s. In 1941 he was transferred from Bomber command to fighter Command-flying Spitfires on coastal sweeps. After a short period of time on Spitfires he was transferred back again to bomber Command, and in 1943 completed 30 Operations on Lancaster’s. When he retired in 1974 he had flown a total of 36 different aircraft including Hunters and Canberras.
Ester, J.
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Ester, J.

On 28th May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK130 GE-P of No.349 Sqn was hit by flak and he baled out 10 miles off Le Treport. He was picked up by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Evans, Kenneth William Samuel
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Evans, Kenneth William Samuel

Joining the RAF in 1939, Ken Evans was posted to 600 Squadron, where he flew night operations. In September 1941 he was posted to 130 Squadron to fly Spitfires, and in early 1942 was ordered to Malta. Arriving in Gibraltar he joined the carrier HMS Eagle. On 18 May he flew his Spitfire to Malta from the Eagle, to join 126 Squadron. Seeing much action over the island in June and July, in August he returned to Gibraltar to lead a new flight back to Malta, this time embarking on the carrier HMS Furious. One of 126 Squadrons most successful pilots on Malta, Ken was awarded the DFC on 1st December 1942, and credited with 5 destroyed, 3 probables and 3 damaged. Commissioned on Malta, he returned to the UK, and in September 1943 was posted to 165 Squadron as a flight commander.
Evans, Roy
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   Died : 1 / 11 / 2009
Evans, Roy


Exelby, A H
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Exelby, A H

Ijured when on landing at Tangmere, his aircraft, Spitfire Mk.XII EN606 came into contact with Spitfire Mk.XII EN227 piloted by Pilot Officer J T May. Subsequently, Flight Lieutenant D E Proudlove flying Spitfire Mk.XII EN615 collided with one of the two aircraft. EN606 was written off, the other two aircraft were damaged.
Eyles, P. R.
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   Died : 20 / 9 / 1940
Eyles, P. R.

Sergeant P.R.Eyles of No 92 Squadron was on patrol in his Spitfire I (N3248) on the 20th of September 1940 when he was shot down and killed off Dungeness.
Fairbairn, R K Y
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   Died : 31 / 1 / 1944
Fairbairn, R K Y

Killed on 31st January 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XII EN618 of No.91 Sqn collided with Spitfire Mk.XII EN613 also of No.91 Sqn in poor weather. They had been escorting Mosquitos to Dieppe. Flying Officer D R Inskip in the other Spitfire was also killed.
Fairbanks, David
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   Died : 1975
Fairbanks, David

Spitfire and Tempest pilot. Serving with No.3 Sqn and No274 Sqn RCAF, he claimed many enemy aircraft, including two Me109s and another damaged during one sortie. On one occasion, his Tempest was hit at low altitude and flipped upside down on fire. Where this would have meant disaster for most pilots, Fairbanks flew the aircraft inverted for a time before righting it, and by doing so put out the fire, which had already damaged his aircraft. After this he successfully returned to base. Later he was shot down and taken prisoner until the end of the war. He passed away in 1975.
Citation for the Distinguished Flying Cross, gazetted 16th March 1945 :

Flight Lieutenant Fairbanks has completed a large number of sorties and has set a fine example of determination and devotion to duty throughout. On one occasion in November 1944, whilst attacking an enemy locomotive, his aircraft was badly hit and turned completely over while at a low altitude. One of the petrol tanks was pierced and a fire commenced in one of the wings. Displaying admirable coolness and great skill, Flight Lieutenant Fairbanks succeeded in righting the aircraft and set course for home. The fire in the wing died down but not before it had done much damage. Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Fairbanks succeeded in reaching base. This officer has invariably displayed a high degree of courage.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC, gazetted 13th April 1945 :

This officer continues to display a high standard of skill and gallantry. Within recent weeks he has destroyed five enemy aircraft, bringing his victories to eight. Flight Lieutenant Fairbanks has also effectively attacked many enemy targets on the ground. His keenness and determination have set a high example to all.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC, gazetted 14th September 1945 :

Squadron Leader Fairbanks has destroyed fifteen enemy aircraft. On two separate occasions since his last award he has shot down two aircraft in one sortie and in less than a fortnight he has destroyed six, including a jet propelled aircraft. As a flight and then a squadron commander he has led many daring and highly successful attacks on enemy communications, principally locomotives and road transport. In three weeks seventy-two enemy locomotives and vehicles were successfully attacked. By the excellent example he has set, his initiative and fine leadership, this officer has inspired the other members of his squadron and all pilots with whom he has come in contact.

Fairhurst, Edward Tim
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   Died : 25 / 4 / 2009
Fairhurst, Edward Tim

Wing Commander Edward (Tim) Fairhurst DFC was born on April 14th 1918 at Mirfield in Yorkshire and educated at Shrewsbury School. He joined the Territorial Army in 1936 and was commissioned into the 7th West Yorkshire Regiment. With little activity after the outbreak of war, he responded to a request for Army officers to transfer to the RAF to train as pilots. He completed his flying training in November 1940 when he was posted to No 4 Squadron, flying the Lysander. In October 1941 he was posted to D Flight No1 PRU (Spitfires), which later became No 541 Squadron. In September 1942 he flew to Russia as OC PRU detachment and operated there with red star markings in place of RAF roundels. He was promoted to Sqd Ldr, converted to Mosquitoes and posted across the airfield as OC A Flight 544 Sqdn. Fairhurst went to America to brief the USAAF on photographic operations before returning to the UK. In September 1944 he was posted back to 541 Sqn (Spitfires) as CO and remained there until the end of the war. By the end of the war he had flown 88 long-range photographic sorties. He was twice mentioned in despatches, was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre avec Palme and received the Territorial Decoration. After two years as a civilian, Wing Commander Edward (Tim) Fairhurst rejoined the RAF in May 1947 and flew Spitfires in Malaya before going to Hong Kong. Following a period selecting men for officer and aircrew training, he spent the final two years of his service as the permanent president of a court martial standing board. He retired in 1965, when he became a civil servant and worked for the MoD as a positive vetting officer. In old age he was invited to the Russian embassy to be presented with the Arctic Star. Tim Fairhurst died on April 25th 2009 aged 91.
Farnes, Paul
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Farnes, Paul

Paul Farnes was born in Boscombe, Hampshire, July 16, 1918. He joined the RAFVR in April 1938 and is mobilized in July 1939 before being posted to 501 Squadron, 14 September 1939. He accompanied the Squadron when it was sent to France in May 1940, winning his first victories in the campaign of France and during the Battle of Britain. In October, he was awarded the DFM after eight victories and was promoted to officer the following month. In February 1941 he was transferred to 57 OTU as an instructor and then to 73 OTU in November, in Aden. In late February 1942, he was posted to 229 Squadron in North Africa as Flight Commander. On March 27, 1942, he flew to Malta with the rest of the Squadron aboard the Hurricane IIc BN122. After a period of intense and difficult battles in which defenders of the island will lose many fighters, during which he took command of the Squadron, he returned to Egypt with the survivors of his unit May 27, 1942. He then transferred to Iraq where he joined the Headquarters and remained there until March 1945. He then returned to Great Britain and three weeks after upgrading to the UTO 53, he took command of 124 Squadron, a position he held until the end of the war. He joined the Tangmere before making command of 611 Squadron equipped Mustang IV July 7, 1945. In August, the Squadron was disbanded and it supports the 164 Squadron with Spitfire IX. 63 Squadron was designated in August 1946. In January 1947, he became an officer of Liaison with training centres with the Air Ministry until October 1948. He then became an instructor in various centres. He continued his career in the RAF until 1958 and left active service with the rank of Wing Commander. He returned to his civilian career in the industry.
Farrow, R E
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Farrow, R E

On 4th January 1944, his Spitfire Vb AB186 SD-P of No.501 Sqn was damaged in combat with aircraft of JG26. He managed to get the aircraft back to base.
Faxon, Richard
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Faxon, Richard


Fearnley, Frederik Arild Sverdrup
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   Died : 25 / 2 / 1944
Fearnley, Frederik Arild Sverdrup

Killed on 25th February 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ534 FN-W of No.331 Sqn was shot down by ground fire as he strafed St Trond airfield. He had already shared in the destruction of an He177 bomber of 3./KG300.
Feld, Sylvan
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Feld, Sylvan


Fenwick, Harry Elmore
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   Died : 21 / 6 / 1944
Fenwick, Harry Elmore

Killed aged 23 on 21st June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH207 of No.401 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Allied anti-aircraft fire as he duelled with an enemy aircraft. He is buried in Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery. Son of Harry and Rosine Fenwick, of Sioux Lookout, Ontario.
Ferguson, Graham Murray
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   Died : 17 / 6 / 1944
Ferguson, Graham Murray

Killed aged 22 on 17th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vc AB208 of No.130 Sqn collided with Spitfire W3128 also of No.130 Sqn and crashed into the sea off the Isle of Wight. The other aircraft was damaged but survived. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of John Ranald Ferguson and Christina Ferguson, of Fyvie, Aberdeenshire.
Fields, Virgil
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Fields, Virgil


Finlay, D. O.
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   Died : 19 / 4 / 1970
Finlay, D. O.

Passed away 19th April 1970.
Finlay, Hartland
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   Died : 22 / 1 / 2009
Finlay, Hartland

Born in Montreal, 1920 and educated at McGill University. Former COTC and RCA. Hartland Finlay enlisted for the RAF in Montreal, on the 14th of September 1940 and trained at No.1 ITS, graduating on 21st December 1940. He then went to No.4 EFTS followed by further training at No.9 SFTS graduating on the 28th of May 1941. Commissioned from Warrant Officer to Pilot Officer in 1942 and Flight Officer in January 1943, he went to Britian in 1943. Posted to 1 Sqn in June 1943, he moved to 416 later in the month. On August 12th Flt Off. Hartland Finlay bailed out of a malfunctioning Spitfire and was rescued from the English Channel. Transferred to 443 Sqn in September 1944 and promoted to F/L in March 1944. Attended Fighter Leaders course in May-June 1944 and posted to 53 OTU in July as an instructor. In March 1945 he rejoined 403 Sqn and in April was posted to 443 Sq. Successfully bailed out at 200 ft when his Spitfire was set on fire by return fire from a Ju88 he was attacking. Returned to unit 3 days later and was awarded DFC on 24th July and promoted to S/L later that month. Joined RCAF HQ in September 1945 and returned to Canada in November1945. Squadron Leader Hartland Finlay DFC after leaving the air force flew for KLM from 1946 to 1948. Served with the Canadian Department of Transport. Sadly, Squadron Leader Hartland Finlay DFC passed away on January 22nd 2009.
Finnie, A.
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 1940
Finnie, A.

Pilot Officer A.Finnie of No 54 Squadron was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6816) at Kingsdown off Dover on the 25th of July 1940. He was killed.
Finucane, Paddy
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   Died : 15 / 7 / 1942
Finucane, Paddy

Wing Commander Brendan (Paddy) Finucane, DSO, DFC and bar was born in Dublin, Ireland. Finucane joined the RAF in May 1938 and, aged 19, became operational with No 65 Spitfire Squadron in July 1940. On the 15th of July 1942 he was killed when hit by anti-aircraft fire on a sweep over the French Coasts and went down into the sea. His score then stood at 32 kills.
Fischette, Charles
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   Died : 3 / 1 / 2016
Fischette, Charles

RAF fighter ace with 5 victories. On April 5th Charles Fischette while Escorting A-20s downed a FW190 and on May 6th while participating in a sweep to Tunis, Fischette destroyed another German fighter. On June 10th while escorting bombers to the Italian island stronghold of Pantelleria. was engaged by 30 enemy fighters over the harbour. Fischette destroyed one ME-109 and shared a probable with Lt. Wooten. On the 11th Pantelleria fell but the 307th engaged a formation of bombers and fighters attacking the invasion fleet. Lt Fischette downed 2 enemy aircraft and making him a ace. (and his five victories were part of the the 307th total of 33 enemy aircraft downed at that point). Charles Fischette woulod go onto command the 494th fighter SQD on the 19th July 1944
Fleming, J W
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Fleming, J W

Taken prisoner on 30th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK737 of No.441 Sqn RCAF was shot down by an Me109 near Gace.
Fletcher, M
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Fletcher, M


Fleurquin, P C DeG
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Fleurquin, P C DeG

On 2nd May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK582 5A-F of No.329 Sqn collided with Spitfire Mk.IX MK213 of No.340 Sqn over the English Channel. He baled out over Dover and was ok. The other aircraft crashed into the sea off Ostend and Sub Liuetenant M Reeve was killed.
Forwell, E W
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Forwell, E W

On 7th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XI PA870 of Mo.16 Sqn was shot down by flak during a photo reconnaissance mission to Normandy. He evaded capture.
Foster, Bob
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Foster, Bob

605 Sqn Battle of Britain, flying Hurricanes throughout the Battle of Britain with much success. 54(F) Sqn Spitfire 1942-1944 in Australia. Flew some missions in aircraft R4118, which saw a total of 49 combat missions, shooting down several enemy aircarft. It was in this aircraft that Bob Foster damaged two Ju88s and shared in the destruction of a third. He finished the war with 7 confirmed victories and 3 probables.
Foster, L
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Foster, L

On 28th January 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MA844 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot up and damaged by Fw190s during a ranger mission to Amiens. He managed to get the aircraft to base safely.
Foubert, J L
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Foubert, J L

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MA842 of No.80 Sqn developed a glycol leak and he baled out off Hastings, being rescued later.
Fowlow, Norman Ralph
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   Died : 19 / 5 / 1944
Fowlow, Norman Ralph

Killed aged 22 on 19th May 1944 after flak struck the bomb his Spitfire Mk.IX MK834 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was carrying on a dive bombing mission. The bomb exploded and he managed to bale out near Neufchatel, but did not survive. He is buried in Longuenesse Souvenir Cemetery. Son of the Revd. Ralph Fowlow, and of Annie E. Fowlow; husband of Elsie M. Fowlow, of San Francisco, California, U.S.A.
Fox, F J
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Fox, F J

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX NH203 of No.602 Sqn was hit by American gunfire and crash landed in Normandy. He was unhurt, but the aircraft was written off.
France, V
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France, V


Francis, E H
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   Died : 20 / 1 / 1944
Francis, E H

Killed on 20th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH796 SK-Q of No.165 Sqn was written off in a collision with Spitfire Mk.IX MH822 SK-Y on landing at RAF Culmhead. Flight Sergeant I F Hakansson in the other Spitfire was injured.
Frank, Frank Jerry
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Frank, Frank Jerry

Sqn. Ldr. Frank (Jerry) Frank DFC volunteered to join the RAF in 1940 and commenced his flying training in the summer of 1941 at Hullavington, Wiltshire. Following training on Spitfires he volunteered to join the Photo-Reconnaissance Unit (PRU) and was posted to RAF Benson, Oxfordshire in 1942. His first op was to Den Helder in July 1942. On 15th May 1943 (his 36th op) he flew to take photographs of the dams from 30,000 feet. He returned to the Mohne, Eder and Sorpe dams on 17th May to photograph the damage inflicted by 617 Squadron.
Franklin, William
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   Died : 12 / 12 / 1940
Franklin, William

Sergeant William Henry Franklin flew with No 65 Squadron in Spitfire I's before and during the Battle of Britain. On the 26th of June and was awarded the D.F.M. and promoted to Flight Sergeant. He was shot down and killed in combat won the 12th of December 1940 in his Spitfire (R6978).
Freeborn, John
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   Died : 28 / 8 / 2010
Freeborn, John

Johnie Freeborn flew Spitfires with 74 Squadron over Dunkirk, and was in action throughout the Battle of Britain, he had been with his squadron longer, and flown more hours, than any other Battle of Britain pilot. He joined 602 Squadron in 1942, and commanded 118 Squadron in June 1943. In June 1944 he was promoted Wing Commander Flying of 286 Wing in Italy. John Freeborn scored 17 victories. Sadly, we have learned that John Freeborn passed away on 28th August 2010.

John Freeborn signing the print In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman, assisted by Cranston Fine Arts owner David Higgins.

John Freeborn signs the print Close Encounter at a signing session in February 2010.

Cranston Fine Arts would like to extend our many thanks to Wing Commander John Freeborn for spending a day (28/2/2010) with us signing a number of our art prints.

Frith, E. T. G.
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   Died : 17 / 10 / 1940
Frith, E. T. G.

Sergeant E.T.G.Frith from No 92 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (X4597) and was badly burned on the October 9th 1940 following combat over Ashford, Kent. He later died from his injuries on the 17th of October 1940.
Frith, Maurice William
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   Died : 10 / 5 / 1944
Frith, Maurice William

Killed aged 23 on 10th May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ303 of No.602 Sqn was shot down by Fw190s of JG26 near Neufchatel. He is buried in Marissel French National Cemetery. Son of William H. Frith and Elsie L. Frith of Erdington, Birmingham.
Frohlich, B
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Frohlich, B

On 21st May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK725of No.310 Sqn was damaged by flak while attacking a train but returned to base safely.
Fromont, J J M
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Fromont, J J M

On 11th February 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vc AR490 GE-A of No.349 Sqn suffered engine failure as it came in to land. The subsequent heavy / crash landing was enough to damage the aircraft beyond repair.
Fry, D P
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   Died : 17 / 3 / 1944
Fry, D P

Killed on 17th March 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ602 of No.341 Sqn crashed into the sea four miles north west of Landunez.
Furniss-Rowe, A
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Furniss-Rowe, A

On 25th January 1944 while on a Ramrod mission over France, the engine of his Spitfire Mk.IX EN575 of No.66 Sqn failed and he force landed 15 miles east of Le Treport. He managed to evade capture.
Gabreski, Francis
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   Died : 31 / 1 / 2002
Gabreski, Francis

Gabby Gabreski was the top scoring 8th Air Force fighter Ace in Europe with 28.5 victories in World War II, plus further 6.5 in Korea. Flying P47s with the 56th Fighter Group, his illustrious career in Europe came to a spectacular end, when, strafing an airfield his aircraft touched the ground. He crash landed and was taken prisoner. The story of this American hero from Oil City, Pennsylvania begins in 1942. Gabreski dropped out of his pre-med studies at the University of Notre Dame to become a flyer. Anxious to get into action quickly Francis Gabreski got himself assigned to the 3-1-5 Polish fighter squadron of the RAF in 1942. Although Gabreski flew many combat missions with the Polish fighter squadron he attained no victories. In February of 1943 he was reassigned to the U.S. Army's Eighth Air Force. On August 24, 1943 he got his first victory (a Focke-Wulf 190) over France. Flying the P-47 Thunderbolt or "Jug", Gabreski continued to achieve victory after victory. He was officially credited with 28 confirmed aerial victories, and that excludes the scores of aircraft, tanks, and other vehicles destroyed by Gabreski during ground attack missions. For many weeks leading up to and following D-Day in June of 1944 Gabby had been on numerous missions involving the dive bombing and strafing of German trains, bridges, armored convoys, and gun emplacements. On July 20,1944 Gabby was scheduled to depart for a much-deserved leave, during which he planned to marry his girl, Kay Lochran. Shortly before his scheduled departure Gabreski was given the opportunity of leading the 61st Squadron of the 56th Fighter Group on an important mission. This was a challenge this ace could not resist. Near Cologne, Gabby spotted an airdrome and began a high-speed low-level attack. Defying his own axiom to "hit them hard, hit them fast, hit them low, but never come around for a second pass," Gabby made an ill-fated second pass over the field. On this second pass his propeller hit the tarmac, and Gabreski was forced to make a crash landing in a wheat field adjacent to the German airfield. For five days he was able to elude the German army, but he was finally captured and sent to Stalag Luft 1 in Barth Germany. In 1945 with the end of the War Gabby was released and he married Kay Cochran on June 11. Not long after the Korean War broke out, Gabby found himself in command of the 51st Fighter Wing, where he flew the F-86 Sabre jet. In Korea Gabreski attained 6.5 more confirmed aerial victories in engagements with Migs, earning the unique distinction of ace status in two different wars. Following his retirement from military service in 1967, Gabby worked for several years for Grumman Aircraft on Long Island. Later he was to become the President and General Manager of the Long Island Railroad. Two of his nine children are Air Force Academy graduates and pilots with the U.S. Air Force. At the time of his retirement from military service in 1967 Gabby is believed to have flown more combat missions than any other American fighter pilot. Gabreski lived in Long Island New York where the American flag proudly flew each day atop the Gabreski family flagpole. Colonel Francis "Gabby" Gabreski passed away on January 31,2002.
Gall, C N
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Gall, C N

On 8th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb P8747 of No.63 Sqn was shot down by a combination of an enemy Me109 and Royal Navy anti aircraft fire near Bayuex. He baled out and landed in Allied territory.
Gamblen, D. R.
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   Died : 29 / 7 / 1940
Gamblen, D. R.

Flight Officer D.R.Gamblen of No 41 Squadron was shot down in combat and killed in his Spitfire I (N3038) on the July 29th 1940.
Gardiner, F. T.
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Gardiner, F. T.

Flight Officer F.T.Gardiner joined No 610 Squadron in July 1940. He was wounded in the arm on the July 25th 1940 over the Channel but managed to safely land his aircraft. On the August 25th 1940 he baled out of his Spitfire I (K9931) after combat near Dover. He suffered slight wounds. Gardiner was awarded the D.F.C. on the 10th of March 1944.
Garvey, L. A.
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   Died : 30 / 10 / 1940
Garvey, L. A.

Sergeant L.A.Garvey of No 41 Squadron was killed on October 30th 1940 after his Spitfire II (P7375) was shot down over Ashford, Kent.
Gaunt, G. N.
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   Died : 15 / 9 / 1940
Gaunt, G. N.

Pilot Officer G.N.Gaunt of No 609 Squadron was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6690) on September 15th 1940 near Kenly, he was killed.
Gaze, Tony
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Gaze, Tony

Australian Tony Gaze joined Bader at Tangmere in March 1941 flying with 610 Sqn, scoring several victories during the high summer of that famous year. In 1942 he was posted to 610 Sqn and then commanded 64 Sqn. In Sept 1943 he joined 66 Sqn but was shot down. Evading capture he escaped back to England. In July 1944 he flew again with 610 Sqn then 41 Sqn. In the final days of the war he flew meteor jets with 616 Sqn. Tony Gaze finished the war an Ace with 11 and 3 shared destroyed, 4 probable and one V. He was awarded the DFC with 2 bars.
Gentile, Dominic
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Gentile, Dominic


Geraud, J J
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   Died : 30 / 1 / 1944
Geraud, J J

On 30th January 1944, while on a Ranger mission to St Omer, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH476 of No.350 Sqn was damaged by flak and although he managed to get the aircraft back to RAF Hawkinge, it caught fire on landing. He died of injuries sustained.
Gheyssens, J L M P
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   Died : 8 / 6 / 1944
Gheyssens, J L M P

Killed on 8th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK252 of No.349 Sqn was shot down by an enemy fighter and crashed into the beach head near Dinan-sur-Mer.
Gibbes, Bobby
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   Died : 11 / 4 / 2007
Gibbes, Bobby

Born 6th May 1916. Bobby Gibbes began pilot training in 1940, and by June 1941 was flying Tomahawks with No3 RAAF Sqn. By February 1942, he was commanding the squadron. Upgrading to the Kittyhawk, he had more aerial victories, before being forced to bale out on May 26th 1942. On December 21st 1942, during an action in the Western Desert, an aircraft from the squadron was forced to crash land a few miles from the target. Gibbes landed his aircraft in the rocky desert, aiming to pick up the downed pilot. He ditched his own parachute, sitting on the pilots lap in the cockpit. On take-off, one wheel fell off the aircraft after colliding with an object on the groud, but he managed to land the aircraft on the one remaining wheel, avoiding a damaging belly landing. He was then shot down behind enemy lines, evading capture for three days before being rescued. He returned to Australia, and was injured during a training flight crash. He died 11th April 2007.
Gibbins, D. G.
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Gibbins, D. G.

Sergeant D.G.Gibbins was posted to No 54 Squadron on August 10th 1940. On the 31st of August his Spitfire(X4054) was shot down over Hildenborough and he baled out, he was uninjured.
Gibbs, N P
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Gibbs, N P

On 12th June 1944, he was injured when his Spitfire Mk.XII MB845 EB-G of No.41 Sqn ran out of fuel and crash landed at Bolt Head.
Gilbert, H. T.
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   Died : 7 / 5 / 1942
Gilbert, H. T.

Pilot Officer H.T.Gilbert of No 603 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire on August 31st 1940, he was shot down over the Thames Estuary but was uninjured. On the 6th of September 1940 he was involved in combat near Mayfield, he baled out of his Spitfire and was wounded.
Gilbert, John Charles
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   Died : 31 / 5 / 1940
Gilbert, John Charles

25th Juky 1937 became a Pilot Officer, 30th May 1939 promoted to Flying Officer RAF (AAF) 90327, 609 Sqdn., age 27, 31/05/1940, missing Shot down by a Me109.over Dunkirk while flying Spitfire Mk. I L1081 on of Harold Francis Charles and Emma Gilbert, of Smethwick, Staffordshire.
Gillam, Denys
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1991
Gillam, Denys

Flight Lieutenant Denys E.Gillam of No 616 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (X4181) on September 2nd 1940. He had been in combat near Tonbridge, Kent. He was uninjured. Gillam later took command of the Typhoon Wing at Duxford in March 1942, which flew their first combat operation in June 1942. He died in 1991.
Gillies, K. M.
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   Died : 4 / 10 / 1940
Gillies, K. M.

Flight Lieutenant K.M.Gillies from No 66 squadron was killed whilst on patrol in his Spitfire I (X4320) October 4th 1940. He failed to return from an interception near the East Coast. His aircraft crashed near Covenhithe, Suffolk.
Gilmore, P S
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Gilmore, P S

On 14th December 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb AA758 was damaged beyond repair in a crash, but he was ok.
Gilpin, Peter
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Gilpin, Peter

Peter originally joined 253 Sqn flying Hurricanes, converting to Spitfire Mark 5s he took part in the invasions of North Africa and Sicily, providing fighter cover. Later based in Italy he was on a low level fighter sweep over Yugoslavia on the 2nd June 1944 when he was hit by ground fire and had to bale out. Captured by the Germans he was initially a PoW in Yugoslavia, before being transferred to Stalag Luft 7a, Moosberg, Germany.
Gilroy, G K
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Gilroy, G K

Pilot Officer G.K.Gilroy of No 603 Squadron was wounded on August 31st 1940 after he baled out of his Spitfire I (X4271) near Wanstead and was injured by civilians who attacked him.
Gimbel, Edward
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Gimbel, Edward


Gladych, Michael
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Gladych, Michael

After flying with the Polish Air Force, Michael Gladych eventually escaped to England after the final fall of France, joining 303 Squadron RAF on Spitfires. With 17 victories to his credit, he rammed his eighteenth and final victory in June 1941 and was in hospital for several months afterwards. In 1943 he was posted to 302 Squadron, but then loaned himself to serve with Gabreski and the 56th Fighter Group.
Gleed, Ian
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   Died : 16 / 4 / 1943
Gleed, Ian

Flight Lieutenant Ian Richard (Widge) Gleed was commissioned in March 1936 and then posted to No 46 Squadron at Kenly. No 46 Squadron was then flying Gloster Gauntlet bi-planes. Gleed was promoted to Flight Lieutenant and on May 17th joined No 87 Squadron in France. In the next few days he scored 5 kills plus a share in another and 1 probable. No 87 Squadron returned to England on the 20th of May 1940 to re-form and re-equip. In September Gleed was awarded the D.F.C. On the 16th of April 1943 Gleed was killed in a fighter sweep in the Cap Bon area. He was shot down in his Spitfire by the enemy. His nickname came from his short stature. 'Widge' is an R.A.F. abbreviation of Wizard-Midget
Goebel, Robert
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   Died : 20 / 2 / 2011
Goebel, Robert

December 1943 found Bob Goebel in North Africa flying Spitfires in preparation for joining the 31st Fighter Group. As soon as they arrived they re-equipped with P51 Mustangs and flew to Italy, where Bob flew a total of 62 combat missions, including 16 hazardous trips to the Romanian oilfields. During his combat operations he led his squadron into action seven times, and his entire Group twice, whilst still only aged 21. He ended the war with 11 air victories. Sadly, Bob Goebel passed away on 20th February 2011.
Goldsmith, C. W.
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   Died : 28 / 10 / 1940
Goldsmith, C. W.

Pilot Officer C.W.Goldsmith a South African flew with No 603 Squadron and No 54 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. He was killed on the 28th of October 1940. His Spitfire II (P7439) had been shot down on the 27th of October 1940 South of Maidstone, Kent, he died of his wounds.
Golley, John
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Golley, John

John Golley flew Hurricanes, Spitfires and Typhoons during World War II, commencing his combat flying with fighter sweeps and ground attacks over Northern Europe. During the run up to D-Day his No. 245 Squadron Typhoons were equipped with rockets, specializing in tank-busting in the Normandy Campaign. He has written several best-selling military books including The Day of the Typhoon.
Goode, P G H
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   Died : 24 / 1 / 1944
Goode, P G H

Killed after baling out of his Spitfire Mk.IX MH375 of No.313 Sqn after it suffered engine failure 6 miles off Deal.
Goodson, James
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Goodson, James

Jim Goodson joined the RAF in 1940. Posted to re-form 133 Eagle Squadron RAF flying Spitfires, he transferred to the USAAF 4th fighter Group in September 1942, commanding 336 Squadron. Flying P47s and then P51s, Jim Goodson flew continuously until he was shot down ten months before the end of the war. He was one of the most highly decorated Aces in the USAAF, with 32 enemy aircraft to his credit.
Goodwin, H. McD.
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   Died : 14 / 8 / 1940
Goodwin, H. McD.

Flight Officer H.MacD. Goodwin of No 609 Squadron was shot down in his Spitfire I (N3024) on August 14th 1940 near Bournemouth and was killed.
Gordon, W. H. G.
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   Died : 6 / 9 / 1940
Gordon, W. H. G.

Pilot Officer W.H.G.Gordon of No 234 Squadron was killed on the 6th of September 1940 at 09:10hrs. He was shot down in his Spitfire I over Hadlow Down in Kent.
Gould, A J Nat
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Gould, A J Nat

Joined the RAAF in April 1940 and trained in Australia. Nat sailed to the UK in December 1940 and attended 56 OTU at Sutton Bridge. In April 1941 he joined 17 Sqn RAF and in September joined 134 Sqn equipped with Hurricanes and sailed aboard HMS Argus for Murmansk, USSR. After some ops, Nat returned to the UK in December and converted to Spitfires. He then sailed for Australia in March 1942 and joined 75 Sqn RAAF equipped with Kittyhawks. He flew to New Guinea in July and participated in the Battle of Milne Bay and on 28th August twice flew S A29-133 on ops and remained with 75 Sqn until December. After instructing at 2 OTU, Nat was posted in October 1943 to 457 Sqn equipped with Spitfires at Darwin. After 12 months of operations he returned to 2 OTU. In June 1945, Gould transferred to RANVR for service with the RN. Nat Gould commanded 816 Firefly and 806 Sea Fury Sqns during Korea.
Graham, E.
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Graham, E.

Flight Lieutenant Edward 'Ted' Graham of No 72 Squadron escaped injury when he was shot down in his Spitfire over Lympne on September 2nd 1940.
Graves, M A
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Graves, M A

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.VII MD104 of No.616 Sqn suffered engine failure and crashed into the sea 40 miles south of Start Point. He was injured, but rescued by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Gray, Colin
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   Died : 1 / 8 / 1995
Gray, Colin


Gray, James
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   Died : 25 / 11 / 2009
Gray, James

James Gray was in college and taking a civilian pilot training course when the European war began. "I tried for the U.S. Army Air Corps and couldn’t pass the physical," he says. "I heard that the British were recruiting pilots for the Royal Air Force. I wanted to fly a fast fighter." Like many prospective Eagle Squadron pilots, Gray went to a special school in the United States and learned flying from former U.S. Army Air Corps pilots before shipping off to England. James Gray joined the RAF as an American volunteer in September 1941, and was posted to 71 Eagle Squadron flying Spitfire Vbs. Gray’s first missions in the Spitfire were mostly convoy patrols over the English Channel. By September of 1941, the faster Spitfire Mk.V had replaced No.71 Squadron’s Mk. IIs, and along with the aircraft change came Eagle missions of a little more range - sweeps across the Channel into France. These missions were dubbed Rhubarbs, Circuses and Rodeos, depending on the number of aircraft used, their tactics and varied methods of enticing the Luftwaffe to fight. Gray says he shot down his first enemy plane in the spring of 1942. The day before, some RAF bombers had been badly shot up on a major operation. Rescue boats went out looking for aircrew that might still be floating in dinghies, and Spitfires were sent to provide air cover for the operation. While on this patrol they were attacked by a number of Fw190's. Gray attacked one of the Fw190s which was pursuing Wing Leader Bob Sprague's Spitfire, Gray opened fire with his cannons and sent the Fw190 plunging into the sea. Staying in the RAF throughout the war, he flew Spitfires in North Africa and the Mediterranean, first with 93 Squadron, and later 111 Squadron. His luck eventually ran out in Italy when he was shot down early in 1945 whilst serving with 72 Squadron. Flight Lieutenant James Gray was shot down on January 4th, 1945, his 26th birthday. Gray's Squadron’s Spitfire IXs were carrying 500-pound bombs in ground attacks against German troops in northern Italy. He was taken POW for four months in Stalag-Luft I, north of Berlin. Among Flight Lieutenant James Gray's awards and decorations is the prestigious British Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC). After the war Flight Lieutenant James Gray became a pilot for United Airlines, started flying the DC-3, then flew the Convair 340 and, after a long successful career, retired as a Captain in DC-8 jets. He was also the historian for the Eagle Squadrons. James Gray at the age of 90 passed away on the 25th of November 2009.
Gray, Trevor
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   Died : 21 / 1 / 2012
Gray, Trevor

Trevor Gray joined the RAFVR in 1939 and was called for service on the outbreak of war. As he was only partially trained, he completed his flying training and after being awarded his wings was posted to 7 OTU at Hawarden After training Trevor Gray was commissioned as a Pilot Officer in August 1940. Converted onto Spitfires, and with the Battle of Britain at its Climax, he was urgently posted to join 64 Squadron at Leconfield, arriving on 16th September 1940. The Squadron had re-equipped from Blenheims to Spitfires earlier that year as it fought in the great air battles over Dunkirk, before seeing hectic action in the Battle of Britain. he damaged a Bf 110 in December 1940. He left the Squadron on April 3 1941 having completed his tour and was posted to 58 OTU at Grangemouth as an instructor from there he was posted to Castletown, the most northerly station on the mainland, to join 124 Squadron which was then being formed. Trevor Gray was then given a post as a research engineer officer at RAE Farnborough and finally left the RAF in 1946 as a flight Lieutenant
Green, Bill
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   Died : 7 / 11 / 2014
Green, Bill

In December 1936, Bill Green joined the Auxiliary Air Force as an aero engine fitter with 501 Squadron at Filton, near Bristol. Shortly before the start of the Second World War, he was given a rare chance for an engine fitter. In 1938 he joined a scheme to recruit NCO pilots, qualifying as a Flight Sergeant and re-joined 501 at Bristol in July 1940. Sgt Bill Green had completed just 10 hours of dual flying – with an instructor. In October, he was sent for further flying instruction and on October 30th he had his first solo flight in a Magister aircraft. After more training – and getting married on June 3rd – he flew a Hurricane for the first time on August 8th 1940, when the Battle of Britain had been raging for a month. He flew from Kenley throughout the Battle of Britain until November, surviving being shot down twice, before being posted to 504 Squadron. After a spell instructing on Spitfires and Tomahawks, he converted to Typhoons, and from November 1944 served with 56 Squadron on Tempests. He flew more than 50 missions in Tempest fighter aircraft with 56 Squadron. He was shot down over Germany on February 22nd 1945 and spent the last three months of the war as a prisoner of war. After the war, Green enjoyed a hugely successful business career, ending up as the managing director and chairman of Crown Paints, before retiring on his 60th birthday. Flight Lieutenant Bill Green, who has died aged 97, was twice shot down flying a Hurricane during the Battle of Britain; five years later he was taken prisoner after again being shot down, this time over Germany. Green had less than 200 hours' flying time, and just seven hours in the Hurricane, when he joined No 501 Squadron and was pitched into the fighting at the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. On August 24, flying from Hawkinge in Kent, his squadron was scrambled to intercept a raid against the nearby airfield at Manston. Green closed in to attack an enemy dive-bomber when his aircraft was hit by the airfield's anti-aircraft fire. His Hurricane was badly damaged and the engine stopped – but he managed to glide to Hawkinge, where he discovered half the undercarriage had been shot away. He crash-landed and scrambled from the wrecked aircraft. Five days later his squadron was orbiting over Deal at 20,000ft when a large force of Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters attacked the formation. The windscreen of Green's aircraft was shattered and the engine damaged. With no control, he was forced to bail out. His parachute failed to stream correctly and the main canopy became entangled around his legs. He fought to release it and fell thousands of feet before it finally opened fully. Within seconds he hit the ground. He had been wounded in the leg and his days in the Battle were over. The son of a regular soldier, William James Green was born in Bristol on April 23 1917 and attended St Gabriel School. He left at 14 to work in a cardboard box factory specialising in packages for shoes and small goods, there he met the girl who would become his wife. Green was an enterprising boy and he designed a new, larger box. Receiving no encouragement from his manager, he took it to Mardon, Son & Hall, where he was offered a job. The company encouraged workmen to join auxiliary military units, and Green joined No 501 Squadron of the Auxiliary Air Force, stationed at nearby Filton. He trained as an aero-engine fitter and two years later volunteered to be a pilot. He was mobilised at the beginning of the war and completed his training before returning to No 501. After recovering from his wounds, he was posted to No 504 Squadron, based at Filton. One night he was cycling home when German bombers attacked Bristol in force and the city suffered heavy damage. Over the next few days Green flew standing patrols over the city and on a number of occasions chased enemy bombers away. He spent three years as a flying instructor before, in late 1944, joining No 56 Squadron, flying the RAF's most powerful piston-engine fighter, the Tempest. The squadron was based at Volkel in the Netherlands and he flew low-level strafing attacks against trains, motor transport and supply columns. On February 22 1945 he came under fire from two friendly fighters but evaded them, only to be shot down near Osnabruck by intense anti-aircraft fire.
I should have zigged when I zagged he said later. Green bailed out and was captured. His prison camp near Nuremberg was soon evacuated and the PoWs marched south to Stalag 7A, a large camp at Moosburg near Munich. On April 29 the US Seventh Army liberated that camp, and within two weeks Green was back in England. He was released from the RAF in December and received the Air Efficiency Award. Green returned to the cardboard box industry, then, in 1960, joined Reed International, rising to be chairman. Green admired the work of the Salvation Army and achieved great contentment in religious activities. In June 2012, aged 95, he flew in a two-seat Spitfire from Goodwood airfield. Bill Green married, in 1940, Bertha Biggs; she died in 2008, and he is survived by their son and daughter. Flight Lieutenant Bill Green, born April 23 1917, died on November 7 2014.
Green, F E
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Green, F E

Injured onn 29th June 1944, when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK790 of No.416 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and crashed landed.
Green, John H.
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   Died : 17 / 9 / 1947
Green, John H.

John Green was born in Vancouver on 30th May 1918 and was educated at Alberni District High School. Hugh Halliday reports that his father worked at Allison Logging Company, Queen Charlotte Islands. He was granted a short service commission as Acting Pilot Officers on probation on 9th October 1939 in the RAF, he was later graded as Pilot Officer on probation on 4th May 1940 and confirmed as P/O on 4th August 1940. He joined 49 Squadron on 12th October 1940 and flew his first operational flight on the night of 16th/17th October 1940. After a remarkably short period he was recommended for the DFC on 28th November 1940 which stated that.. "This Canadian officer joined his squadron on 12th October 1940, and carried out his first operation, as a First Pilot, on 16th October. On this occasion he flew through extremely difficult weather conditions and was one of four out of twelve aircraft to locate and attack enemy submarines at Bordeaux. On 20th November this officer was captain of an aircraft detailed to bomb the Skoda works in Czechoslovakia which he attacked successfully from 1,500 feet causing fires and explosions. Pilot Officer Green's work as an operational pilot has been outstanding and his enthusiasm, skill and courage have been a source of inspiration to the newly joined flying personnel in his squadron. He has completed a total of ten operational flights against the enemy during the course of which he has completed 77 hours flying as a first pilot." For service with 49 Squadron he was awarded the DFC, Gazetted on 17th January 1941. He was the pilot of Hampden X3001 when it was shot down over Holland on 11th February 1941 and became a PoW but received a promotion to F/O (war subs) on 4th May 1941 and later to F/Lt. Post-War he remained in the RAF and continued to fly. On 17th September 1947 he was flying Spitfire TP454 as part of the Battle of Britain air display over Bournemouth when the aircraft crashed into the sea. He was sadly killed and is buried at Brookwood Cemetery, and was twenty nine years old. At the time of his death he was married to Irene who lived in South Kensington, London.
Green, T W Terry
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Green, T W Terry

Trained by the United States Army in Georgia and Alabama. He was awarded his wings in March 1942 and joined 501 Sqdn at Middle Wallop later that year. He was posted overseas when 501 were rested in Northern Ireland. He joined 232 Sqdn in North Africa in March 1943 and stayed with them through Tunisia on to Malta to cover the invasion of Sicily and then on to Sicily to cover the invasion of Italy at Salerno. The Squadron then flew their Spitfires some 2,500 miles to the north of Syria on the Turkish border to cover what Churchill called the invasion of the soft underbelly of Europe. Since this was aborted they moved back to Corsica to cover the invasion of the south of France at Frejus. They stayed in France until September 1944 where the Squadron was disbanded after handing over their Spitfires to the Free French Air Force. Finally, Terry was posted to 1675 Heavy Conversion Unit at Abu Sueir, Egypt for fighter affiliation duties with aircrews converting from twins to B24 Liberators. He was demobilised in June 1945 and carried on as a weekend flyer in the RAF Volunteer Reserve at Woodley and Fairoaks until 1952.
Greenhalgh, Dennis Newton
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   Died : 9 / 5 / 1944
Greenhalgh, Dennis Newton

Killed aged 23 on 9th May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL594 was shot down by flak and crashed near Berck-sur-Mer. He baled out of the aircraft but did not survive. He is buried in the Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Charles James Greenhalgh and Hilda Greenhalgh, of Buxton, Derbyshire.
Gregory, Felix Stafford
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   Died : 13 / 8 / 1940
Gregory, Felix Stafford

Killed August 13th 1940 aged 21 during night flying training when he baled out too low over Eastry. His memorial is at Enfield crematorium in Middlesex. Son of Richard Thomas Gregory and Kathleen Maude Gregory, of Potters Bar.
Griffiths, A.
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Griffiths, A.

On 13th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb AB240 of No.26 Sqn was hit by flak and force landed at Noirey-en-Bessin. He evaded capture and returned to his squadron two days later. On 23rd June 1944 his Spitfire Mk.Va P8561 of No.26 Sqn was shot down by flak near Caen and he was taken prisoner.
Grigg, Robert Jackson
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Grigg, Robert Jackson

Killed aged 23 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH183 AU-K of No.421 Sqn RCAF ditched into the sea off the Isle of Wight. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Dr. William Grigg and Isabel Bush Grigg, of Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, Canada.
Guillot, Joseph Rolland Louis Nazaire
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 1944
Guillot, Joseph Rolland Louis Nazaire

Killed on 1st June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ347 developed engine trouble and dived into the Somme estuary. He is buried in the Calais Canadian War Cemetery, Leubringhen.
Hakansson, I F
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Hakansson, I F

Injured on 20th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH822 SK-Y of No.165 Sqn was in collision with Spitfire Mk.IX MH796 SK-Q piloted by Flying Officer E H Francis, who was killed, during landing at RAF Culmhead.
Hall, James Dickie
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   Died : 16 / 6 / 1944
Hall, James Dickie

Killed on 16th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK397 of No.443 Sqn RCAF went missing after being attacked by enemy fighters and engaged by flak. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery.
Hall, R. M. D.
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Hall, R. M. D.

Pilot Officer R.M.D.Hall volunteered for Fighter Command after Army training in a tank Regiment. He flew some 40 sorties in Spitfire's with No 152 Squadron.
Hall, Ted
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Hall, Ted

Flight Commander, 452 Squadron. Ted Hall joined the RAAF in 1940 and went to England where he was posted to 129 Squadron at Tangmere flying Spitfires. As Flight Commander he claimed his first victory on 24th July 1942. In the next month he destroyed two more and one shared. He returned to Australia, joining 452 Squadron in Darwin again as Flight Commander. In March 1943 he claimed two Japanese aircraft damaged and on 30th Jun destroyed a Zeke.
Halliday, Richard Arthur George
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   Died : 9 / 5 / 1942
Halliday, Richard Arthur George

Killed aged 27 when the Spitfire (AA851) he was flying was abandoned off Deal while returning from escort duties on 9th May 1942. He is buried at Aylesham cemetery in Kent. Son of Richard Blair Halliday and Maggie Muriel Halliday; husband of Una Joyce Halliday, of Springton, South Australia.
Hamilton, H K
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Hamilton, H K

Taken prisoner on 10th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ385 was shot down by flak near St Omer.
Hamilton, J S
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Hamilton, J S

On 11th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ136 of No.412 Sqn RCAF was in collision with Spitfire Mk.IX MH427 also of No.412 Sqn RCAF piloted by Flying Officer R W Thatcher, over the Pas de Calais. He abandoned the stricken Spitfire and was rescued. Flying Officer Thatcher ditched Spitfire MH427 into the English Channel and was also rescued.
Hamilton, Malcolm Wallace
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   Died : 9 / 3 / 1942
Hamilton, Malcolm Wallace

Killed aged 24 when his Spitfire (AA849) was shot down by fighters off Berck. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of William Graham Hamilton and Kathleen Daphne Hamilton, of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Hamlyn, R. F.
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Hamlyn, R. F.

Sergeant Ronnie F.Hamlyn joined No 610 Squadron on the 6th of June 1940 he was 23 years old. Hamlyn was awarded the D.F.M. on the 13th of September 1940 and the A.F.C. on the 1st of January 1943. He rose to the rank of Wing Commander.
Hancock, Norman
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   Died : 8 / 12 / 2010
Hancock, Norman

Sqn Ldr Norman Hancock - Battle of Britian pilot who flew Spitfires with 65 and 152 Squadrons. He recieved the DFC on the 23rd of June 1944. Sadly, Norman Hancock passed away on the 8th of December 2010.
Hannam, Tom
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Hannam, Tom

Flying Officer Tom Hannam qualified as a pilot in October 1942 having been trained by the US Army Air Forces in Georgia, Alabama and Florida. Returning to the UK and after Operational Training Unit he joined 222 (Natal) Squadron, which was equipped with Spitfires Mark V’s in January/February 1943 aged 21. Most operational sorties were on sweeps, high cover for bombers and ships convey patrols. At the end of September he was shot down over Normandy and spent the next three months avoiding capture by the Germans. Eventually arriving in Gibraltar he was flown home on 23 December 1943. After a brief period he rejoined 222 Squadron to take part in the invasion of Europe and went through Northern France, Belgium and Holland. In December 1944, with the war in Europe no more than 5 months from its end, the Squadron converted onto Tempests Mark V’s and returned to Europe supporting the crossing of the Rhine near Nijmegen and then into Germany. Operational flying covered attacks on airfields, trains, road transport, tanks and rocket sites. When the war in Europe ended he became a flying instructor on Tiger Moths for a short period. Tom returned to civilian life a little older but very much wiser.
Harder, J W
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Harder, J W

On 18th April 1944, his No.64 Sqn Spitfire Mk.Vb AD565 suffered an engine fire during a reconnaissance mission over the North Sea. He ditched the aircraft 50 miles east of Yarmouth and was rescued.
Harding, Peter
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   Died : 24 / 1 / 2006
Harding, Peter

P/O Peter Harding joined the University of London Air Squadron in 1937, Flying Tutors, Harts and Hinds. He received a VR commission in June 1939 and was prohibited from joining up. In his reserved occupation as metallurgical student at the Royal School of Mines he failed his exam in 1940 and then wrote to the Air Ministry saying 'failed exam - call me up'. By return post he was told 'get medical, get uniform'. He was put through his training period and passed out in Lysander in 227 Squadron. He was converted to Spitfires by Wg Cdr Tuttle and then to 3 PRU Oakington and later to Benson. During his 23rd op his engine stopped over Wilhelmhaven and he had to bail out. He was a PoW from August 1941 to May 1945. After his discharge VJ + 1, he returned to his studies. We have learned that he died on 24th January 2006 aged 86.
Harmeyer, Raymond
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Harmeyer, Raymond


Harries, Raymond Hilary
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   Died : 14 / 5 / 1950
Harries, Raymond Hilary

Joining the RAFVR in September 1939, after training Harries was posted to No. 43 Squadron at Drem in Scotland. He was then posted on 8 July 1941 to 52 OTU at Debden as an instructor. In February 1942 he joined No. 131 Squadron RAF, based at Llanbedr as a flight commander, and claimed his first kill, a Junkers Ju 88, soon after. He served with the unit until December 1942, when he became CO of 91 Squadron, and in April 1943 received the new Mark XII Spitfire and were based at Hawkinge. Harries was ultimately the most successful pilot to fly the Rolls-Royce Griffon powered Supermarine Spitfire, scoring 11 kills in the type, including a brace of Focke-Wulf Fw 190s on 25 May 1943. Flying a Spitfire XII, Harries intercepted the Fw 190s from SKG 10: I was leading Blue Section on a defensive patrol. I had just returned to base, with my No 2, had just landed when the scramble signal was given from the watch office. We both immediately took off again, and saw enemy aircraft approaching Folkestone. I sighted one lone Fw 190 at sea level returning to France. I came in from his starboard side, delivering a three-second burst at 250 yards. The enemy aircraft hit the sea tail first, split in two, and sank immediately. The Fw 190 was thought to be Fw 190A-5 Wrk Nr 2511 of 6./SKG 10, flown by Oberleutnant Josef Keller. I then spotted another Fw 190 to starboard. I flew straight over the top of it in order to identify it in the failing light. The enemy aircraft pulled his nose up and gave me a quick squirt. I pulled straight up to about 1000ft, and turning to port, dived right onto his tail, opening fire from 300 yards and closing to 150 yards. I fired a four-second burst, seeing strikes and flames all over the enemy aircraft. The enemy aircraft gradually lost height, with smoke and flames coming from it, skimmed for some distance along the surface of the water and then sank. I orbited around taking cine gun snaps of the oil patch and pieces of wreckage that were visible. In June the squadron moved to Westhampnett to form a Mk XII fighter wing with No. 41 Squadron. On 18 July 1943 Harries shot down three Bf 109's while flying MB831. In doing so he became the first pilot to reach five kills in the Griffon-engined Spitfire. Harries became Wing Leader in August 1943, and by November, had been awarded a total of three DFCs and a DSO. In early 1944 Harries went to the United States, to lecture on fighter tactics, only to return and become Wing Leader of 135 Wing, 2nd TAF, in the spring of 1944. On 22 September 1943 Harries claimed one Fw 190 shot down and another as a probable. The Westhampnett Wing were the highest scoring Wing in Fighter Command for the month of September, claiming 27 kills. On 20 October 1944 Harries shot down a pair of Messerschmitt Bf 109Gs near Rouen, his last kills in the type. In January 1945 he underwent a conversion course on the Hawker Tempest, prior to the wing being re-equipped, but was posted then to 84 Group as Wing Commander/Training. After the war he was awarded a bar to the DSO, and served as CO No. 92 Squadron RAF in 1949. On 14 May 1950 he died while flying a 92 Squadron Gloster Meteor F4 when it ran out of fuel and crashed near Sheffield, Yorkshire. His funeral was held at RAF Linton-on-Ouse on 18 May 1950.
Harris, S B
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Harris, S B

On 22nd May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK672 of No.74 Sqn was hit by flak near Dunkirk, collided with a tree and crashed. He initially evaded capture but was taken prisoner later. He then made good his evasion by escaping from a train.
Harrison, Geoffrey Austin
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   Died : 12 / 6 / 1944
Harrison, Geoffrey Austin

Killed on 12th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII collided with an Me109 and crashed near Laval. He is buried in La Pellerine Communal Cemetery.
Hart, Kenneth Graham
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   Died : 28 / 12 / 1944
Hart, Kenneth Graham

In 1939 he engaged on a short time commission when he joined the RAF and was with 65 Sqn in March 1940. While on patrol to Dunkirk area his engine burst into flames and he managed to crash land his stricken aircraft at North Foreland where it burnt out. On the 26th May he claimed a Bf109 destroyed and was himself shot down and crash landed on a Dunkirk beach and returned to England by ship. On the 25th June claimed another Bf109 and a He111 on 5th July. During the Battle of Britain he declared a Bf109 destroyed on August 12th (no specific information found) and he made a force landing at Havengore Island, Foulness on the 20th August at 15:30 after his engine was damaged in combat with Lt. Achleitner of 9/JG3 over the Thames Estuary, his Spitfire, R6818, was a write-off. He also claimed a Bf109 destroyed (no specific details found). On 26th January 1942, having completed a ‘tour’, Hart was posted to Rear HQ Desert Air Force, then joining 71 OTU in the Sudan as a Flight Lieutenant Instructor in February. He was posted to 94 Squadron on 10th August 1942 but returned to 71 OTU on 20th September. On 10th February 1944, he was posted to 18 Squadron, flying Boston light bombers. Throughout 1944 he completed over 33 ground attack sorties, destroying airfields and a variety of motor transport over Italy and into Southern France. He was quite rightly promoted to Squadron Leader. On 28th December 1944 whilst flying Boston BZ557 on a night intruder/armed recce of Villafranca aerodrome, his luck ran out. S/Ldr. Hart and his crew of F/Sgt. Bluston (Navigator), F/O J Woods ( Wireless Operator), and Air Gunner WO RJ Frizzel (RNZAF) were hit by flak, the aircraft seen to be enveloped in fire when it crashed with no survivors. Buried at Coriano Ridge War Cemetery 3.5 kilometres west of Riccione, Italy.
Hart, Robert Arthur
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   Died : 19 / 6 / 1944
Hart, Robert Arthur

Killed aged 21 on 19th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII MD133 of No.616 Sqn suffered engine failure and dived into the sea off Start Point. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Arthur Lewis Hart and Mabel Elizabeth Hart, of Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
Hattrem, P
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   Died : 30 / 6 / 1944
Hattrem, P

Killed on 30th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX ML149 FN-S of No.331 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed into trees near Tilles-sur-Heulles.
Head, Harold Gore
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   Died : 19 / 6 / 1944
Head, Harold Gore

Killed aged 22 on 19th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MA304 of No.229 Sqn was lost in bad weather off the Normandy coast. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Arthur Gore and Amy Beatrice Head of Hove, Sussex.
Heimes, Leopold
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   Died : 2009
Heimes, Leopold

Already in the Belgian Air Force, he moved to 235 Sqn Coastal Command as an Air Gunner on Blenheims during the Battle of Britain before becoming a pilot, flying Spitfires and Catalinas with 350 Sqn before converting to 76 Sqn on Dakotas in India. Heimes stayed in the RAF until September 1951 having been gazetted as a Master Pilot. Sadly, Leopold Heimes died in 2009.
Henderson, Gordon
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Henderson, Gordon

Gordon Henderson joined the RAF in 1941, at Lords Cricket Ground, and after training in America returned home in 1943. He was then posted to 225 Squadron in North Africa, flying Spitfire Mk IXs in Tactical and Photographic Support to the First Army, completing a total of 105 sorties. For his second tour he rejoined 225 Squadron, becoming its Commanding Officer.
Henderson, R B
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Henderson, R B

On 7th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ455 of No.443 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and crash landed on the beach head at Magny. He was unhurt but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Heninger, H F
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   Died : 6 / 1 / 1944
Heninger, H F

Killed on 6th January 1944 after abandoning his Spitfire Mk.XII EN223 of No.91 Sqn which was suffering fuel problems.
Henshaw, Alex
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   Died : 24 / 2 / 2007
Henshaw, Alex

Alex Henshaw perhaps understands the Spitfire better than any other pilot - for he was Vickers Chief Test Pilot on Spitfires at the new Spitfire factory at Castle Bromwich during World War II. By the end of the war he had personally test flown a total of 2360 different Spitfires and Seafires - more than ten per cent of the entire production. It is often stated that those lucky enough to have seen Alex handle the Spitfire in flight, that it is an experience that can never be forgotten, he was acknowledged as a virtuoso in aerobatics. Alex Henshaw died 24th February 2007.
Herremann, A M L
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   Died : 8 / 6 / 1944
Herremann, A M L

Killed on 8th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM363 collided with a B-26 Marauder in bad weather north of Friston and crashed.
Hetland, T
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   Died : 14 / 4 / 1944
Hetland, T

Killed on 14th April 1944 when his No.332 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX MH760 was damaged by flak on a Ranger mission to Le Havre and he baled out over the English Channel.
Heywood, Edward Kinder
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Heywood, Edward Kinder

Killed aged 29 on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Va AB961 of No.26 Sqn was shot down by an enemy fighter near Criqueville. He is buried in Criqueville-en-Auge Churchyard. Son of Samuel Kinder Heywood and Beatrice Alice Heywood; husband of Margaret Heywood, of Sale, Cheshire.
Hilken, Clive
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Hilken, Clive


Hill, Frank
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Hill, Frank


Hill, George Urquhart
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Hill, George Urquhart

On 25th April 1944 his No.441 Sqn RCAF Spitfire Mk.IX MK519 crashed landed near Laon after combat with Fw190s. Initially he evaded capture but was later taken prisoner.
Hircock, William Frederick
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   Died : 24 / 6 / 1944
Hircock, William Frederick

Killed aged 21 on 24th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V AR500 of No.130 Sqn was shot down by return fire from a Ju88. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Walter and Sarah Annie Hircock, of Laxton, Northamptonshire.
Hively, Howard
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Hively, Howard


Hodges, Jack
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Hodges, Jack

Jack Hodges joined the RAF in late 1940, and after completing his pilot training in Canada he returned to England and was then briefly sent to a Photo Reconnaissance Unit flying Spitfires. He moved to a OTU in Annan, Scotland on Hurricanes before finally moving to a holding unit in Redhill, flying Typhoons. In 1944 he was posted to join 175 Squadron. Shortly after this he moved to 174 Squadron at Westhampnett. He served on operations throughout occupied Europe until the end of the war, being awarded the DFC in 1945 for successfully leading a group of Typhoons against a German Armoured Division.
Hodgson, John
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   Died : 2 / 6 / 1944
Hodgson, John

Killed aged 22 on 2nd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK742 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot down by flak and crashed near Herbecourt. He is buried in St Pierre Cemetery, Amiens. Son of John and Susanna Hodgson; husband of Doreen Lydia Hodgson, of Southgate, Middlesex.
Hogg, R. M.
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   Died : 25 / 8 / 1940
Hogg, R. M.

Pilot Officer R.M.Hogg of No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed on August 25th 1940 in his Spitfire I (R6810) near Portland.
Hoiland, R
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Hoiland, R

Taken prisoner on 8th March 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ299 of No.322 Sqn was shot down by an Fw190, probably that of JG26 Ace Karl Borris, over the Dutch coast.
Holland, A. L.
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Holland, A. L.

Squadron Leader A.Laurie Holland lead No 65 Squadron from around the 18th of August 1940. He flew Spitfire's during the Battle of Britain.
Holland, D. F.
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   Died : 20 / 9 / 1940
Holland, D. F.

Pilot Officer D.F.Holland of No 72 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (X4410) on the 20th of September 1940 after combat over Canterbury. Pilot Officer Holland later died of his wounds.
Holland, K. C.
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   Died : 25 / 9 / 1940
Holland, K. C.

Sergeant K.C.Holland of No 152 Squadron was killed on September 25th 1940. His Spitfire I (N3173) was shot down while following combat over West of Bristol.
Holland, R. H.
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Holland, R. H.

Pilot Officer R.H.(Bob) Holland of No 92 Squadron was in combat on September 15th 1940 over Ashford. He baled out of his Spitfire I, injured.
Holland, Tony
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Holland, Tony

Tony Holland flew the first spitfire to Malta from USS Wasp with 603 Squadron in April 1942. He shared in the destruction of 6 enemy aircraft.
Homolle, J
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Homolle, J

On 27th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK234 GW-X of No.340 Sqn was hit by flak and crash landed near Caen. He evaded capture and returned to his squadron the following day.
Hood, H. R. L.
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1940
Hood, H. R. L.

Squadron Leader H.R.L.Hood of No 41 Squadron was killed on September 5th 1940 after his Spitfire I (P9428) was involved in a collision in mid-air with Flight Lieutenant J.T.Webster's Spitfire I (R6635) during combat over Basildon in Essex. Hood's aircraft came apart in the air and he was killed.
Hopgood, C. L.
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   Died : 5 / 12 / 1940
Hopgood, C. L.

Sgt. C.L.Hopgood of No 64 Squadron was killed after the Battle of Britain on the 5th of December 1940 when he was shot down in his Spitfire II (P9450).
Houle, Albert
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 2008
Houle, Albert

Flying Officer and Group Captain Albert Shorty’Ulrich Houle Jr. Born in Massey on March 24, 1914, Albert Houle went to the University of Toronto with a Bsc (science) in 1936. In 1936 he won the Canadian intercollegiate wrestling championship . After the outbreak of World War Two Albert Houle in September 1940 enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at North Bay and received his flying wings is Saskatchewan. Along with other Canadian Pilots he joined 213 Squadron at Nicosia, Cyprus in September 1941 and remained with 213 Squadron until 1942. It was during this period that Flying Officer Albert Houle destroyed three enemy aircraft, damaged three others, and also had one probable and one shared. He was awarded the DFC on November 27, 1942. Not only did Group Captain Albert Houle fly with 213 Squadron but also 145 and 417 Squadrons, and his score of enemy aircraft was 11 destroyed, one probable and seven others damaged. Houle and his Spitfire became a legend during and after the war. He was the most successful of the many Canadian pilots who flew with the squadron during the war. His citation for his DFC reads : One evening in October, 1942, Flying Officer Houle was flying with his squadron on patrol over El Alamein when a formation of enemy dive-bombers was sighted. The enemy aircraft jettisoned their bombs and flew west in an attempt to avoid the combat. With great tenacity and determination Flying Officer Houle pursued them far over the enemies lines and in the rapidly failing light engaged and destroyed at least two of the hostile bombers, Group Captain Albert Shorty Ulrich Houle died June 1st 2008 and is buried in Ottawa Canada.
Howe, John
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Howe, John

John Howe flew Spitfires, Mustangs and Vampires With the South African Air Force and F-5lD Mustang fighter bombers in the Korean War before joining the RAF 'to fly Hunters'. He commanded the first RAF Lightning squadron when No.74 Sqn converted from Hunters to Lightnings in 1960, and led the famous No.74 Sqn 'Tigers' nine-ship Lightning aerobatic team. He has flown all the legendary USAF 'century series' fighters, and later commanded the F-4 Phantom OCU and RAF Gutersloh.
Howell, Frank J.
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   Died : 9 / 5 / 1948
Howell, Frank J.

F/Lt Frank Howell, DFC*, was born at Golders Green in London on 25th January 1912. Frank Howell took a short service commission in the Royal Air Force. He trained at AST Antsy 1st March - 30th April 1937, moving on to No 3 FTS at Grantham from 1st May - 7th August 37. On 3rd May 37 he was made Acting Pilot Officer. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesTraining was completed at South Cerney from 24th August - 26th November 37, whereupon he was posted to No 25 (F) Squadron at Hawkinge, flying Hawker Demon aircraft on 3rd December 37. He became a Pilot Officer on 1st March 1938. His next posting was to No 80 Sqdn flying Gloster Gladiators at Ismailia from 27th March 1938, during which time he was attached to No 4 FTS at Abu Sueir from 13th June - 25th September 38. No 80 Sqdn moved to Amiriya on 24th September 1938, returning to Ismailia on 9th October 38. On 16th January 1939, they again moved to Helwan, where they remained until Frank was posted back to the UK on 28th August 1939. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesHe was stationed at the Uxbridge depot from the 29th August 1939 until being posted to 609 (West Riding) Squadron at Drem on 14th November 1939. On 1st September 39 his promotion to Flying Officer had taken place, and it was with this rank that he joined the squadron. From Drem, Frank followed the movements of the squadron, going to Kinloss from 5th December 1939 - 12th January 1940, whereupon they returned to Drem until 19th May 40. From Drem, the Squadron moved south to Northolt, where they stayed until moving to Middle Wallop in Hampshire on the 4th July 40, finally heading to Warmwell in Dorset on 29th November 40. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesFrank Howell force landed Spitfire N3203 on 30th May 40 at Martlesham (with no damage) due to foul weather. His first combat came the next day, 31st May 40, while flying an offensive patrol at 15,000ft over Dunkirk in Spitfire N3024. He attacked a Junkers Ju88 with Joe Dawson, which is believed to have crashed, and, in conjunction with John Dundas, attacked a Heinkel He111, setting fire to the starboard engine. Both were claimed as 'Damaged Probable'. The following day 1Jun40, again over Dunkirk, he attacked another He111, seeing no result, before attacking 3 more and setting the starboard engine alight on one of them - claiming one 'Damaged' and one 'Damaged Probable'. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesThis was also the day, 1Jun40, he became 'A' Flight Commander. He was amongst the party that escorted Winston Churchill to France and back on 11th and 13th June 40. On 12th July 40, Red Section, consisting of Flt-Lt Frank Howell in R6691, Fg-Off Paul Edge in R6636 and Plt-Off Johnny Curchin R6634 shot down a Heinkel 111 (later only credited with a 'Probable'). On 18th July 40, whilst flying Spitfire R6634, he shared in the destruction of a Junkers Ju88 of 1/KG54, engaging it 5 miles off Swanage. His aircraft was hit in the glycol tank by return fire and he baled out uninjured, landing 4 miles south of Poole at 15.15 hours and being picked up by the Royal Navy. Paul Edge was also shot down, and the aircraft was finally shot down by Alan Feary. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesHe was scrambled on 13th August 40 in R6691 and flying at 18,000ft saw "50 plus Ju87's with Escort". He promptly shot down 2 of them. On August 15th 1940, in his own words: "Middle Wallop attacked again by 12 Ju88's. Took off as a salvo hit hangar and chased a Ju88 to Warmwell, and shot it down in flames". On the 25th August 1940, flying X4104 he damaged two Messerschmitt 110's in head on attacks. He was credited on this day with 1 Bf110 'Destroyed' in X4234. On the 3rd September 1940 he was promoted to Flight Lieutenant. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesOn 7th September 1940, whilst patrolling Northolt - Brooklands at 20,000ft in R6691, he encountered a large formation of Messerschmitt 110's. Having shot one down, he then spotted a large formation of Ju88's and attacked one, setting its engine on fire, before attacking another, on which he observed no result - although the cine-gun film shows a fire starting. He was also shot at by another Spitfire during this engagement. He was credited with one Bf110 Destroyed, and 2 Ju88's Probably Destroyed. Patrolling Brooklands at 20,000ft in R6691 on 15th September 1940, he took 2 snap shots at a formation of Dornier Do17's with escort, with no visible result. During his second patrol that day, over Hastings, he shot down 1 Dornier Do17 out of a formation of 18. On 7th October 1940, he force landed Spitfire X4472 at Shaftesbury after combat with Messerschmitt Bf 109's over Yeovil. He had been hit in the oil tank, but had shot down a Bf110. On 21st October 1940, in conjunction with Sydney Hill, he shared in the destruction of a Ju88 which had been machine-gunning Old Sarum. This was 609 Squadrons 100th Kill. 4 Days later, on the 25th October 1940, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. rom 609, Frank was posted to Filton on 23rd February 1941 to form and command 118 Squadron on Spitfires. Whilst with 118, Howell claimed the squadron's first victory, a Heinkel He111 on the night of July 7th. He also claimed a 'Probable' Bf109 and shared another on October 13th. 118 subsequently moved to Colerne, Warmwell and Ibsley, from where Frank was posted on 23rd October 1941, joining HMS Prince of Wales and heading out to the Far East theatre of war. During his command of 118 Sqn as an actinbg Squadron Leader, Frank won a bar to his DFC. "The King has approved the following awards in recognition of gallantry displayed in flying operations against the enemy:- Bat to DFC: Acting/Sq Ldr. F. J. Howell, D.F.C. 118 Sq. This officer has displayed fine qualities as a fighter pilot, combined with outstanding leadership and talents for organisation. He has played a large part in raising and maintaining a high standard of efficiency in his squadron, which had distinguished itself. He has destroyed at least ten enemy aircraft and possibly a further seven." His promotion to Squadron Leader came through on 1st December. Joining 243 Sqdn on 6th December, which was reforming at Kallang with Brewster Buffalos, he was almost immediately posted a few days later to Headquarters Fighter Command in Singapore. He was on the Prince of Wales when it was sunk on 10th December, and was taken prisoner by Japanese forces on 16th February 1942 whilst trying to reach Sumatra - being held at Muntok, Palembane, Singapore, Changi, until 15th August 1945. Frank returned to the UK, arriving back at Cosford on 24th October. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesFrom 18th March - 9th April 1946, Frank Howell was posted to No. 110 Refresher Unit at Wittering, before moving on to No 17 SFTS at Coleby Grange until 24th May. On 17th August he was sent to HQ Fighter Command until 30th June 1947, becoming Squadron Leader again on 15th November, before a posting to No 1 Squadron at Tangmere on IF Course 5th -23rd January 1948. He was subsequently posted to take over as Commanding Officer of No 54 Squadron at Odiham on 12th January, which was equipped with De Havilland Vampire's. 1px-trans.gif, 43 bytesOn 9th May 1948, Frank Howell was making a cine film of his squadron's aircraft, when the wingtip of one of them struck him, severing his jugular vein. Squadron Leader Frank Howell, DFC, bled to death before he could be treated.
Hrbacek, H
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Hrbacek, H

On 21st May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ798 was hit by flak while attacking a train and crash landed 5 miles east of Lisieux. He successfully evaded capture.
Hughes, Arthur James
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   Died : 30 / 5 / 1944
Hughes, Arthur James

Killed aged 24 on 30th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH455 of No.66 Sqn suffered radiator problems after a dive bombing raid, stalled and crashed near Shoreham as he attempted to bale out. He is buried in Stoke Churchyard. Son of Reginald John and Elizabeth Mary Amelia Hughes; husband of Esther Dora Hughes, of Stoke, Coventry.
Hume, W G M
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Hume, W G M

On 3rd May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK179 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and he baled out 12 miles off Le Treport. He was rescued by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Humphrey, A. H.
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Humphrey, A. H.


Hurd, Richard
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Hurd, Richard


Hutchinson, Iain
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   Died : 27 / 4 / 2007
Hutchinson, Iain

Squadron Leader Iain Hutchinson was born in Charminster. Posted to join 222 Squadron at Hornchurch, Iain Hutchinson flew with them from June 1940 throughout the Battle of Britain. He said of his experience; "On our first sortie we lost half the squadron. I myself was shot down the next day. "I was flying again the next day but I was shot down five times during the next month, though I didn't end up in hospital until the last time." That happened when he was shot down in flames over south west London, miraculously managing to bale out, although he was badly burned. Hutchinson was treated for burns at RAF hospital Uxbridge where he was one of the last to receive a tannic acid treatment then used for burns. He said: "The acid produced great scabs that covered my face and legs while the whites of my eyes turned bright red." As the fighting grew towards its crescendo, on 30th August his Spitfire was damaged in fighting and he force landed unhurt in Essex. Returning to the fray he downed an Me109 on 6th September, another the following day, and a third a week later. On 18th September, after combat over Kent, he was forced to bale out near Canterbury, and then on 30th September following action over London he was wounded and made a forced landing at Denham. His Battle of Britain totals were three Me109 German fighters as confirmed kills, one Heinkel bomber, an Me109 and one Me110 twin-engined heavy fighter as probably destroyed and one Me109 damaged. It was Hutchinson who shot down the German Ace Oberleutenant Eckhardt Priebe, who was taken prisoner and sent to Canada Squadron leader Hutchinson conitnued his service flying reconnaissance un armed spitfires. He was on a long range mission in a specially adapted Mosquito when he was shot donw by a Me109 over Norway. He landed despite the tail being shot off and his navigator fired a Verey pistol into a pool of petrol, blowing up the Mosquito. Hutchinson spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft 3 the prisoner of war camp of Wooden Horse and Great Escape fame. After the war he returned and stayed with the RAF flying the Vampire jet aircraft and helped pioneer innovations in aircraft safety, finally retiring form the Royal Air Force in 1957. Sadly he died on April 27th 2007 in Dorchester aged 88.
Hymas, J H
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Hymas, J H

Taken prisoner on 23rd January 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.VII MB832 of No.91 Sqn was shot down by enemy fighters.
Idema, Walter Doornink
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   Died : 17 / 6 / 1944
Idema, Walter Doornink

American pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was killed aged 27 on 17th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH852 of No.229 Sqn (Royal Air Force) failed to return from a patrol against V-1 rockets. He is buried in Bernay Communal Cemetery. Son of Walter D. Idema and Mary W. Idema, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S.A.
Ince, Alec A
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Ince, Alec A

Joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in January 1941 and by midsummer he had travelled to Quebec, then to North Sidney, Nova Scotia, followed by Victoriaville, Quebec for air crew training in Oshawa, Ontario flying Tiger Moths and next to Montreal, Quebec for advanced training on Harvards. By January 1942 he arrived in Shropshire, England at an advanced flying school at RAF base Fern Hill, followed by operational training on Spitfires, marks one and two at RAF station Aston Down, near Stroud. By midsummer 1942, the training there was complete and Alec was posted to 402 Sqdn at RAF Kenley where they were occupied with escorting American bombers to Northern France on bombing expeditions, which lasted until the American Mustang and Thunderbolt fighters arrived to take over from the RAF fighter squadrons. Their duties then changed to Hit and Run raids along the south and south-east coast of England where many dog fights took place over coastal towns. The policy of the Canadian Government was to repatriate aircrews back to Canada after four years on active service and Alec was returned to the University to complete his education.
Inskip, D R
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   Died : 31 / 1 / 1944
Inskip, D R

Killed on 31st January 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XII EN613 of No.91 Sqn collided with Spitfire Mk.XII EN618 also of No.91 Sqn in poor weather. They had been escorting Mosquitos to Dieppe. Flight Sergeant R K Y Fairbairn in the other Spitfire was also killed.
Isaac, L. R.
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   Died : 5 / 8 / 1940
Isaac, L. R.

Sergeant L.R.Isaac of No 64 Squadron was flying in his Spitfire I (L1029) on August 5th 1940 when he was shot down and killed off Folkstone.
Iveson, T. C.
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Iveson, T. C.

Sergeant T.C.Iveson of No 616 Squadron crash landed his Spitfire I (R6690) into the sea on September 16th 1940 and was picked up. He ran out of fuel chasing a Ju 88 off Cromer.
Iveson, Tony
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   Died : 5 / 11 / 2013
Iveson, Tony

Tony Iveson fought in the Battle of Britain with RAF Fighter Command, as a Sergeant pilot, joining 616 Squadron at Kenley flying Spitfires on 2 September 1940. On the 16th of September, he was forced to ditch into the sea after running out of fuel following a pursuit of a Ju88 bomber. His Spitfire L1036 ditched 20 miles off Cromer in Norfolk, and he was picked up by an MTB. He joined No.92 Sqn the following month. Commissioned in 1942, Tony undertook his second tour transferring to RAF Bomber Command, where he was selected to join the famous 617 Squadron, flying Lancasters. He took part in most of 617 Squadrons high precision operations, including all three sorties against the German battleship Tirpitz, and went on to become one of the most respected pilots in the squadron.

Some of Tony Iveson's operational sorties with No.617 Squadron:

5-8-44 Submarine pens-Brest 12,000LB Tallboy
6-8-44 Submarine pens-Keroman 12,000LB Tallboy
7-8-44 Submarine pens-Lorient-Sqaudron scrubbed the operation
8-8-44 Submarine pens-La pallice-12,000LB Tallboy
24-8-44 E-boat pens -Ijmuiden-12,000LB Tallboy
27-8-44 Shipping-Brest- 12 x 1000LB
11-9-44 Tirpitz-Alten Fiord 12,000LB Tallboy plus Johnny Walker Mines
23-9-44 Aqueduct, Dortmund Ems Canal-12,000LB Tallboy
3-10-44 Westkapelle Sea Wall- Squadron abandoned sortie
7-10-44 Rhine Barrage, North of Basle-12,000LB Tallboy
28-10-44 Tirpitz-12,000LB Tallboy
12-11-44 Tirpitz-12,000LB Tallboy
8-12-44 Urft Dam-12,000LB Tallboy
11-12-44 Urft dam - 12,000LB Tallboy
15-12-44 Submarine pens- Ijmuiden-12,000LB Tallboy
21-12-44 Politz-12,000LB Tallboy
12-1-45 Submarine pens-Bergen-12,000LB Tallboy


Citation for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, gazetted 16th March 1945.

This officer has completed numerous sorties on his second tour of operational duty, including three attacks against the battleship Tirpitz. In January, 1945, he was detailed to attack the U-boat pens at Bergen. Whilst over the target his aircraft was attacked by two fighters. The first burst of machine-gun fire from the enemy aircraft struck the tailplane, rudder and elevator. The port inner engine was set on fire and the rear turret was put out of action. After the fighters broke off their attack Squadron Leader Ivesons aircraft came under heavy fire from the antiaircraft batteries. It was almost impossible to maintain level flight. Squadron Leader Iveson instructed another member of the crew to lash the control column in such a way as to ease the strain. Under these most trying conditions, Squadron Leader Iveson flew clear of the fire zone and afterwards reached a home based airfield where he landed his seriously damaged aircraft safely. By his great skill, courage and determination, this officer was undoubtedly responsible for the safe return of the aircraft.

Jacobs, J
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Jacobs, J


Jacobsen, Erik Flohr
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   Died : 22 / 5 / 1944
Jacobsen, Erik Flohr

Killed aged 26 on 22nd May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK890 of No.1 Sqn was shot down by flak near Morlaix. He is buried in St Eloy churchyard. Son of Svend Adolf and Emma Jacobsen, of Risskov, Denmark.
James, Ken
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James, Ken

A native of Victoria, Squadron Leader Ken James first served in the UK before going back to Australia in August 1944. He became CO of No.85 Squadron RAAF from September 1944 to March 1945, then No.790 Squadron RAAF in May 1945. Squadron Leader Ken James made the first Spitfire flight in Australia just before midday on the 25th August. He demonstrated the aircraft to an audience of assembled VIPs and film-camera men. After assembly the six aircraft were ferried up to RAAF Richmond, near Sydney, NSW. Leader Ken ‘Skeeter’ James later took charge of 457 squadron and ended the war with 2.5 victories.
Jeka, Jozef
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   Died : 13 / 4 / 1958
Jeka, Jozef

Sergeant Jözeph Jeka from Poland was with No 238 Squadron during the Battle of Britain flying Hurricane's. In less than a month he had become an Ace with 5 victories, before being shot down himself on 5th November 1940. He baled out and after a short stay in hospital joined No.306 Sqn flying Spitfire. Through the war years he also flew with No.316 Sqn and No.308 Sqn. It was with the latter unit that on 21st May 1944 his aircraft was hit by flak and he was forced to land near Buchy, flying Spitfire Mk.IX ML254. Some references say he was captured, but it appears he evaded capture with the help of the French Resistance and was serving with No.306 Sqn once again by 8th September 1944. Post war he was the first Polish pilot to fly at more than Mach 2. On 13th April 1958, fighting with rebel mercenaries in Indonesia, his A-26 Invader Mk.B 34375 suffered engine difficulties on take off and crashed, killing him and his navigator John Peter Izycki, along with an Indonesian radio operator.
Jenkins, C H
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Jenkins, C H

Rescued from the sea after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH722 ditched after running out of fuel. He had encountered Fw190s while escorting bombers.
Johnson, Arthur
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Johnson, Arthur


Johnson, J. I.
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1940
Johnson, J. I.

Sergeant J.I.Johnson from No 222 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (R6629) by a Bf 109 at Bishopsbourne, Kent on the 30th of August 1940.
Johnson, Johnnie
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   Died : 30 / 1 / 2001
Johnson, Johnnie

Johnnie Johnson joined 92 Spitfire squadron in August 1940, but it was with 616 squadron that he scored his first victory on June 26th 1941 while flying with Douglas Baders Tangmere Wing. He was squadron leader of 610 squadron in July 1942, but it was as Wing Commander of the Kenley Wing in 1943 that his scores really started to mount. He was W/C of 144 wing during D-Day and led 127 and 125 wings until the end of the war when we has the topscoring allied fighter pilot with 38 air victories. Inspired by the great British WW 1 aces like Bishop and Ball, Johnnie Johnson dreamed often as a child of becoming an R.A.F. pilot. The young Johnson enthusiastically joined the Volunteer Reserve at the first opportunity. After completing his initial flight training Johnson was posted to 616 Squadron at Kenley. However, this Squadron had been hit hard with the loss of six pilots and five wounded, and the unit was withdrawn to Coltishall prior to Johnson encountering combat. With only 12 hours of flight time in a Spitfire this was no doubt advantageous. In February 1941 Billy Burton moved the Squadron to Tangmere. Douglas Bader then arrived to take over the Tangmere Wing, and fly with the 616 Squadron. Johnnie, Alan Smith and Cocky Dundas were chosen to fly with Bader. During the summer of 1941 the Battle of Britain was at its peak. Bader took the time to instruct Johnson carefully in both the art of flying and the skills necessary to attain success in aerial combat. Bader's idea of an afternoon off duty, according to Johnson, was to take his section over the Channel in hopes of running into Adolph Galland and his Abbeyville Boys. On August 19, 1941 Bader failed to return from a mission when 616 Squadron was hit hard by a group of Messerschmitt 109s. Johnson flew on in Baders absence, and in the summer of 1942 he was promoted to command of the 610 Squadron. In 1943 he was promoted again to Wing Commander of the Canadian Spitfire Wing in Kenley. By that time Johnson had attained eight confirmed victories. During the spring and summer of 1943 Johnnie led the Canadian unit on more than 140 missions over Northwest Europe. Johnsons squadron attained more than 100 victories during this period, and Johnnies own personal score rose to 25. After a short leave, Johnson was posted to lead the 144 Canadian Spitfire Wing. On D-Day Johnson led his Wing on four missions in support of the Allied invasion. On June 8, Johnsons Wing was the first Spitfire group to land in newly liberated France. Johnson continued fighting in France through September 1944 when he achieved his 38th and final victory. Patrolling the Rhine Johnsons unit jumped nine 109s which were flying beneath them in the opposite direction. Five of the 109s were downed. Early in 1945 Johnson was promoted to Group Captain and put in command of the 125 Wing, which was equipped with the Spitfire XIV. Flying from former Luftwaffe airfields the 125 Wing assisted in the final Allied push to Berlin. Johnson attributed much of his aerial combat success to his ability to make tight turning maneuvers. Johnsons tightest call came on August 19, 1942 when he was unable to dislodge an Me-109 from his tail during the raid on Diepppe. Johnson raced his Spitfire flat out at a group of Royal Navy ships. The usual barrage of flak and tracer fire came right at him, and fortunately for the ace, missed his Spitfire but effectively eliminated the brave pilot on his tail. During the Korean War Johnson flew fighter-bombers with the USAF. Following his retirement from the R.A.F. in 1966 Johnson founded the Johnnie Johnson Housing Trust that has provided homes for more than 4000 disabled and elderly persons, and his sixth book Winged Victory was published in 1995. Johnson flew many of the Spitfire models. His favorite was the beautiful Mark IX, the best of them all. Johnnie passed away in 2001 at the age of 85, in Derbyshire, England.
Johnson, P
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Johnson, P


Johnson, R. B.
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Johnson, R. B.

Sergeant R.B.Johnson of No 222 Squadron was injured on the 3rd of September 1940 when his Spitfire I (L1010) suffered a Glycol leak. He baled out over Burnham on Crouch. He was shot down on the 14th of September 1940 and he baled out of his Spitfire I (X4249) after combat with a Bf 109 over Aveley, Essex. He escaped unhurt.
Johnston, D E
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   Died : 1 / 4 / 1944
Johnston, D E

Killed on 1st April 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII MD116 YQ-K of No.616 Sqn crashed near Parham in bad weather after scrambling from Tangmere.
Johnstone, Sandy
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   Died : 13 / 12 / 2000
Johnstone, Sandy

Early in 1938, Johnstone was a civilian navigation instructor at Scottish Aviation, moving later to the Civil Air Navigation School at Prestwick. In August 1939 he was called to full-time service with 602 Squadron. After some Spitfire engagements off the Scottish coast, he received command of 602 - he was still only 24 - and led it south to the tiny airfield at West Hampnett, in West Sussex, where it was stationed throughout the Battle of Britain. Sandy was in command of no. 602 squadron during the critical days of the Battle of Britain, flying with the squadron before the war though to 1941, when he was posted to the Middle east, he also served with 229 and 249 squadrons in Malta during the Islands most fateful days of the war. Sandy became a successful author and resided near Ipswich in Suffolk. Sandy Johnstone died 13th December 2000, aged 84.

Citation for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross :

Acting Squadron Leader Alexander Vallance Riddell JOHNSTONE (90163), Auxiliary Air Force.

This officer has proved himself to be a leader of ability and determination and has been mainly responsible for the high standard of morale in his squadron. He has destroyed four enemy aircraft of which one was shot down at night.

(London Gazette – 1 October 1940)




Sandy Johnstone discusses a painting with artist Anthony Saunders.

Jones, J. S. B.
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   Died : 11 / 8 / 1940
Jones, J. S. B.

Pilot Officer J.S.B.Jones of No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (R6614) by a Bf 109 on the 11th of August 1940 over the Channel. J.S.B.Jones is buried at St Marie, Le Harve, France. He was 21 years old.
Jones, Richard L
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   Died : 7 / 3 / 2012
Jones, Richard L

Richard Jones was born in 1918 and in July 1940 Richard Jones was posted to 64 Squadron at Kenley, flying Spitfires. He was involved in heavy fighting over the Channel during the Battle of Britain, with the squadron suffering many losses during July and August. Towards the end of the Battle of Britain, in October, he moved to 19 Squadron flying Spitfires from Fowlmere, and was heavily involved in the fighter sweeps taking place at that time. Near the end of the Battle of Britain, Pilot Officer Richard Jones was shot down during a dogfight over Kent with Me 109s. Jones crash landed his Spitfire in a field, colliding with a flock of sheep - he would go on to write in his log book "Crashed into a load of sheep. What a bloody mess!"After the Battle of Britain, Richard Jones became a test pilot for De Havilland at Witney in Oxfordshire, and test flew thousands of Hawker Hurricanes and other types, including civil types. After the war Richard Jones joined the RAFVR and started a long career in the motor industry. Sadly Richard Jones passed away on 7th March 2012.
Jones, Ripley
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   Died : 17 / 10 / 1942
Jones, Ripley


Joubert des Ouches, J
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   Died : 6 / 6 / 1944
Joubert des Ouches, J

Killed on 6th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.V W3843 of No.345 Sqn lost engine glycol and he baled out.
Jozefiak, Stanislav
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Jozefiak, Stanislav

Escaping Poland in 1939, and already a pilot, Stan completed 2 full tours on Wellingtons with 304 Sqn, Bomber Command. After a period of training he returned to action flying Spitfires with 317 Sqn, part of the 2nd TAF. After the war Stan was to fly Dakotas for the CIA.
Kane, Terence
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   Died : 5 / 8 / 2016
Kane, Terence

Kane joined the RAF on July 25 1938 on a short service commission. During his flying training he was injured in an Audax crash and admitted to hospital, however he was able to complete his training and was posted to CFS, Upavon, for an instructor's course, after which he joined the staff at 14 FTS, Kinloss and later Cranfield. He went to 7 OTU, Hawarden in July 1940, converted to Spitfires and joined 234 Squadron on September 14th. He shared in the destruction of a Ju88 on the 22nd. The next day he failed to return from a routine section patrol. His Spitfire was damaged in combat off the French coast and he baled out at 6,000 feet and was picked up from the sea and captured by the Germans. Before being shot down, he destroyed a Bf109. He was freed in May 1945 and stayed in the RAF until 1950. He rejoined the RAF in April 1954, serving in the Fighter Control Branch, and retired in 1974.
Kayll, Joseph Robert
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   Died : 3 / 3 / 2000
Kayll, Joseph Robert

Joe Kayll joined the Auxiliary Air Force in 1934, serving with No. 607 (County of Durham) Squadron rising to become a flight lieutenant. Following the outbreak of the war he volunteered for full-time service and fought in France in early 1940 before taking part in the Battle of Britain, commanding No. 615 (County of Surrey) Squadron as an acting squadron leader. During the Battle of Britain Kayll was credited with shooting down seven German aircraft with one shared and six unconfirmed destroyed, along with six damaged. For these efforts he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and Distinguished Flying Cross personally by King George VI. In 1941, he was promoted to wing commander and given command of The Hornchurch wing of three Spitfire squadrons. In 1941 he was mentioned in despatches before being shot down over France in July. He was subsequently captured by the Germans and became a prisoner of war. He became Senior British officer at Oflag IX until moved to Oflag VI-B Warburg in October 1941. In September 1942 Wing Commander Kayll escaped in a mass break out and with a companion travelled by foot 90 Kilometres before being recaptured south of Fulda. He was transferred to Stalag Luft III at Sagan in May 1943, and was in charge of the Escape Committee for the East Compound. He remained in captivity for the remainder of the war, co-ordinating numerous escape attempts, for which he was later appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1946. After the war he continued to serve, rejoining the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, and commanding No. 607 (County of Durham) Squadron. Born in Sunderland and educated at Aysgarth and Stowe, he entered the family timber business but, inspired by flying, he joined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force in 1934. Commissioned, he learned to fly with 607 County of Durham Squadron, using Wapiti and Hart biplanes. By early 1939, Kayll was a Flight-Commander in 607 Squadron, which now flew Gladiator biplane fighters. In November 1939, Kayll's squadron was posted to France. The following March, he became commander of 615 County of Surrey Squadron flying obsolete Gladiators. On May 10, the German offensive against the low countries and France began, and 615 Squadron, caught re-equipping with Hurricane 1 fighters, was involved in the intensive air fighting. Kayll nourished 615's fighting spirit by flying up to seven sorties a day from improvised airfields with a mixture of Hurricanes and Gladiators. The squadron inflicted heavy losses on the Luftwaffe while the German army continually overran the squadron's forward airfields. On May 15th, Kayll, flying a Hurricane, shot down two Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engined fighters, and on May 20th destroyed a Heinkel 111 bomber. The next day, 615's surviving pilots flew back to Kenley, south of London. By mid-June, 615 had regrouped, and it resumed operations against Luftwaffe-occupied airfields in France. Kayll was awarded the DSO and DFC, and during the Battle of Britain he shot down a Messerschmidt Bf 109E fighter and Do 17 and He 111 bombers. This was in a ferocious seven-day period, which started on August 18th. In late September, the exhausted 615 Squadron was moved to Prestwick to regroup. It was credited with 97 German aircraft destroyed. Kayll's score was seven and one shared destroyed, seven unconfirmed destroyed and six damaged. In October, 615 returned to defend London against German fighter-bomber attacks. In June 1941, after six months at Fighter Command HQ, Kayll returned to operations as a wing-commander flying with the famous Hornchurch Wing, operating three Spitfire squadrons. Fighter Command was mounting numerous sweeps over France and he flew in several Circus operations, which involved a small number of bombers, heavily escorted by fighters, to draw the Luftwaffe into battle. On June 25th, Kayll, while flying with his section near St Omer, was shot down, captured and sent first to Spangenberg Castle POW camp, and later to Wartburg, from which he escaped during the great breakout of September 1942. He was recaptured and sent to Stalag Luft III at Sargan, Silesia, location of the wooden horse escape. Other short-term escapes followed until the Great Escape of March 1944. But after the Gestapo shot 50 allied airmen, all escape plans ceased. Kayll was awarded an OBE for his escape activities, and was demobilised in 1946. He rejoined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, commanding 607 Squadron, and also re-entered the family business, which he later ran with his two sons. He died on 3rd March 2000.
Keighley, G.
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Keighley, G.

Flight Officer G.Keighley was a former pre-war member of No 610 Squadron, he rejoined them in May 1940. On the last day of May he was shot down by defensive gunfire from a Dornier 215 and baled out of his Spitfire into the Channel. Keighley was picked up by a trawler then transferred to Naval pinnacle. He baled out again on the 20th of July 1940 when his tail was shot off by Oberfeldwebel Schmid of I Gruppe of JG 51 .The Spitfire (N3201) he was flying crashed at Wootton, Kent at 18:30hrs. Keighley was wounded.
Kelly, D P
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Kelly, D P

On 21st April 1944, he was wounded in the eye after his No.616 Sqn Spitfire MB767 YQ-F was hit by flak above Cherbourg. He returned the aircraft to base with slight damage.
Kelly, D. P. D. G.
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   Died : 11 / 2 / 1987
Kelly, D. P. D. G.

Flight Lieutenant D.Piers D.G.Kelly joined No 74 Squadron on the 15th of July 1940. He flew in Spitfire's during the Battle of Britain.
Kelly, E. D.
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Kelly, E. D.

On 7th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH719 of No.403 Sqn RCAF ran out fuel over the English Channel, and he was forced to bale out. On 9th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ951 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was damaged by naval anti-aircraft fire over Normandy and he was injured.
Kemp, J. L.
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Kemp, J. L.

Pilot Officer J.L.Kemp of No 54 Squadron was forced to bale out of his Spitfire I (N3184) because of engine failure on July 21st 1940 East of Clacton. He was rescued by the Navy.
Kempka, W
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Kempka, W

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM565 of No.303 Sqn crashed near Villiers.
Kendal, J. B.
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   Died : 25 / 5 / 1942
Kendal, J. B.

John Bedford Kendal, of Chepstow, was born on 29th September 1920 and educated at Ardingly. He joined the RAFVR about April 1939 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on 1st September, he went to No.1 ITW, Cambridge, did his elementary flying at 22 EFTS, Cambridge and then completed his training at 5 FTS, Sealand. Kendal converted to Spitfires at 7 OTU, Hawarden and was posted to 616 Squadron at Coltishall on 2nd September 1940. He passed four non-operational weeks and then went to 66 Squadron at Gravesend on 29th September, his 20th birthday. He claimed a Me109 destroyed on 2nd October. Kendal was himself shot down on the 5th in combat with Me109's over Tenterden. He is believed to have made a forced-landing at Detling, slightly injured, On 29th October he destroyed a Me109.( which is likely to have been Pilot of Bf 109E-4 (3724) of 5/JG26. Oblt Kurt Eichstadt He was flying escort cover when attacked from above, his a/c, 12+-, broke up in the air throwing Eickstadt clear. His parachute failed to open and he fell to his death at Shovers Green. ) In 1941 Kendal volunteered for the Merchant Ship Fighter Unit. He was in the first Camship to sail in a Russian convoy, the Empire Morn. Convoy PQ15 sailed from Hvalfjord, lceland on 26th April 1942 and arrived at Murmansk on 6th May, having lost three ships to He111 torpedo-bombers. The convoy, now numbered QP12, sailed from Murmansk on 21st May. Four days later Kendal was launched to attack enemy aircraft around the convoy. He destroyed a Ju88. Later, at the limit of his fuel, Kendal baled out but his parachute did not function properly and he sustained serious injuries when he struck the sea. He was quickly picked up from the icy water but died soon afterwards. Kendal was the first MSFU pilot to destroy an enemy aircraft and he was the only one to die after an operational launching. His final action had been to radio the position of the dinghy of the Ju88 crew. Kendal was buried at sea. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial, Panel 67. He received a Mention in Despatches. Killed May 25th 1942**
Kennard-Davis, P. F.
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   Died : 10 / 8 / 1940
Kennard-Davis, P. F.

Pilot Officer P.F.Kennard-Davis of No 64 Squadron was shot down in flames in his Spitfire I (L1039) on the 8th of August 1940 whilst in combat. His aircraft crashed at West Langdon, Kent. P.F.Kennard-Davis later succumbed to his wounds on the 10th of August 1940.
Ketterson, A B W
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   Died : 4 / 3 / 1944
Ketterson, A B W

Killed on 4th March 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ306 of No.412 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and force landed near Ypres.
Keymer, M.
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   Died : 22 / 8 / 1940
Keymer, M.

Sergeant M.Keymer of No 65 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (K9909) on August 22nd 1940 off Dover. M.Keymer is buried at Bazinghem, France. He was 24.
Kidd, L. D.
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Kidd, L. D.

Pilot Officer L.D.Kidd of No.602 Squadron was flying in Spitfire Mk.IX (MJ339) on 6th June 1944, he crash landed on a Normandy beach. He was uninjured and the aircraft was later salvaged.
King, P. J. C.
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1940
King, P. J. C.

Flight Officer P.J.C.King from No 66 Squadron was involved in combat on September 5th 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (N3060) after combat near the Medway and was killed when his parachute failed to open.
Kingaby, Don
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   Died : 31 / 12 / 1990
Kingaby, Don

Born in London on 7th January 1920. Joined the RAFVR in April 1939 at the age of 19. He flew a Mk.I Spitfire with No.266 Squadron during the initial stages of the Battle of Britain, claiming as damaged two Ju88s and an Me110. He then joined No.92 Squadron in September 1940, claiming 4 aircraft (including 3 Me109s) in October, then 6 more Me109s in November 1940, including 4 in a single day on the 15th. He claimed a further 12 victories during 1941, before joining No.111 Sqn and No.64 Sqn in March and April 1942 correspondingly. He later joined No.122 Squadron, and was promoted to lead the Hornchurch wing in March 1943. On D-Day, he claimed the final addition to his total, sharing in the destruction of an Me109. He was the only RAF pilot to be awarded three DFMs, and scored a total of 23 victories and 8 probables. His Air Force Cross medal was awarded in 1952 for his work with Vampire jets. He retired in 1958. Sadly, he passed away on 31st December 1990.
Kingcome, Brian Fabris
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1994
Kingcome, Brian Fabris

Brian Fabris Kingcome was born in Calcutta on May 31st 1917. Brian Kingcome was educated at Bedford and in 1936 entered the RAF College, Cranwell. Soon after he began his pilot course he was seriously injured in a car accident and was told by the RAF medical board that he would never fly again as he was expected to suffer permanent double vision. But after months in hospital and with Brians strength of character he proved the board wrong. In 1938 he was posted to No 65, a biplane Gladiator fighter squadron based at Hornchurch. Brian Kingcome took part in the Battles of France and Dunkirk but transferred to 92 Squadron as a flight commander and flying Spitfires in May 1940 scoring his first victories in June 1940. Brian Kingcome became acting commanding officer during the latter stages of the Battle of Britain. During this time he and his pilots achieved the highest success rate of any squadron in the entire Battle of Britain. After being shot down by Me109s and wounded, he returned to active operations. In February 1942 he was posted to command 72 Squadron, followed by promotion to Wing Leader at Kenley. In May 1943 he was posted to lead 244 Wing in the Mediterranean during the invasion of Sicily. An Ace, Brian Kingcome flew Spitfires in combat continually until the end of 1944, his tally finishing at 8 and 3 shared destroyed, plus a score of probables and damaged. One of the prewar Cranwell elite, Brian Kingcome was to become one ofthe Second World Wars great fighter leaders, alongside such immortals as Douglas Bader, Bob Stanford Tuck and Johnnie Johnson. At the outbreak of war he was serving in 65 Squadron, but in May 1940 was posted to 92 Squadron as flight commander. On 25 May he shared a Do 17 and on 2 June destroyed two He l l Is and damaged a third. He shared a Ju 88 with two others on I0 July, and again on the 24th. On 9 September he probably destroyed a Bf 110 and two days later shot down a He 111. On the 14th he damaged another. He shot down a Bf 109 on the 23rd and next day probably destroyed another and damaged a Ju 88. Three days later he shared a Ju 88 again, damaged two others, probably destroyed a Do 17, and damaged one of these also. Around this time he was awarded a DFC for six victories, and on 11 October got a Bf 109 He claimed another next day, and also damaged one. In 1941 he became commanding officer, having frequently led the squadron. It will be noted that he claimed many probables and damaged during the Battle of Britain, and this was due to his view that it was more important to hit as many as possible than to try and confirm victories. On 16 June 1941 lie probably destroyed a Bf 109, and on 24 July shot one down. He was then rested until late in the year, when he was posted to command 72 Squadron, and in February 1942 gave escort cover to the Fleet Air Arm pilot Eugene Esmonde, who won the VC trying to attack German capital ships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and and the cruiser ‘Prinz Eugen’ with Swordfish during the Channel Dash. In atrocious weather Kingcome caught a fleeting glimpse of tbe Scharnhorst - Oh what a beautiful battleboat! he exclaimed, just as a shell made a hole the size of a dustbin lid in his port wing. During 1941 he received a Bar to his DFC, having brought his score to 10. He was promoted to lead the Kenley wing, and on 15 April 1942 damaged a Fw 190. He probably destroyed a Bf 109 on 28 May, and during the year was awarded a DSO, having added another victory to his score. In 1943 he was posted to North Africa to lead 244 Wing, and lead this for 18 months, becoming a Gp. Capt. after the invasion of Italy. By the end of his stay with the wing he had brought his score to 18, and was then posted as SASO of a Liberator group, and flew an operation as a waist gunner over northern Yugoslavia after taking up this appointment. Sadly Group Captain Brian Kingcome passed away aged 76 in 1994.
Knight, L R
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   Died : 4 / 1 / 1944
Knight, L R

Killed on 4th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb AA733 SN-V of No.501 Sqn was shot down by Me109s near Abbeville.
Kornicki, Franciszek
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Kornicki, Franciszek

Posted in 1939 to 3rd Fighter Wing in Lwow as part of the Polish Air Force. This area was soon overrun by Germans so he travelled to England to join 303 Polish Sqn on Spitfires and also served with 308, 315 and 317 Squadrons carrying out many fighter sweeps over France and occupied Europe.
Krajewski, J
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Krajewski, J

Injured on 9th March 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH853 of No.302 Sqn was hit by flak and force-landed in Bradwell Bay.
Kurowski, J
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   Died : 21 / 5 / 1944
Kurowski, J

Killed on 21st May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX ML215 of No.308 Sqn was hit by flak and exploded.
Lacey, James
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   Died : 30 / 5 / 1989
Lacey, James

James Harry Lacey, from Wetherby, who was destined to become the top scoring RAF fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain, joined the RAFVR. in 1937. After an instructors course in 1938 he became an instructor at the Yorkshire Aeroplane Club. Called up at the outbreak of war, he was posted to 501 Squadron, and in May 1940 was posted with the unit to France. On the 13th he set off late on an early patrol, and shot down a Bf 109 and a He 111. Later in the day he destroyed a Bf 110. On the 27th he destroyed two He 11 Is and then returned to the United Kingdom, in June, having made an emergency landing in a swamp on the 9th and overturned, nearly being drowned. On 20 July he shot down a 13f 109, and was then awarded a DFM. In the Battle of Britain, during August, he destroyed a Ju 87 and a probable on the 12th, damaged a Do 17 on the 15th, probably destroyed a Bf 109 on the 16th, and on the 24th shot down a Ju 88 and damaged a Do 17. On the 29th he destroyed a 13f 109 and next day claimed a He 111 and probablya Bf110. He shot down a Bf109 on the 31st and on 2 September got two Bf 109s and damaged a Do 17. Two days later he destroyed two more Bf 109s, and was then sent on leave for a few days. on his return, on the 13th, he took off in very bad weather to shoot down a lone He 111 which had just bombed Buckingham Palace. Having destroyed it, he found the cloud too thick to return to base and was forced to bale out. On the 15th he shot down another He 111 and two Bf 109s with a third damaged, on the 27th destroyed another Bf 109 and on the 30th damaged a Ju 88. During October he was in action frequently against Bf 109s, getting a probable on the 7th and destroying others on the 12th, 26th, and the 30th, damaging one also on this latter date. His score was now 23, and he had been shot down or forced to bale out nine times. Of his victories 18 were gained during the Battle of Britain, and this was the highest score of any pilot for this period. In December he received a Bar to his DFM and was commissioned the following month. He converted to Spitfires early in 1941, and in June became a flight commander. During July he destroyed a Bf 109 on the 10th, damaged one on the 14th, shot down a He 59 floatplane on the 17th and destroyed two more Bf 109s on the 24th, causing them to collide. He was then posted as an instructor to 57 OTU where he trained, among others, George Beurling. In March 1942 he was posted to 602 Squadron, and on 24th March damaged a Fw 190. On 25 April he damaged two more, but was then posted to HQ 81 Group as Tactics Officer, now as a Sqn. Ldr. He spent some while testing Hurricanes with rocket projectiles and 40 mm. anti-tank guns, and then became Chief Flying Instructor at Millfield. In March 1943 he was sent to India, and first was responsible for converting squadrons to Hurricanes at Madras. He then moved to Bangalore, where he converted Hurricane pilots to Thunderbolts. In September 1944 he was posted to 3 TAC at Komila as Sqn. Ldr. Tactics, and the following month attended an Air Fighting Instructors Course at Armarda Road, which was run by Wg. Cdr. F.R. Carey. In November he became temporary commanding officer of 155 Squadron, flying Spitfire 8s in Burma, but later that month took command of 17 Squadron, equipped with the same aircraft. His squadron was responsible for giving ground support to a Gurkha regiment, so he ordered his pilots to have their heads shaved in the Gurkha fashion, which proved to be a very popular move. On 19 February 1945 he shot down a Nakajima Ki 43 Oscar, his twenty-eighth and last victory. He died on 30th May 1989.
Lamb, P. G.
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Lamb, P. G.

Flight Officer P.G.Lamb had been a member of No 610 Squadron since 1938. Lamb was awarded the A.F.C. on the 26th of October 1943.
Lamour-Zevaco, A E
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Lamour-Zevaco, A E

Killed on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK738 of No.165 Sqn crashed south of Canterbury. (No record with war graves commission - and continued service record of the aircraft together suggest this information may not be accurate.)
Lanfranchi, James Leon
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   Died : 28 / 6 / 1944
Lanfranchi, James Leon

Killed age 26 on 28th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ988 of No.403 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure after combat with an Fw190 near Falaise. He baled out but was killed. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. Son of Guido Lanfranchi, and of Martha Lanfranchi, of Montreal, Province of Quebec.
Langley, G. A.
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   Died : 15 / 9 / 1940
Langley, G. A.

Pilot Officer G.A.Langley of No 41 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (X4325) safely after combat on September 11th 1940 near Sevenoaks. He was on patrol on the 15th of September 1940 in his Spitfire I (P9324) when he was shot down near Thurrock and killed.
Large, R G Bob
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Large, R G Bob

Learned to fly in Scotland in 1940 and in 1941 joined 616 Squadron as part of the Tangmere Wing, commanded by the famous legless pilot Wing Commander Douglas Bader. The Squadron flew Fighter and Bomber sweeps over Northern France. The remains of Bobs Spitfire lie at the bottom of the sea ten miles off Hythe (where he now lives) after being bounced by eighty plus ME 109Gs over the English Channel. Having learned of the activities of 161 SD Squadron he was interviewed by the CO, Wing Commander Lewis Hodges, and joined the Lysander Flight. He then flew many important missions into occupied France in single, double and a memorable treble pickup when his excuse for being late at the rendezvous was that he had had a haircut in the firms time because it grew in the firms time! After D-Day he returned to Fighter Command and later flew Meteors. (Bobs dog, Patrick, became the first dog in the Allied Forces to fly in a jet which took place in a Meteor 3 on 11th May 1946 and is now recorded in the Guinness Book of Records!)
Laubman, Donald C
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Laubman, Donald C

Born in Provost, Alberta, 16th October 1921. Home in Edmonton. Enlisted there, 13th September 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27th November 1940), No.5 EFTS (graduated 16th January 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 4th May 1941), Awarded wings 4th May 1941 as a Sergeant. Promoted successively to Flight Sergeant and Warrant Officer. Commissioned 1st July 1942. Promoted to Flying Officer, 1st January 1943, Flight Lieutenant, 1st July 1944, Squadron Leader, 6th April 1945. Retained in Canada for home defence duties with No.133 Squadron from 7th September 1942 to 8th May 1943. Arrived in UK, June 1943. With No.412 Squadron, 16th August 1943 to 5th November 1944, and No.402 Squadron 6th-14th April 1945. Briefly POW, 14th April 1945. Released 25th September 1945. Re-enrolled 17th January 1946. Initially with No.6 Communications Flight, NWAC. Command of No.416 Squadron (January 1951 to March 1952). Command of No.3 Wing at Zweibrucken (July 1963 to August 1966). Command of No.1 Air Division (July 1969 to April 1970). Command of Canadian Forces in Europe (April 1970 to Aug. 1971), &. Chief of Personnel, CFHQ (May 1972 to retirement)

On 23rd March 1943, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ230 of No.412 Sqn RCAF was damaged in a crash landing at Kenley after sustaining hits from the return fire of a Ju88. He survived the event unscathed.

On 14th April 1945 his Spitfire Mk.XIV RM932 of No.402 Sqn RCAF was abandoned after being hit by flak near Saltan. He was taken prisoner.
Lawler, John
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Lawler, John


Lawrence, Keith
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   Died : 2 / 6 / 2016
Lawrence, Keith

Keith Lawrence was born in New Zealand at Waitara on November 25th 1919. He went to Southland Boys’ High School at Invercargill until leaving in December 1936 when Lawrence went to work in a local bank. In February 1938 Keith Lawrence joined the Civil Reserve of Pilots and was accepted for further pilot training in Britain and sailed in February 1939. In November 1939 Keith Lawrence completed his flying training and joined the newly-formed 234 Squadron. 234 squadron flew Spitfires in early May 1940 in time for the Battle of Britain. Keith Lawrence shared 234's first victory when on 8th July Lawrence shared in the destruction of a Ju88, while attacking a convoy in the Western Approaches. In September Lawrence was posted to 603 Squadron and moved to 421 Flight, which then became 91 Squadron in early 1941. During the Battle of Britain he destroyed two enemy aircraft and damaged four others. Whilst on a weather reconnaissance on 26 November 1940 Lawrence's Spitfire was shot down by Bf109’s, his Spitfire breaking up and throwing him clear to parachute into the sea. Lawrence was picked up by a Royal Navy minesweeper, and having suffered leg and arm injuries he was taken to hospital, returning to 91 squadron 8 weeks later on the 10th of January 1942. On the 17th of February 1942 Lawrence was posted to Malta, where he joined 185 Squadron at the time Malta was going to see some of the hardest fighting. Lawrence became one of Maltas best known squadron commanders. Arriving in February 1942 he flew Hurricanes until Spitfires arrived in May. A New Zealander, Lawrence had flown Spitfires in Britain. He was lucky to survive being shot down on October 26 when his Spitfire disintegrated and he parachuted into the sea with a broken leg and a dislocated arm. Lawrence returned to the UK from Malta in August 1942, returning to operations in Maly 1945, as commanding officer or 124 Squadron flying Spitfire IXs.
Lawrence, N. A.
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   Died : 22 / 8 / 1958
Lawrence, N. A.

Sergeant N.A.Lawrence of No 54 Squadron on the 15th of August he was shot down his Spitfire I (N3097) and crashed in the sea off Dover, he was rescued by the Navy. Unusually, he left the RAF during the war, in mid-1943.
Laws, A. F.
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   Died : 30 / 9 / 1940
Laws, A. F.

Pilot Officer A.F.Laws from No 64 Squadron was killed when his Spitfire I (P9564) collided with another Spitfire I during a patrol on the 30th of September 1940.
Lawson, Walter
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   Died : 8 / 1941
Lawson, Walter


Lazenby, C H
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Lazenby, C H

Taken prisoner on 10th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK892 ZD-C of No.222 Sqn suffered engine failure and crash landed in Normandy.
Leathart, James
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1998
Leathart, James

After flight training, he joined No.54 Squadron flying Gauntlets. He became the commanding officer of No.54 Squadron as they re-equipped with Spitfire MkIs. In a remarkable event, he was awarded the DSO when he rescued the stranded CO of No.74 Sqn. Commandeering a Miles Master training aircraft, he flew to France escorted by other pilots from No.54 Sqn, and rescued the CO before returning across the Channel. It was for this action that he was awarded the DSO in June 1940. Died in 1998.

Citation for the DSO
During May, 1940, this officer led his squadron on a large number of offensive patrols over- Northern France. On one occasion an attack was made on a formation of no less than 60 enemy aircraft. In company with his squadron he has shot down fifteen Messerschmitts, and possibly one Heinkel in and one Junkers 88, during the period mentioned. He also flew a trainer aircraft to Calais Marck aerodrome to rescue a squadron commander who had been shot down there but was uninjured. Whilst taking off, after the rescue, an attack was made by twelve Messerschmitt 109s but with great coolness and skilful evasive tactics Flight Lieutenant Leathart succeeded in shaking off the enemy and landing again without damage. Subsequently, he took off and flew back to England unescorted. This officer has displayed great courage, determination and splendid leadership.
Lecky, J. G.
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   Died : 11 / 10 / 1940
Lecky, J. G.

Pilot Officer J.G.Lecky flew with No 610 Squadron and No 41 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. He died after bailing out of his Spitfire I (P9447) on October 11th 1940 during combat near Maidstone, Kent.
Lee, M. A. W.
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   Died : 31 / 12 / 1940
Lee, M. A. W.

Sergeant M.A.Lee of No 421 Flight was attacked on October 15th 1940. He force landed his Spitfire II (P7444) and he was wounded. The Spitfire was written off, but was repaired at a later date.
Lees DFC, Ronald B.
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Lees DFC, Ronald B.

Wing Commander Ronald B.Lees of No 72 Squadron was wounded on September 2nd 1940 when his Spitfire I (K9840) was damaged in combat and he crashed near Lympne.
Legard, William Ernest
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 1940
Legard, William Ernest

On 2nd January 1940 Flying Spitfire K9835 suffered engine failure near Thornaby airfield, at 10.45hrs the pilot force landed the aircraft on Thornaby airfield. The aircraft airframe was not further damaged but it required a new engine. 41 Squadron were using Thornaby as a forward operating base in their operational patrols of the North Sea. Killed on 1st June 1940 when his Spitfire of No.41 Sqn was shot down over Dunkirk. 29 years old. His body was never found His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Digby and Elaine Legard; husband of Alice Legard, of York.
Leigh, Arthur
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Leigh, Arthur

Another RAFVR pilot, The son of a regular soldier, Arthur Leigh was called up at the outbreak of war. After finishing his flying training he was posted to 7 OTU and then on to convert to Spitfires in August 1940. Arthur Leigh flew with 64 Squadron at Leconfield and 72 Squadron at Biggin Hill during the Battle of Britain before transferring to 611 Squadron. Awarded the DFM in September 1941, Leigh had then completed 50 sweeps, had destroyed two Bf 109s, probably destroyed another four and shared in the destruction of a Do 17. After a spell instructing and ferrying Hurricanes from Gibraltar to Cairo, he returned to operations with 56 Squadron flying Typhoons from Manston. He was shot down on his first sweep by flak, near Calais but was picked up by an ASR launch. In late 1943 Leigh was posted to 129 Squadron at Hornchurch and was awarded the DDC on completing his second tour in December 1944, spending the rest of the war as an instructor.
LeLarge, L M
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LeLarge, L M

On 14th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vc EE723 of No.350 Sqn was hit by flak and he baled out over the English Channel. He was rescued by the Royal Navy.
Libert, P A L G
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Libert, P A L G

Taken prisoner on 10th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH491 of No.349 Sqn suffered engine failure and he baled out over Montdidier.
Likeness, E C
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Likeness, E C

Taken prisoner on 10th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH617 of No.413 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Fw190 near Reims.
Limet, H J R
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Limet, H J R

On 28th April 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH610 GE-Z of No.349 Sqn suffered fuel problems while escorting bombers to Paris. He crash landed his aircraft west of the River Seine and was taken prisoner.
Lincoln, John Abe
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Lincoln, John Abe

Born in 1923, Abe Lincoln joined the RAF in August 1942, spending two years training in India and Rhodesia. After training he was posted back to the UK, flying first Spitfires and then on Typhoons with 175 Squadron. The squadron was by then heavily involved with softening up targets with rockets ahead of the armies advance and close support duties at the front as the allies advanced through France into Germany. He remained with the squadron until the end of the war.
Lindsay, James
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Lindsay, James

Born in September 1922, James "Doug" Lindsay joined the RCAF in February 1941, training on Harvards. He was posted to the UK, arriving in March 1943 and joining 403 Sqn in October that year. In his first tour, he claimed 5 Me109s as well as 2 Fw190s, plus another damaged. Of the Me109s he shot down, three of these were in a single minute, earning him a DFC. For his second tour, he rejoined 403 Sqn in April 1945, claiming a probable Fw190 during his short time with this squadron before he moved to 416 squadron until the end of the war in Europe. After the war he stayed with the air force, and in 1952 served during the Korean war with the USAF. He flew F-86 Sabres with the 39th Fighter Squadron of the 51st Fighter Wing, claiming victories over two MiG-15s and damaging 3 others. In 1953, he returned to the UK with No.1 Fighter Wing leading Sabres in formation at the Queen's Coronation. He retired in 1972, having flown more than 30 different types of aircraft (excluding different Mks). These included, Harvard, Anson, Master, Spitfire, Typhoon, Tempest, Hurricane, Mustang, Beaufort, Beaufighter, Oxford, Dakota, Tiger Moth, Vampire and Sabre.
Lister, R. C. F.
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   Died : 0 / 3 / 1988
Lister, R. C. F.

Squadron Leader R.C.F.Lister took over command of No 41 Squadron from Squadron Leader H.R.L.Hood on September 8th 1940. He was wounded on September 14th 1940 when he baled out of his Spitfire I (R6605) after combat. He was involved in combat again on the 24th of September whilst with No 92 Squadron and this time suffered wounds in the legs. His Spitfire I (X4427) was damaged in the combat but later repaired and flown again.
Litchfield, P.
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   Died : 18 / 7 / 1940
Litchfield, P.

Pilot Officer P.Litchfield from No 610 Squadron was on patrol on July 18th 1940 in a Spitfire I (P9452) when he was shot down North of Calias and killed.
Little, T D
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   Died : 2 / 6 / 1940
Little, T D

F/O TD Little was shot down over Dunkirk on 2nd June 1940 in Spitfire N3055 of 611 Squadron. He is buried in Castricum, Alkmaar, Holland.
Lloyd, J. P.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1971
Lloyd, J. P.

Passed away 1971.
Lloyd, P. D.
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   Died : 15 / 10 / 1940
Lloyd, P. D.

Sergeant P.D.Lloyd of No 41 Squadron was killed on October 15th 1940 when his Spitfire I (X4178) was shot down off the North Kent Coast.
Lock, Eric Stanley
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   Died : 3 / 8 / 1941
Lock, Eric Stanley

Born 19th April 1919, Eric Lock became one of the most famous fighter pilots of the war. Joining No.41 Sqn, he flew Spitfires in the Battle of Britain, but was eventually forced to crash-land his badly damaged Spitfire, and spent a long time recovering from his injuries. Returning to action over France in 1941, he joined No.611 Squadron, again flying Spitfires. On 3rd August 1941, Lock was last seen going in for a ground attack near the Pas-de-Calais, where it is presumed he was shot down and killed. Neither his body or aircraft have ever been found. Lock scored 26.5 victories in total, making him the 8th highest scoring British Ace of the war, despite only living until 1941. He was awarded the DSO, DFC and a Bar to the DFC.

Citation for the DSO

This officer has shown exceptional keenness and courage in his attacks against the enemy. In November, 1940, whilst engaged with his squadron in attacking a superior number of enemy forces, he destroyed two Messerschmitt 109's, thus bringing his total to at least twenty-two. His magnificent fighting spirit and personal example have been in the highest traditions of the service.

Citation for the DFC

This officer has destroyed nine enemy aircraft, eight of these within a period of one week. He has displayed great vigour and determination in pressing home his attacks.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC

In September, 1940, whilst engaged on a patrol over the Dover area, Pilot Officer Lock engaged three Heinkel 113's one of which he shot down into the sea. Immediately afterwards he engaged a Henschel 126 and destroyed it. He has displayed great courage in the face of heavy odds, and his skill and coolness in combat have enabled him to destroy fifteen enemy aircraft within a period of nineteen days.
Lofts, K. T.
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Lofts, K. T.

Pilot Officer K.T.Lofts of No 249 Squadron crash landed his Hurricane I (V6566) at West Malling after combat on September 15th 1940. The aircraft was later repaired. Lofts survived when he force landed his Hurricane I (V6878) again, near Tenterdern, Kent after combat with a Bf 109 on the 16th of October 1940. The aircraft was also repaired.
Lojek., K.
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   Died : 6 / 1 / 1944
Lojek., K.

Killed on 6th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb P8744 PK-B was shot down by fighters of JG2 near Le Mesnil. Three German pilots claimed Spitfires at this time in this location. They were Oberfeldwebel Willi Stratmann, Oberfeldwebel Meindl and Oberfeldwebel Karl-Heinz Munsche.
Love, Lawrence Wyman
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   Died : 17 / 6 / 1944
Love, Lawrence Wyman

Killed on 17th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ384 of No.412 Sqn RCAF went missing over the Normandy beaches. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery.
Lovell, A. D. J.
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   Died : 17 / 8 / 1945
Lovell, A. D. J.

Flight Officer A.D.J.Lovell from No 41 Squadron was shot down while on patrol over Dover on the 28th of July 1940 in a Spitfire I (P9429), he crash landed at Hornchurch and was wounded. On September 5th 1940 Lovell baled out of his Spitfire I (R6885) after combat over the Thames Estuary.
Lovell, Derek
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Lovell, Derek

Volunteered for the RAFVR in January 1941. He trained in Canada on Tiger Moths and Oxfords. He received his wings in April 1942 and was posted to Central Flying School. Following graduation, he taught Fleet Air Arm trainees on Harvards. He returned to the UK in March 1943 and flew Masters at AFU and Hurricanes at OTU. He taught Lancaster crews fighter evasion prior to posting to 84 GSU to fly Typhoons. He joined 197 Squadron at Needs Oar Point in the New Forest in June 1944 and was involved in close support operations and tactical dive bombing and low level bombing throughout the Normandy campaign and on through to VE-Day. He completed 135 operations and in August 1945 was posted to an OTU to instruct on Typhoons and Tempest Vs. He was demobbed in June 1946 and flew weekends in the VR on Tiger Moths and later Chipmunks. He was called up on the G Reserve in July 1951 and flew Harvards, Spitfire XXIIs and then Vampire Vs. He stood down in September as the Korea situation eased.
Loving, George
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Loving, George

George Loving first saw combat in 1943, and flew over 100 missions in Spitfires before the 31st Fighter Group converted to the P-51. He took part in air battles over Italy, France, Germany and many other European countries while serving in the Mediterranean Theater, becoming an Ace in the P-51. During the Korean War he commanded an F-80 Squadron flying 113 missions against the North Koreans and Chinese communist forces before retiring to the U.S.A. as a test pilot. He retired in 1979 as Commander, 5th Air Force in Japan.
Lucas, Laddie
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1998
Lucas, Laddie

Laddie Lucas rose in two years from Aircraftman 2nd class to Command no. 249, the top scoring fighter squadron in the Battle of Malta in 1942. He was then 26. Lucas led two Spitfire squadrons and in 1943 a wing on the Western Front. 1944 switching to Mosquitoes of the 2nd tactical air force. After the war he was a conservative MP for ten years. He was also one of Britains best amateur golfers, captaining Cambridge University, England in the Walker Cup, Great Britain and Ireland against the United States, to date he has written eleven books. Sadly Laddie Lucas passed away in 1998.
Luczyszyn, E
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Luczyszyn, E

On 22nd June 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX ML257 of No.303 Sqn force landed in France. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair, but Luczyszyn was unharmed.
Lundberg, S T
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Lundberg, S T

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ832 DN-T of No.416 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak while attacking a train and he baled out.
Lundsten, L
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   Died : 9 / 6 / 1944
Lundsten, L

Killed on 9th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK966 FN-M of No.331 Sqn was shot down by US Navy anti-aircraft fire near Isigny.
Lynch, John
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Lynch, John


Lynch, Joseph
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Lynch, Joseph


Macdonald, D. K.
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   Died : 28 / 8 / 1940
Macdonald, D. K.

Pilot Officer D.K.MacDonald of No 603 Squadron was shot down in his Spitfire I (L1046) near Dover and killed on August 28th 1940.
Macdonald, H. K.
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   Died : 28 / 9 / 1940
Macdonald, H. K.

Flight Lieutenant H.K.MacDonald of No 603 Squadron was shot down on September 28th 1940 in his Spitfire I (L1076) near Gillingham, Kent. He was killed.
Macgregor, A. N.
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Macgregor, A. N.


Machaeek, J.
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   Died : 8 / 7 / 1941
Machaeek, J.

Pilot Officer J.Machaeeck a Czech flew with No 310 and No 145 Squadron. Whilst with 145 he was shot down in his Hurricane I (V7337) on October 15th 1940. He baled out over Christchurch with minor wounds. He had been flying as 'Tail end Charlie'. His Hurricane crashed near New Milton. J.Machaeeck was killed when his Spitfire Va (R7128) was shot down on July 8th 1941.
Mackie, Evan
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   Died : 28 / 4 / 1986
Mackie, Evan


MacLennan, Ian R
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MacLennan, Ian R

Canadian Ian Maclennan joined the RCAF in October 1940, arriving in England in August 1941. He joined 610 Squadron in February 1942, then 401 Sqn, where he destroyed an Fw190. Posted to Malta, he flew his Spitfire off HMS Eagle on 9th June, and shortly after transferred to 1435 Flight. On Malta he claimed 7 victories and was awarded the DFM. He was commissioned, becoming a flight commander in November. In December he returned to England. In February 1944 he joined 433 Squadron as a flight commander. On 7th June his Spitfire Mk.IX MH850 2I-H was hit by ground fire whilst covering the Normandy beaches, crash landed west of Cabourg, and he was taken prisoner.
Macleod, Henry Wallace
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1944
Macleod, Henry Wallace

On 27 September 1944, McLeod was leading a section of six aircraft of his squadron on high patrol as part of the fighter Wing led by Wing Commander James "Johnnie" Johnson over Nijmegen, Netherlands During the action McLeod went missing. Johnson made repeated calls over the R/T, but McLeod did not answer. After landing, Johnson could see his friend had not returned. Johnson questioned the rest of the pilots and one reported seening Wally chasing a lone Messerschmitt Knowing McLeod's character, Johnson believed he would have attacked regardless of the enemy fighter's advantage: I feel certain that he wouldn't have let go of the 109 until the issue had been decided one way or the other. There was no other aircraft in the area [that Johnson had seen] and they must have fought it out together, probably above the cloud. To start with he would have been at a disadvantage, for the 109 was already several thousand feet higher I think the Messerschmitt got him. It was always all or nothing for Wally Remains of his Spitfire IX (NH425) were discovered in September 1949. McLeod was still in the wreckage of his Spitfire, in the outskirts of Wesel, near Duisburg, just inside the German border. He was buried in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery at Rheinberg McLeod may have been shot down by Major Siegfried Freytag of Jagdgeschwader 77 flying a Bf 109, who claimed on this day, the only Spitfire shot down in the Duisburg area near Wesel for his 101st victory
MacLeod, J A
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MacLeod, J A

On 22nd June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.V BM233 of No.402 Sqn RCAF was damaged by Allied anti-aircraft fire. He was unharmed, but the aircraft never returned to a squadron again.
Magee, John Gillespie
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   Died : 13 / 12 / 1941
Magee, John Gillespie

John Magee joined the RCAF as an American volunteer in 1940 and spent most of the following year training in Canada. After obtaining his wings in mid 1941, he was transferred to South Wales, via the Personnel Reception Centre at Bournemouth, for some final training. Shortly afterwards he was assigned to active service in the newly formed,Number 412 RCAF Fighter Squadron, based at Digby, Lincolnshire. He was killed in a mid-air collision during practice maneuvers on December 13th, 1941 at the age of 19, while flying Spitfire coded VZ-H, serial number AD291. He had taken off with other members of 412 Squadron from RAF Wellingore (near Navenby & RAF Digby, and about three miles northwest of RAF Cranwell), which has now reverted to agriculture. The aircraft was involved in a mid-air collision with an Airspeed Oxford trainer from Cranwell, flown by Leading Aircraftman Ernest Aubrey Griffin. The two aircraft collided just below the cloud base at about 1,400 feet AGL, at 11:30, over the hamlet of Roxholme, which lies between RAF Cranwell and RAF Digby, in Lincolnshire. Magee was descending at high speed through a break in the clouds with three other aircraft. At the inquiry afterwards a farmer testified that he saw the Spitfire pilot struggling to push back the canopy.[2] The pilot stood up to jump from the plane but was too close to the ground for his parachute to open, and died on impact. Griffin was also killed.
Mahon, Jackson
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Mahon, Jackson


Maines, George
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   Died : 11 / 6 / 1944
Maines, George

Killed aged 26 on 11th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX BS167 9R-N of No.229 Sqn crashed on the Isle of Wight in fog. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of William Craig Mains and Mary Mains; husband of Mary Mains, of Glasgow.
Malam, Adolf
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   Died : 17 / 9 / 1963
Malam, Adolf

He learned to fly in the Tiger Moth at an elementary flying school near Bristol, flying for the first time on 6 January 1936. Commissioned an acting pilot officer on 2 March, he completed training by the end of the year, and was sent to join 74 Squadron on 20 December 1936. He was confirmed as a pilot officer on 6 January 1937, and was appointed to acting flight commander of "A" Flight, flying Spitfires, in August. He was promoted to acting flying officer on 20 May 1938 and promoted to substantive flying officer on 6 July. He received another promotion to acting flight lieutenant on 2 March 1939, six months before the outbreak of war. No. 74 Squadron saw its first action only 15 hours after war was declared, sent to intercept a bomber raid that turned out to be returning RAF planes. On 6 September 1939, "A" Flight was scrambled to intercept a suspected enemy radar track and ran into the Hurricanes of No. 56 Squadron RAF. Believing 56 to be the enemy, Malan ordered an attack. Paddy Byrne and John Freeborn downed two RAF aircraft, killing one officer, Montague Hulton-Harrop, in this friendly fire incident, which became known as the Battle of Barking Creek. At the subsequent courts-martial, Malan denied responsibility for the attack. He testified for the prosecution against his own pilots stating that Freeborn had been irresponsible, impetuous, and had not taken proper heed of vital communications. This prompted Freeborn's counsel, Sir Patrick Hastings to call Malan a bare-faced liar. Hastings was assisted in defending the pilots by Roger Bushell, the London barrister and RAF Auxiliary pilot who later led the Great Escape from Stalag Luft III. The court ruled the entire incident was an unfortunate error and acquitted both pilots. Events soon overtook the squadron. After fierce fighting over Dunkirk during the evacuation of Dunkirk on 28 June 1940, Malan was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross having achieved five 'kills'. During this battle he first exhibited his fearless and implacable fighting spirit. In one incident he was able to coolly change the light bulb in his gunsight while in combat and then quickly return to the fray. During the night of 19/20 June Malan flew a night sortie in bright moonlight and shot down two Heinkel He-111 bombers, a then unique feat for which a bar to his DFC was awarded. On 6 July, he was promoted to the substantive rank of flight lieutenant. Malan and his senior pilots also decided to abandon the "vic" formation used by the RAF, and turned to a looser formation (the "finger-four") similar to the four aircraft Schwarm the Luftwaffe had developed during the Spanish Civil War. Legend has it that on 28 July he met Werner Mölders in combat, damaging his plane and wounding him, but failing to bring him down. Recent research has suggested however that Mölders was wounded in a fight with No. 41 Squadron RAF. On 8 August, Malan was given command of 74 Squadron and promoted to acting squadron leader. This was at the height of the Battle of Britain. Three days later, on 11 August, action started at 7 am when 74 was sent to intercept a raid near Dover, but this was followed by another three raids, lasting all day. At the end of the day, 74 had claimed to have shot down 38 aircraft, and was known from then on as "Sailor's August the Eleventh". Malan himself simply commented, "thus ended a very successful morning of combat." He received a bar to his DFC on 13 August. On the ground, Malan was remembered as an inveterate gambler and often owed his subordinates money. Malan was older than most of his charges and although sociable and relaxed off-duty, he spent most of his time with his wife and family living near Biggin Hill. He would soon develop a routine of flying the first sortie of the day and then handing the squadron to a subordinate while he stayed on the ground to do paperwork. Despite frosty relations after the Battle of Barking Creek he would often give command of the squadron to John Freeborn (himself an ace of note), showing Malan's ability to keep the personal and professional separate. Malan commanded 74 Squadron with strict discipline and did not suffer fools gladly, and could be high-handed with sergeant pilots (many non-commissioned pilots were joining the RAF at this time). He could also be reluctant to hand out decorations, and he had a strict yardstick by which he would make recommendations for medals: six kills confirmed for a DFC, twelve for a bar to the DFC; eighteen for a DSO On 24 December, Malan received the Distinguished Service Order, and on 22 July 1941, a bar to the Order. On 10 March 1941 he was appointed as one of the first wing leaders for the offensive operations that spring and summer, leading the Biggin Hill Wing until mid August, when he was rested from operations. He finished his active fighter career in 1941 with 27 kills destroyed, 7 shared destroyed and 2 unconfirmed, 3 probables and 16 damaged, at the time the RAF's leading ace, and one of the highest scoring pilots to have served wholly with Fighter Command during World War II. He was transferred to the reserve as a squadron leader on 6 January 1942. After tours to the USA and the Central Gunnery School, Malan was promoted to temporary wing commander on 1 September 1942 and became station commander at Biggin Hill, receiving a promotion to war substantive wing commander on 1 July 1943. ] Malan remained keen to fly on operations, often ignoring standing orders for station commanders not to risk getting shot down. In October 1943 he became officer commanding 19 Fighter Wing, RAF Second Tactical Air Force, then commander of the 145 (Free French) Fighter Wing in time for D-day, leading a section of the wing over the beaches during the late afternoon.
Malan, A. G.
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   Died : 17 / 9 / 1963
Malan, A. G.

Passed away 17th September 1963
Malinoswky, E
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Malinoswky, E

On 12th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX Ml130 of No.317 Sqn suffered engine failure and crash landed at Colombieres. He returned safely to his squadron three days later.
Mamedoff, Andrew
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   Died : 8 / 10 / 1941
Mamedoff, Andrew

Pilot Officer Andrew Mamedoff was an American and had originally planned and even signed up to fight for Finland against Russia, but arrived in Europe too late for that war. He spent time in France, before moving to England on the last ship from the port of St Jean-de-Luz, this led to him joining the R.A.F. He was accepted and on the 5th of July went to 7 O.T.U. Hawarden. He was later posted to fly with No 609 Squadron on August 8th 1940 and became operational on the 16th of August on his first patrol encountered the enemy. He was involved in combat before transferring on September 18th 1940 to help form the No 71 'Eagle' Squadron at Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lincoinshire. On 8 October 1941, Mamedoff was flying with 133 Squadron on a standard transit flight from Fowlmere Airfield to RAF Eglinton in Northern Ireland in his Hurricane Z3781. The wreckage of his plane was found near Maughold on the Isle of Man and it is thought that he crashed due to poor weather conditions. His body was later recovered for burial at Brookwood Military Cemetery in Surrey
Mann, J
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   Died : 0 / 0 / ?
Mann, J

Sergeant H.Jackie Mann of No 64 Squadron was shot on August 9th 1940. He had a cannon shell jam in the control column of his Spitfire I but managed to force-land at Kenly, suffering minor burns.
Manton, E.
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   Died : 29 / 8 / 1940
Manton, E.

Sergeant E.Manton of No 610 Squadron was shot down on August 29th in his Spitfire I over Mayfield and killed.
Maranda, Joseph Cyril Robert
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   Died : 8 / 6 / 1944
Maranda, Joseph Cyril Robert

Killed on 8th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ929 of No.416 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak while on a Normandy beach patrol and crashed into the sea.
Marek, F.
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   Died : 14 / 9 / 1940
Marek, F.

Sergeant F.Marek of No.310 Squadron was killed on September 14th 1940.
Marples, Roy
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   Died : 26 / 4 / 1944
Marples, Roy

Killed aged 24 on 26th April 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK360 of 145 Wing collided with Spitfire Mk.IX MK346 5A-T of No.329 Sqn flown by Sergeant-Chef A Alligier while returning from a sweep over Mons. A Alligier was injured. He is buried in Chichester cemetery. Son of Percy Salisbury Marples and Elizabeth Marie Louise Marples; husband of Kathleen Gladys Victoria Marples, of Cambridge.
Marriott, J T
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Marriott, J T

On 13th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK326 of No.442 Sqn RCAF caught fire after being hit by flak and he was rescued after he baled out 10 miles off Beachy Head.
Marshall, Norman
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Marshall, Norman

Killed aged 27 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK902 of No.401 Sqn RCAF was shot down by an enemy fighter and crashed at Banville-la-Compagne. He is buried in Banneville-la-Campagne War Cemetery. Son of Alexander and Marjorie C. Marshall, of London, Ontario. Canada.
Mather, John Romney
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   Died : 27 / 10 / 1940
Mather, John Romney

On 5th September 1940, his Spitfire Mk.Ia N3029 of No.66 Sqn was shot down (presumably force landed) and he was unharmed. On 18th September 1940, his Spitfire Mk.Ia R6925 of No.66 Sqn was damaged by enemy fighters and he successfully baled out over the Thames estuary. He was killed aged 25 on October 27th 1940 when his Spitfire Mk.IIa P7539 of No.66 Sqn was shot down by an Me109 near Tunbridge Wells. He is buried in Ifield Churchyard. Son of Richard and Marie Charlotte Louise Grace Amelie Mather, of Ifield, husband of Peggy Mather.
Maunders, G R
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Maunders, G R

On 11th April 1944 his No.64 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX BL581 was shot down during a night patrol by the Me410 of 5./KG51 flown by Hauptmann Dietrich Puttfarken. He managed to bale out near Coltishall and was ok.
May, Alexander Davidson
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   Died : 6 / 6 / 1944
May, Alexander Davidson

Killed on 6th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK751 SK-T ran out of fuel following combat with Ju88s. He baled out but his parachute failed. His name ids on the Runnymede Memorial.
May, J T
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May, J T

On 20th January 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII EN227 of No.91 Sqn was damaged in a collision with Spitfire Mk.XII EN606 on landing at Tangmere. Subsequently, one of these aircraft was then in collision with Spitfire Mk.XII EN615. Both EN615 and EN227 were damaged, while EN606 was written off.
May, Peter
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May, Peter

Peter May was under training as a pilot in the Civil Air Guard at Weston Super Mare on the 3d September 1939 and was immediately accepted for further training with the RAF at Downing College, Cambridge. In June 1940 he was posted to a holding unit at Hernswell, near Lincoln, from which Hampden aircraft were employed in dropping leaflets over Germany. This aerodrome was subjected to one of the first, possibly the first, bombing raid on England by the Germans. Peter went solo on a Magister monoplane at Kingsdown Aerodrome, Chester on the 26 th June 1940. On the 1st July he suffered an engine failure over the Solway Firth, but managed to force land safely. As a reward for this safe landing he was one of six fortunate pupils on the Course of 52 to be selected for training as fighter pilots. His first solo flight in a Spitfire 1 at Hawardene Operational Unit, was on the 10th December 1940. A few days later flying over Liverpool in poor visibility, the engine failed. He decided to pancake in the Mersey but fortunately at the last minute he saw a field alongside. By using his emergency pressure bottle to lower the undercarriage quickly he managed to force land safely. Spitfire 1 aircraft undercarriage had to be raised and lowered manually. In January 1941 with only 20 hours experience on Spitfires he was posted to Sailor Malan's 74 Squadron based at Biggin Hill and later at Manston. This squadron was engaged in protecting the Channel convoys, the south-coast radar stations and the Lysanders on rescue missions over the North Sea. Returning from operational patrol over the Channel on the 21st April 1941, Peter crash-landed at Manston Aerodrome. he was taken to Margate General Hospital suffering from concussion and a broken leg. During the latter part of 1941 Peter was appointed Aerodrome Control Pilot at Manston and recommenced flying non-operationaily in December 1941. In June 1942 he moved to No. 1 Squadron at Tangmere, flying Hurricanes and mainly engaged in sweeps over France. In July it was decided to convert No. 1 squadron into a Night Fighter Squadron. As Peter's nightflying experience was limited he was sent on a Beam Approach Course at Watchfield. Peter was commissioned in 1943 and in 1944 was appointed C.O. of a Communications Flight on the island of Orkney. In July 1945 he joined 286 Hurricane Squadron at Weston Zoyland, Somerset, flying mostly at night. His completed his flying career as Naval Liaison Officer with 667 Squadron at Gosport, flying Spitfire XV1 s. Peter amassed 1687 flying hours, including 110 in Spitfires and 55 in Hurricanes.
May, Walter Le
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May, Walter Le

Flight Lieutenant Walter Le May DFC joined the R.A.F. in 1941,and trained as an Observer in Canada, joining 140 Squadron, Army Co-operation Command, at Hartford Bridge (now Blackbushe). The squadron, engaged on photo- reconnaissance, was unique in that one flight was equipped with Spitfires while a second flight, converting from Blenheims to Lockheed Venturas, was used for night operations. In June 1943 the squadron became part of the 34 Wing 2nd Tactical Air Force, and later converted to Mosquito 1X & XV1. Mainly involved in night operations, he, with his pilot, F/Lt Ray Batenburg DFC, R.N.Z.A.F., crossed the French coast a few minutes after midnight on D-Day, and took photographs of key points, followed by nearly 2 hours of low-level visual reconnaissance, at heights down to 200 feet. After operational flying he was appointed Night Ops. Controller 34 Wing, and, afterwards Ops. Controller at H.Q. 2 Group, Gutersloh.
McAdam, J.
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   Died : 20 / 2 / 1941
McAdam, J.

Sergeant J.McAdam of No 41 Squadron was shot down in his Spitfire I (N3118) off Dover and baled out on September 24th 1940 following combat. He was later rescued from the Channel.
Mcarthur, J. H. G.
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Mcarthur, J. H. G.

Flight Lieutenant J.H.G.McArthur flew Spitfire's with No 609 Squadron.
McColpin, Carroll
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   Died : 28 / 11 / 2003
McColpin, Carroll

Carroll Warren McColpin was born in Buffalo, New York on November 15th 1914 and was raised and educated in Los Angeles. Carroll McColpin participated in civilian flying activities in Los Angeles, he started to learn to fly in 1928 and in 1936 obtained his pilots certificate. As a young man, he had built his own airplane and taught himself the basics of stick flying and aerial acrobatics by the age of sixteen. Carroll Red McColpin volunteered for the RAF in 1940 despite official US disapproval, going via Canada to England. After serving with No.607 Squadron, he became the second Eagle Ace after shooting down two ME-109s on October 2, 1941 and is the only pilot known to have fought in aerial combat to a draw - with Werner Molders, the high-scoring German Ace. Red McColpin commanded 133 Eagle Squadron up to the transfer to the USAAF in September, 1942, General McColpin was the only American to fly combat in all three RAF American Eagle Squadrons. His total missions in these Squadrons exceeded three hundred counting the ones he flew with the 607. He was a double ace before Pearl Harbor and was the first American to be decorated, in Buckingham Palace by King George during World War II. McColpin joined the 4th Figher Group. He later led the 404th Fighter Group in support of the D-Day invasion and the drive across Europe. In 400 missions, he recorded 11.5 victories and collected 29 awards for gallantry. Following the war, McColpin remained in the Air Force, serving in several command and senior staff positions, ultimately becoming the commander of the 4th Air Force. He retired as a Major General in August, 1968. Sadley Major General Carroll Warren McColpin passed away on November 28, 2003.
McCorkle, Charles
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   Died : 24 / 8 / 2009
McCorkle, Charles


McDonald, Norman
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McDonald, Norman


McKay, D. G.
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McKay, D. G.

On 28th January 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ302 of No.412 Sqn RCAF suffered enhine failure over the English Channel and he baled out. He was picked up by a Walrus of Air Sea Rescue.
McKellar, Archie
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   Died : 2 / 11 / 1940
McKellar, Archie

Born 10th April 1912. Joined No.602 Sqn City of Glasgow flying Spitfires and Hurricanes. Has at least part claim to the first British air victory of the war, and is credited with shooting down the first aircraft to fall on British soil since 1918. In all, he scored 21 victories before being killed when his Hurricane plunged into a field in Kent. He was awarded the DSO and DFC with Bar, the citations for which follow :

Citation for the DFC

This officer has at all times displayed the keenest desire to engage the enemy. In his first large-scale encounter against enemy aircraft he displayed a great sense of leadership and tactics in launching his flight against ninety Heinkel m's. As a result, at least four enemy aircraft were destroyed, of which Flight Lieutenant McKellar destroyed three. He has displayed outstanding leadership and courage.

Citation for the Bar to the DFC

During a period of eight days in the defence of London, Flight Lieutenant McKellar has destroyed eight hostile aircraft, bringing his total to twelve. He displays an excellent fighting spirit, is a particularly brilliant tactician and has led his squadron with skill and resource.

Citation for the DSO

This officer has led his squadron with outstanding courage and determination. He has destroyed 20 enemy aircraft, and his magnificent fighting spirit has proved an excellent inspiration to his fellow pilots.
McKennon, Pierce
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McKennon, Pierce


McLachlan, Percy Alan
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   Died : 5 / 5 / 1944
McLachlan, Percy Alan

Killed on 5th May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ473 of No.441 Sqn RCAF was shot down by the Fw190 of Feldwebel Peter Crump of 7./JG26 during a sweep to Lille. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
McLaughlin, Murry
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McLaughlin, Murry


McLean, James Johnston
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   Died : 12 / 6 / 1944
McLean, James Johnston

Died aged 20 on 12th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK567 SK-Q of No.165 Sqn suffered engine failure and he baled out 70 miles south of Start Point. He was seen to climb into his dinghy but was never recovered. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of David William and Lizzie McLean, of Te Papapa, Auckland, New Zealand; husband of Olive Claire McLean, of Epsom, Auckland.
McPharlin, M
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McPharlin, M


Meadows, J R
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Meadows, J R

On 10th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vc EE685 of No.130 Sqn was hit by anti-aircraft fire from Allied warships and crash landed on the beach head at Normandy. He was uninjured. , but the aircraft was damaged beyond reapir.
Measures, W. E. G.
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Measures, W. E. G.

Flight Lieutenant W.E.G. 'Tink' Measures joined No 74 Squadron in July 1937 from R.A.F. Cranwell. He then flew Spitfire I's with them and also flew Hurricane's with No 238 Squadron during the Battle of Britain.
Meier, Augustin
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   Died : 21 / 5 / 1944
Meier, Augustin

Killed on 21st May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK116 NN-O of No.310 Sqn ditched into the English Channel after the engine cut out. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Husband of L.A.C.W. E. F. Meier, W.A.A.F.
Mencel, Jurek
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Mencel, Jurek

Flying with the French Air Force he fought in the Battle of France but was hospitalised after breaking his back in a crash in mid-1940. Returning to operations with 317 Polish Sqn, his first mission was on Spitfires escorting the RAF Bombers taking part in the engagement that lead to the German ‘Channel Dash’. He flew Spitfires throughout the Normandy Invasion also flying Hurricanes and Mustangs with 308 and 309 Sqn’s scoring victories against Me109's and Me108's and on the 9th April 1945 he shot down an Me262 Jet over Hamburg.
Mermagen, H. W.
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Mermagen, H. W.

Passed away.
Merrick, C.
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Merrick, C.

Pilot Officer C.Merrick joined No 610 Squadron on July 27th 1940. Merrick was injured when his Spitfire I (L1037) was shot down on August 24th 1940 and he crash landed at Fyfield. He didn't fly again during the Battle. Merrick was awarded the D.F.C. on July 14th 1944. He was a pilot of a paratrooper transport in the Caen area of Normandy on the night of the 5th of June 1944. He was awared the Bronze Star (US) on October 30th 1945 for his part in this mission.
Middlemiss, Robert G
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Middlemiss, Robert G

Bob was born in Montreal in 1920 and was educated at Commercial High School of Montreal. After graduating from high school Bob Middlemiss accepted a track scholarship from an American College but war broke out and he volunteered to join the RCAF. He was told when an opening was available he would be called. In the interim, his Dad's Regiment, of which he was the RQSM, the 17th Duke of York's Royal Canadian Hussars was mobilized as the 3rd Canadian Motorcycle Regiment. Bob decided to join as a trooper but was called by the Air Force and a few months later joined the RCAF on September 14, 1940. He received his flying training at 13 EFTS, St. Eugene, ON and 9 SFTS, Summerside, PEI where he received his wings. He was posted overseas and trained on Spitfires at 57 OTU, Hawarden, Cheshire. He was posted to 145 Squadron and then later to 41 Squadron. They carried out operations consisting of air defence patrols against high level and low level fighter bomber attacks, convoy patrols in the English Channel, fighter sweeps, bomber escort and low level rhubarbs. In June 1942, he was selected to serve with a team of Spitfire pilots posted to Malta. They were taken to within 700 miles of Malta on the aircraft carrier HMS Eagle and then launched to hopefully make the island. During his tour with 249 Squadron on Malta Bob shot down and destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged two others before he was shot down and wounded. After recuperating, he served as an Instructor at 52 OTU and then 53 OTU in England. From the OTU he was posted to 403 Squadron, part of the 127 Wing commanded by Johnnie Johnson, the highest scoring ace of WWII. Bob had the honour of flying as his number 2 on a number of sorties. After completing two tours of operations he returned to Canada and instructed on Hurricanes and Mosquitos. Colonel Middlemiss was decorated for his war effort with the Distinguished Flying Cross the citation read as follows:
This officer completed two tours of operational duty and has completed sorties from Malta and the United Kingdom. He has destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged others. His standard of leadership as a section leader and flight commander has always been high and he has invariably shown outstanding courage.
Miejnecky, F
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Miejnecky, F

On 23rd March 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ893 of No.312 Sqn was damaged in a force landing at Manston after combat with Fw190 near Ostend.
Mills, Henry
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Mills, Henry


Mills, S A
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Mills, S A

On 15th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ831 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and abandoned near Amiens. He baled out successfully but was taken prisoner.
Miluck, Michael
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Miluck, Michael

American volunteer Michael Miluck arrived in the UK in September 1941, and was posted to join 71 Eagle Squadron. Flying Spitfire Mk Vbs the squadron was engaged in escort and offensive fighter sweeps over the channel and northern France, taking part in the air cover over Dieppe. Later he flew Hurricanes with 250 Squadron.
Mitchell, G. T. M.
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   Died : 11 / 7 / 1940
Mitchell, G. T. M.

Pilot Officer G.T.M.Mitchell from No 609 Squadron was killed when he was shot down while in combat with ME109 of JG27at 18.25 off Portland on July 11th 1940 whilst on convoy patrol in his Spitfire (L1095). His body was later washed ashore.
Moberley, G. E.
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   Died : 26 / 8 / 1940
Moberley, G. E.

Flight Officer G.E.Moberley from No 616 Squadron was killed on August 26th 1940 when he was shot down over Dover. His Spitfire I (N3275) crashed near Eastchurch, Kent.
Moffat-Wilson, Donald
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   Died : 12 / 6 / 1944
Moffat-Wilson, Donald

Killed aged 21 on 12th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK471 SK-N of No.165 Sqn was hit by flak 10 miles west of Lamballe, crash landed and burst into flames. He is buried in Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Guy Burgo Moffat-Wilson and Edith Moffat-Wilson, of Dublin, Irish Republic. His father and brother were also killed during military service in World War Two.
Molland, Leland
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Molland, Leland


Moody, Vincent Kenneth
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   Died : 12 / 6 / 1944
Moody, Vincent Kenneth

Killed aged 24 on 12th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII MD123 of No.131 Sqn was shot down by flak over Le Mans airfield during combat with Me109s. He is buried in Yvre L'Eveque Communal Cemetery. Son of Fred and Louise Moody, of West Middle Sable, Clare Co., Nova Scotia, Canada.
Moore, Eric
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Moore, Eric

Originally serving in the Army, he was involved in the Battle of Dunkirk before volunteering for the RAF in 1941 and joining 501 Sqn on Spitfires. Spending time in the Middle East and West Africa, he also spent time with 601 Sqn
Moreau, J
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Moreau, J

On 21st April 1944, after a dive bombing mission to Abbeville, he abandoned his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ962 of No.349 Sqn 20 miles south of Beachy Head and was rescued by Air Sea Rescue.
Morgan, R G
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   Died : 9 / 2 / 1944
Morgan, R G

Killed on 9th February 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MH480 TM-U on loan to No.504 Sqn from No.129 Sqn crashed near Petersfield after a dogfight with enemy aircraft.
Morris, J E
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Morris, J E

On 17th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.VII MD166 of No.131 Sqn failed to return from a shipping reconnaissance mission to Lezardrieux. He successfully evaded capture.
Morrogh-Ryan, Oliver Bertram
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   Died : 26 / 7 / 1941
Morrogh-Ryan, Oliver Bertram

Pilot on Spitfires in the Battle of Britain with No.41 Sqn. Killed aged 22 on July 26th 1941 whn his Beaufighter Mk.Ic T3354 of No.68 Sqn collided in bad weather with The Wrekin hill in Shropshire during a training flight. He is buried in Barton Churchyard. Son of Leonard and Laura Morrogh-Ryan; husband of Marguerite Morrogh-Ryan, of Brettanby Manor.
Mortimer-Rose, Edward Brian
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   Died : 28 / 1 / 1943
Mortimer-Rose, Edward Brian

dward Mortimer-Rose was born in Littleport, Cambridgeshire, he was granted a short service commission in the RAF on 15th April 1939 as Acting P/O on probation. He was graded as P/O on 6th November 1939 and posted to 234 Squadron on its reformation around the same date. On 26th October 1940 P/O Mortimer-Rose was in combat with a Ju88 off Land's End and made a forced landing at Breage, near Porthleven. He was unhurt and his aircraft was only slightly damaged. He was awarded the DFC (Gazetted on 6th June 1941) for service during the Battle of Britain and in the months after for shooting down many enemy aircraft. Later in 1941 he was posted to the Middle East HQ and in December 1941 arrived at 249 Squadron in Malta to command, he was awarded the Bar to the DFC (Gazetted on 12th December 1941). He was injured in the foot in late December 1941 and before he was fit to fly again he was posted to command 185 Squadron on 23rd February 1942. He returned to flying in March 1942 but on 24th March 1942 he was seriously injured manning ground defence guns at Hal Far airfield which was bombed. After recovering he was posted to 111 Squadron in December 1942. On 28th January 1943 F/Lt Mortimer-Rose DFC & Bar was killed in a flying accident when flying with 111 Squadron in Tunisia. His Spitfire collided with W/C George Gilroy's as they took off from Souk el Khemis. Gilroy survived. He is buried in Medjez-El-Bab War Cemetery, Tunisia. He had over ten enemy aircraft to his name at his death and was only twenty two years old.
Morton, Butch
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Morton, Butch

Bob Morton has the honour of a nickname personally bestowed on him by Bader, apparently referring to his modest 5 foot 3 inch height! Like Bader he was shot down over St Omer, on July 9 1941, a month before the Wing Leader. Joining the RAFVR just before the outbreak of war, Morton unusually, did his elementary flying training on Blackburn B2s which he considered far superior to Tiger Moths. After conversion to Spitfires he was posted to 74 Squadron, but in spite of valiant efforts he was not able to operate during the Battle of Britain, transferring to 616 in September 1940. Douglas Bader led the Tangmere Wing from March 1941, always flying with 616 Squadron. Morton clearly remembers Baders invigorating leadership style, but as a young Sergeant Pilot he had little personal contact with him.
Morton, J. S.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1982
Morton, J. S.

Pilot Officer J.S.Morton of No 603 Squadron was on patrol on October 5th 1940 when his Spitfire I (K9807) was shot down over Dover. He baled out but suffered burns.
Mottram, Roy
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1941
Mottram, Roy

Pilot Officer Roy Mottram from No 92 Squadron was wounded when he crashed and burned his Spitfire I (N3193) after combat September 18th 1940 over Hollingbourne, Kent. Mottram was killed in action in a Spitfire V on the 31st of August 1941 flying with No 54 Squadron on a fighter sweep over France. He is buried at Merville, France.
Mould, Bill
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Mould, Bill

After joining 213 Sqn as a pilot he flew Hurricanes and Spitfires over France and Germany. In July 1944 he moved to 112 Sqn operating from Italy flying the P-40 and P-51 Mustang, completing a total of 100 operations. He was shot down on a mission over Croatia but evaded capture and was able to return to the unit in Italy.
Mould, E. A.
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   Died : 20 / 1 / 1943
Mould, E. A.

Sergeant E.A.'Tony' Mould of No 74 Squadron was flying patrol over France and was brought down on May 25th 1940, he returned to England by boat. He made a forced landing on the 10th of July 1940 after sustaining battle damage to his Spitfire (P9446) whilst attacking Dorniers escorted by fighters over a convoy near Dover. Mould was wounded when he baled out after being shot down off Dover on July 28th 1940 in his Spitfire I (P9336).
Moulden, A R
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Moulden, A R

On 22nd May 1944, he returned safely after his Spitfire Mk.IX ML187 of No.127 Sqn was damaged by flak.
Mount, Mickey
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   Died : 4 / 8 / 2002
Mount, Mickey

Flying Officer C.J Mount joined NO.602 squadron on August 8th 1940 after a brief conversion course on Spitfires. On August 18th his Spitfire L1005 was severely damaged in combat with JU 87s and BF109s over Ford. Micky was unhurt. he again escaped injury when his Spitfire X4270 was damaged landing at Tangmere. he served in many of the theatres of WW2 and he flew Hurricanes in Malta and North Africa and Wellingtons in the Middle east. Micky retired and lived in Ascot in Berkshire. He died 4th August 2002.
Mrtvy, Arnost
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   Died : 19 / 4 / 1944
Mrtvy, Arnost

Killed on 19th April 1944 when his No.313 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX MJ558 was shot down near Brussels during combat with fighters of JG26. He is buried in Schoonselhof cemetery. A Spitfire victory claim matching this location and time was made by Oberleutnant Wolfgang Neu of 4./JG26.
Murphy, N P
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Murphy, N P

On 22nd June 1944 his Spitfire Mk.V BL969 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Allied anti-aircraft fire near Foret de Cerisy. He was unharmed.
Murray, G B
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   Died : 28 / 6 / 1944
Murray, G B

Killed on 28th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ246 was shot down by Fw190s south of Caen. He baled out but did not survive.
Murray, Robert Wilton
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   Died : 13 / 6 / 1944
Murray, Robert Wilton

Killed aged 24 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK235 of No.421 Sqn RCAF collided with another Spitfire of his squadron (NH415) and crashed into the English Channel. He is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery. Son of David Gregg Murray and Ethel Ellen Murray. The pilot of the other Spitfire, Frank Joel Clark was also killed.
Nawwarski, Stanislaw
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Nawwarski, Stanislaw

Polish pilot Stanislaw Nawwarski flew with the French Air Force, but escaped to England after the fall of France in 1940 and joined the RAF. Just prior to the Battle of Britain he was injured after being shot down whilst ferrying an unarmed Hurricane. In 1941, back in action, he was posted to 302 Polish Squadron flying Spitfires. He flew Spitfires om D-Day and throughout the subsequent Allied advance through Normandy, scoring four victories, all Me109s.
Neal, C
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Neal, C

On 22nd June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH723 LZ-H of No.66 Sqn was shot down by an enemy fighter. He was unharmed and the aircraft was eventually repaired.
Nee, Don
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Nee, Don

Don Nee flew Spitfires with 152 and 64 Squadrons RAF before being unified with other Americans into the first Eagle Squadron, No.71. He transferred to the 4th Fighter Group's 336th Fighter Squadron in September 1942 and flew 119 missions in P-47s and P-51s, becoming a flight commander.
Neil, Tom
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Neil, Tom

Tom Neil joined 249 Squadron flying Hurricanes just before the start of the Battle of Britain flying from North Weald on 7th September; his first victory was an Me109, followed in quick succession by 10 others and 1 probable. On 7th November he collided in mid-air with Wing Commander Francis Beamish and his aircraft lost its tail. He baled out of his Hurricane unhurt, Beamish force-landing unscathed. Tom was awarded a Bar to his DFC in November Later he served in Malta where he gained another victory, over an Mc200. In September 1942 he was given command of 41 Squadron flying Spitfires before moving to the 9th USAF, 100th Fighter Wing flying P51 Mustangs before and after D-Day. In January 1944 he was posted as Fighter Liason Officer with the US 100th Fighter Wing, and flew with the unit on D-Day. He is believed to be the first English pilot to land on French soil after D-Day. Tom Neil finished the war with 12 and 4-shared victories.
Nelson, William Henry
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   Died : 1 / 11 / 1940
Nelson, William Henry

Flight Officer William Henry Nelson an American who became part of the R.C.A.F. and was listed as Canadian joined No 74 Squadron on July 20th 1940. He had been awarded the D.F.C in France whilst flying bombers. He then flew Spitfires during the Battle of Britain.
Neville, W. J.
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   Died : 11 / 8 / 1940
Neville, W. J.

Sergeant W.J.Neville joined No 610 Squadron on July 27th 1940. Neville force-landed in a marsh on the 8th of August 1940, overturning his aircraft, but he escaped unhurt. Following a patrol off Calais in his Spitfire I (R6630) on August 11th 1940 he was reported missing, he was aged 26.
Newling, M. A.
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   Died : 6 / 7 / 1941
Newling, M. A.

Flight Officer M.(Mike) A.Newling of No 145 Squadron destroyed two aircraft in fighting over Dunkirk. On July 19th 1940 M.A.Newling force-landed his aircraft on an emergency strip. He was awarded the D.F.C. on the 4th of February 1941. M.A.Newling was killed in a Spitfire Va (W3366) near Lille, France on July 6th 1941.
Newman, Frank
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Newman, Frank

Flight Lieutenant Newman left O.T.U. to join 131 Squadron at Tangmere in time to participate in the closing months of the Battle of Britain. As the enemy activity diminished so the policy of Fighter Command turned to offensive sweeps over western France. By the end of 1942 the A.O.C decided to give the squadrons of 11 Group a rest from their intensive operations, so 131 Squadron was posted to northern Scotland to defend Scapa Flow naval base. This routine series of operations came to an end when Frank was chosen, together with a number of other experienced pilots, to form a fighter wing for the invasion of North Africa. My mid-1943 Rommel and the African Corps had been swept out of Algeria and Tunisia by General Montgomery and the Eighth Army. After a short rest the Desert Air Force was heavily engaged in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. By this time Frank was transferred to join the already famous 92 Squadron where he was pleased to come under the command of such experienced pilots as Group Captain Brian Kingcome and Squadron Leader Neville Duke. For the next few months 92 Squadron was heavily involved in a twice-weekly patrol over the Anzio Bridgehead where they occasionally met small units of the Luftwaffe. It was at this point that the squadron was hoping to score its 300th enemy aircraft destroyed. This happened on the 17th February 1944 and it was time for a squadron celebration! The enemy continued to appear in small numbers and later in the year whilst leading a dusk patrol Frank Newman and his fellow pilots were able to add to this score so that by the end of the campaign the total score reached 317½ definitely destroyed and over 200 probably destroyed. Any further increase in this number of victories was made impossible when the squadron was switched to fighter/bombers in late 1944; for this, tactics were so different. Each Spitfire carried a 500lb bomb and was given a map reference for his target by the army ground force. After the war Fl. Lt. Newman was sent on a training course to be become a Test Pilot. Upon completion of the course he was appointed Test Pilot at the R.A.F.’s biggest maintenance units (132 M.U.) where he enjoyed the privilege of flying thirty-one different types of aircraft.
Nicholls, John
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   Died : 17 / 5 / 2007
Nicholls, John

A Korean war veteran with 2 MiG kills in F-86 Sabres, in April 1952 Nicholls was sent to the US to convert to the F-86 Sabre before joining a USAF squadron in Korea. He was assigned to the 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron operating from Kimpo airfield near Seoul and over the next six months he completed 100 operations On June 28th 1952 John Nicholls flew his first sortie, he flew every day and soon built up his experience. Two months later he was credited with damaging two MiGs on one sortie. He set one on fire before it disappeared into cloud and the other was seen damaged and with a lot of smoke as it made its escape across the Yalu River, an area Allied pilots were forbidden to fly over. On his 99th and penultimate operation, John Nicholls was a wingman to the Wing leader when they intercepted four MiGs just south of the Yalu. Nicholls chased one of the MiGs for some time and fired his cannons, scoring hits on the enemy fighter, which broke up and crashed. It was the first MiG to be shot down by an RAF pilot. On December 9th John Nicholls flew his last sortie in Korea and shortly afterwards was awarded a DFC to add to an American DFC and Air Medal. John Nicholls has flown every great fighter from the Spitfire to the Phantom, including the USAF century series. On his return to the RAF, Nicholls continued his career as a fighter pilot flying Meteors and Hunters before becoming a tactics instructor at the prestigious Day Fighter Leader's School. In 1959 he was attached to English Electric as RAF project test pilot on Lightnings. He commanded AFDS at RAF Binbrook where in 1963 Lightning vs Spitfire combat trials were flown and later, he commanded RAF Leuchars. He retired as Vice Chief of the Air Staff to become Director in charge, BAe Lightnings in Saudi Arabia. John Nicholls was appointed CBE (1967) and KCB (1978). Sadly, he died 17th May 2007, aged 80.
Nichols, Dennis
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 2008
Nichols, Dennis

Battle of Britian pilot also served in Italy with 241 squadron. Former chairman of the Spitfire Society. Dennis Nichols was born on the 16th of January 1924 and died on the 1st of June 2008, following a short illness.
Nickerson, R W
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Nickerson, R W

On 21st May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ786 of No.421 Sqn was hit bf flak and he baled out. Amazingly he hid for more than two months before contacting Canadian troops in August.
Nixon, H J
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Nixon, H J

On 27th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ857 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and he baled out south of Bayeux. He evaded capture, but did not return to the UK for over two months - in September.
Norfolk, N. R.
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Norfolk, N. R.

Sergeant N.R. Norfolk of No 72 Squadron was forced to crash-land his Spitfire I (K9938) on September 2nd 1940. He was in combat over Herne Bay.
Norwell, J. K.
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Norwell, J. K.

Sgt J.K.Norwell of No 54 Squadron scored four kills during the Battle of Britain. He was awarded the A.F.C. on January 1st 1945.
Nosowski, J
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Nosowski, J

Force landed in Spitfire Mk.IX MA791 of No.302 Sqn at Hawkinge on 4th January 1944 after it was damaged by flak newar Gris Nez.
Nowierski, T.
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Nowierski, T.

Flight Officer T.Nowierski from Poland of No 609 Squadron was saved when he baled out of his Spitfire I (N3223) over Sailsbury Plain after undercarriage failure on October 5th 1940.
Nowsielski, Darek
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   Died : 20 / 8 / 2008
Nowsielski, Darek

Darek fought with the Polish Army in 1940, and after te fall of Poland escaped to volunteer as a pilot with the Royal Canadian Air Force. In 1943 he joined 315 Polish Squadron flying Spitfire MkIXs and Mustangs. He flew first on convoy patrols on the Atlantic Approaches, then fighter patrols over France and Norway in 1944, and completed over 200 sorties. "Dan" Nowosielski passed away on 20th August 2008.
O'brien, J. S.
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   Died : 7 / 9 / 1940
O'brien, J. S.

Squadron Leader Joe S.O'Brien of No 234 Squadron was killed on September 7th 1940. He was shot down in his Spitfire I (P9466) following combat over Kent.
O'meara, J. J.
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O'meara, J. J.

P/O James J. O'meara flew with No 421 flight, No 64 and No 72 Squadron's. He flew Spitfire (P 9554) between the 12th and the 15th of August 1940. His score at the end of the war was 11 destroyed, 1 shared, 1 unconfirmed, 4 probables and 11 damaged.
O'Neill, D. H.
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   Died : 11 / 10 / 1940
O'Neill, D. H.

Flight Officer D.H.O'Niell flew with No 611 Squadron and No 41 Squadron. He died on October 11th 1940 when his parachute failed to open after bailing out of his Spitfire I (X4052) when he collided with Sergeant L.R.Carter in another Spitfire I (X4554) whilst climbing to engage enemy aircraft. O'Niel's aircraft crashed near West Kingsdown, Kent.
O'Hagan, Walter Gerald
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
O'Hagan, Walter Gerald

Killed on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vc AB489 of No.402 Sqn RCAF was last seen with engine trouble over the English Channel. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
Ohr, Fred
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Ohr, Fred

Probably the only World War II flying ace of Asian descent, Fred F. Ohr overcame widespread distrust of Asian Americans in the United States military to become a fighter squadron commander and a fighter ace with six victories in the Mediterranean Theatre. Ohr claimed his first victory as a fighter pilot, flying Spitfires over North Africa in 1943. While in Africa, he joined the famed 2nd Fighter Squadron, called the “American Beagles” and began flying a P-51 Mustang with the 52nd Fighter Group. When the African campaign ended, Ohr found himself transferred to Italy, flying cover for bombers attacking Italian and Eastern European targets. After becoming squadron commander of the 2nd Fighter Squadron, Ohr and his fighter group were flying cover for the B-24’s making the famous attack on the oil fields at Ploesti, Romania. While making one final pass to ensure that his squadron was out of harm’s way, Ohr spotted one of his men flying the opposite direction. As Ohr turned back to retrieve the confused pilot, a German Me 109 appeared and attacked what he thought was a lone Mustang. Ohr, unseen by the German, came to the pilot’s aid, shooting down the German and escorting the pilot and his damaged plane back to base. By the end of his tour in December of 1944, Ohr had flown 155 missions and shot down a total of six German planes in aerial combat, in addition to destroying 17 planes on the ground. Among the decorations Ohr received are the Silver Star with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Distinguished Flying Cross with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Bronze Star, and the Air Medal with 18 Oak Leaf Clusters.
Oldfield, T. G.
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1940
Oldfield, T. G.

Sergeant T.G.Oldfield of No 92 Squadron was killed on September 27th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6622) was shot down by a Bf 109 over Dartford.
Olson, J. O. W.
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Olson, J. O. W.

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK566 FU-L of No.453 Sqn RAAF was hit by flak and he baled out.
Olufsen, E B
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Olufsen, E B

Died on 23rd June 1944 from injuries sustained on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ218 of No.332 Sqn crash landed near Juaye, Port-en-Bessin.
Olver, Peter
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Olver, Peter

Battle of Britain pilot, 611 and 603 squadrons. Wing Commander Peter Olver served with 603 Squadron on the 24th of October and on the following day his Spitfire was shot down but he baled out with only light injuries. When returning to duty he was transferred to 66 Squadron based at Biggin Hill and promoted to Flight Commander.
Orr, R W
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Orr, R W

On 2nd June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ229 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and he baled out over the English Channel, to be safely rescued.
Ossendorf, R
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Ossendorf, R

On 21st May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ907 failed to return from an armed reconnaissance mission to Le Havre. Recovered after the D-Day invasion.
Overton, Charles. Nevil.
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Overton, Charles. Nevil.

In 1938 as the pace of rearmament accelerated, Overton – known as ‘Teeny’ because of his fondness for Ovaltine (advertised with the ditty "We are the Ovalteenies") – had been granted a short service commission. He did his elementary training at 13 E&RFTS White Waltham, going on to 8 FTS Montrose on 9th April. His first posting was to the School of Naval Co-Operation at Ford on 29th October 1938. In late September 1939 he joined 17 Squadron, operating Hurricanes from Debden, Essex. In November 1939 Overton was posted to 609 (West Riding) squadron flying defensive patrols from Drem in Scotland. On 18th May 1940, after the German invasion of the Low Countries and France, 609 was ordered south to Northolt. Barely 20, Overton was the youngest pilot in the squadron. He later reflected: ........I don't think that I had a clue what was happening. From being a small, semi-isolated unit we suddenly found ourselves part of a big and often baffling circus. Abruptly we were really in the war. On 30th May Overton and his fellow pilots refuelled at Biggin Hill and at lunchtime flew 609's first patrol of the war to cover the Dunkirk evacuation. In the evening, loss and damage having depleted the squadron, Overton and eight others returned to Dunkirk. On 609's approach run, Overton encountered 15 He111 bombers and 20 Me109 fighters. There followed a superb display of air fighting; Overton and Flying Officer Hank Russell, an American volunteer, making simultaneous beam attacks, destroying a Heinkel. Overton then noticed that he had a Me109 on his tail. After a six minute dogfight he was in a stall turn when he got the 109 in his sights and opened fire at 70 yards. The 109 plunged into the sea. Shortly afterwards Overton piloted one of nine Spitfires which escorted Winston Churchill to see the French Prime Minister, Paul Reynaud. Having got lost on the way home Overton refuelled in Jersey and loaded his aircraft up with brandy. In mid-summer 1940, 609 operated from Middle Wallop and Warmwell in the south west. On 12th August, led by Squadron Leader George Darley, 609 intercepted 80 Me110 twin-engine fighters circling east of the Isle of Wight. Darley led Overton and his fellow pilots straight through the circle of enemy aircraft, taking beam shots and breaking away downwards. Overton accounted for two of six 110’s shot down. The next day, 609 intercepted 40 Ju87 Stuka dive-bombers over Lyme Bay; of 10 destroyed, Overton was credited with two. In April 1941, Overton, now a flight commander, had survived long enough to become the doyen of the squadron. He was posted as an instructor to No 59 Operational Training Unit at Crosby-in--Eden for a "rest". Charles Nevil Overton was born on 25th September 1919, the youngest of six children at Navenby, Lincolnshire where his father farmed the Blankney Estate. Nevil was one of the first entry of boys to attend St Hugh’s School, Woodhall Spa, from where he went on to Denstone College, Staffordshlre. Before joining the RAF he trained briefly in land agency with Woodruffe Walters. In December 1941, keen to return to operations , Overton was posted as a flight commander to No 145, a Spitfire squadron at Catterick. In New Year 1942, 145 was the first Spitfire squadron to be sent to the Middle East where in April Overton received command, at Helwan in Egypt. The next month, operating from Western Desert landing grounds, Overton began to lead the squadron in sustained fighter and bomber support operations. On 10th June 1942 Overton damaged a 109, following it up with a kill. After a spell with No 239 Wing's four squadrons of Kittyhawks, Overton was appointed Wing Commander Operations at Desert Air Force Headquarters. He was awarded the DFC (gazetted 6th October 1942) and was twice mentioned in despatches.
Page, Alan Geoffrey
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   Died : 3 / 8 / 2000
Page, Alan Geoffrey

Geoffrey Page was born in Boxmoor on 16th May 1920. Geoffrey Page developed an early interest in aviation, which is not surprising as he had an uncle who flew during the Great War and another uncle was Sir Frederick Handley Page, the great aircraft manufacturer. Page went to Dean Close School in Cheltenham, Glouscestershire, and later went to the Imperial College to study engineering. It was at college he joined the University Air Squadron at Northolt. Two weeks after the outbreak of the Second World War, Geoffrey Page received his call-up papers and joined the RAF with the rank of Acting Pilot Officer and went to Cranwell for advanced training. In May 1940 after a short period of instructing, Page was posted to 66 Squadron, flying Supermarine Spitfires but was almost immediately re-assigned to 56 Squadron where he was to fly the Hawker Hurricane. Whilst as a pilot officer with 56 squadron he took part in the Battles of France and Britain, and had accounted for three kills by the time he was shot down on the 12th August 1940 during the Battle of Britain. Flying behind his commanding officer, who was attacking a large formation of Dornier Do17 bombers, his Hurricane was hit and caught fire. Burning high-octane fuel sprayed into the cockpit, covering Page, resulting in very bad burns to his face and hands. Page parachuted out and his Hurricane crashed into the sea. After being picked up from the sea he was taken to the burns unit at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, where he was treated by Sir Archibald MacIndoe, a pioneering plastic surgeon. He spent the next two years in hospital undergoing numerous plastic surgery operations. Both of his hands were burnt down to the bone, and his head had swollen to three times its normal size. Page had also received gunshot wounds to his legs. Page became a founding member of the Guinea Pig Club, where Sir Archibald MacIndoe was elected life time president and Geoffrey Page was its first chairman. In late 1942 he re-joined operations again as a Flight Lieutenant. He joined No.132 Squadron as a supernumerary Flight Lieutenant, before volunteering for service in North Africa, but returned to the UK as the desert heat caused problems on his skin grafts. In July 1943 he won his first DFC. Later in the year he joined 122 Squadron as a Flight Commander, before re-joining No.132 Squadron in January 1944 as Commanding Officer. On 29th April 1944 Page led his squadron to strafe Deelen airfield in Holland, and attacked a Bf110 night fighter that was landing. Despite the odds, the Bf110 shot down two Spitfires, before Page forced the aircraft down and destroyed it. The pilot of the Bf110 was the famous Major Hans-Joachim Jabs, who survived. Page was later promoted Wing Leader of 125 wing, and after another DFC he won the DSO at the end of 1944. Page had achieved his goal of 15 victories (10 solo, 5 shared, and 3 damaged). After the war on a tour of the United States met his wife to be, the daughter of a British Hollywood actor. He left the R.A.F. in 1948 joining Vickers Armstrong. In retirement, Page remained the driving force of the Guinea Pig Club, and also founded the Battle of Britain Trust. This raised more than one million pounds, with which the Battle of Britain memorial was erected overlooking the Straits of Dover. In 1995 he was created an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. Sadly Alan Geoffrey Page DSO, OBE, DFC and Bar died 3rd August 2000.
Painter, William Henry
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   Died : 17 / 6 / 1944
Painter, William Henry

Killed aged 24 on 17th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL720 of No.234 Sqn collided with Spitfire EN861 during a night patrol. He is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery. Son of William Henry and Annic Beatrice Painter; husband of Irene Nellie Florence Painter, of Southgate, Middlesex.
Paley, B
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Paley, B

Taken prisoner on 7th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX ML310 JH-J of No.317 Sqn suffered engine trouble during a patrol over the Normandy beaches and he baled out.
Parker, K. B.
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   Died : 15 / 10 / 1940
Parker, K. B.

Sergeant K.B.Parker of No 92 Squadron was killed on October 15th 1940 when his Spitfire I (R6838) was shot down over the Thames Estuary and crashed on the mudflats off All Hallows, Essex. He is buried at Terschelling, Netherlands.
Parker, V.
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Parker, V.

P/O V.Parker of No 234 Squadron was in combat off Swanage on August 15th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6985) went missing but he was rescued from the sea by the Germans and interned.
Parkinson, Colin
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   Died : 31 / 3 / 2006
Parkinson, Colin

Australian Colin Parkinson joined the RAAF in 1940, arriving in England to join 19 Squadron flyin Spitfires. In March 1942 he shot down a Do217. In May he was posted to Malta, flying his Spitfire off HMS Eagle on 9th June, with 602 Squadron. After scoring several victories he flew to Gibraltar to lead in further Spitfires, taking off from HMS Furious to the island on 17th August. Commissioned, he now flew with 229 Squadron. On 9th October with Winco Donaldson and Screwball Beurling, he performed a low level beat up and acrobatics over the presentation of the George Cross to the people of Malta. He ended his tour of Malta in November 1942 with the DFC and 10.5 victories, plus probably 2 more. Colin Parkinson passed away aged 89 on 31st March 2006.
Parry, Gwyn
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Parry, Gwyn

Flight Lieutenant Gwyn Parry DFC was called up from Oxford University Air Squadron in August 1941 and was commissioned after completion of training in Canada in June 1942. After a navigation course at Squires Gate and PR, OTU he joined 140 Squadron based at Hartfordbridge and later Northolt. The operations he undertook on Spitfires were mostly at high level (up to 34,000 feet) over France and the Low Countries, but also some in Mosquitoes at 12,000 feet over French pre-invasion beaches.
Parry, Hugh
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Parry, Hugh

Hugh Parry joined the RAF from Northern Rhodesia in December 1939, and after training in England was posted in February 1941 to join 260 Squadron flying Hurricanes. In April he transferred to 266 Squadron flying first Spitfires and then Typhoons. In March 1943 he went to Malta with 601 Squadron on the USS Wasp, flying the Spitfire Vc, where he remained until July. After a spell as a test pilot, he returned to combat with 41 Squadron flying Spitfire MkXIIs. On 24th September 1943 he was shot down near Beauvais and managed to evade capture for the next five months until he was eventually captured by the Gestapo in Paris. After a month in prison he was sent to Stalag Luft III until the end of the war.
Pattle, Marmaduke
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   Died : 20 / 4 / 1941
Pattle, Marmaduke

Born in South Africa on 3rd July 1914, Pattle joined the South African Air Force before transferring to the Royal Air Force in 1936. Flying Gladiators with No.80 Squadron, he achieved many victories in the aircraft, and also recorded victories flying Hurricanes with both 80 Squadron and 33 Squadron. Flying in North Africa and Greece, he was shot down and killed on 20th April 1941 by German Me110s. He had been awarded the DFC and Bar.
Payne, Carl
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Payne, Carl


Pearsall, A L
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   Died : 8 / 3 / 1944
Pearsall, A L

Killed on 8th March 1944 after baling out of his apparently stricken Spitfire Mk.XI PA863 near Calais. No trace was found.
Pearson, John Vinton
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   Died : 30 / 5 / 1944
Pearson, John Vinton

Killed aged 22 on 30th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX ML234 was hit by flak from Dunkirk and crashed into the sea during a shipping reconnaissance mission. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Vincent Brougham Pearson and Emily Maud Pearson, of Marske-by-the-Sea, Yorkshire.
Peck, James
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Peck, James


Peck, James
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Peck, James


Penny, Michael
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Penny, Michael

His war service began in October 1940 at I.TW. Newquay. On completion of his training he was posted to No. 24 E. F.T.S. Luton. After 11 hours dual flying he first flew solo in a Miles Magister. After forty hours instruction he was posted to No. 9 S.F.T.S. Hullavington for advanced flying on Miles Masters and Hurricanes. On completing this course he was presented with his "Wings", having now flown 62 hours. His next posting was to No. 60 O.T.U. at East Fortune where he converted to B & P Defiants. "The Defiant was a very unpleasant aircraft to fly, very heavy and I did not like the idea of becoming a night fighter in this aircraft" said Michael. He was then posted to No. 153 Squadron in Northern Ireland; after only a few days the Squadron was disbanded and he was given a chance to convert to Beaufighters or stay on 'singles'. Michael requested training for Spitfires but was informed that there were no vacancies at that moment in time. He then asked if he could fly Lysanders being used to tow drogues. His request was granted and he flew Lysanders until January 1943 when his posting came through to 58 O.T.U. Grangemouth. He completed 50 hours on Spitfires and was posted to 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron 124 Airfield, Lasham. Michael recalls, "Although we were operational, we were now in 2 nd T. A. F. and most of our flying was done in cooperation with the Army and Tank Cor. This involved continual very low flying and demanded very strict air flying discipline - this held me in good stead as time went on". In May 1943 the Squadron moved to 121 Airfield Fairlop where he flew his first operation over occupied Europe on a fighter sweep over Rouen, followed by an escort op. with Ventura bombers to Zeebruger; this was his first experience of enemy antiaircraft fire. Various escort and fighter sweeps followed. There followed a series of moves to various airfields in Sussex and Kent. In early 1944 the Squadron, then stationed at Ford, had bombs fitted to our aircraft for dropping on V1 launch sites. "We began our dive at about 10,000 feet and released our bomb at 5000 feet - a most unpleasant experience. This brought us into range from all kinds of anti-aircraft fire, but fortunately we suffered very few direct hits," Michael recalls. After completing over 120 operations Michael was posted "tour expired" by the Air Comm. and went on to become a Spitfire flying instructor. He was demobilised in November 1945.
Pentz, J
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Pentz, J

Taken prisoner on 28th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ934 JH-N of No.317 Sqn was hit by flak and crash landed near Bois de Crecy.
Percy, Hugh Harold
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   Died : 22 / 5 / 1944
Percy, Hugh Harold

Killed aged 24 on 22nd May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XIV RB162 of No.610 Sqn was shot down by flak from Pleinmont Point. He baled out but was killed when his parachute failed. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of John Hugh and Josephine Percy, of Chwilog, Caernarvonshire.
Perez-Gomez, Luis
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   Died : 16 / 6 / 1944
Perez-Gomez, Luis

Killed on 16th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK607 of No.443 Sqn RCAF was shot down by enemy fighters and flak. He is buried is Sassy Churchyard.
Peters, R G
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Peters, R G

On 30th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK510 FU-J of No.453 Sqn RAAF was hit by flak. The aircraft lost its canopy and he suffered head injuries, but managed to fly the aircraft back to base.
Peters, W A
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Peters, W A

On 27th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb AR330 of No.402 Sqn RCAF suffered elevator failure over the French coast and he was forced to bale out near Rye.
Peterson, Chesley
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Peterson, Chesley


Phillips, Douglas Frederick
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   Died : 23 / 4 / 1944
Phillips, Douglas Frederick

Killed aged 25 on 23rd April 1944 when his No.131 Sqn Spitfire Mk.VII MB935 crashed into the sea 25 miles south east of Bolt Head. His name is on the Runnymede memorial. Son or Thomas Frederick and Elizabeth Catherine Phillips.
Pickering, J. H. T.
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   Died : 15 / 2 / 1942
Pickering, J. H. T.

Pilot Officer J.H.T.Pickering of No 66 Squadron was rescued unhurt out of the sea off Aldeburgh on August 30th 1940 after being shot down in his Spitfire I (R6715) by return fire enemy aircraft. Pickering was injured on October 11th 1940 when Spitfire I (X4052) was shot down.
Pickering, James
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Pickering, James

Jim Pickering joined the RAFVR in 1937, and was attached to 769 Sqn FAA, then 804 Sqn FAA. In June 1940 he returned to the RAF and flew Spitfires with 64 Sqn during the Battle of Britain. With 418 Flight Jim flew Hurricanes to Malta from HMS Argus on 2nd August 1940. This flight was to reinforce Maltas handful of outdated Gladiators and few surviving Hurricanes, and on 16th August was amalgamated to become 261 Squadron. With this unit Jim flew Hurricanes and at least five operations in the legendary Gladiators, which have been immortalised as Faith, Hope, and Charity. In April 1941 Jim was posted, first to Egypt, then 80 Squadron in October 1942, and 145 Squadron in December. He returned to the UK in 1943. Born in 1915 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, James Pickering studied the printing business in Europe during the 1930s. Convinced that Hitler represented a threat which could lead to war, Pickering joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1937. As a "week-end" flyer he earned his wings as a Sergeant Pilot in April of 1939. In September of that year Pickerings unit was mobilized. He was sent to an attachment of the Fleet Air Arm, where he flew Gladiators, Skuas, and Rocs, following his carrier training. In June of 1940 Pickering returned to the RAF flying Spitfires with No. 64 Squadron based in Kenley during the Battle of Britain. Pickering was selected along with eleven other carrier-qualified pilots to fly Hurricanes to Malta off the deck of the HMS Argus. On arrival in Malta these new Hurricanes and their pilots were integrated with the 3 flyable Gladiators and 3 Hurricanes already there to form No. 261 Squadron. This unit carried on the defense of Malta against Italian and German bombing missions which were launched regularly from Sicily, only sixty miles distant. Because of his earlier experience with the Gladiator, Pickering flew both Gladiators and Hurricanes at Malta for eight months. It is believed that Pickering is the last living RAF pilot to fly the Gladiator at Malta. Following his assignment in Malta, Pickering joined No. 1 Aircraft Delivery Unit which ferried aircraft from the West African Gold Coast and Port Sudan to various points throughout the war theater of operations. Pickering delivered a P-40 Warhawk to the Flying Tigers which involved one of the first flights "over the hump." In October of 1942 Pickering returned to operational flying with No. 80 Squadron (Hurricanes) at EI Alamein, and later with No. 145 Squadron (Spitfires). Having completed three separate operational tours, Pickering returned to England when victory was achieved in North Africa. In England, Pickering was assigned as a test pilot with No. 3501 Servicing Unit. He tested modifications to the Spitfire, and also test flew a number of P-51 Mustangs. Later he was transferred to No. 151 Repair Unit as its Chief Test Pilot. This was the largest unit of this kind in the RAF. Because of these experiences, Pickering is unusual in having flown eighty different types of aircraft during the War. Awarded the Air Force Cross, Pickering was released from the RAF at Wars end. He returned to his family-owned printing business, and spent his working career with the company, from which he retired in 1965. He also served as an outside Director of the largest Building Society in Britain. Pickering joined the Volunteer Reserve once again following the War, and continued to fly with the RAF until reaching the mandatory age limit of sixty. Pickering has had a private pilots license since 1938. He has flown thousands of hours and he is an expert on geological and archaeological research from the air. A Fellow of both the Geological Society and the Society of Antiquaries, Jim Pickering epitomizes the English character of determination and persistence which was so vastly underestimated by Hitler during WW 11.
Piddocke, Bernard Gregory
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Piddocke, Bernard Gregory

Greg Piddocke was born in Wooler in either 1917 or 1919 and joined 41 Squadron on 20th March 1939, he had the misfortune to damage Spitfire K9844 at Catterick on 22nd November 1939 in a taxiing accident. 23rd February 1940 he flew Spitfire N3098 to Thornaby. On the 24th he practiced low level attacks in the same aircraft and whilst landing back at Thornaby the aircraft tipped up onto it's nose damaging it slightly, it was later repaired and put back into service. The pilot was uninjured but did no flying until 26th February 1940 when he flew back to Catterick in Magister K8296. His next flight in a Spitfire was on the 27th in "EB-D". He left the squadron on 17th October 1940 and transferred to being an ATA ferry pilot at White Waltham on 13 November 1940. He survived the War and later moved to Cairns, Queensland, Australia where (at the time of writing in 2009)
Pieri, D
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Pieri, D


Pigg, O. St. J.
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   Died : 2 / 9 / 1940
Pigg, O. St. J.

Flight Officer O.Stj Pigg of No 72 Squadron was shot down and killed on September 1st 1940 over Pluckley, near Ashford in Kent. His Spitfire I (P9458) had been attacked.
Pinckney, D. J. C.
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   Died : 23 / 1 / 1942
Pinckney, D. J. C.

Pilot Officer D.J.C.Pinckney of No 603 Squadron was wounded on August 29th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6753) had been in combat over Dymchurch. He suffered slight burns.
Pinkham, P. C.
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1940
Pinkham, P. C.

Squadron Leader Phillip C.Pinkham of No 19 Squadron was a career officer in the R.A.F. which he joined in 1935. He served with No 17 Squadron flying biplanes. In January 1940 Pinkham took command of the Air Fighting School at St Athan, training pilots to fly Hurricane's. On June 10th 1940 he took over command of No 19 Squadron. In July he received the A.F.C. for his flying training work. Pinkham was shot down and killed on September 5th 1940. His Spitfire I (P9422) was shot down over the Thames Estuary. His aircraft crashed near Birlink, Kent.
Piotrowski, J P
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   Died : 14 / 1 / 1944
Piotrowski, J P

Killed on 14th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH927 of No.308 Sqn was shot down near St Omer during combat with Fw190s and Me109s of JG26.
Pisanos, Spiros Steve
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   Died : 6 / 6 / 2016
Pisanos, Spiros Steve

Born Nov. 10, 1919, in the Athens suburb of Kolonos, Spiros Nicholas 'Steve' Pisanos, the son of a subway motorman, arrived in America in April 1938 as a crew member on a Greek merchant tramp steamer. Arriving in Baltimore speaking no English, he worked in a bakery and hotels to earn money for flying lessons at Floyd Bennett Field. In August 1940, he settled in Plainfield, New Jersey, and continued flying lessons at Westfield Airport. He earned a private pilot's license and, though still a Greek national, in October 1941 he joined the British Royal Air Force sponsored by the Clayton Knight Committee in New York City. Pisanos began his military flight training at Polaris Flight Academy in Glendale. Upon graduation, Pilot Officer Pisanos was transferred to England where he completed RAF Officers Training School at Cosford, England, and OTU (Operational Training Unit) at Old Sarum Aerodrome in Salisbury. Pisanos was posted to the 268 Fighter Squadron at Snailwell Aerodrome in Newmarket flying P-51A's. He later transferred to the 71 Eagle Squadron, one of three Eagle squadrons in the RAF, comprised of just 244 American volunteers flying Spitfires at Debden RAF Aerodrome. When the USAAF 4th Fighter Group absorbed the American members of the Eagle Squadrons in September and October 1942, Pisanos was commissioned a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Forces. Flying his first mission in his P-47 'Miss Plainfield' out of Debden Aerodrome with the 334th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Group, Lt. Pisanos, 'The Flying Greek,' scored his first shootdown on May 21, 1943, when he targeted a German FW-190 over Ghent, Belgium. By Jan. 1, 1944, he had become an ace with five confirmed downings. On March 5, 1944, he obtained his 10th shootdown and while returning from that B-17 escort mission to Limoges and Bordeaux, France, Pisanos experienced engine failure in his P-51B and crash-landed south of Le Havre. For six months he evaded the Germans and fought with the French Resistance and the American OSS, sabotaging the German war machine in occupied France. Lt. Pisanos returned to England on Sept. 2, 1944, following the liberation of Paris. Because of his exposure and knowledge of the French Resistance operations, Pisanos was prohibited from flying additional combat missions because the Air Force could not risk him being captured. Upon returning to the United States, Capt. Pisanos was assigned to the Flight Test Division at Wright Field, Ohio. He attended the USAF Test Pilot School and served as a test pilot at Wright Field and Muroc Lake, California, testing the YP-80 jet aircraft, America's first operational jet. During his Air Force career, Pisanos graduated from the University of Maryland, attended the Air Command and Staff College and the Air War College. Pisanos also served tours of duty in Vietnam (1967-68) and with NORAD before retiring from the USAF with the rank of colonel in in December 1973. Colonel Steve Pisanos died on 6th June 2016.
Plagis, Agorastos
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   Died : ?
Plagis, Agorastos

John Agorastos Plagis was born in Rhodesia; his parents were both Greek. He joined the RAF in 1941 and in 1942 was part of a 16 Spitfire reinforcements for the beleagured island of Malta, flying off from the carrier Eagle. In the following year while stationed on Malta, John Plagis shot down 9 enemy aircraft, winning the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving with 249 and 185 squadrons. In 1943 he was promoted to Squadron Leader of 126 squadron flying operations over occupied France including on the 24th July 1944 shooting down another Me109. During operation market garden his aircraft was shot down and he was wounded, returning to duty flying the Mustang, with his last mission to escort the Mosquitos whose misison was to destroy the headquarters of Gestapo in Denmark. He remained with the Royal Air Force until 1948, ending his flying carrer flying the Gloster Meteor. His total aerial victories stands at 16 and he was awarded the DFC, DSO and bar. It is believed that he committed suicide several years after the war.

Citation for award :

London Gazette 1/5/1942

PLAGIS John Agorastos : PO (80227) RAFVR , 249 Sq.

Since the beginning of March 1942, this officer has destroyed 4 and probably a further 3 hostile aircraft. With complete indifference to odds against him, he presses home his attacks with skill and courage. In one day alone he destroyed 2 enemy fighters and 1 bomber. He has set an outstanding example.

Plant, R. E.
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   Died : 21 / 11 / 1940
Plant, R. E.

Sergeant R.E.Plant from No 603 Squadron was killed on November 21st 1940 near Faversham, Kent. His Spitfire II (P7387) was in a collision.
Plzak, S.
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   Died : 7 / 8 / 1941
Plzak, S.

Missing August 7th 1941
Pocock, M. H.
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Pocock, M. H.

Sergeant Maurice H.Pocock of No 72 Squadron was wounded on September 1st 1940 in a Spitfire I (L1056) over Beachy Head. His aircraft was damaged in the combat and he belly landed it at West Malling. He was later promoted to Flight Lieutenant and became an air traffic controller.
Pool, P. D.
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   Died : 19 / 8 / 1942
Pool, P. D.

Pilot Officer P.D.Pool of No 72 Squadron was wounded on October 11th 1940 when his Spitfire I (K9870) was shot down near Deal in Kent. Pool baled out and was injured.
Porter, J. A.
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Porter, J. A.

Sergeant J.A.Porter flew with No 615 Squadron & No 242 Squadron flying Hurricane's & No 19 Squadron in Spitfires during the Battle of Britain. Porter was with No 19 Squadron when he was shot down in his Spitfire I (X4070) after chasing a enemy aircraft to the French coast on September 15th 1940. Potter was wounded and taken prisoner.
Posener, F. H.
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   Died : 20 / 7 / 1940
Posener, F. H.

Pilot Officer F.H.Posener a South African from No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (K9880) on July 20th 1940 in combat off Swanage.
Poulton, H R G
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Poulton, H R G

Flying Spitfire Mk.IX EP549 of No.64 Sqn, his aircraft was in combat over Dieppe on 14th January 1944 and developed a glycol leak. He ditched the aircraft into the Channel, and was taken prisoner.
Powers, MacArthur
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Powers, MacArthur


Proudlove, D E
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Proudlove, D E

On 20th January 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII EN615 of No.91 Sqn was damaged in a collision with one of two Spitfires which had collided with each other while landing at Tangmere. The two other Spitfire Mk.XIIs were EN606 and EN227 both of No.91 Sqn.
Prouting, G E
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   Died : 22 / 5 / 1944
Prouting, G E

Killed aged 22 on 22nd May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.VII MD108 YQ-E of No.616 Sqn was shot down by flak from a train at Folligny Marshaling Yards. He is buried in Equilly Churchyard. Son of Gilbert and May Prouting, of Cosham, Hampshire.
Prowse, H. A. R.
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Prowse, H. A. R.


Pujji, Mahinder
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   Died : 22 / 9 / 2010
Pujji, Mahinder

In 1940 Mahinder, a qualified pilot flying for Shell in India, volunteered to join the RAF and was commissioned as Pilot Officer. Arriving in England, he was posted to 43 Squadron, and then 258 Squadron at Kenley, flying both Hurricanes and Spitfires. Later posted to the Western Desert, then to India, and finally to Burma, where he completed two tours against the Japanese. Sadly, Mahinder Pujji passed away on 22nd September 2010.
Pullin, Roy Bernard
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   Died : 29 / 4 / 1944
Pullin, Roy Bernard

Killed aged 21 on 29th April 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ170 of No.132 Sqn crash landed near Deelen airfield, hit trees and was destroyed by fire. He is buried at Apeldoorn General Cemetery. Son of Eric James L. Pullin and Dora F. Pullin, of Bristol. Flak may have brought down the aircraft, but the victory has been claimed by Major Hans-Joachim Jabs of NJG1 who was landing his Me110 at the airfield.
Pyman, L. L.
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   Died : 16 / 8 / 1940
Pyman, L. L.

Pilot Officer Lee L.Pyman of No 65 Squadron was forced to land his aircraft at Manston on August 14th 1940. He was shot down in his Spitfire I (K9915) over the Channel and killed on August 16th 1940. Pyman was buried at Calais Southern France.
Quill, Jeffrey
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   Died : 20 / 2 / 1996
Quill, Jeffrey

Jeffrey Quill was born at Littlehampton in Sussex in 1913, the youngest of five children. He was educated at Lancing College, overlooking Shoreham aerodrome (then a small grass field with old hangars and a wooden hut for the flying club). The frequent sight of aircraft at close quarters increased Quill’s already burning interest in aviation, and after leaving Lancing in 1931 he was accepted into the Royal Air Force at the age of 18, as an acting Pilot Officer. He learned to fly on Avro Tutor biplanes, and went solo after only 5 hours 20 minutes – well below the usual 9 hours. In September 1932 he joined No.17 (Fighter) Squadron at Upavon, where he flew Bristol Bulldogs. He was then posted to Duxford, to the RAF Meteorological Flight, where they flew open-cockpit Siskins to heights of up to 25,000 feet to collect weather data. In November 1934 Quill became Flight Commander, and set out with his team to achieve 100 per cent regularity in the scheduled climbs (twice every day, except Sundays, at 0700 and 1300 hrs) without missing a single flight, even in “unflyable” weather. For this outstanding achievement he was awarded the Air Force Cross. In January 1936 Jeffrey Quill became assistant to Mutt Summers, the chief test pilot at Vickers (Aviation) Ltd., and his initial task was the testing of the Wellesley bomber. On 26 March 1936 Quill made his first flight in the prototype Spitfire K5054. Much work was needed on the Spitfire before it was eventually cleared for squadron service in July 1938. Jeffrey Quill spent the entire war in charge of development and production flying, but insisted on having first-hand combat experience, and in August 1940 he was assigned to 65 (Spitfire) Squadron at RAF Hornchurch. During that month he shot down a Me109, and shared in a Heinkel He111 before being recalled to Supermarine to test the Spitfire Mk III. The Seafire, the naval version of the Spitfire used by the Fleet Air Arm, was suffering enormous losses in deck landing accidents. During 1944 Quill spent five months with the Royal Navy, and made more than 75 deck landings. By the end of the war, he had personally test-flown all 50-odd variants of Spitfire and Seafire. His personal favourite was the Spitfire Mk VIII. Jeffrey Quill continued as chief test pilot after the war, when Vickers – ever on the cutting edge of development – produced Britain’s third jet aircraft, the Attacker. On 27 July 1946 Quill made the first flight from Boscombe Down, and continued to undertake the testing, until one day the following June he passed out at about 40,000 feet. Fortunately he recovered at about 10,000 ft, in time to land safely. Quill had been flying continuously for 16 years, often at high altitude and without oxygen. He had logged over 5000 hours and flown more than 95 aircraft types. Jeffrey Quill died at Andreas, Isle of Man, on 20 February 1996.


Jeffrey Quill after winning his Air Force Cross.


Raby, Ray
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Raby, Ray

F/Lt Ray Raby jojned the RAFVR in 1940. His flying training began in the USA, where he was retained as an instructor with both USAF and RAF wings. He qualified on his return for an Air Navigators Certificate. He was posted to 519 Squadron, Wick, on Spitfires prior to joining 542 Squadron, Benson PRU with Jerry Fray as Flight Commander. In 1943, he was posted to Benson and survived 58 operational sorties until he was demobbed in 1946. In 1947 he joined 605 (County of Warwick) Wsquadron, Raux AF, Honiley on Vampire and Meteor jet aircraft as flight commander until disbandment in 1957. His total hours flown are 3265.
Rae, John
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Rae, John

New Zealander Jack Rae joined the RNZAF in September 1940, was posted to England and joined 485 Squadron RNZAF. He claimed 2 victories before being posted to 603 Squadron. With this unit he flew his Spitfire off USS Wasp to Malta, on 20th April 1942. After being shot down over the island, he was posted to 249 Squadron. During the following two weeks he saw much action, claiming 4 and one shared by the end of July. Posted back to the UK, he returned to combat flying in May 1943, rejoining 485 Squadron. He rapidly scored further victories, but on 22nd August just after downing an Fw190, his engine failed forcing him to land in France where he was taken POW. His final tally stood at 12 victories and 8 probables. He died on 19th December 2007.
Rafter, W. P. H.
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   Died : 9 / 11 / 1940
Rafter, W. P. H.

Pilot Officer W.P.H.Rafter of No 603 Squadron was wounded on the 5th of September 1940. His Spitfire I (X4264) was shot down in combat over Biggin Hill.
Ramsay, N. H. D.
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Ramsay, N. H. D.

Sergeant N.H.D.Ramsay joined No 610 Squadron in June 1940. He claimed a solitary victory during the Battle of Britain.
Ramshaw, J. W.
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   Died : 4 / 9 / 1940
Ramshaw, J. W.

Sergeant J.W.Ramshaw of No 222 Squadron was killed on September 4th 1940 in his Spitfire I (K9962) when it crashed near Yalding and he succumbed to his wounds.
Rankin, James
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Rankin, James


Reader, C
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Reader, C

On 21st March 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK619 of No.66 Sqn was damaged by flak during a Ranger mission to Chartres, but returned to base safely.
Reddington, L. A. E.
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   Died : 30 / 9 / 1940
Reddington, L. A. E.

Sergeant L.A.E.Reddington of No 152 Squadron was killed on September 30th 1940 when he was shot down in his Spitfire I (L1072) off Portland.
Reeve, M
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   Died : 2 / 5 / 1944
Reeve, M

Killed on 2nd May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MK213 of No.340 Sqn collided with Spitfire Mk.IX MK582 of No.329 Sqn over the English Channel and crashed into the sea off Ostend. The pilot of the other aircraft, Commandant P C DeG Fleurquin baled out over Dover and was ok.
Refshauge, J G H
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Refshauge, J G H

On 9th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII MB794 EB-H of No.41 Sqn was hit by flak and he baled out over Carentan. He was injured and was treated in a US hospital.
Reid, Donald George
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   Died : 22 / 7 / 1942
Reid, Donald George

Enlisted in the RCAF October 28, 1940 in Windsor, Ontario, his home town. Previously attended Windsor Vocational Institute. Received his pilot's flying badge at No. 9 Service Flying Training School, Summerside, Prince Edward Island, July 16, 1941. Arrived overseas 30 August 1941. At No.57 OTU (5 September to 21 October 1941), went to.152 Squadron (21-28 October 1941), No.412 Squadron (28 October to unknown date, 1941),No.161 Squadron in December 1941), No.601 Squadron (15-23 December 1941), Joined No.19 Squadron (23 December 1941 to 30 April 1942). Posted to Malta, arriving with major reinforcement (Operation "Bowery" via aircraft carriers on 9 May 1942; assigned to No.185 Squadron. He was Commissioned 7 July 1942 He was killed when his Spitfire BR203("X") was shot down and crashed at Hal Far Malta during engagement with Bf.109s, 2 June 1942, one Z.1007 damaged Italian bomber destroyed) one Re.2001 probably destroyed; 6 June 1942, one Re.2001 destroyed ,one Re.2001 damaged ,one Z.506B destroyed (third share) 7 June 1942, one Bf.109 probably destroyed; 22 June 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire coded GL-O); 1 July 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged (flying Spitfire BR294); 2 July 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed (flying Spitfire BR294); 6 July 1942, one Bf.109 probably destroyed , one Ju.88 damaged (half share - both on BR317) 17 July 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged (BR380).
Reilley, H. W.
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   Died : 17 / 10 / 1940
Reilley, H. W.

Pilot Officer Hugh William Reilley an American was was born in Detroit, Michigan of an American father and Scottish mother Before going to England and joining the R.A.F. Hugh lived in London, Ontario, Canada and was considered a Canadian. He flew with No 64 Squadron and No 66 Squadron in Spitfires during the Battle of Britain. He was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6800) on October 17th 1940. His Spitfire crashed and burned out at Crockham Hall, Sevenoaks. H.W.Reilley was 22 years old when killed and is buried in Gravesend Cemetery in Kent.
Rhodes, W H
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Rhodes, W H

On 28th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX ML248 of No.403 Sqn RCAF crash landed south of Caen after combat with Fw190s and he was taken prisoner.
Ridley, M.
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   Died : 26 / 8 / 1940
Ridley, M.

Sergeant M.Ridley of No 616 Squadron was killed on August 26th 1940. He was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6633) over Dover. The Spitfire crashed near Adisham, Kent.
Rinde, J P
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Rinde, J P

On 11th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ235 of No.332 Sqn was hit by flak and suffered engine failure and was abandoned 5 miles off the Sussex coast. He baled out and was rescued the next day.
Ritchie, David Fraser
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   Died : 6 / 1 / 2015
Ritchie, David Fraser

Received his wings at No. 6 SFTS Dunnville, August 20, 1941. Posted overseas receiving operational training at No. 52 OTU. Posted to No. 411 Squadron. Posted to Malta flying a Spitfire from the deck of the HMS Eagle, July 15, 1942.
Ritchie, I. S.
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Ritchie, I. S.

Pilot Officer I.S.Ritchie of No 603 Squadron was wounded on August 28th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6989) was damaged in combat off Dover.
Roach, R. J. B.
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Roach, R. J. B.

Pilot Officer R.J.B.Roach from No 266 Squadron shared in the shooting down of a He 115 off Dunkirk on the 15th of August 1940. He was shot down in combat on September 11th 1940, baling out from his Spitfire(P7313) over Billericay, escaping injury.
Robbins, R. H.
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Robbins, R. H.

Sergeant R.H.Robbins was with No 54 Squadron in July 1940. He was posted to No 66 Squadron in September. On September 14th 1940 he was shot down in his Spitfire I (X4327) over Maidstone and was seriously wounded.
Roberts, R.
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Roberts, R.

Pilot Officer R.Roberts of No 64 Squadron was forced to land his Spitfire I (R6990) SH-W at Calais-Marck on August 15th 1940 after combat and was taken prisoner.
Robinson, Kenneth Basil
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Robinson, Kenneth Basil

Killed aged 22 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.XII MB881 EB-S of No.41 Sqn was hit by flak off Sark and crashed into the sea. He is buried at Buckland Monachorum Cemetery. Son of Ernest S. Robinson and Lilian M. Robinson, of Monkstown, Co. Dublin, Irish Republic.
Rodgers, Samuel Alvin
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   Died : 21 / 5 / 1944
Rodgers, Samuel Alvin

Killed aged 23 on 21st May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK640 of No.66 Sqn was hit by flak over Bayeux and crashed into the sea 10 miles off Normandy. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Maj. Alvin Rodgers and May Louisa Rodgers, of Ormskirk, Lancashire.
Roovers, Henricus Christianus A J
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   Died : 2 / 5 / 1944
Roovers, Henricus Christianus A J

Killed on 2nd May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.XIV RB141 VL-L of No.322 Sqn failed to return from a patrol south of the Isle of Wight. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
Roscoe, Arthur
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Roscoe, Arthur

American Arthur Roscoe joined the RAF in February 1941, through the Clayton Knight Committee that was recruiting American civilian pilots for the RAF. Arriving in England he joined 71 Eagle Squadron, where he made his first claims. In June 1942 he volunteered for service on Malta and flew off the carrier HMS Furious on 11th August to join 229 Squadron. During his final combat on 12th October he was shot down, wounded and evacuated from the island in a Liberator, which in turn crashed on landing in Gibraltar. On recovery, he was posted to join 165 Squadron, then 242 Squadron, and in May 1944 was given command of 232 Squadron. He had destroyed 4 enemy aircraft and probably 3 more.
Rose, Jack
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   Died : 10 / 10 / 2009
Rose, Jack

Jack Rose was born on January 18 1917 at Blackheath, London, and was educated at Shooters Hill School before studying Science at University College London where he represented the university at rugby. He joined the RAF Volunteer Reserve in October 1938, completing his training as a fighter pilot just before the outbreak of war. With the British Expeditionary force under constant air attack, fighter reinforcements were requested and Jack Rose flew one of the Hurricanes sent to Merville to reinforce No.3 Squadron. He was in action immediately and on the 15th he shared in the destruction of a Messerschmitt Bf109 as the air battle reached its climax. For the next few days the Hurricane squadrons operated at maximum intensity. During the afternoon of the 18th Rose intercepted a lone Messerschmitt Bf110 fighter over Douai and shot it down. A few hours earlier, his elder brother Tommy, of No 56 Squadron, had been shot down and killed in his Hurricane. The following day Rose attacked a Heinkel 111 and closed to within a few yards to shoot the bombers port engine. Oil from the engine covered the windscreen of his Hurricane so he climbed away, slowed the aircraft down to almost stalling speed, loosened his harness, stood on his seat and leant out of the cockpit in an attempt to clean the windscreen. As he did, tracer from an enemy fighter hit his aircraft. Seeing Rose standing in the cockpit, the German pilot claimed he had shot down the Hurricane, but Rose managed to break away. His aircraft was badly damaged but he managed a forced landing at a forward airfield where the aircraft was destroyed. Orders were given to evacuate the Hurricanes on the 20th. Without an aircraft, Rose joined others on a French transport and was flown to England. In the 10 days of the air war, No 3 Squadron lost seven pilots killed with another taken prisoner. A further nine Hurricanes were lost. He formed the new 184 Squadron in 1942, initially on Hurricanes, later Spitfires. In late 1943 the squadron converted to rocket firing Typhoons, and were heavily involved in the build up to D-Day, moving to France in late 1944. He later transferred to the Far East, finishing the war with 3 victories. Leading the rocket-firing Hawker Typhoons of 184 Squadron, Jack Rose swept down on German armour concentrations south of Caen on D-Day, the first of many such sorties over Normandy Constantly on call during the battle, the squadrons targets ranged from enemy armour and convoys, to gun and mortar positions, bridges and railway targets. From June 14, they operated from Advanced Landing Grounds in France, with the enemy close enough to fire at them on landing and take-off. Rose joined his first squadron, No 32, at Biggin Hill flying Hurricanes. In the Battle for France he scored three victories before returning to England to take part in the Battle of Britain. In 1942 he formed 184 Squadron from scratch, leading it until October 1944. He later flew Hurricanes again in the Far East. He left the RAF in October 1945. Sadly, Jack Rose died on 10th October 2009.
Rose, Stuart Nigel
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Rose, Stuart Nigel

Originally from Elswick in the north east of England, Rose moved south to join the RAFVR in March 1939, called up at the outbreak of war he was commissioned in June 1940 joining No.602 Sqn in June 1940 flying Spitfires and serving with the unit throughout the Battle of Britain, claiming three victories. Squadron Leader Nigel Rose was then posted to 54 Sqn at Hornchurch in September 1941 before becoming an instructor in 1942, and also serving in the Middle East. Afterwards he moved to No.54 Sqn before taking on positions in training units.
Ross, Don
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Ross, Don

Don Ross flew Spitfire Vbs with the second American Eagle Squadron, 121 Squadron. By the time the squadron transferred to the 357th Fighter Group in September 1942 he had already completed 72 combat sorties. Shot down in February 1944 he became a POW until May 1945. He flew combat in Korea, and then F-4 Phantoms in Vietnam.
Rosser, T N
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Rosser, T N

Squadron Leader T.N. Rosser OBE DFC volunteered for pilot training early in 1940. After training in England he was commissioned and flew with Spitfire and Hurricane squadrons in England and Bengal from August 1941 until December 1942, when he joined No 3 PRU (later redesignated 681 Squadron) in Calcutta for photographic reconnaissance operations in Japanes-occupied Burma, Thailand, and the Andaman Islands. (At that time the squadron was equipped with converted Hurricanes and North American B52s, and three PR Spitfires, the only Spitfires of any kind in India. A year or so later it had a full complement of Spitfire Mk XIs and 684 Squadron, equipped with Mosquitoes, had been formed). After his operational tour ended in July 1944, he commanded the PR training Flight in 74 OTU in Palestine until VE Day when the OTU was disbanded. He later formed and led a temporary squadron of Spitfire fighter/bombers based in Egypt for internal security duties in the Middle East. He was demobilised in late 1946 after administrative appointments in Air HQ Egypt, and at Cranwell.
Russell, Ian Bedford Nesbitt
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   Died : 1 / 6 / 1940
Russell, Ian Bedford Nesbitt

Ian joined the pre war Royal Air Force. In November 1939 he was posted to No. 609 (West Riding) Squadron with the rank of Pilot Officer, flying Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1 aircraft from RAF Drem in Scotland. Promotion to Flying Officer followed, Kinloss. 7.1.40. Yellow Section on general flying practice. Yellow 1 out of R/T touch and only one wheel lowered. Pilot Flying Officer Russell abandoned aircraft and landed safely by parachute. The aircraft - Spitfire L.1064 crashed at Crook of Alves and burnt out on impact. 25th January 1940 Flying Officer I.B.N. Russell damaged his Airscrew and Flaps on landing and running into a slight drift of snow and mud which caused the tail to lift. Aircraft repaired same day. Drem. 8.5.40 . Flying Officer I.B.N. Russell posted to No. 245 Squadron Leconfield. Information was received today from Headquarters No. 13 Group to the effect that the Heinkel 111 attacked by Red Section at 09.45 hours on 29th January, 1940 and lost in the clouds had been riddled by bullets but had been able to regain its base. The aircraft was later shot down at Wick and the pilot volunteered this information. and on 8th May 1940 he was posted to No. 245 Squadron at RAF Leconfield flying Hawker Hurricane Mk.1's 245 moving to Drem on the 12th. Subsequently posted to No. 607 Squadron at RAF Croydon, 'Hack', as he was known amongst his colleagues, flew Hurricanes in combat against the Luftwaffe. On 15th May 1940, whilst flying Hurricane P2619 AF D , Hack crash landed after being wounded whilst flying on a patrol which came into contact with German Heinkel He111 bombers. His aircraft is believed to have been abandoned at approximately 16.30 hours. He returned to 609 Squadron on 22nd May 1940, now stationed at RAF Northolt 25th May 1940. Fg Off Russell taxied out in L1068 in a big hurry and collided forcibly with a brand new Command Reserve Aircraft P9427, which was dispersed on the edg e of the taxiway. Both aircraft beyond unit capacity to repair. F/O Russell was only back with the squadron for only ten days before he was posted as 'missing, presumed killed', having disappeared over Dunkirk in Spitfire L1058 whilst on a patrol covering the evacuation of troops from the beaches of Northern France, during which he had got involved in a combat with German Messerschmitt Bf110 ‘Zerstörer’ aircraft. Ian Russell is credited as having shot down a total of 11 enemy aircraft confirmed destroyed, with a further six probably destroyed. On one particular occasion he got two confirmed victories, after which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. As one of the missing aircrew with no known grave, Ian's name is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial
Ryll, Stefan
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Ryll, Stefan

Stefan Ryll went into operations with 306 Squadron flying both Hurricanes and Spitfires, and took part in the last raid of the war flying a P-51 Mustang on escort for the bombers flying to Berchtesgaden.
Samuels, Norman
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Samuels, Norman

Initially flying Typhoons with 193 Sqn, Norman then transferred to 610 Sqn flying Spitfires on fighter sweeps over France, heavy-bomber missions, and operations against VIs. Returning to ground attack Typhoons over Europe with 193 Sqn, he was shot down in March 1945 and taken prisoner of war.
Sandvig, K
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   Died : 15 / 6 / 1944
Sandvig, K

Killed on 15th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ728 FN-T of No.331 Sqn was hit by flak and he baled out.
Sans, Marcel Adrien
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Sans, Marcel Adrien

On 21st May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK192 GE-H of No.349 Sqn was hit by flak and he baled out off Beachy Head, and picked up by Air Sea Rescue. Killed on 7th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ748 of No.349 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed near Caen.
Sarre, A. R.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1980
Sarre, A. R.

Sergeant A.R.Sarre of No 603 Squadron baled safely out of his Spitfire I (R7021) on August 30th 1940 after combat over West Malling. He was wounded on September 7th 1940 when he baled out of his Spitfire I (P9467) over the Thames Estuary.
Saunders, C. H.
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Saunders, C. H.

Pilot Officer C.H.(Fishy) Saunders of No 92 Squadron was wounded on September 9th 1940. He crash landed his Spitfire I (L1077) near Rye, following combat.
Saunders, G. A. W.
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Saunders, G. A. W.

Flight Lieutenant G.A.W.Saunders was with No 65 Squadron flying Spitfire's during the Battle of Britain. He assumed command of the Squadron after the death of Squadron Leader H.C.Sawyer on the August 2nd 1940 until A.L.Holland arrived to take command mid-way through August.
Saunderson, T M
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Saunderson, T M

On 16th March 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ149 of No.412 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and was abandoned over the Somme Estuary. He was picked up by a Walrus seaplane of Air Sea Rescue.
Savage, Thomas Wood
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   Died : 10 / 7 / 1943
Savage, Thomas Wood

Killed July 10th 1943
Sawyer, Henry C.
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   Died : 2 / 8 / 1940
Sawyer, Henry C.

Squadron Leader Henry Cecil 'Sam' Sawyer of No 65 Squadron was killed on August 2nd 1940. He crashed shortly after taking off for night patrol and his Spitfire I (R6799) was burned out.
Sayer, C E
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   Died : 12 / 3 / 1944
Sayer, C E

Killed on 12th March 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XII crashed near Turnhouse for an unknown reason. It had been scrambled to assist a Liberator returning to base.
Scott, Allan
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Scott, Allan

Allan Scott joined the RAF in March 1941, joining 124 Squadron in October, where he made his first claims. Ordered to Malta, he flew his Spitfire off HMS Eagle to the island on 21st July. Initially posted to 603 Squadron, he went to 1435 Squadron, seeing much action - including a victory during Operation Pedestal on 13th August. He remained with this unit until December 1942. Whilst on Malta he was credited with at least 5 destroyed and a further 2 probables, and received the DFM. Returnong to the UK he was commissioned in January 1943. In September he was posted to join 122 Squadron. His final tally was 6 victories.
Scott, E.
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1940
Scott, E.

Sgt. E.Scott of No 222 Squadron was killed on September 27th 1940. He failed to return in his Spitfire I (P9364).
Scott, J. A.
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   Died : 27 / 10 / 1940
Scott, J. A.

Sergeant J.A.Scott of No 74 Squadron was shot down and killed on October 27th 1940 in his Spitfire II (P7526) in combat over Maidstone.
Scott, W. J.
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Scott, W. J.

Flight Officer W.J.Scott of No 41 Squadron was flying a Spitfire I (N3038) on the 29th of July 1940. He had been in combat off Dover and went to land, but his under-carriage collapsed when he touched down. He escaped uninjured. W.J.Scott was again shot down and this time killed, he was shot down off Dover in a Spitfire I (R6756) on September 8th 1940.
Scott-Malden, David
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   Died : 1 / 3 / 2000
Scott-Malden, David

Born 26th December 1919, at Portslade, Sussex , David Scott-Malden became a Pilot Officer in October 1939. After training in the Cambridge University Air Squadron, Scott-Malden was selected for an Army Co-Operation course as a pilot officer. He was thrilled when in late May 1940 the chief instructor announced that he had "a severe disappointment" to communicate: "Gentlemen," he said, "you are to be transferred immediately to fighters". Scott-Malden joined No 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron at Hornchurch, Essex in early October 1940 as a replacement Spitfire pilot during the early stage of the Battle of Britain over the South-East. The squadron had been much depleted by losses that summer as was only too apparent in an action over Kent on October 12th. "Eight aircraft were directed into a large gaggle of Me109 fighters, we split up individually and passed head-on through the enemy formation. There was a sense of shock as a distant series of silhouettes suddenly became rough metal with grey-green paint and yellow noses, passing head-on on either side. At the far end I had a few minutes dog fight with the last 109, scoring hits leaving a trail of black smoke. Then we were alone at 20,000 feet, the German gliding down with an engine which coughed and barely turned over, I with very little ammunition and very little petrol. He glided towards the Channel. I looked for an airfield before my petrol ran out. Strangely, I felt inclined to wave to him as I left. But then I was only 20". It was Scott-Malden who would go onto many other victories with five confirmed and as many as seven probables. In June 1940 he was posted to fly Spitfires with No 611 (West Lancashire) Squadron at Digby, Lincolnshire before being transferred to No 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron at Hornchurch in early October. In the New Year of 1941 Scott-Malden flew offensive sweeps with 603 over northern France. He was promoted to flight commander and in September received command of No 54 Squadron. Bearing the initials "S-M" below the cockpit and the legend "Bahrain", Scott-Maldens Spitfire W3632 - built at the Supermarine factory at Woolston, Hampshire - was a gift from the people of Bahrain, who had raised £15,000 to purchase the Spitfire. Moving in November to headquarters No 14 Group in Scotland, Scott-Malden had the task of helping to bring to operational readiness the first Free Norwegian fighter squadrons, with pilots who had escaped from Norway. When they were ready Scott-Malden was appointed, in March 1942, to command the Norwegian Fighter Wing of three squadrons at North Weald in Essex. In the summer, the wing built a magnificent reputation and covered itself in glory during the disastrous Dieppe raid of August 20. Operating from the Kent coastal airfield at Manston, Scott-Malden led Nos 242, 331 and 332 squadrons in three separate sorties on the day, seeking, against great odds, to protect the mostly Canadian troops as they attempted to land and then to withdraw. Scott-Malden was awarded a DSO in 1942 and was also decorated by King Haakon of Norway with the Norwegian War Cross, lunching with the King afterwards at Claridges. In New Year 1944, in preparation During the run for the Normandy invasion, in 1944 Scott Malden joined a mobile group control unit on Goodwood racecourse. After D-Day June 6, the unit moved to Normandy with the roll to control fighter support. During the summer of 1944 Scott-Malden was promoted acting group captain and given command of No 125, a Spitfire wing covering the Allied forces as they advanced through North-West Europe from nine different points. Scott-Malden took a permanent commission witht he RAF and took a number staff and command appointments, one of which was to assist with plans for the Suez campaign of 1956. Scott-Malden final tally of victories stood at 3 confirmed destroyed with two shared, five probables and 12 damaged with another one sharedbecame an Air Vice marshal in 1965. and left the RAF in 1966 taking a administrator position with the Ministry of Transport and in 1978 retiring to Norfolk . Sadly, he died on 1st March 2000.

Citation for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Acting Flight Lieutenant Francis David Stephen SCOTT-MALDEN (74690) Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No.603 Squadron.

This officer has been continuously engaged in operational flying since June, 1940, leading his flight and sometimes the squadron. During the last six weeks, he has taken part in 38 offensive operations over enemy territory. A fine leader, Flight Lieutenant Scott-Maiden has at all times displayed great keenness and determination in his engagements with the enemy. He has destroyed three and damaged many of their aircraft.
(London Gazette – 9 August 1941)

Citation for the award of the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Acting Wing Commander Francis David Stephen SCOTT-MALDEN, D.F.C.(74690) Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

This officer has led the wing on 44 sorties over Northern France. During these operations 6 enemy aircraft were destroyed 1 of which was shot down by Wing Commander Scott-Maiden himself. On 2 occasions, in April, this officer displayed great skill when his force was attacked by superior numbers of enemy aircraft. Throughout, he has displayed great courage and leadership.
(London Gazette – 5 June 1942)

Citation for the award of the Distinguished Service Order.

Acting Wing Commander Francis David Stephen SCOTT-MALDEN, D.F.C. (74690) Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

During the past 6 months, this officer has led his wing on a large number of sorties. In this period, the wing has destroyed 49 enemy aircraft and probably destroyed and damaged many others. During the combined operations at Dieppe on the 19th August, 1942, the wing completed a large number of sorties; 21 enemy aircraft were destroyed, and many others damaged. Wing Commander Scott-Malden led the wing on 3 of these sorties. The splendid success achieved on this and other occasions is largely attributable to the magnificent leadership displayed by Wing Commander Scott-Maiden. He is a brilliant pilot and a fine tactician, whose thorough knowledge and personal example have proved worthy of the highest praise.
(London Gazette – 11 September 1942)

Scuvie, Didier John Maurice
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   Died : 30 / 4 / 1944
Scuvie, Didier John Maurice

Killed on 30th April 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V AR498 of No.350 Sqn crashed into the sea off Tangmere after colliding with Spitfire Mk.V AA853 also of No.350 Sqn. piloted by Warrant Officer G C DeJaeger, who survived. He is buried in the Belgian Airmen's Field of Honour at Brussels Town Cemetery.
Seller, A E
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Seller, A E

On 28th June 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MH754 of No.412 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and crash landed south east of Caen. He was taken prisoner.
Seward, Dave
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Seward, Dave

Dave Seward flew RAF Meteors, Canberras and Javelins and USAF F-86, F-102 and F-106 fighters. In 1961, as C.O. of No.56 Sqn he led the 'Firebirds' Lightning aerobatic team and later Commanded the Lightning OCU and Battle of Britain Flight, flying the Lancaster, Hurricane and Spitfire.
Shafer, Dale
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Shafer, Dale


Shand, M. M.
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   Died : 22 / 12 / 2007
Shand, M. M.

Pilot Officer M.M.Shand a New Zealander joined No 54 Squadron on the 24th of August 1940 with little experience of flying in Spitfires, he had no previous training at all in combat. He flew as No 2 to Al Deere on his first outing. He suffered injuries on August 25th 1940 when his Spitfire I (R6969) was attacked over Dover. Michael Moray Shand was born in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 20 1915 and educated at Nelson College. He was working in the fruit industry when, in early 1939, he applied for a short service commission in the RNZAF, starting his pilot training later that year. After gaining his wings he sailed for England in June 1940. The RAF was desperately short of fighter pilots, and Shand was rushed through training. After just 20 hours' flying on the Spitfire, during which time he never fired its guns, he was posted to No 54 Squadron. The squadron was based at Hornchurch, in Essex, and when he arrived in late August, the Battle of Britain was reaching a climax. He flew his first sortie as wingman to the outstanding New Zealand ace, Al Deere, who told him to stay close and watch was going on. Three days after his arrival Shand was on an evening patrol over Dover when a Messerschmitt Bf 109 attacked him, damaging his aircraft. He managed to crash-land on the airfield at Manston, but had been badly wounded in the arm. He spent several months in hospital. Shand returned to operations in October 1941 with No 485 (RNZAF) Squadron, flying Spitfire Vs from Kenley, in Surrey. The squadron was heavily involved in operations over northern France, escorting bomber formations and attacking road transports. Shand was appointed a flight commander in May 1942, and he and his pilots provided withdrawal cover during Operation Jubilee, the raid on Dieppe. By September he had flown 60 operations over France and was awarded a DFC, the citation describing him as "a skilful pilot and fearless leader". On November 28 Shand led a formation of six Spitfires on a low-level sweep off the Dutch coast seeking targets of opportunity. They successfully attacked a tanker-barge on a canal and, as they returned, Shand and his wingman went down to shoot up a train. Two Focke Wulf 190s attacked them. Shand was shot down and quickly captured. Within a few weeks he arrived at Stalag Luft III, 100 miles south-east of Berlin. It was Goering's "show camp", administered and guarded by the Luftwaffe. After the Great Escape, Shand remained at Stalag Luft III until the camp was evacuated in January 1945, the PoWs being forced to march westwards in the harshest winter for many years. In May he was liberated. He returned to England before going home to New Zealand in September.
Shannon, R C A
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Shannon, R C A

On 29th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH928 of No.416 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Fw190s west of Lisieux. He successfully evaded capture.
Sharpe, Johnny
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Sharpe, Johnny

Qualified as a pilot in 1944 and was posted to Italy flying Spitfires and Mustangs for 249 and 213 Squadrons, flying across the Adriatic and taking part in combat over the Balkans. He was nicknamed 8 o'clock because he was never on time for briefings!
Sheen, Desmond
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 2001
Sheen, Desmond

Flight Officer Desmond F.B.Sheen of No 72 Squadron an Australian baled out of his Spitfire I (X4109) safely on September 1st 1940 at Ham Street, Kent. He had been in combat with some German fighters. On September 5th 1940 he was wounded in combat after baling out of his Spitfire I (X4034) near Hawkinge. He was later promoted to the rank of Wing Commander and awarded the D.F.C. and Bar.
Shepherd, F. E. R.
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   Died : 11 / 9 / 1940
Shepherd, F. E. R.

Sergeant F.E.R.Shepherd of No 611 Squadron was killed on September 11th 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire II (P7298) after combat over Croydon, Surrey however his parachute burned and he was killed. His aircraft crashed at Weybridge, Surrey.
Shepley, D. C.
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   Died : 12 / 8 / 1940
Shepley, D. C.

Pilot Officer D.C.Shepley of No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed on August 12th 1940 South off the Isle of Wight in his Spitfire I (K9999).
Sheppard, George
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Sheppard, George

Volunteering initially in October 1940 and called up in January 1941, George Sheppard learnt to fly in America and graduated and was commissioned in April 1942. He stayed on as an instructor in America returning to England in March 1943. He joined 198 Typhoon Squadron and after the invasion moved to Normandy in July 1944. He stayed with the squadron all the way through to Germany, becoming a flight commander in February 1945. He flew a total of 84 operational sorties. He felw Meteors with 74 Squadron and Spitfires with 263 Squadron in Italy before demob in May 1946. -- At the time of the Falaise battle we were operating from B7 Martragny and checking my log book I flew 16 ops during this time. The targets in and around Falaise were troop concentrations, tanks, trucks, armoured vehicles and gun positions. A flight which I was in, claimed many tanks, trucks etc, these being the ones that could be identified. One did not hang around after firing rockets and cannons to check results of attacks as the flak was intensive. In our flight we lost 2 pilots killed, 2 baled out but returned to base. Many planes were damaged by flak. I was hit and lost my brakes. Crash landed back at B7. I was also hit by 88mm flak on July 31st and forced landed over our lines at Cuverville, near Caen. After the battle a few of us went down to the Falaise area in our Commer 15 cwt truck. The destruction was incredible, burnt out vehicles, tanks, dead animals in the fields and dead Germans on the roadside. The smell was overwhelming. I thought at the time what it must have been like on the ground being under constant attack from the air. It was the first time I had seen on the ground the destruction caused by rockets, bombs and 20mm cannon fire.
Sheppard, J
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Sheppard, J

On 24th January 1944, the engine of his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ145 of No.401 Sqn failed as he was over the English Channel. He managed to bale out and was picked up by an Air Sea Rescue launch.
Sherk, R J F
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Sherk, R J F

On 15th March 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ126 of No.401 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and crash landed near Albert. Feldwebel Bohm of JG26 claimed a victory over this Spitfire.
Shields, W M
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Shields, W M

On 22nd June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.V W3946 of No.130 Sqn was shot down by American flak near St Lo. He was unharmed.
Silver, W. G.
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   Died : 25 / 9 / 1940
Silver, W. G.

Sergeant W.G.Silver of No 152 Squadron was killed on September 25th 1940. His Spitfire I (P9463) was shot down off Portsmouth.
Sims, Dennis Jonathan
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   Died : 6 / 6 / 1944
Sims, Dennis Jonathan

Killed aged 22 on 6th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.V AA936 suffered engine failure and ditched off St Catherine's Point on the Isle of Wight. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Jonathan William and Maud Sims, of Braintree, Essex. King's Scout.
Sizer, Wilf
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   Died : 22 / 12 / 2006
Sizer, Wilf

Born on 23rd February 1920, at the outbreak of war Bill Sizer was flying Hurricanes with 213 Squadron, after flying Guantlets with No.17 Squadron. The squadron flew to France in May 1940, where he scored his first victories, before being attacked by five Me109s and shot down. Rejoining his squadron soon after, he took part in the air battles over Dunkirk before again being shot down and escaping back to England. He flew throughout the Battle of Britain. Based at Exeter, on the 11th of August, he shot down a Ju88, and the next day he shot down a fighter escorting a large formation of bombers. As the attacks intensified, the pilots of 213 Sqn fle wup to four patrols a day. On the 15th of August he shot down two Ju87 Stukas. He also shared in the destruction of a Ju88 in October 1940, bringing it down over Beachy Head. He was awarded the DFC for scoring 7 and 5 shared victories. In April 1941 he was posted to join 1 Squadron, and then 91 Squadron. In April 1942 he joined 152 Squadron flying Spitfires, with whom he went to North Africa. In January 1943 he was given command of 93 Squadron and took part in the Sicily landings. While leading 93 Squadron he shot down two Italian fighters and damaged several others. He was awarded a Bar to the DFC. He finished the war with 7 and 5 shared victories. He died 22nd December 2006.
Skinner, W. M.
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Skinner, W. M.

Sergeant William Malcolm Skinner joined No 74 Squadron from the R.A.F.V.R. on June 10th 1939 from No 5 E & R.F.T.S. at Hanworth. He baled out of his Spitfire I (X4022) after a collision while on patrol on August 30th 1940, he was uninjured. He was promoted to Pilot Officer and awarded the D.F.C. Skinner was taken prisoner on July 6th 1941 when he was shot down over France in a Spitfire V (W3208).
Slack, T A H
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Slack, T A H

On 18th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII MB876 EB-V of No.41 Sqn was hit by flak. The engine cut and he baled out, being rescued by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Slade, Bill
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Slade, Bill

Arriving in England in July 1941, Bill quickly completed his RAF training and joined his fellow compatriots at 133 Eagle Squadron, formed a few months earlier. Flying Spitfires he took part in the air operations attacking the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau during the Channel Dash. Transferring to the 336th Fighter Squadron, USAAF, he completed a total of over 80 combat sorties during the war.
Small, Ronald Harold
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Small, Ronald Harold

Killed aged 22 on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MA817 of No.229 Sqn was shot down by an Fw190 north of Caen. He is buried in St Sampson Churchyard, Calvados. Son of Harold Campbell Small and Ettie Small, of Epping, New South Wales, Australia.
Smith, A. D.
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   Died : 6 / 9 / 1940
Smith, A. D.

Sergeant A.D.Smith of No 66 Squadron crashed in to the sea on July 24th 1940. The cause was unknown but he escaped uninjured. On the September 4th 1940 A.D.Smith Baled out of his Spitfire I (N3048) badly wounded near Purleigh, Essex. His aircraft had been shot up in combat. He later died of his wounds on September 6th 1940.
Smith, A. T.
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 1940
Smith, A. T.

Squadron Leader A.T.Smith of No 610 Squadron was killed when he stalled his battle damaged Spitfire I (R6693) at Hawkinge on July 25th 1940. This was following a combat over the Channel.
Smith, D. N. E.
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   Died : 11 / 8 / 1940
Smith, D. N. E.

Pilot Officer D.N.E.Smith a Canadian fought with No 74 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. On August 11th 1940 he was shot down and killed in a Spitfire I (R6962) East of Harwich.
Smith, D. S.
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   Died : 28 / 9 / 1940
Smith, D. S.

Pilot Officer D.S.Smith of No 616 Squadron was wounded on September 27th 1940. He was shot down in his Spitfire I (R6702) near to Faversham. He died on September 28th 1940 and is buried at Faversham.
Smith, E. B. B.
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Smith, E. B. B.

Flight Lieutenant E.B.B.Smith of No 610 Squadron. On August 12th, he was on patrol in his Spitfire I (K9818) when he was shot down in flames over New Romney, he baled out, and was rescued from the sea and hospitalised with burns. E.B.B.Smith was awarded the D.F.C. on August 30th 1940.
Smith, F. M.
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Smith, F. M.

Flight Lieutenant F.M.Smith a Canadian of No 72 Squadron was wounded on August 31st 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (P9438) after combat.
Smith, Henry Lacy
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   Died : 11 / 6 / 1944
Smith, Henry Lacy

Killed aged 27 on 11th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ789 of No.453 Sqn RAAF was hit by flak and crashed into a canal near Ouistreham during a forced landing. He is buried in Ranville War Cemetery. Son of Richard Lacy Smith and Mary Ellen Smith, of Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia; husband of Edna Smith.
Smith, Kenneth
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Smith, Kenneth


Smith, Robert Harry
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   Died : 19 / 5 / 1944
Smith, Robert Harry

Killed on 19th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ480 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was abandoned 15 miles north of Dieppe. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
Smith, Roderick
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   Died : 16 / 4 / 2002
Smith, Roderick

Flight Commander 412 Sqn RCAF, Flight Commander 126 Sqn RAF, Squadron Commander 401 Sqn RCAF. One of Canada's most skillful Spitfire pilots, his victory total included a shared victory over an Me262 jet fighter.Born in 1922, he joined the RCAF and was sent to Scotland for training on the Spitfire Mk.I. He was posted to Malta with No.126 Sqn, where his older brother was already serving. His brother was killed in action during theit time in Malta, and Roderick himself was forced to bail out of his burning aircraft. On D-Day, he flew over the Normandy beaches as Flight Commander of No.412 Sqn RCAF. He returned to Canada in December 1944 and retired the next year. Sadly, Roderick Smith died on 16th April 2002.
Smith, Sir Alan
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   Died : 1 / 3 / 2013
Smith, Sir Alan

An RAFVR pilot Alan Smith completed his conversion to Spitfires and was posted to 610 Squadron in October 1940. and then to 616 Squadron in December 1940, Alan Smith often flew as wingman to Douglas Bader and would have been flying in that position on the fateful August 9th had he not been suffering from a head cold and instead set off for London to buy a uniform to match his newly granted commission. Johnnie Johnson described him as the perfect No 2. He usually flew in the same section with Bader, Cocky Dundas and Johnson. Alan Smith was impressed not only by Baders ability to inspire his pilots, but also his willingness to protect them. He remembers the RAF police pouncing on the squadron to see if anyone was using aviation fuel in their cars and how Bader sent them packing in no uncertain terms! In November 1941 Alan Smith was posted to a training role but returned to operations in November 1942 in North Africa. After completing this tour he returned to instructing latterly in the USA. By the end of the war Smith had been awarded the DFC and Bar and had recorded five confirmed victories. After the war he had a very successful career in the textile industry.
Sparling, Richard Herbert
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   Died : 25 / 4 / 1944
Sparling, Richard Herbert

Killed on 25th April 1944 when his No.441 Sqn RCAF Spitfire Mk.IX MK394 failed to return from a bomber escort mission near Laon, after combat with Fw190s. His name is on the Runnymede memorial.
Sparrow, G F
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Sparrow, G F

On 17th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb EN861 of No.234 Sqn was in collision with Spitfire BL720 of the same squadron while on a night patrol. EN861 was damaged, but Sparrow managed to land safely. In the other Spitfire, BL720, Flying Officer William Henry Painter was killed after it crashed.
Squier, John
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   Died : 30 / 1 / 2006
Squier, John

John Squier was called up from the RAFVR at the outbreak of war, joining 64 Squadron at Kenley in June 1940 flying Spitfires. In August he crash landed following an attack by Hannes Trautloft of III/JG51, suffering severe injuries. Rejoining 64 Squadron in November, he was posted to 72 Squadron, then 603 Squadron, and finally 141 Squadron. He was commissioned in 1942. After the war he became a test pilot and was the first pilot to eject at supersonic speed. He died 30th January 2006.
St. Aubin, E. F.
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   Died : 27 / 5 / 1943
St. Aubin, E. F.

Flight Officer E.F.St Aubin of No 616 Squadron wounded on August 26th 1940 when he crash landed his Spitfire I (R7018) at Eastchurch after combat in the air. The aircraft burst into flames on landing but was later repaired and flown again.
St.John, P. C. B.
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   Died : 22 / 10 / 1940
St.John, P. C. B.

Flight Officer Peter Cape Beauchamp St John joined No 74 Squadron on May 7th 1940 from No 501 Squadron. He was killed on October 22nd 1940 in action when his Spitfire II (P7431) was shot down over South Nutfield, Surrey.
Stanford-Tuck, Robert
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   Died : 5 / 5 / 1987
Stanford-Tuck, Robert

Bob Stanford Tuck was a flamboyant fighter pilot, Tuck was born in Catford, SE London. After a less-than-stellar school career he left St Dunstan's College, Catford in 1932 to join the Merchant Navy as a sea cadet (seaman's Discharge Number R112769) aboard the ss.Marconi from 19 May 1933 before joining the RAF on a short service commission as an acting pilot officer in 1935.[5] Following flying training, Tuck joined 65 Squadron in September 1935 as an acting probationary pilot officer. He became a pilot officer on probation in September 1936 and his pilot officer rank was confirmed in early 1937 (which was backdated to December 1936). On 17th January 1938 Tuck was involved in a Mid air collision flying Gladiator I K7940 he had to bail out of the aircraft over Ridgewood, near Uckfield, Sussex . The other Pilot was not so lucky, also of 65 Squadron in Gladiator K8014, Sgt Geoffrey Edwin Gaskell (24) was killed In September 1938 he was promoted to Flying Officer Tuck led his first combat patrol on 23 May 1940, over Dunkirk, claiming three German fighters shot down. The following day he shot down two German bombers and as aerial fighting intensified over the next two weeks his score rapidly mounted. Tuck was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) on 11 June and received it from King George VI at RAF Hornchurch on 28 June. His combat successes continued into July and August as the Battle of Britain gathered pace, although he himself was forced to bail out on 18 August. While attacking a formation of Junkers Ju 88s over Kent, he shot one down and damaged another. However, during the head on attack at Ju 88, when he overtook it, cannon shells hit his Spitfire and he was forced to bail out near Tunbridge Wells. He fell at Tucks Cottage, near Park Farm, Horsmonden. In another incident on 25 August Tuck's Spitfire was badly damaged during combat with a Dornier Do 17 bomber, which he destroyed 15 miles off the coast. His aircraft had a dead engine, but he glided it back to dry land and made a forced landing To the British public he was a hero in the mould of the knights of old, and today his name is legend. In the early stages of the Battle of Britain Bob fought with 92 Squadron flying Spitfires, quickly becoming one of the leading aces. Promoted to command 257 Squadron, now flying Hurricanes, Bob's dashing style of leadership inspired his pilots to great success. He went on to command the Duxford and Biggin Hill Wings, taking his personal score to 29 air victories before being shot down by ground fire over Northern France in 1942. Tuck then spent the next couple of years in Stalag Luft III at Żagań (Sagan), before making a number of unsuccessful escape attempts from several other prisoner of war camps across Germany and Poland. In company with the Polish pilot Zbigniew Kustrzyński, he finally escaped successfully on 1 February 1945 as his camp was being evacuated westwards from Russian forces advancing into Germany. Tuck's Russian, learned from his childhood nanny, was now crucial as he spent some time fighting alongside the Russian troops until he managed eventually to find his way to the British Embassy in Moscow. He eventually boarded a ship from Russia to Southampton, England. He died on 5th May 1987.
Staples, M. E.
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   Died : 9 / 11 / 1941
Staples, M. E.

Pilot Officer M.E.Staples of No 609 Squadron was wounded when he baled out of his Spitfire I (N3238) after combat over Yeovil on October 7th 1940.
Staples, Robert Charles John
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1985
Staples, Robert Charles John

Robert Charles John Staples was born on 13th March 1914 and attended Weymouth Technical High School. He joined the RAF in January 1930 as an Aircraft Apprentice and passed out in December 1932 as a Fitter, Aero Engines. He later applied for pilot training and was selected. He began his elementary flying course at 6 E&RFTS Sywell on 17th October 1936, moved on to 6 FTS Netheravon on 6th February 1937 and, with his training completed, he joined 72 Squadron at Church Fenton on 4th September 1937. Sergeant R.C.J.Staples of No 72 Squadron crashed his Spitfire I (L1078) during landing on August 6th 1940 at Acklington. The aircraft was written off but he escaped injury.He had flown this spitfire several time Other Spitfire he had flown were 18th AUGUST X4109, 22ND August X4034 24th August K9940 31st August R6928, 1st September morning X4105, 1st Sept afternoon X4005 , 2nd Sept morning X4105 2nd sept afternoon both R6971 and K9460 - 2/9 pm, flying N3068 Sept. 9th and 11th R9460 Septe. 14th and 15th, L1083 on Septe 23 and 27th, Sept 28th flying X4486 R6721 on October 1st, 2nd and 4th at 09:50 on 05/10/1940. Sergeant R.C.J.Staples also flew Spitfire Mk1a, serial no.X4544 which was damaged in a mid-air collision while being scrambled from Biggin Hill P/O Sutton in Spitfire K9989 was killed. X4486 on October 7th and 8th, X4483 on the 23th October and X4595 on 27th and 29th. On 26th March 1941 Staples was posted to 58 OTU Grangemouth as an instructor. He was with 65 Squadron at Westhampnett briefly in November 1941 but was then sent to 2 CFS Dalcross on 23rd November for an instructors course. Staples was commissioned in January 1942 and posted to 2 FTS Brize Norton on the 21st. He moved to 3(P) AFU Long Newton on 29th July. From 10th May 1943 he was with 1539 BAT Flight at South Cerney, and later Bibury. On 19th June 1944 Staples went to 1533 BAT Flight at Church Lawford and stayed there until October. He transferred to the Administrative and Special Duties Branch and became involved with mechanical transport. Staples was posted to Singapore in late 1945 and remained in the Far East until returning to the UK to retire from the RAF on 26th March 1948 as a Flight Lieutenant.
Stapleton, Basil
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   Died : 13 / 4 / 2010
Stapleton, Basil

Born in South Africa, Basil Stapleton joined the RAF in Jan 1939, being posted to 603 Sqn flying Spitfires. He first saw action off Scotland, sharing in the destruction of two bombers, before the Squadron was posted south to Hornchurch during the height of the Battle of Britain. By Nov 1940 his tally had risen to 6 and 2 shared victories and 8 probables. In March 1942 he was posted to 257 Sqn as flight commander. In August 1944 he commanded 247 Sqn flying Typhoons, taking part in the Arnhem operations. In December 1944, whilst attacking a train, debris hit his aircraft forcing him to land behind enemy lines where he was taken prisoner of war. Stapme Stapleton had scored 6 victories, plus 2 shared, 5 probable and 2 damaged. Sadly, we have learned that Basil Stapleton passed away on 13th April 2010.
Stasik, J
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1944
Stasik, J

Killed on 31st August 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH822 of No.303 Sqn was hit by flak and abandoned 10 miles north of Ostend.
Stefankiewicz, H
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Stefankiewicz, H

On 11th March 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM470 PK-C of No.315 Sqn suffered engine failure over the English Channel and was abandoned. He was picked up by an Air Sea Rescue launch.
Stenstad, B E F
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   Died : 4 / 1 / 1944
Stenstad, B E F

Killed on 4th January 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX EN130 of No.331 Sqn collided with Spitfire BS148 during take off from North Weald.
Stephen, Harbourne
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   Died : 20 / 8 / 2001
Stephen, Harbourne

Flying Spitfires with 605 squadron he took part in the air battles over France and Dunkirk and throughout the thick of the Battle of Britain. He was one of the top scoring R.A.F. pilots at the end of 1940 with 22 and a half air victories. In 1942 he was posted to the far east where he took command of 166 wing, remaining in fighters until the end of the war. After the war he had a successful career in newspapers where he became managing Director of the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. He died on 20th August 2001.
Stevenson, P. C. F.
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   Died : 13 / 2 / 1943
Stevenson, P. C. F.

Pilot Officer Peter C.F.'Paddy' Stevenson of No 74 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (P9393) near Dover on August 11th 1940 after combat. He was picked up unhurt by a motor torpedo boat.
Stewart, Charles
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   Died : 15 / 3 / 1941
Stewart, Charles

Pilot Officer Charles Stewart a New Zealander from No 54 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (P9389) on August 24th 1940. His aircraft was damaged over the Thames Estuary in combat. The Spitfire crashed at Kingsdown. Later in the war he was killed in action.
Stillwell, Len
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   Died : 6 / 12 / 2008
Stillwell, Len

Len Stillwell trained in Southern Rhodesia and was posted to Italy with 92 Squadron flying Hurricanes. Later Len Stillwell went onto fly Mk.V , MK VIII and IX Spitfires with 92 squadron providing close ground support. He was wounded when enemy fire hit his aircraft injuring both his legs, but soon he rejoined the squadron. It was sad news to hear of his passing on the 6th December 2008.
Stokoe, J.
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Stokoe, J.

Sergeant J.Stokoe of No 603 Squadron was wounded on September 2nd 1940. He had been in combat with fighters and baled out of his Spitfire I (N3056). He later joined No 54 Squadron and was promoted to Pilot Officer.
Stone, D
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Stone, D

11th January 1940 involved in combat with He111 bomber which returned fire. Although Sergeant D Stone was unhurt the Spitfire Mk.Ia N3036 of No.66 Sqn was written off.
Studd, J. A. P.
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   Died : 19 / 8 / 1940
Studd, J. A. P.

Pilot Officer J.A.P.Studd of No 66 Squadron was killed by the return fire on August 19th 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (N3182) and was rescued but died later from his injuries.
Surma, F.
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   Died : 8 / 11 / 1941
Surma, F.

Pilot Officer F.Surma from Poland flew Hurricane's with No 151 Squadron, No 607 Squadron & No 257 Squadrons during the Battle of Britain. Pilot Officer F.Surma was with No 257 Squadron when he baled out of his Hurricane I (P3893) safely on the 29th of October 1940 over Bobbingworth, Essex. F.Surma was shot down and killed over Dunkirk on November 8th 1941 in a Spitfire Vb (AB930) of No 308 Squadron whilst on Circus 110.
Sutherland, R A
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Sutherland, R A

On 18th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH709 LO-R force land on a beach head at Normandy. He was ok and the aircraft was recovered.
Sutton, N.
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   Died : 5 / 10 / 1940
Sutton, N.

Killed October 5th 1940 when involved in a mid-air collision with F/O Robert Charles John Staples and P/O N Sutton in Spitfire K9989, was killed.
Swanwick, George W
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   Died : 4 / 1 / 2011
Swanwick, George W

George Swanwick was born on 10th November 1915 and was an air-gunner on Wallaces and Hinds with 504 squadron at RAF Hucknall during the 1930s. In May 1936, 504 became part of the Auxiliary Air Force, and in October 1938 converted to a fighter unit, equipped with Gauntlets. In 1938 George re-trained as a pilot, and was promoted to Sergeant Pilot in August 1939. In May 1940 George Swanwick joined 7 BGS, and on 7th September was posted to 54 Squadron at Catterick flying Spitfires. He then went to 41 Squadron at Hornchurch. Commissioned in late 1941, he was posted to 222 Squadron at North Weald in April 1942 as a Flight Commander. In July George Swanwick joined 603 Squadron in Malta and in September 1942, George was posted to 7 OTU at Port Sudan as Flight Commander. In July 1943, he joined 81 Squadron in Malta as a supernumerary. George was invalided back to the UK and following his discharge from hospital in 1944, George held various staff appointments until the end of the war. George Swanwick was granted a Permament Commission in 1949 and retired on 30th April 1970, as a Wing Commander. Sadly, George Swanwick passed away on 4th January 2011.
Switon, L.
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Switon, L.

Sergeant L.Switon from Poland joined No 54 Squadron in Spitfire's on August 9th 1940, but was only with them a week before being posted to No 303 Squadron where he flew Hurricane's.
Sydney, C.
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   Died : 27 / 9 / 1940
Sydney, C.

Flight Sergeant C.Sydney of No 92 Squadron was killed on September 27th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6767) was shot down over Kingston in Surrey.
Szczesny, Henryk
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Szczesny, Henryk

Pilot Officer Henryk Szczesny was from Poland. He was born in Warsaw and went to college there. He became an army cadet before joining the Polish Air Force at Deblin. He fought the Germans in Poland and was wounded. He escaped to Malta by ship the arrived at Eastchurch via France, joining No 74 Squadron in August 1940 after converting to Spitfire's. He was also known as 'Henry the Pole'. He attained the rank of Squadron Leader.
Szlagowski, J.
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Szlagowski, J.

Sergeant J.Szlagowski from Poland of No 234 Squadron crashed his Spitfire I (N3278) at Pensilva after running out of fuel on August 8th 1940. He escaped uninjured.
Szlenkier, T K
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Szlenkier, T K

On 1st January 1945 his No.308 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX MK346 ZF-T was shot down by fighters and crash landed near Ghent. Although the aircraft was damaged beyond repair, Szlenkier was ok.
Sznapka, W
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Sznapka, W

On 22nd June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL617 of No.303 Sqn was hit by flak and suffered engine failure. He successfully baled out of the aircraft to safety.
Tanner, E J
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   Died : 21 / 6 / 1944
Tanner, E J

On 21st June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.VII MD131 of No.131 Sqn was damaged by flak and damaged beyond repair when it caught fire during the subsequent belly landing. He was unharmed.
Tanner, J. H.
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   Died : 11 / 8 / 1940
Tanner, J. H.

Flight Sergeant J.H.Tanner of No 610 Squadron was a pre-war airman pilot. He was killed during a patrol off Calais when his Spitfire I (R6918) was shot down on August 11th 1940. He was 25 and he is buried at Calais Southern, France.
Taussig, Kurt
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Taussig, Kurt

Czech Kurt was sent, age 15, by his parents on the Kindertrnsport to England from Czechoslovakia in June 1939 to escape the Nazi persecution of the Jews. Determined to fight the Germans he joined the RAF at eighteen in late 1942, and after training was posted to the Middle East to join 225 Squadron flying Spitfires on photo-reconnaissance duties in Tunisia, the Sicily landings, and in Italy.
Taylor, D. M.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1977
Taylor, D. M.

Flight Officer D.M.Taylor from No 64 Squadron was wounded on July 17th 1940 when his Spitfire (P9507) was shot down and crash landed near Hailsham.
Taylor, Jimmy
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Taylor, Jimmy

Flt/Lt Jimmy Taylor joined the RAF in 1941, received his pilot training in the USA under the Arnold Scheme and instructed American cadets on the Vultee BT-13a from 1942 to 43. He took the PRU OTU course at Dyce and joined 16 Squadron, part of 34 PR Wing in 2nd Tactical Air Force, at Northolt in August 1944, flying blue Spitfire XIs and pink Spitfire IXs. He moved with the Squadron to A12 airstrip in Normandy, then to the airfield at Amiens - Glisy and at the end of September, to Melsbroek airfield outside Brussels. On 19th November, he suffered engine failure over Germany , baled out and landed in a field in Holland. after evading capture for five days he reached the Rhine, but was spotted by an alert German officer and spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft I on the Baltic. He returned to instructing, on Harvards, until he was demobilized in 1946. Thereafter, he followed a career in education. In 1989, he took up gliding and found it more challenging than flying with an engine. In 1990, he learned from a Dutch archivist that four Dutchmen had been executed as a result of his landing in their village. This was a great shock and he returns each year to lay a wreath on their memorial.
Thatcher, R W
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Thatcher, R W

On 11th May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MH427 of No.412 Sqn RCAF collided with Spitfire Mk.IX MJ136 also of No.412 Sqn RCAF over the Pas de Calais and ditched into the English Channel. He waqs rescued. The pilot of Spitfire MJ136, Flying Officer J S Hamilton, baled out and was also rescued.
Thomas, N O
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Thomas, N O

Taken prisoner on 22nd May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX ML172 of No.127 Sqn was hit by flak and crashed near Compiegne.
Thompson, W. W.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1986
Thompson, W. W.

Sergeant W.W.Thompson of No 234 Squadron crash landed his Spitfire I (P9365) at St Eval on July 31st 1940 while on night patrol. He was uninjured.
Thomson, R. A.
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Thomson, R. A.

Flight Officer R.A.Thompson of No 72 Squadron was wounded on September 1st 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I over Hythe after combat.
Thorne, J
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Thorne, J


Thornton, C P
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Thornton, C P

On 28th January 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MA628 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was damaged during combat with Fw190s near Amiens. He managed to get the aircraft back safely. On 13th May 1944 his Spitfir Mk.IX MK507 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and he baled out near Courtrai. He was taken prisoner.
Thorogood, Laurence
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   Died : 12 / 2005
Thorogood, Laurence

Joining 87 Squadron on June 14th 1940, Laurence Thorogood was thrown straight into the Battle of Britain, destroying a Ju88 on 25th August. Commissioned in 1941 he then was posted to India and remained in the Far East until the end of the war. He served with No 9 Sqn Indian Air Force (Hurricane IIc) and 67 Sqn RAF (Spitfire VIII) in the campaign down the Arakan Coast. Staying in the RAF after the war, he served in Singapore and Sumatra with 155 Sqn before converting to Vampires on 130 Sqn, after two years instructing on Oxfords at Middle Wallop, we was Adjutant with 615 Sqn, Biggin Hill before moving to Germany in 1951 to fly Vampires with 118 and 94 Sqns. He served on the Thor missile system before finishing his career as a civilian in Whitehall. Sadly Laurence Thorogood passed away in December 2005. We would like to thank Dr John Thorogood for supplying the photo of his father.
Thyng, Harrison
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Thyng, Harrison


Tilley, Reade
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   Died : 2001
Tilley, Reade

A native of Clearwater, Florida, Reade Tilley grew up with a love for competition in the fast lane. This made Reade natural for driving race cars and the military equivalent; fighter pilot. After attending the St. Petersburg College in Florida and the University of Texas at Austin, Reade was faced with the difficult choice of deciding whether to continue to pursue his race car driving career or become a fighter pilot. With war raging in Europe, Reade opted for the latter, and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1940. In 1941 he was assigned to No. 121 Eagle Squadron of the RAF. This was one of the three American-manned squadrons in the RAF. Reading of the horrific air attacks being endured by the people of the besieged Island of Malta, Reade volunteered for a daring mission to launch landbased Spitfires from the USS Wasp to relieve the forces on the island. On the morning of April 20, 1942 forty-seven Spits, including one flown by Tilley, were launched from the Wasp. The arrival of these fighters was very important in saving the strategic island from annihilation by the Nazis. Arriving safely in Malta, Tilley would soon fly in combat, and on his second mission he would down a Bf-109. The Luftwaffe launched an all-out effort to destroy the recently arrived Spitfires, and within a matter of days all of the newly arrived aircraft were either destroyed or damaged. In June Tilley returned to Gibraltar and led another flight of Spitfires to Malta, this time from the deck of the HMS Eagle. During his combat tours at Malta, Tilley attained a total of seven confirmed aerial victories, two probables, and five damaged. He was one of the first two American pilots to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross during the defense of Malta. The citation reads in part: "... on three occasions by making feint attacks after having expended his ammunition he successfully drove off enemy fighters attempting to machine gun our aircraft as they landed ..." Reade was promoted to Flying Officer in August of 1942, and in October he transferred to the USAAC with the rank of Captain. In early 1944 he was promoted to the rank of Major. Tilley remained with the USAF following the War and served initially with the USAFE, the Air Forces in Europe, where he was involved with the Berlin Air Lift. Later Tilley would serve with the Strategic Air Command. Promoted to Colonel in 1955, he served as the Director of Public Information for General Curtis LeMay. During this period Tilley was able to hone his race car driving skills as a member of the SAC Racing Team. Driving an Allard, Tilley competed against some of the top professional drivers of the era in a series of road race competitions at Air Force bases throughout the country. Reade also served as Director of Information for Pacific Air Forces during the Vietnam War. After retiring from the Air Force, he became a consultant. Reade Tilley passed away in 2001.
Todd, Noel C
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Todd, Noel C

Joined the RAAF in November 1940. Noel trained in Australia and gained his wings in Canada. Commissioned as Pilot Officer, he sailed to the UK in 1941 and attended a Spitfire OTU then posted to 501 Sqn equipped with Spitfire Vs. Noel was seconded to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in June 1942. Flying Kittyhawks he took part in the Battle of Milne Bay during August / September 1942. After returning to Australia to rest and re-equip, Todd returned to Milne Bay with the squadronin February 1943. In April, Flg Off Todd flew A29-133 during a patrol from Milne Bay and on 14th April claimed a Zero destroyed during 75 Sqns last major air to air battle of the war when one hundred Japanese planes attacked Milne Bay. He remained with the squadron for much of 1943 and was then posted as a Test Pilot to the Aircraft Performance Unit at Laverton. Noel Todd ended his service career testing aircraft at 2 OTU.
Trafton, Frederick
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Trafton, Frederick


Treider, O
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   Died : 9 / 2 / 1944
Treider, O

Killed on 9th February 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK129 FN-Z of No.331 Sqn suffered engine failure and he abandoned the stricken aircraft.
Tribble, Ernest Edward
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   Died : 19 / 6 / 1944
Tribble, Ernest Edward

Killed on 19th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MA807 of No.33 Sqn was shot down by flak from a train near Wahen. He is buried in Calais Canadian War Cemetery, Leubringhan. Son of Edward James Tribble and Elizabeth May Tribble; husband of Marion Verna Tribble, of Brantford, Ontario.
Trott, D E
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Trott, D E

On 2nd May 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK241 Y2-H of No.442 Sqn RCAF was damaged by flak over Bauple. He managed to return to base safely, but the aircraft was written off.
Trull, J C
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Trull, J C

On 20th February 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ944 of No.403 Sqn RCAF had to be abandoned near Lille after engine failure. He evaded capture.
Turley-George, D. R.
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Turley-George, D. R.

Flight Lieutenant D.R.Turley-George joined No 54 Squadron on July 15th 1940. He was hot down twice by Bf 109's during the Battle, the first time was on July 25th 1940 when he crash landed his Spitfire I (P9387) near Dover after combat with Bf 109's. The second time on the 12th of August when he was wounded in the head and eye. He was grounded for over a year as a result of his injuries. He was awarded the D.F.C. on October 30th 1944.
Turnbull, Ian Alexander
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   Died : 10 / 4 / 1944
Turnbull, Ian Alexander

Killed on 10th April 1944 aged 23 after his No.4 Sqn Spitfire Mk.PRXI PA901 failed to return from a high level photographic sortie over Knocke-Hult. His name is on the Runnymede memorial. Son of John Rutherford Turnbull, M.C., and Dorothy Helena Wellesley Turnbull; husband of Margaret Turnbull, of Glapwell, Derbyshire.
Turner, Thomas Gemmell
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   Died : 28 / 5 / 1944
Turner, Thomas Gemmell

Killed aged 24 on 28th May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ417 FF-S of No.132 Sqn failed to return from an attack on a V-1 rocket site in the PPas de Calais. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of W. and Jean Turner, of Bellshill, Lanarkshire.
Tuttle, Thomas Weldon
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   Died : 11 / 6 / 1944
Tuttle, Thomas Weldon

Killed aged 22 on 11th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH195 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was shot down by flak over Villons-les-Buisson. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery. Son of William Weldon Tuttle and Helen Mary Brown Tuttle, of Pugwash, Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia.
Tyler, James
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Tyler, James


Unwin, George
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   Died : 28 / 6 / 2006
Unwin, George

George Unwin joined the RAF in 1929, and in 1936 was posted to Duxford with 19 Squadron as a Sergeant Pilot. He was one of the first pilots in the RAF to fly the Spitfire. With the outbreak of war 19 Squadron moved to Hornchurch and George, now one of the Squadron's most experienced pilots, took part in the great air battles over France and Dunkirk, scoring 3 and a half victories. He flew with 19 Squadron continuously during the whole of the Battle of Britain. He was commissioned in 1941. After a period instructing, he resumed operations, flying Mosquitoes with 16 Squadron. George finished the war with 13 victories, 2 shared, 2 unconfirmed, and 2 probables. He died 28th June 2006.
Urie, J. D.
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Urie, J. D.

Flight Lieutenant J.Dulop Urie flew with No 602 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. On the 18th of August 1940 he was flying a brand new Spitfire (X4110) which was damaged beyond repair in combat. He landed the aircraft at Westhampnett, and suffered wounds to the legs.
Urquhart, G E
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Urquhart, G E

On 29th May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MH370 of No.443 Sqn RCAF returned to base with flak damage and he was slightly injured.
Usmar, F.
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   Died : 0 / 0 / 1998
Usmar, F.

Sergeant Frank Usmar of No 41 Squadron was wounded on September 27th 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (R6884) after combat over West Malling. His parents watched him bale out near their home without realising who he was.
Valasek, K.
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Valasek, K.

Taken prisoner on 21st May 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ663 of No.310 Sqn was shot down by flak near Balleroy.
Vale, A A.
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Vale, A A.

Taken prisoner on 22nd May 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK796 of No.1 Sqn was hit by flak as he attacked a train near Sizun and broke up.
Van den Broeck, A E
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   Died : 2 / 1 / 1944
Van den Broeck, A E

Killed when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BL565 crashed into the Channel after combat with Fw190s of JG26. It is believed he was shot down by Feldwebel Gerd Wiegand.
Van Molkot, J C
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Van Molkot, J C

Taken prisoner on 6th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK363 of No.349 Sqn was shot down after combat with Ju88s near Caen.
Van Nagell, Baron E J
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   Died : 28 / 1 / 1944
Van Nagell, Baron E J

Killed when his Spitfire Mk.Vb AB818 VL-N of No.322 Sqn was shot down by flak off the French coast.
Varnell, James
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Varnell, James


Veiersted, E
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Veiersted, E

On 19th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK341 of No.332 Sqn suffered engine failure over the Channel after being caught in the explosion of a V-1 rocket. He baled out and was rescued. On 30th June 1944, his Spitifre Mk.IX MJ253 of No.332 Sqn suffered engine failure and he baled out over the English Channel. He was rescued by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Venesoen, Francois August
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   Died : 6 / 6 / 1944
Venesoen, Francois August

Francois August Venesoen DFC, a pilot from Belgium, who flew Spitfire with No.235 Sqn RAF, No.350 Sqn RAF, died on this day 6th June 1944 François Venesoen was born on 19th October 1920 and as he grew up he developed a longing to become a fighter pilot, so in the late 1930's he enlisted into the Belgian Air Force (Aéronautique Militaire). However his dreams were shattered in May 1939 when he failed pilot training, but despite this setback he re-mustered to become an air-gunner. François was sent to Nivelles aerodrome to a squadron within III Groupe of the 2e Regiment d' Aéronautique to fly in obsolete Fairy Fox two-seat biplane fighters. After Belgium was defeated Venesoen boards on June 23thd the HMS Ettrick in Saint-Jean-de-Luz and manages to escape across the English Channel, arriving in England on the same day, where he immediately sought to enlist in the Royal Air Force. It was not until 27th August that François was posted to serve as an NCO air-gunner with the Bristol Blenheim MkIVF's of No.235 Squadron based at Bircham Newton in Norfolk. The Squadron usually had the task which consisted mainly of convoy protection patrols and reconnaissance missions over the North Sea with occasional forays to attack the French Channel ports. The squadron suffered comparatively light losses of 6 aircraft on operations from July to October of 1940, and with claims for at least 12 Luftwaffe aircraft, achieved what could be considered a good return! Sadly however most of the crews No.235 Squadron lost went missing, but François survived the Battle of Britain as one of the Belgians to have proudly served amongst the ranks of 'The Few'. He applied for pilot training whilst with No.272 Squadron, which had reformed in November 1940 at RAF Aldergrove in Northern Ireland for shipping escort duties. He began his ab-initio pilot training with No.13 Service Flying Training School, and on successfully completing his elementary flying moved to No.5 Flying Training School at RAF Sealand near Chester on 9th July 1941, where he was soon granted a Commission. In October Pilot Officer Venesoen at long last realised his dream, for he gained his 'wings' and went to No.61 Operational Training Unit at Heston in Middlesex, to convert onto the Spitfire. On 18th December he joined the newly formed No.350 (Belgian) Squadron flying Spitfire MkIIA's at RAF Valley on the island of Anglesey for operational defensive duties and convoy escorts over the Irish Sea. In April 1942 the squadron moved to Southern England to join the Debden Fighter Wing for the hazardous task of fighter sweeps over occupied Northern France. To test the German defences and to lift the spirits, plans were put together for an amphibious attack on the heavily defended port of Dieppe under the codename of Operation Jubilee. The day of the attack on 19th August proved costly for the Allies with heavy casualties both on the beaches and in the air, with RAF Fighter Command losing around 100 aircraft whilst covering the assault. Valuable future lessons were learned from the ill-fated operation, but Venesoen achieved success for himself that day when he claimed the destruction of 2 Focke-Wulf Fw190's - his first personal victories over the Luftwaffe. During the squadrons fourth sortie of the day François had a wingtip on his Spitfire shot away, but he returned safely. His next success came on 16th November when he shared in the destruction of a Junkers Ju52 over St.Aubin airfield in France during a Rhubarb sortie. In March 1943 No.350 Squadron moved north, but François remained in the frontline with a posting to No.610 Squadron and soon would claim another victory on 29th March when shot down a Fw190 off the coast near to Brighton. On 24th September, 1943, François Venesoen achieved his last credited victory when he shared in the shooting down of a Messerschmitt Bf110 at Cap St-Mathieu near Caen in Normandy. Prior to the Normandy invasion, Venesoen went back to his countrymen of No.350 Squadron to conduct offensive missions with the Second Tactical Air Force, in readiness for the invasion of Mainland Europe. On 6th June at 04:35 hours, François took off for an early morning patrol over the Normandy beachhead. south west of Friston F/Lt Venesoen had bale out of Spitfire Mk.Vb EN950 owing to an internal glycol leak. His parachute opened alright and he was last seen by his Number 2 (F/O L. Siroux) alighting on the rough sea and struggling in the water, trying to inflate his dinghy. After F/O Siroux had pulled up to lead 3 launches to the spot, no trace of F/Lt Venesoen could be found". He is now commemorated on Panel 203 of the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede. He also got a memorial plaque on the 'Ereperk' in Evere with the notification 'disparu' (missing). Killed on June 6th 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.Vb EN950 of No.350 Sqn suffered a glycol leak and he baled out . His name is on the Runnymede Memorial.
Vigors, Tim
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   Died : 14 / 11 / 2003
Vigors, Tim

Born 22nd March 1921. He joined No. 222 Sqn in February 1940 flying Spitfires. By the end of September 1940, he had downed 6 enemy aircraft with a further 6 probables, while being forced to crash land his Spitfire on two occasions. He claimed a further two Me109s in October. He was posted to Singapore, joining No.243 Sqn and then 453 Sqn RAAF, the Fleet Defence Squadron for Force Z when the Royal Navy lost the battleships Repulse and Prince of Wales to Japanese aircraft. Moving the squadron to Malaya, he was forced to bale out of his Buffalo after a skirmish with a large number of Japanese aircraft, being evacuated to India, retirning from the RAF after the war. He died 14th November 2003.
Vineyard, Merriwell
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Vineyard, Merriwell


Vinson, Arnold
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   Died : 4 / 3 / 1943
Vinson, Arnold


Vinyard, F. F.
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   Died : 6 / 10 / 1940
Vinyard, F. F.

Sergeant F.F.Vinyard of No 64 Squadron was on patrol in his Spitfire I (R6683) on October 6th 1940. He was killed when he crashed into the sea off Flamborough Head, Yorkshire.
Wade, Lance
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Wade, Lance


Wade, T. S.
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Wade, T. S.

Pilot Officer T.S.Wade of No 92 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (N3287) over Exeter while on night patrol at Swansea Bay. Wade crash landed a Spitfire I (R6703) near Selsey after being shot down in combat over the Solent on August 19th 1940. His Spitfire I exploded but he escaped injury. T.S.Wade was again wounded in June 1941 flying a Spitfire V.
Wagner, H A
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Wagner, H A

Taken prisoner on 2nd June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.XII MB843 EB-K of No.41 Sqn was hit by flak off Brechou and crashed into the sea off Herm in the Channel Islands.
Wainwright, Michael Terry
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   Died : 23 / 3 / 2015
Wainwright, Michael Terry

Squadron Leader Michael Terry Wainwright joined 64 Squadron RAF flying Spitfires and in May 1940 during the Battle of Britain destroyed an Me109. On the 25th of July his section destroyed a Messershmitt Bf109 fighter encountered off the south coast. He went on to become a flight instructor at the Central Flying School at RAF Upavon, Wiltshire, and later flew Douglas Dakotas. Sqd Ldr Michael Terry Wainwright retired form the Royal Air Force in March 1958, but continued his flying as an instructor and also as a Civil Airline Pilot in the UK as well as the Middle East. Michael still flew until August 1st 1990 and logged a total of 14,100 hours.
Walker, Brian Black Jack
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   Died : 21 / 4 / 1997
Walker, Brian Black Jack

Brian Walker joined the RAAF in 1935. The outbreak of World War Two found him with 25 Squadron RAAF flying Wirraways. After a period of instructing he went to 12 Squadron before joining 30 Squadron RAAF as Command Officer. This was the first RAAF Beaufighter Squadron. He then went north to New Guinea where his exploits on Beaufighters are legendary. In 1944 he was seconded to de Havilland as test pilot on Mosquitoes. At the end of the year, until the conclusion of the war, he commanded No. 1 Fighter Wing in Darwin flying Spitfires and Mustangs. Brian Walker passed away on 21st April 1997, aged 84.
Walker, William
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   Died : 21 / 10 / 2012
Walker, William

Born on August 24 1913, William Walker joined the Royal Air Force Voluntary reserve on September 2 1938 at Kidlington, Oxford as an Airman u/t Pilot. William Walker joined the RAF on September 1st 1939 and posted to 1 ITW, Cambridge on November 15. He went to 2 FTS, Brize Norton on February 17 1940 and after training was posted directly to 616 Squadron on June 18th, flying Spitfires. The month of August saw an increased tempo of fighting as the Battle of Britain intensified. On the 15th, the Luftwaffe launched a major attack from Norway and Denmark against the north of England. No 616 was scrambled and intercepted a large force of bombers approaching the Yorkshire coast. Walker, who had only recently joined, flew on the wing of his section leader as they attacked the force. By the end of the engagement, six enemy bombers had been shot down. Four days later, No 616 moved to Kenley, where Walker was immediately in action. During the late morning of August 26 1940, Walker and his squadron colleagues of No 616 (South Yorkshire) Auxiliary Squadron were scrambled from Kenley to intercept a raid of 40 enemy bombers approaching Dover. Too low to attack the raiders, the squadron turned north to gain height but were ambushed by a large formation of Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters. Within minutes, three Spitfires had been shot down. As Walker attacked a Bf 109 his Spitfire was hit from behind and he was wounded in the leg. The controls were shot away and Walker was forced to bail out at 20,000ft from his Spitfire MK II, R 6701 He landed in the English Channel very close to a sandbank, which he was able to reach. Shortly afterwards, suffering from hypothermia, he was picked up by a fishing boat. A large crowd cheered as he was landed at Ramsgate, but the badly damaged hospital there was unable to deal with his wound. He was taken to Ramsgate Hospital suffering from hypothermia, he was then transferred to the RAF Hospital at Halton, where they operated to remove the bullet from his ankle. ( a souvenir he kept for the rest of his life ) On May 2nd 1941 he rejoined. Walker returned to hospital at Halton on September 23 1941 and after convalescence at Torquay, he rejoined 1 ADF on November 17. He was posted to 116 Squadron on July 8 1942, on anti-aircraft co-operation duties. He remained with the squadron until July 6 1944. He then went to the Sector Gunnery Flight at Gatwick until October 4, when he rejoined 1 ADF. He served with the unit at various locations until released from the RAF at Uxbridge on September 1 1945, as a Flight Lieutenant and received the Air Efficiency Award. Post-war, he returned to the brewing trade and rose to become chairman of Ind Coope, a role previously held by his father. Sadly Flt Lt William Walker died on October 21st 2012.
Wall, Peter
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Wall, Peter

Joined the RAF at the Air Crew Reception Centre at Lords Cricket Ground, London in 1941 and after Initial Training Wing at Clare College, Cambridge, found himself en route to the USA to take part in the "Arnold Scherne", being trained to be a pilot by the South East Army Air Corps in Florida, Georgia and Alabama. After 200 hours of training Peter graduated at a ceremony where he was given the silver wings normally awarded to the American cadets - the RAF wings came later out of a cardboard box! On return to the UK and after six weeks at the Advanced Flying Unit at Bodney, Norfolk, he was posted to the target towing at 61 OTU, Rednal and West Felton, flying Westland Lysanders and Miles Martinets, towing drogues for the Spitfire pilots to shoot at. After six months he joined a Spitfire course and after completion Peter was sent to Hawkinge, Kent to join No 41 Sqdn who were flying a new Spitfire, the Mark 12 with the Griffon engine developing nearly 2000 horsepower. The task there was to protect the bombers returning from raids in Northern France. From there the Sqdn was sent to Beachy Head to deal with the "hit and run" raiders attacking Eastbourne and other South Coast towns. Up until then it had been forbidden to take the aircraft over to the continent but the policy changed and the Sqdn joined up with 91 Sqdn to form a Wing acting as escort cover to the bombers trying to destroy the V1 and V2 sites. Returning from one of these operations he had an accident on landing and was sent to Training Command as an Instructor! After converting to the twin engine Oxford he taught trainees at Southrop Advanced Flying Unit for a further six months when he was selected to be an instructor at Luisgate Bottom teaching ex-operational Bomber pilots to be OTU instructors. Whilst there, he gained an A2 instructing category. As not so many instructors were then required the Unit was closed down and he then went to Church Lawford where he taught Naval Officers to fly on Harvards without any preliminary training on simpler aircraft quite successfully!
Wallace, P
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Wallace, P

On 27th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK776 of No.411 Sqn RCAF was shot down by Fw190s south of Caen. He baled out and was unharmed.
Wallace, Robert George
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   Died : 23 / 6 / 1944
Wallace, Robert George

Killed aged 21 on 23rd June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX NH204 of No.421 Sqn RCAF was shot down by a fighter near Argentan. He is buried in Sainte Gauburge-Sainte Colombe Communal Cemetery. Son of George and Marion Ida Wallace, of Tilbury, Ontario, Canada.
Wallens, Ronald Walter "Wally"
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   Died : 13 / 11 / 1995
Wallens, Ronald Walter "Wally"

Ronald Wallens was born Stourbridge, Worcestershire in 1916. He joined the RAFO having been granted a short service commission as Acting P/O on probation in Summer 1937. After completing pilot training he was posted to 41 Squadron on 26th March 1938 and was granted a commission in the RAF on 7th October 1938 as P/O n 23rd January 1940 on return from a coastal shipping patrol off Scarborough this aircraft hit a concrete mixer on landing at Catterick. Information is vague as the incident is not recorded in squadron records. It was repaired. He became a F/O on 7th July 1940 and to F/Lt exactly a year later.was wounded in the leg on September 5th 1940. He crash landed his Spitfire I (X4021) after combat with a Bf 109 over the Thames Estuary., he rejoined 41 Squadron after hospital treatment but his commanding officer rejected him as he was not fully fit. He later commanded No.1 ADF and was promoted to S/Ldr on 1st July 1943 and was posted to Command 277 (ASR) Squadron in late 1943. For service with this unit he was awarded the DFC (Gazetted on 15th August 1944), the citation for the award reads.. "In the early phases of the war, Squadron Leader Wallens took part in a large number of sorties during which he destroyed at least 4 enemy aircraft. In combat in September 1940 he was wounded in the leg by a cannon shell. Since his return to operational duties he has undertaken many air/sea sorties and has been responsible for saving a number of personnel from the sea. He has set a splendid example of gallentry and devotion to duty." He survived the War and wrote his autobiography "Flying Made My Arms Ache". He was one of three pilots that shot down a Junkers Ju88 on the North Yorkshire Moors on 11th August 1940
Walsh, J. P.
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   Died : 4 / 8 / 1940
Walsh, J. P.

Sergeant J.P.Walsh of No 616 Squadron was killed on August 4th 1940. He spun his Spitfire I (N3271) into the ground from 5,000ft in a practice dogfight near Kirton in Lindsey.
Walz, D M
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Walz, D M

On 16th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK605 of No.443 Sqn RCAF was shot down by enemy fighters and flak. He evaded capture and returned two months later.
Ward, Fred William
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 1944
Ward, Fred William

Killed on 25th July 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK796 of No.421 Sqn RCAF was hit by flak and crashed during an armed reconnaissance mission to Flers. He is buried in Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery.
Ward, R. A.
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   Died : 8 / 10 / 1940
Ward, R. A.

Sergeant R.A.Ward of No 66 Squadron was shot down and killed on October 8th 1940. His Spitfire I (N3043) was shot down by a Bf 109 near Rochester, Kent.
Ware, J P
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Ware, J P

On 18th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.XII EB231 EB-M of No.41 Sqn ran out of fuel while providing cover for the flak damaged Spitfire MB876. He baled out and was picked up by an Air Sea Rescue Walrus.
Wareing, P. T.
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   Died : 0 / 5 / 1987
Wareing, P. T.

Sergeant P.T.Wareing of No 616 Squadron failed to return on the 25th of August 1940 after combat in his Spitfire I over the Channel. He had been in combat with a Bf 109. He crashed near Calais and was taken prisoner. P.T.Wareing escaped from a P.O.W. camp and returned via Sweden and for his escape was awarded the D.C.M.
Warner, W. H. C.
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   Died : 16 / 8 / 1940
Warner, W. H. C.

Flight Officer W.H.C.Warner was a pre-war member of No 610 Squadron. Warner's Spitfire I (R6802) was shot down in combat with Bf 109's on August 16th 1940 off Dungeness. He died, aged 21.
Warren, Douglas
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   Died : 27 / 8 / 2011
Warren, Douglas

Douglas Duke Warren was Born in Nanton, Alta., in 1922, along with his twin brother Bruce joined the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) at the age of 18. After advanced training, the Warren twins flew two tours of operations with Royal Air Force Spitfire squadrons. After joining 403 Squadron, Duke Warren flew as part of 165 Squadron in the air battles over Dieppe. He fought over Falaise, and also served with 66 Sqn and 11 Group at Biggin Hill. In 1945, they were both awarded Distinguished Flying Crosses by King George VI at Buckingham Palace. He returned to Canada in May 1945, and along with Bruce joined the permanent RCAF in October 1946. Douglas became a Flight Commander with 421 Squadron flying DH Vampire jet aircraft at Chatham, New Brunswick. On April 5th, 1951, his brother Bruce was killed as a test pilot at AV Roe aircraft company in Toronto flying the prototype CF100 jet fighter. Duke became Commanding Officer of the F-86 Sabre-equipped 410 Squadron in 1952. The following year, he was attached to the United States Air Force and flew Sabres in Korea. Duke Warren flew 253 combat missions, including flying the F-86 Sabre in Korea. Sadly Duke Warren passed away Saturday August 27th 2011 in Comox at the age of 89.


Duke Warren.

Waterman, P F
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Waterman, P F

Taken prisoner after his Spitfire Mk.IX MA847 of No.65 Sqn failed to return from a mission to Brussels on 2nd February 1944.
Waterston, R. McG.
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1940
Waterston, R. McG.

Flight Officer R.McG Waterson was on patrol with No 603 Squadron on August 31st 1940 in his Spitfire I (X4273) and was shot down by a Bf 109 from JG 3 over London.
Watkinson, A. B.
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Watkinson, A. B.

Pilot Officer A.B.Watkinson a South African of No 66 Squadron was wounded on September 28th 1940. He baled out of his damaged Spitfire I (X4322) after combat over Mayfield in Sussex.
Watlng, W. C.
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   Died : 7 / 2 / 1941
Watlng, W. C.

Pilot Officer W.C.Watling of No 92 Squadron was wounded on September 9th 1940. He baled out of his Spitfire I (P9372) near Biggin Hill after being attacked by enemy aircraft.
Watson, A. R.
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   Died : 28 / 11 / 1940
Watson, A. R.

Pilot Officer A.R.Watson of No 152 Squadron baled out of his Spitfire I (R6597) after combat with a Bf 109 over Arne on November 28th 1940. Unfortunately his parachute snagged on his aircraft and ripped, he fell to his death.
Watson, Bruce D
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Watson, Bruce D

Joined the RAAF in December 1940. After initial training in Australia, gained his wings and graduated as a Pilot Officer in Canada. He sailed to the UK in 1941, then posted to 32 Sqn equipped with Hurricanes at Manston, gaining 2.5 victories. He then returned to Australia and joined 75 Sqn in June 1942. Flying Kittyhawks, Bruce took part in the Battle of Milne Bay as A Flight Commander and on 27th August 1942 he and Flg Off Peter Jones attacked 3 Val Dive Bombers over the Bay. They were credited with sharing 1 destroyed, 1 probable and 1 damaged. After serving at Milne Bay, he was posted to 2 OTU as an instructor. When Clive Caldwell formed 80 Fighter Wing RAAF in April 1944, he selected Watson to lead 457 Sqn. Bruce led the squadron from Darwin to, and operated from Morotai. Watsons Spitfire marked ZP-W was the first to wear the famed Grey Nurse scheme which the entire squadron adopted.
Watson-Parker, P. I.
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   Died : 13 / 7 / 1940
Watson-Parker, P. I.

Sergeant P.I.Watson-Parker from No 610 Squadron crashed and was killed while on patrol in a Spitfire (R6807) on July 13th 1940 at Tatsfield near Biggin Hill.
Way, B. H.
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   Died : 25 / 7 / 1940
Way, B. H.

Flight Lieutenant B.H."Wonky Way" Way of No 54 Squadron shot down a Bf 109 and was then shot down and killed over the Channel near Dover in his Spitfire I (R6707) by a Bf 109 on July 25th 1940. He was aged 22 and is buried in Belgium. He is Buried at Oostduikerke Communal Cemetery, Belgium.
Weaver, Claude
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   Died : 28 / 1 / 1944
Weaver, Claude

Claude Weaver enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force on 13th February 1941. After earning his wings and briefly flying in the UK, he joined No.185 Sqn at Malta, from July to September 1942. With 10.5 victories and 3 probables, he was shot down on 9th September 1942 and taken prisoner. After a year, he escaped from his PoW camp and began flying again, this time with No.403 Sqn RCAF. He scored another two victories before being shot down once more. On 28th January 1944, he was shot down by Gerhard Vogt of JG26, who watched as Weaver escaped from his aircraft. His parachute became entangled in the tail of the stricken aircraft and Weaver was dragged down to the crash site, where he lay, still alive, just metres from his aircraft. He was taken to hospital by the Germans, but died a few hours later.
Webb, Paul
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   Died : 10 / 7 / 2007
Webb, Paul

Joining 602 Squadron Aux AF L in Scotland in late 1937, Paul Webb was called up full time in August 1939. After initial skirmishes off the Scottish East Coast, 602 came south to Tangmere / Westhampnett. During the Battle of Britain he claimed a Bf110 destroyed on August 16th, on the 25th two more, on the 26th a He59, on September 7th a Bf10 and on the 9th a Do17. In 1941 he was the first Commanding Officer of 416 Squadron RCAF, which he led until 1942 when posted to the Middle East and then Malta. He served later in Italy and with the Balkan Air Force in Yugoslavia. He finished the war with 3 victories and 3 shared. He died 10th July 2007.
Webster, F. K.
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   Died : 26 / 8 / 1940
Webster, F. K.

Pilot Officer F.K.Webster was a former member of the R.A.F.V.R. he joined No 610 Squadron on July 26th 1940. On August 26th 1940, Webster`s Spitfire I (R6965) was damaged by Bf 109's over Folkestone. Webster crashed in flames while attempting to land at Hawkinge and he was killed, aged 26.
Webster, John
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1940
Webster, John

Flight Lieutenant John Terence Webster joined the R.A.F. in 1938. He was a flight commander of No 41 Squadron at the start of the hostilities. He had shot down 11 confirmed and 2 shared before he was killed on September 5th 1940. His Spitfire I (R6635) was involved in a mid air collision with the Spitfire I (P9428) of Squadron Leader H.R.L.Hood during combat over Basildon in Essex. Flight Lieutenant J.T.Websters aircraft crashed at Laindon, near Basildon.
Webster, William Derek
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Webster, William Derek

Killed aged 23 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH438 5J-X of No.126 Sqn suffered engine failure and crashed into the sea 30km south east of Lyme Bay. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of William B. and Ada Webster, of Alkrington, Lancashire.
Weller, K C
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Weller, K C

On 22nd May 1944 he returned to base safely after his Spitfire Mk.IX MK644 JX-M of No.1 Sqn was damaged.
Wellum, Geoffrey
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Wellum, Geoffrey

Joined the RAF with a Short Service Commission in August 1939. He joined 92 Squadron flying Spitfires in June 1940 at the time of Dunkirk. He flew throughout the Battle of Britain, later completing over 50 fighter sweeps and escorts over northern France and Belgium until August 1941. He then joined 65 Squadron as Flight Commander in March 1942 operating over northern France and flew off aircraft carrier HMS Furious on Operation Pedestal, to Malta. Geoff was a Flight Lieutenant during Operation Pedestal. He returned to the UK as a test pilot for Gloster Aircraft and finished the war as a Pilot Attack Instructor. Geoffrey was credited with three destroyed, four probables and several damaged and was awarded the DFC in July 1941.
Wemyss, A
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Wemyss, A

Taken prisoner on 20th April 1944 after his No.313 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IX MK122 failed to return from a Ramrod mission to Abbeville.
West, John Edward
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   Died : 12 / 6 / 1944
West, John Edward

Killed aged 26 on 12th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.IX MH447 of No.441 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and was abandoned over the English Channel. His parachute snagged on the tail as he baled out and he was seen to go under the water with the aircraft. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Welsford A. and Mary F. West, of Hopewell, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Weyman, B
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Weyman, B

Taken prisoner on 14th February 1944 when the engine of his Spitfire cut out. Spitfire Mk.IX MH870 of No.317 Sqn force landed near Abbeville.
Wheeler, Neil
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   Died : 9 / 1 / 2009
Wheeler, Neil

An ex-Cranwell entrant who had graduated in 1937, Wheeler had served in Bomber Command before the war. In 1940 he joined the Photographic Development Unit at Heston pioneering photographic reconnaissance, flying unarmed Spitfires deep into enemy territory. In November 1942 he was just completing his OTU on Beaufighters when the posting arrived to 236 Squadron and the North Coates Wing shortly after its first disastrous strike attack on 28th November 1942. Wheelers review and revision of the tactics involved in Strike Wing attacks, and the intensive training program he introduced, were to prove critical to the success of the whole concept. On 18th April 1943, Wheeler led the North Coates Wing in its first successful attack, on a German convoy off Ijmuiden. Leading the Wing until September 1944, Neil Wheeler went on to hold high command in the post-war RAF. Sadly, Neil Wheeler died on 9th January 2009.
Whipps, G. A.
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   Died : 26 / 8 / 1941
Whipps, G. A.

Shot down by Me109 in Spitfire N3227 over Hailsham on 6th September 1940, but managed to bail out. Killed August 26th 1941.
White, A C H
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White, A C H

On 27th May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.IX MK696 of No.127 Sqn was hit by flak near Le Treport V-1 rocket site and ditched into the sea 10 miles west of Ault. He was rescued by a Walrus from Air Sea Rescue.
White, G A
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White, G A

Fl/Lt G A White volunteered for the RAF in January 1940, aged 19. He trained as a Wop/Ag and from October of that year, flew on 86 operational flights on Lockheed Hudsons of 206 and 279 Squadrons of Coastal Command, totalling 923 operational flying hours. On one occasion, in November 1941, after successfully bombing and sinking one of three German mine sweepers off Ushant at low level, the port engine caught fire from the intensive return barrage from all three ships. "With the pilot, Sgt John Whitfield DFM, of 206, we somehow managed to make it back to Predannock in Cornwall, smoking all the way!". Commissioned in May 1942, and after an official suggestion, as a result of his operational experience, he volunteered to fly Spitfires without guns. Qualifying as a PR pilot, he joined 682 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron in May 1945 at San Severo, Italy, where he took part in high level photography up until VE Day in Mk XIs. In August 1945 he became Staff Photographic Officer for Desert Air Force until his discharge in 1946.
White, J R B
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   Died : 3 / 7 / 1940
White, J R B

3rd July 1940 Spitfire K9928 when it was struck by lightning and crashed near Margate, Kent, killing the then pilot, Sgt J R B White RAFVR (742734).
White, John
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White, John


Whitmore, W T
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   Died : 3 / 1 / 1944
Whitmore, W T

Killed after his Spitfire Mk.IX MA835 failed to return from a mission to Brussels.
Wilcock, Ronald Frederick
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Wilcock, Ronald Frederick

Killed aged 21 on 7th June 1944 after his Spitfire Mk.Vc EE744 of No.26 Sqn exploded after a fuel tank was hit by flak. He is buried in the Bayeux War Cemetery. Son of Frederick Thomas Wilcock and Beatrice Annie Wilcock, of Grimsby, Lincolnshire.
Wilcox, E. J.
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   Died : 31 / 8 / 1940
Wilcox, E. J.

Flight Officer E.J.Wilcox of No 72 Squadron was shot down and killed in his Spitfire I (P9457) on August 31st 1940 over Dungeness.
Wildblood, T. S.
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   Died : 25 / 8 / 1940
Wildblood, T. S.

Pilot Officer T.S.Wildblood of No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed off Portland on August 25th 1940 in a Spitfire I (R6994). He was mentioned in dispatches on March 17th 1941.
Wilhelm, David
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Wilhelm, David


Wilkinson, R. L.
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   Died : 16 / 8 / 1940
Wilkinson, R. L.

Squadron Leader R.L.Wilkinson took command of No 266 Squadron on July 6th 1940. Wilkinson was shot down by Bf 109's on August 16th 1940 in his Spitfire I (R6768) near Deal, Kent and killed, aged 30.
Willcocks, P. H.
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   Died : 28 / 11 / 1940
Willcocks, P. H.

Sergeant P.H.Willcocks joined No 610 Squadron on July 27th 1940. He moved to No 66 Squadron in early September. He made a force-landing on September 14th 1940 due to engine failure, and another on September 29th 1940 when he was slightly wounded after combat with enemy fighters. Willcocks moved to No 66 Squadron and his Spitfire II (P7491) was involved in a mid-air collision on November 28th 1940 and he was killed, aged 20.
Williams, D. G.
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   Died : 10 / 10 / 1940
Williams, D. G.

Pilot Officer D.G.Williams of No 92 Squadron was killed when his Spitfire I (X4038) was involved in a midair collision on October 10th 1940 over Tangmere. The aircraft crashed East of Brighton, Sussex.
Williams, E C
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Williams, E C

On 9th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ827 of No.403 Sqn RCAF was shot down near Omaha Beach by naval anti-aircraft fire. He was taken to hospital in Cherbourg as a prisoner, but was later freed on 27th June 1944 when the Allies took the hospital.
Williams, Stan
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Williams, Stan

Stan was a pilot with 152 Squadron and was posted out to Burma in 1944. Flying Spitfires throughout the campaign he then returned to England and was posted to 91 Squadron flying Spitfires from Duxford.
Williams, W. S.
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   Died : 21 / 10 / 1940
Williams, W. S.

Pilot Officer W.S.Williams joined No 266 Squadron in November 1939. On August 12th he was forced to crash-land his damaged aircraft at Bembridge, he managed to get clear of the blazing Spitfire I (N3175) when it exploded. On October 21st he took part in an interception and after the action he landed at another airfield to refuel, as he took off he flew low across the airfield and then his engine seemingly stalled. His engine cut and unable to pull out, he crashed and this resulted in his death, aged 21.
Willis, O. E.
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Willis, O. E.

On 23rd May 1944 his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM385 SD-W of No.501 Sqn was damaged by flak near Bayeux. He returned to base safely.
Wilson, F A
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Wilson, F A

On 6th June 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MK420 of No.441 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure after flak damage. He baled out over the English Channel and was rescued. The aircraft was later recovered.
Wilson, Maurice Keith Hasard
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   Died : 14 / 6 / 1944
Wilson, Maurice Keith Hasard

Killed aged 20 on 14th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Ia R6888 of No.611 Sqn was shot down by Me109s south west of Caen. He is buried in Culey-Le-Patry Communal Cemetery. Son of Robert Maurice Hasard Wilson and Ida Whiteside Wilson, of Auchenflower, Queensland, Australia.
Wilson, Peter Allan
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   Died : 10 / 6 / 1944
Wilson, Peter Allan

Killed aged 21 on 10th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM422 of No.350 Sqn failed to return from a patrol near Caen. His name is on the Runnymede memorial. Son of Walter and Jessie Wilson, of Scarborough, Yorkshire.
Winter, D. C.
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   Died : 5 / 9 / 1940
Winter, D. C.

Pilot Officer D.C.Winter of No 72 Squadron was killed on September 5th 1940. His Spitfire I (X4013) was shot down in combat with a Bf 109 over Kent, he baled out of his aircraft too low.
Withall, L. C.
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   Died : 12 / 8 / 1940
Withall, L. C.

Flight Lieutenant L.C.Withall of No 152 Squadron was shot down and killed on August 12th 1940 off the Isle of Wight in his Spitfire I (P9456).
Witkowski, Joseph
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Witkowski, Joseph

Arrested in Poland in 1940, he escaped through Russia, Iran and Iraq to South Africa. Leaving Durban on the ‘Empress of Canada’ the ship was torpedoed in the South Atlantic and some of the survivors rescued by the Royal Navy. Upon arriving in the UK he then joined 308 Polish Sqn on operations flying Spitfires over Europe from 1944.
Woodey, Jack Edward
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   Died : 7 / 6 / 1944
Woodey, Jack Edward

Killed aged 24 on 7th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.VII MB883 of No.131 Sqn failed to return from a mission to Morlaix. His name is on the Runnymede Memorial. Son of Arthur William and Rosa Woodey, of Bowral, New South Wales, Australia.
Woodhouse, K B
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Woodhouse, K B

On 16th March 1944, his Spitfire Mk.IX MJ119 of No.401 Sqn RCAF suffered engine failure and he baled out near Amiens. He managed to evade capture.
Woods, Steve
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Woods, Steve

Having served with 33 Sqn which flew in support of the Army in West Africa, he then transferred to 145 Sqn flying Spitfires in Malta and Italy including a spell as acting Commanding Officer.
Wright, Allan
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   Died : 16 / 9 / 2015
Wright, Allan

Born Devon 12th February 1920. He entered RAF College Cranwell as Flight Cadet April 1938. After training Allan was posted to 92 Sqn at Tangmere on 27 October. Over Dunkirk on 23 May 1940 he destroyed an Me110 and possibly two more, on the 24th a possible He111 and on 2 June a confirmed Me109. During the Battle of Britain he destroyed a He111 on 14 August, a He111 at night over Bristol on 29 August, a He111 and Me109 on 11 Sept, a He111 on the 14th, a Me109 on the 15th, a Ju88 on the 19th, a Do17 on the 26th, a Ju88 on the 27th plus damaging a He111, a Do17, two Ju88s, two Me109s on the 30th. On 30 Sept he was shot down wounded near Brighton and hospitalised. An award of the DFC was made on 22 October 1940. On 6 December 1940 he destroyed a Me109. By July 1941 Wright had destroyed 6 more Me109s and received a bar to the DFC on 15 July. Service at HQ Fighter Command and as an instructor followed until being posted to 29 Squadron at West Malling in March 1943 where he destroyed a Ju88 on 3 April. Further command postings saw him through the war and post-war till 12 February 1967 when he retired as a Group Captain. Group Captain Allan Wright, who has died aged 95, was a veteran of the Battle of France in 1940 and one of the last three surviving Battle of Britain ace fighter pilots. As the opening phase of the Battle of Britain commenced in July 1940, Wright and his colleagues of No 92 Squadron were resting in South Wales following their fierce activity covering the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Force from the beaches of northern France. Nevertheless, Wright shared in the destruction of a German bomber over Gloucestershire and on August 29 achieved a rare success for a Spitfire pilot when he engaged a Heinkel III bomber over Bristol at night and shot it down. On September 9th No.92 Sqn was sent to Biggin Hill, at the height of the battle, to intercept the large formations of enemy bombers attacking London. Within two days Wright achieved success when he destroyed another Heinkel bomber and probably one of the escorting Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters. In the space of the next 20 days, as the battle reached its climax, he was credited with knocking out four more enemy aircraft, sharing in the destruction of a fifth, probably destroying a further two and damaging four. On September 30th he engaged some Bf 109 fighters near Brighton and shot one down. His Spitfire was damaged and he had to make a forced landing. He was slightly wounded in this engagement and this signalled the end of his involvement in the battle. A month later he was awarded the DFC for displaying great determination and skill. The son of Air Commodore A C Wright, a Royal Flying Corps pilot and regular RAF officer, Allan Richard Wright was born at Teignmouth, Devon, on February 12 1920 and educated at St Edmunds College. He was awarded a cadetship to the RAF College, Cranwell, where he gained a commendation before graduating as a pilot in October 1939. Wright joined No.92 Squadron as it was re-equipping with the Spitfire. Flying from Northolt, the squadron was soon in action over Dunkirk. Wright flew his first patrol on May 23rd, when he destroyed a Messerschmitt Bf 110, possibly brought down another and damaged a third. His successes were tempered by the loss of his closest friend from his time at Cranwell. Many years later he commented: We were just 22 years old and I was overwhelmed by shock and disbelief. The whole episode seemed a dream. The squadron's commanding officer, Squadron Leader Roger Bushell, was also shot down on this day. Later, as Big X, Bushell masterminded the Great Escape from Stalag Luft III, but he was murdered by the Gestapo after being recaptured. Wright flew six more patrols over the Dunkirk area, being engaged and firing his guns every time, and was credited with shooting down an enemy fighter and possibly destroying a bomber. After recovering from wounds sustained in the closing phase of the Battle of Britain, Wright returned to No.92 Sqn and, in December, shot down a Bf 109. He saw considerable action over northern France during the spring and summer of 1941. Fighter Command had gone on the offensive, seeking combat, and Wright gained further success. Flying the Spitfire Mk V on sweeps and bomber escort operations, he was frequently engaged by Bf 109s and he destroyed one, shared in the destruction of another and probably destroyed two more. On one occasion his Spitfire was badly damaged but he managed to cross the Channel back to England to make an emergency landing. He was rested in July after a year of constant combat and was awarded a Bar to his DFC. Wright then trained fighter pilots before becoming the chief instructor at the newly formed Pilot Gunnery Instructors School. He later undertook a tour of the United States to discuss gunnery and fighter tactics. On his return he trained as a night fighter pilot before becoming the flight commander on No.29 Squadron flying the Beaufighter. On April 3rd 1943 he shot down a Junkers 88 bomber and damaged a second, his final success of the war. As a 23-year-old wing commander, he took command of the Air Fighting Development Unit, his service recognised by the award of the AFC. In early 1945 he left for Egypt to command the fighter wing of a bombing and gunnery school. He remained in the RAF and held a number of fighter-related appointments including four years at the Air Ministry responsible for air defence planning. After converting to jet fighters he became wing commander, flying at Waterbeach near Cambridge with Hunter and Javelin squadrons under his command. After two years in the Far East and a further two at HQ, Fighter Command, he was appointed to command the Ballistic Missile Early Warning Station (BMEWS) – the famous Giant Golf Balls – situated on the Yorkshire Moors at Fylingdales, near Whitby. This was the final site of three – the others operated by the USAF at Thule in Greenland and Clear in Alaska – to provide early warning of a ballistic missile attack. Fylingdales became fully operational during Wrights period of command. He retired from the RAF in February 1967. He moved to North Devon where he spent the next 10 years developing a smallholding and renovating a cottage. He was an excellent and meticulous carpenter and woodworker. He married his wife Barbara in June 1942 and she and their two sons and two daughters survive him. Group Captain Allan Wright, born February 12 1920, died September 16 2015.
Wynn, V
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Wynn, V


Yarra, Robert Ernest
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   Died : 14 / 4 / 1944
Yarra, Robert Ernest

Killed aged 21 on 14th April 1944 when his No.453 Sqn RAAF Spitfire Mk.IX MK324 FU-Y was shot down by flak as he dive bombed a target near Abbeville. He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension. Son of Alfred Ernest and Harriet Yarra, of Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia.
Yeardley, A D
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Yeardley, A D

On 14th February 1944, his Spitfire Mk.VII MB808 ON-C of No.124 Sqn was involved in combat with Fw190s of JG26. He returned the aircraft to base with damage.
Young, J. H. R.
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   Died : 28 / 7 / 1940
Young, J. H. R.

Pilot Officer J.H.R.Young of No 74 Squadron was shot down and killed near Goodwin Sands on July 28th 1940. Young was shot down by a Bf 109 whilst flying in his Spitfire I (P9547). He is buried at Pihen les Guines, France.
Zary, H
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Zary, H


Zoerb, Daniel
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Zoerb, Daniel


Zygarlicki, L
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   Died : 17 / 6 / 1944
Zygarlicki, L

Killed on 17th June 1944 when his Spitfire Mk.Vb BM407 of No.303 Sqn was shot down by flak over the Normandy beaches. He is buried in the Bayeux War Cemetery.



Pilots or Aircrew :
Robert Andre Guy Alexandre
Historical Notes :
13-09-1941 - Joined No.266 Sqn
12-03-1942 - Joined No.154 Sqn.
18-06-142 - Joined No.121 Sqn.
01-10-1942 - Joined No.335 Sqn.
09-11-1943 - Joined No.416 Sqn RCAF.
13-02-1944 - Joined No.186 Sqn.
23-03-1944 - Damaged in flying accident.
22-05-1944 - Joined No.350 Sqn with code MN-J.
10-06-1944 - Suffered engine failure and crashed into sea off Beachy Head. Flight Lieutenant Robert Andre Guy Alexandre killed.
Squadrons :
No.129 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.234 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.234 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.234 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.234 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.91 Sqn RAF
Pilots or Aircrew :
L R Knight
Historical Notes :
04-01-1944 - Shot down by Me109s near Abbeville. Flight Sergeant L R Knight killed. The German pilot who claimed this victory was either Egon Mayer or Wilhelm Hoffman, both of whom claimed Spitfires at roughly the same time and place on this date.
Squadrons :
No.118 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.118 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.302 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.412 Sqn RCAF
Squadrons :
No.72 Sqn RAF
Pilots or Aircrew :
Stanislaw Brzeski
Historical Notes :
19-10-1941 - Joined No.317 Sqn.
31-01-1942 - Damaged in flying accident.
20-09-1942 - Joined No.132 Sqn.
21-05-1943 - Joined No.122 Sqn.
15-08-1943 - Joined No.234 Sqn.
19-08-1943 - Damaged on operations.
27-04-1944 - Joined No.64 Sqn.
14-01-1948 - Transferred to Portugal.
08-11-1941 - Flown by Polish Ace Stanislaw Brzeski as he claimed an Me109 and also a damaged Fw190.
Pilots or Aircrew :
P S Gilmore
Stanislaw Brzeski
Historical Notes :
19-10-1941 - Joined No.317 Sqn.
20-12-1942 - Joined No.164 Sqn.
21-02-1943 - Joined No.341 Sqn.
23-03-1943 - Joined No.340 Sqn.
20-06-1943 - Crashed in forced landing near East Fortune.
xx-06-1944 - Joined No.808 Sqn FAA.
14-12-1944 - Damaged beyond repair in crash. Squadron Leader P S Gilmore ok.
25-04-1942 - Flown (with code JH-V) by Polish Ace Stanislaw Brzeski as he claimed an Fw190, taking his total to 5 victories and making him an Ace.
Squadrons :
No.71 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.65 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.54 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.317 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.65 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.19 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.317 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.541 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
17-08-1942 - Failed to return from Photo Reconnaissance mission over Kiel.
Historical Notes :
25-08-1944 - 24-9-41 411S 6-10-41 AFDU Duxford 9-11-41 service trials elev inertia weight gun heat 411S fast landing struck hangar Hornchurch CB 8-1-42 ASTE 167S 22-9-42 610S 14-10-42 131S 25-1-43 310S 30-6-43 FACB 10-8-43 345S 3-4-44 CAC ops 22-6-44 410RSU 13-7-44 Ran out of fuel and hit tree in forced landing Fairoak Lane Oxshott Surrey 26-8-44
Squadrons :
No.403 Sqn RAF
Historical Notes :
27-05-1942 - Collided with BM123 nr Le Touquet F/Lt H P Duval MID killed
Squadrons :
No.501 Sqn RAF
Squadrons :
No.411 Sqn RCAF
Squadrons :
No.411 Sqn RCAF
Squadrons :
No.91 Sqn RAF

Known Individual Aircraft : Spitfire :

Type

Serial

Codes

First Flew

Squadron History

Aircrew History

History Notes

Engine

Factory

Spitfire Vb

AA718

-

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45M

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA719

29/08/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA720

MN-J

30/08/1941

details

details

details

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA721

30/08/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA722

AZ-B

03/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA723

04/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA724

04/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA725

05/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA726

05/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA727

06/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA728

06/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45M

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA729

09/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45M

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA730

09/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA731

10/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA732

10/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA733

ON-K
SD-V

11/09/1941

details

details

details

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA734

12/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA735

13/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA736

13/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA737

YT-K

17/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA738

-

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA739

G3O

18/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA740

19/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA741

19/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA742

20/09/1941

details

no information

no information

Merlin 45

Chattis Hill

Spitfire Vb

AA743

23/09/1941

details

no information

no information<